36 Burst results for "Parkinson"

Fresh "Parkinson" from KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:58 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "Parkinson" from KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

"Let's weigh out some security realize well. His state is one of many up and down the East Coast. Bracing for Tropical Storm Zaius, CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson says. It's expected to strengthen into a hurricane dumping a lot of rain. There will be spots that do get up to maybe eight or nine inches. So want to point out that there is a high likelihood of some flooding. Rain. The storm could make landfall in North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper says there's a new reality for storm evacuees. Shelters will be screening people for Corona virus symptoms. If someone has symptoms, there'll be directed towards sheltering option. Where they can more easily isolate or receive medical attention. The storm brought rain and flooding to parts of Florida over the weekend, and it had an impact on yesterday's remarkable return from space for two astronauts. CBS's Mark Strassmann says it was the latest technology doing it like it was done 45 years ago. Splashed down Welcome back to Planet Earth, Thanks for flying basics. The first splashdown ever in the Gulf of Mexico to dodge Hurricane PCs in the Atlantic. We're doing pretty good so far to space. Six fast boats reached the bobbing capsule, but recreational boaters did to Ah, breach of safety and security. Something like this. Just Can endanger the whole thing. A recovery ship hoisted aboard the capsule, The astronauts came out the open hatch on stretchers, as expected, still readjusting to Earth's gravity now to Southern California, where hot dry weather is fueling an out of control Wildfire east of Los Angeles, CBS's Carter Evans, Flames continue to tear through trees and dry brush on hillsides in Riverside County, as winds picked up, giving the ample fire new life as of late Sunday, only a small number of the house Zins under evacuation orders have come to this Red Cross shelter, perhaps unaware they'll be given hotel vouchers. This's the first major wildfire in Southern California since the pandemic began. Just one more concern for people living here. I'm picking up my mom and my kids. We have to move him out of the house. You know, we spray for the best. Microsoft says it is in talks to by the US, part.

CBS Southern California Governor Roy Cooper East Coast David Parkinson Mark Strassmann North Carolina Hurricane Florida Microsoft Mexico Los Angeles United States Atlantic Riverside County Carter Evans Red Cross
Elon Musk Wants to Stream Music Directly to Your Brain With His Neuralink Chip

Dave Ramsey

01:24 min | Last week

Elon Musk Wants to Stream Music Directly to Your Brain With His Neuralink Chip

"Heads up Tesla's Space six and the boring company also cofounded another startup back in 2016 called Nora Link. If you heard about this, um there hasn't been a lot of details about the start I could accept that involves the chip that's supposed to be surgically implanted. Into the brain. That kid next to a computer. Get the goal is to add a level a I artificial intelligence to a person. But before that, Must said that it actually has a really great purpose for help people suffering with conditions like Parkinson's, but more information supposed to come out late next month, But you know, Elon Musk is pretty active on Twitter. And sometimes he tweets about, you know, every once in a while things that are actually coherent makes sense, and he recently had a few things to say about the chip. He said that nor link had potentially retrained parts of the brain as a way to cure addiction and depression. He also said that the chip could control hormone levels. That's a pretty bold claim. In a few days ago. He tweeted that the interface will allow you to stream music listeners stream music directly to your brain. Imagine that no speakers. No, You're buds, headphones. Nothing. Just go right into your brain. Just a small microchip that he claims is no worse than LASIK eye surgery, getting it in their interesting prospect when it comes to the possible medical benefits, But If you think you were having trouble getting a Taylor Swift song at your head Now we'll just wait till that thing gets in. You

Elon Musk Nora Link Tesla Must Twitter Taylor Parkinson
Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | Last month

Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

"Actor Ian home has died from an illness related to Parkinson's CBS is Peter king takes a look back at his extraordinary career he was Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit and lord of the rings I still have an ending for my book Ian Holm also had memorable roles in alien time bandits chariots of fire and as Skinner in the animated routed to a satellite calm dogs only smaller he's a really unpleasant looking little and I don't think he looks like me home was a stage actor it hard he won the Olivier award for his portrayal of King Lear he also won a Tony at the British Academy Awards night in nineteen ninety eight in the home was a Peter king CBS

Ian Home Parkinson CBS Bilbo Baggins Ian Holm Skinner King Lear Peter King British Academy
'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last month

'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

"Of the rings star Ian home has died correspondent Jason Nathanson has celebrated actor Sir Ian Holm was nominated for an Oscar for his role as coach samosa beanie in chariots of fire it said the bloody years for this because starting everything from alien to Brazil to the fifth element but one of his most high profile role was as Bilbo Baggins in the lord of the rings movies in nineteen ninety eight he received a knighthood for services to drama he passed away from complications due to Parkinson's disease Sir Ian Holm is eighty eight

Jason Nathanson Sir Ian Holm Oscar Brazil Parkinson
'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:43 sec | Last month

'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

"British actor Ian Holm has died after an illness related to Parkinson's disease he was Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit and lord of the rings I thought of an ending for my book and he lived happily ever after Ian Holm also had memorable roles in alien time bandits chariots of fire and as Skinner in the animated right to do it it's not like Cologne dogs only smaller he's a really unpleasant looking little and I don't think he looks like me home was a stage actor at heart he won the Olivier award for his portrayal of King Lear he also won a Tony at the British Academy award was knighted in nineteen ninety eight in the home was a Peter king CBS news

Ian Holm Bilbo Baggins Skinner King Lear Peter King British Academy CBS
"Lord of the Rings" actor Ian Holm dies

Garret Lewis

00:22 sec | Last month

"Lord of the Rings" actor Ian Holm dies

"Meredith and the lord of the rings star has died at eighty eight I thought about ending her life took home the actor that brought to life Bilbo Baggins lord of the rings inside home died in London at the age of eighty eight due to issues related to Parkinson's disease in addition to his role in the Peter Jackson's trilogy the actor had frequent roles in science fiction and fantasy genre

Meredith London Peter Jackson Bilbo Baggins Parkinson's Disease
Kim Kardashian West is the next superstar celebrity to snag an exclusive podcast deal with Spotify

Colleen and Bradley

02:35 min | Last month

Kim Kardashian West is the next superstar celebrity to snag an exclusive podcast deal with Spotify

"Tell us about Kim Kardashian's house okay she is just doing things and actually here's the thing I think you might be interested in so Kim Kardashian west's that lovely lady of many media has entered into a deal this time with Spotify which put a pin in that to do a podcast not only to host a podcast but produced and hosted all only Simplon gas when I first saw the that story I thought well of the things that I want to listen to the world and I do list do a fair amount of Parkinson's I don't know that I really care what Kim Kardashian has to say all through them because the first story I read said we don't really know what she's going to talk about then I came across the story which purported to know what they're going to talk about it in fact she's not going to be alone and I might just wanna listen let me tell you more okay so according to who the Wall Street journal I read that every morning with my English muffins do you really know do not okay I was both surprised that you read it every morning and the evening last month and I don't mind I don't I don't do either of those things that you're lying I'm lying I was sitting on my couch this morning in pants and I read that for this as yet untitled project Kim will be joined by Emmy nominated television producer Lori Rothschild and salty as a co producer and host Amazon salty brings experience into this arena but it's the contact excuse me the B. R. content of this podcast which I think you might find interesting you know she's been studying for the bar right right she wants to be a lawyer not like that yeah not like the bar where you go drink not like that Applebee's neighborhood grill and bar exactly well it doesn't require a lot of studying she's also worked with the innocence project which seeks to use DNA to I'm just reading the thing D. N. A. technology and testing to help exonerate wrongly convicted people and you know she even like lobbied president trump's to help commute the sentence of Alice Marie Johnson yeah right all of those efforts will combine with ms on salty who by the way has worked most recently as an executive producer on investigation discovery's the face of evil it sounds like this is going to be a criminal justice reform podcast beams podcast

Kim Kardashian Spotify Parkinson Wall Street Journal Emmy Lori Rothschild Producer Applebee President Trump Donald Trump Executive Producer Amazon Alice Marie Johnson
Los Angeles - Paso Robles Ambush Shooting Suspect Dead, 3 Officers Wounded In Shootout

KNX Evening News

00:59 min | Last month

Los Angeles - Paso Robles Ambush Shooting Suspect Dead, 3 Officers Wounded In Shootout

"The man suspected of ambushing and shooting at San Luis Obispo county sheriff's deputy and killing a homeless man in Paso Robles Robles is is dead dead following following a a shootout shootout with with law law enforcement enforcement agencies agencies San San Luis Luis Obispo Obispo county county sheriff sheriff Ian Ian Parkinson Parkinson says says they they had had set set up up a a perimeter perimeter around around the the suspect suspect twenty twenty six six year year old old Mason Mason later later on on in in the area of highway forty six and Ramada drive in Paso Robles the suspects were shot and during the shooting two more officers were injured one a California highway patrol officer was shot in the bullet proof vest a second deputy sheriff from Kings County got out of the armored vehicle to rescue the CHP officer that just been shot and was shot himself an officer from the Arroyo Grande police department was also wounded there is started shooting at the possibles pull up police station early Wednesday morning which is where the deputy was shot in the face the death but he underwent surgery and is in serious

Paso Robles Robles Ian Ian Parkinson Parkinson Mason Mason Officer San Luis Obispo San San Luis Luis Obispo Obisp California Kings County Arroyo Grande
"The Rookie" Jim Morris.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

04:56 min | Last month

"The Rookie" Jim Morris.

"Jimmy Morris historian one for the ages so much so that Disney made his life into a movie in two thousand and two called the rookie and his most recent book. DREAM ACRES COMES OUT June twenty third. He is back for extra innings. Jim Morris so glad to have you back on the show. Nationally Sarah Thank. You grab me so I gotta say man I'm I'm start this off with a compliment. I'm GonNa Kiss Your behind so I I've been looking at your playing days, and we all know the great story. It's so uplifting phenomenal. Get to that. How are you in better shape? Now I mean you are in phenomenal shape, I mean. Are you guy that's always active because most people as they get older, they put the pounds on. I'm raising my hand for those. That can't see but I. TRY to exercise it. Try to run. I, try to get enough. What is your secret because you are getting more fit by the year? You know. Battled chronic illness for a long time and The, more people say I can't do something. Tomorrow makes me WANNA. Do something. And so we've worked out and I'll tell you what these last five months. Hasn't been. A time for me to reset and retool and get ready for something new. Because, we have no idea what normal is gonNA, be so I've been able to work out at walked. My doctors. My neurologists said you'll never walk again. You're starting. Drag your leg and my mom bought me a cane. I got rid of all that and I'm walking five to ten miles a day, and now I'm running. So you know what I just I like to be in motion when I'm in motion, I can sing better in so when I can sing better that clears the mind out, and you know what now my neurologist is going. You don't have Parkinson's more. That's not possible, said you know what anything's possible. Yeah, that's amazing. I was I. was going to bring that up. I was Kinda taking whether it should or not. You were diagnosed with Parkinson's now things the sound of it sound very positive wing for Jim. Absolutely I had a I had turned it down slowly. and. When you get to read the book you're going to understand chapter ten is going to. Either blow people sox offer. It's GonNa make inferior furious and go. WHO believes in that stuff, but I eventually. Turned off my deep brain stimulator, which was the electricity sent Dopamine Mimic does me and my brain turn it off, and there was a message I got quite strongly to turn it off I did and I went back some urologists. She did a brain scan on me and made me do all these Parkinson's test. My balance was a great I was standing on one toe, and then the other toe on both feet could turn circles I can touch my nose with my eyes closed and everything else, and the brain scan came back clean and she goes. You do not have Parkinson's anymore. And she goes I've been doing this for fifteen years, and that does not happen. Said well. I'm standing in front of you. Holy Cow I need. Your Life is legitimately filled with like miracles, because that is unbelievable, and and that makes me feel really happy because you know that's usually a diagnosis. People panic rightfully, so, but I'm so happy a better place now. My that such good news to hear. Awesome. Thank you so much. It's been. It's been a blessing. I've got a daughter out in California, and she's doing a Bible school saying she just graduated with vessel. She was talking to us the other day and she's been reading the book and she's like you know. What can you give up some of the miracle, so we can have? A. And I WANNA get to adjust you ago. I want to I want to end the interview talking about your book. Because I'm right before chapter nine, which is maybe the most interesting chapter title I've ever read in my life, but we're going to get there eventually. We're going to get there, so it's just a couple. Things before I get to your life. Is Baseball in big trouble Jimmy Johnson baseball going to this year. We're going to have baseball again, you think. I had not one clue and I'll tell you this and it's I. Talk About this in my speech is baseball. Has Seen US through wars, depressions, recessions civil unrest when the men couldn't play, the women played. Baseball has seen US through our entire democracy and now. That question is up in the air and if there's no baseball, there's no concessions there. No ticket tickets. There's no security There's nothing and there's no fans and so. I'm hoping they get back on the field pretty soon at least filming it, so he has something to do at home besides workout or eat banana, bread and. I just want our sports back and it doesn't matter if it's baseline of all sports and I WANNA see everybody, get back. Their business and I want to see all those great athletes gooden after it and were. We just got a lot of big unknowns right

Parkinson Baseball Jim Morris Jimmy Morris United States Disney Dopamine Gooden Jimmy Johnson California
Jerry Sloan, longtime Utah Jazz head coach, dead at 78

WBZ Midday News

00:12 sec | 2 months ago

Jerry Sloan, longtime Utah Jazz head coach, dead at 78

"Former NBA coach Jerry Sloan aside from complications from Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia Sloan seventy eight coach the chance for twenty three seasons and ranks fourth in NBA history with twelve hundred twenty one

Jerry Sloan Parkinson NBA
'The most competitive guy I ever coached against': Jerry Sloan, as remembered by fellow greats

AP 24 Hour News

00:08 sec | 2 months ago

'The most competitive guy I ever coached against': Jerry Sloan, as remembered by fellow greats

"Another study with one hundred thousand patients around the world finds there's no benefit from hydroxy chloride Quinn and there is a higher rate of heart problems and death former vice president Joe Biden's walking back this comment on I heart radio's breakfast club guy telling if you have a problem figuring out what you're for mayor trump and you a black leader saying that he does not take black voters for granted some of basketball's greats are honoring Jerry Sloan the former Utah Jazz coach died from Parkinson's disease and other complications the Dow was down slightly lower the nasdaq up

Joe Biden Basketball Jerry Sloan Vice President Utah Parkinson's Disease
Jazz great, Hall of Fame coach Jerry Sloan dies at 78

The Valenti Show

00:08 sec | 2 months ago

Jazz great, Hall of Fame coach Jerry Sloan dies at 78

"NBA hall of fame coach and player Jerry Sloan dead at the age of seventy eight from Parkinson's and dementia he coached the jazz for twenty three

NBA Parkinson Jerry Sloan
Jazz great, Hall of Fame coach Jerry Sloan dies at 78

Rush Limbaugh

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Jazz great, Hall of Fame coach Jerry Sloan dies at 78

"And NBA coaching great has died legendary Utah Jazz head coach Jerry Sloan has died inducted to the basketball hall of fame in two thousand nine Jerry Sloan spent twenty three seasons as head coach of the Utah Jazz with whom he won more regular season games than nearly every other coach in NBA history he's fourth on the all time list in a statement the jazz wrote like John Stockton and Karl Malone as players Jerry Sloan epitomized the organization Sloan was also known as the original ball he played ten seasons in Chicago including the ball's first NBA season in nineteen sixty six his Jersey number four the first retired by the balls Jerry Sloan died this morning from complications of Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia he was seventy eight

Jerry Sloan John Stockton Karl Malone Chicago Parkinson NBA Utah
Tropical Storm Arthur nudging closer to North Carolina coast

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Tropical Storm Arthur nudging closer to North Carolina coast

"Will tropical storm Arthur is moving closer to the coast of North Carolina prompting threats of minor flooding and rough seas but CBS news meteorologist David Parkinson says it will not be making landfall hurricane season is getting off to a bit of an early start as tropical storm Arthur makes a close pass to day to the North Carolina Outer Banks this is the sixth consecutive year where the a storm happened before June first which is when hurricane season begins and also the Arthur storms that we've had in the past all seem to like to come close to the Outer Banks without causing much damage and that's what's going to happen here Parkinson predicts the biggest effects will be large waves and rip

Arthur North Carolina David Parkinson Arthur Storms CBS
Covid-19 Sniffer Dogs: The U.K.’s Latest Attempt to Tackle Virus

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

Covid-19 Sniffer Dogs: The U.K.’s Latest Attempt to Tackle Virus

"British scientists are training special sniffer dogs to see if they can detect corona virus in humans the drugs are already trained to detect certain cancers malaria and Parkinson's disease the trouble explore whether the six Culver dogs made up of Labradors and Cocker spaniels can spot the virus in humans from older samples before symptoms appear the goal would be to screen up to two hundred fifty

Culver
Inside the strange world of designing psychoactive drugs

The Big Story

06:12 min | 3 months ago

Inside the strange world of designing psychoactive drugs

"I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Joe Bruni is a writer at the Walrus. I promise he is not tripping right now Joan I Jordan. Why don't you start by telling me what is pace and just tell me about the drug? Never heard of it before well paces essentially just water and the substance called Mea I which is the active ingredient an emmy. I is It's a new drug. It was created in two thousand fifteen And it was marketed last year as an alcohol. Substitute and Binge. Drinking litigator so essentially. It's an effort to replace alcohol with the substance that at certain doses has similar Or was simply saying better effects. And how would that actually work in practice like by better effects you get drunker oddest drunk no hangover? What so. This is difficult for me to imagine. Because I actually haven't tried substance myself right by the time I started working on the story it It was illegal but from what I've heard from people who have tried it. It's a stronger drunk. And it's a feeling that you're more in control You're not slurring your speech as You're not getting like the spins. You're not falling over and that's at certain doses And then of course there are people who have exceeded those doses and at that point they report effects that are similar to things. Like ecstasy and Indiana okay. So you mentioned that it's illegal but At what point did it become illegal because it was for sale right right So it's a little tricky. It was technically never legal for sale right. The Way Canadian drug was work and struggles in a lot of the world's Are there essentially just lists of banned substances so until substance is on that list? It's not illegal to have or to us. But in order to sell a psychoactive substance you Bam you have to go through all sorts of licensing and applications to submit kind of a laundry list of studies to prove that it's safe and things like that for pace none of that took place so it was really never legal for sale. And now it's since been added to the list of controlled substances So now it's is definitely illegal. So how does the process for creating something like that work like? Where did MEA I come from? So there's a bit of a historical precedent for MEA. I it's in this family of drugs called Amino Indians. And they were first synthesized in the seventies as a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease and that didn't pan out and the pharmaceutical cook community sort of lost interest in them decades later Along comes Ezekiel Golan. Who's an Israeli chemist Sort of a career drug discoverer And he becomes interested in I mean Indians and an emmy a specifically For it's sort of pleasant effects. Okay so tell me about our career drug discover who is Zeki Golan? And what's he done so Golan he's trained as a mathematician actually his PhD in that he worked for a time. It's more accurate to say. Could he consulted for a number of major pharmaceutical companies? But then he kind of went his own way and for about two decades now. He's been creating new drugs. And sort of licensing the patents to the more or against the less scrupulous people who then synthesize and sell them on the black market. Soglo has been doing this for a while now. He only recently settled in. Canada was featured in a few BBC documentaries back in what was kind of his heyday in the EU He had a lab in Amsterdam. So he's sort of this infamous figure in the world of underground designer drugs. Okay so you're GonNa have to explain something to me Like I'm that kid who barely scrape by and science. How does a guy like that go about making a new designer drug? Like what do you do so there are these computer programs? It's called Kevin from addicts software. It's essentially like a three d blueprint of the molecular structure. That you have on your screen and that you can alter and make adjustments to and then you can analyze these new structures eve created. You can get some idea of what their effects might be. And then once he has a blueprint that he feels his promising he would export that and send it to a lab elsewhere where the actual chemists would synthesize it and sent him back samples. And what does he do with the samples so what? He Does the samples is he. He takes them he test them on himself. He's a little more responsible than I'm probably making it sound. But he does test everything on himself. He he'll start from a very small dose and he'll ramp it up carefully serve recording any effects. He experiences an of course stopping at the first sign of of anything miss. What is the process? Let's let's say you know He. He sends off this molecule and he gets back the substance and he starts trying it and he thinks lake with Ma. I that he's onto something if he's not doing it for like pharmaceutical corporations that create new medicines. What's the purpose behind doing this? He can't sell it. What's the process behind China? Make it legal or capitalize on it. Glenn is the theory Libertarian Mindset. When it comes to drugs he believes that you know free free adults consenting adults should be able to try what they want And so that's I think. Part of what motivates his crusade almost is. He he's excited by substances and the ones he enjoys and he just wants to

Emmy Zeki Golan Jordan Heath Rawlings Joan I Jordan Joe Bruni Ezekiel Golan Writer Indiana Parkinson's Disease EU Glenn BBC Soglo China Canada Kevin Amsterdam MA
Tornado Warnings issued for much of Washington DC region until 6PM

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:03 min | 4 months ago

Tornado Warnings issued for much of Washington DC region until 6PM

"Along to your window visor okay can at six this morning until six this evening for the entire area with a high wind warning east of I ninety five basically which make us up to sixty miles an hour times us even outside of thunderstorms and now the ground is saturated from the rain this moves through when I see some trees and power lines down be prepared for some power outages a look at starting full radar we're watching a band of severe thunderstorms over southwestern Virginia pushing the Lynchburg area some of the storms have tornado warnings associated with them I think they're gonna move into this far south western suburbs from about seven seven thirty then sweep northeastward across the entire metro area about seven thirty and ten thirty eleven o'clock this morning so I wouldn't be surprised if we see a tornado watch come out for the metro area so forecast calls for showers and thunderstorms or rain heavy at times late this morning I'm a mid morning to late morning so many stores may be severe with damaging winds and isolated tornadoes it's gonna turn very windy to over the next several hours they will get a break I think we'll see another round of thunderstorms acceptance of powerful cold front comes through in the stores also could be severe highs upper seventies to lower eighty is becoming fair breezy and colder behind the front tonight lows will be in the forties probably sunny breezy cooler tomorrow with a high near sixty we'll see some showers on Wednesday with highs in the fifties and run numbers of chapter sixteen camp springs fifty nine hundred and sixty at Reagan national ride bike it's five fifty one now severe storms did battle the south yesterday and overnight prompting flash floods tornadoes and thunderstorm warnings and watches the storms killed at least six people in Mississippi CBS news meteorologist David Parkinson says some areas will still have issues today swath of strong wind gusts actually goes all the way back to Chicago where they're under a wind advisory it's a high wind warning closer to the coast to New York but that shows you the extent of the wind really about a hundred and fifty million people sold half of America dealing with the wind advisory during the day to day as Mike just told you were expecting storms through the morning with potential for strong and damaging winds we're on top of it watching closely and Michael let us know as soon as things start to

Virginia Mississippi David Parkinson Chicago New York America Mike Michael Lynchburg Reagan CBS
Brain discovery could have important implications for neurodegenerative diseases

Innovation Now

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Brain discovery could have important implications for neurodegenerative diseases

"From sixteen different countries are combining their talents with a team at the University of Virginia to investigate a two part system. That is a type of brain cleaning to fight diseases. Such as Multiple Sclerosis Parkinson's Alzheimer's stroke and dementia. The cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brain serves as the immune system's highway for toxin and plaque removal. The UVA team is researching a slow release Gel. That can be put on the head like shampoo to enhance lymphatic function clearing the roads for medication to pass through the second part of the therapy. Introduces a substance into the body that induces an immune response producing antibodies. That helped clean out the sticky brain plaque. We can't yet cure Alzheimer's but we may soon see a day when restoring memories is just a shampoo away

Alzheimer University Of Virginia
"parkinson" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:33 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"And help put an end to Parkinson's disease one thirty nine can extend seventy a new partnership between LA and the YMCA is gonna provide some sorely needed hygiene options for people living on the streets amid the coronavirus crisis some YMCA facilities will be opening up their showers and bathrooms to homeless people also help produce jobs for folks who have been either laid off or have lost their hours to be able to staff those are Eric Garcetti and we put dozens of new port a potties out on Skid Row and other places around the city in the last couple days as well LA is also turned three more rec centers and trimmers into shelters more than two weeks ago Garcetti announced a plan to provide six thousand shelter beds at rec centers around the city so far there are close to seven hundred beds Garcetti says that number may more than double in the coming week but the need for space between beds he says has pushed the original goal of six thousand beds down to about two thousand city and county officials are also working to secure more motel and hotel rooms for people who need to be isolated or quarantined by have no where to do so there was a hotel motel rooms is really with the ramping up will be thousands of them I think the county was talking about going as high as fifteen thousand but these are stretch goals right now I hope that we can get into the thousands of people in those hotel and motel rooms in the next two to three weeks if we do that then I think the sky's the limit thankfully this week good news FEMA said that they would reimburse us for hotel and motel rooms for folks before they're sick who are homeless that's never been done before at last check seven homeless people in LA county have tested positive for coke at nineteen public health officials earlier in the week put the number at nine but later said further investigation determined two of those people were not actually homeless Claudia this guitar KNX ten seventy newsradio in his daily briefing on the coronavirus pandemic the president always takes some time to criticize the media well that's nothing new for the president it could be dangerous with president trump on able to hold the kinds of rallies he loves because of the corona virus pandemic he's been using part of his daily briefings to lash out at the media it's therefore critical that certain media outlets stop spreading false rumors and creating fear and even paddock with the public but professor of television and popular culture at Syracuse University Robert Thompson says the constant media bashing can be dangerous I do think the in times like these we really depend on journalists to get us important information especially when everybody is stuck at home virtually the only information they are getting is coming from from the news and from but journalists and all the rest of it making that even all the more important Johnson says he feels most of the mainstream media is doing a remarkably good job of staying on top of bringing us the ever changing information about the corona virus pandemic Nick Roberts K. and extend seventy newsradio average price of regular gas in LA county cost seventy two cents a gallon less than it did a year ago triple a says it's down fifty seven cents just since two years day the card prices three oh four a gallon after last night one point four percent decline orange county's average also dropped one point four cents overnight four forty two it is three minutes away from checking traffic L. one oh five freeway at the LAX got some issues going on there we'll check it out for you coming up at four forty five hello to wait here for me so our hearts go out to everyone dealing with the corona virus pandemic we're all in this together.

Parkinson
Dogs are being trained to sniff out coronavirus

Lewis and Logan

01:06 min | 4 months ago

Dogs are being trained to sniff out coronavirus

"Well you know we're all dog lovers here on the show we love dogs they're such amazing animals and that researchers in the UK are working on a way to help stop the spread of the virus using dogs they partnered with a charity called medical detection dogs on a trial to see if dogs can sniff out patients with COPD nineteen wow as you know they've already been trained to smell diseases like cancer and Parkinson's and they're hoping that they can train them to sniff out the virus and they say if so they may be ready in six weeks if the trial has positive results and they would use the dogs to detect potential carriers in large groups of people people walking around that have been don't even know they have it but this is how you could find out without even doing a test that's that's pretty cool yeah like I said dogs their their sense of smell is off the charts what they can smell and they're also very very smart animals that would be cool I think

UK Copd Cancer Parkinson
"parkinson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 4 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on KCRW

"He ruled over meat we boast rolled out of the bed he was sort of movement and shaking me in and that you but she was totally oblivious of less was having a nightmare but after the attack J. put her foot down she was worried less had a brain tumor they needed to seek medical attention she remembers sitting next to last in the sterile office as the doctor delivered his diagnosis her husband had Parkinson's when he was told that he had Parkinson's was he devastated yes he was yeah less was young for a diagnosis only forty five still joy says over the next twenty years she unless tried to make the best of things the loss of movement the loss of work the slow narrowing of their world until about seven years ago when they decided to attend a support group for people suffering from Parkinson's we were late you know a lot of people were there I walked into the room and I thought new mountain now it was the same greasy musty smell that les had the smell your head first sensed when less was just thirty one and then I realized for some people it's not stronger another people didn't smell so strong beach I wondered that Parkinson's had a smell when they got home she explained her discovery to less Dr we both understood the significance immediately joy and less knew instantly they had to get this information to the right scientist.

J. Parkinson scientist les
"parkinson" Discussed on Man Up

Man Up

09:45 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Man Up

"Support for today's episode comes from Progressive Insurance Fun fact progressive customers qualify for an average of six discounts when they sign up for Progressive Auto insurance discount for things like enrolling automatic payments ensuring more than one car going paperless and of course being a safe driver plus customers who bundled their auto with home or advertisers insurance. Save an average of twelve percent on their auto. There are so many ways to save when you switch and once your customer with progressive you get unmatched claim service with twenty four seven support online or by phone. It's no wonder why more than twenty million drivers trust progressive and why recently climbed to the third largest auto insurer in the country get a cool online at progressive dot com in as little as five minutes and see how much you could be saving auto insurance with. Progressive Casualty Insurance Company and affiliates home and Renter's insurance not available in all states provided and service by affiliated and third party insurers discounts very inter- not available in all states and situations kid. You relate to seeing it all here. Oh word-for-word well you know. I've been there. I've been diagnosed now since two thousand and three seventeen years. I've been living with this disease. Every word he's mentioned is something that I've gone through it either at one point in my life or I am still going through today. so I can relate to you one hundred percent. Jimmy Choi is a beast. There's just no other way to describe him. He was diagnosed with Parkinson's at age. Twenty seven twenty seven and as the years went on his symptoms got worse and worse by age thirty four. He was walking with a cane two years after that he ran his first marathon that he ran fourteen more in ultramarathons multiple Spartan races and in two thousand seventeen. He was competing on American Ninja Warrior. He's been on that show every year since puget subscribe. What your life was like when you were at peak Mojo You know what I'm going to be very honest with you until you peak mo Jo right now. Is that people look at me. And they think you're crazy right but let's let's look at this from all facets I'm financially independent. I am more now than I ever was. Even I was a three sport kid in high school. I was a captain of the football team but I am more fit now than I was back in high school. My friends and family. My inner circle has never been closer to me than before my community that I have built around myself right and this is important because when you you need to start building that community around you surround yourself with other people who are like minded and you know what. I'M NOT GONNA lie to you right now actually sitting in my house. I've got three other people with Parkinson's in their forties and early fifties who are downstairs in my basement swinging around on on a Ninja obstacles. And they all have live this disease for think on an average of six to twelve years so you surround yourself with people just like you that way. You can share experiences. You can share things that work. I have a question. I wanted to really understand how that happened. Like how that became your peak post. Parkinson's is it more to do with this time because I know that you also experienced What your wife called like the dark days the dark period or is there some kind of journey that you went on something like Something that triggered this kind of revolution in your I inside. It really is about the journey when I was diagnosed. Two Thousand and three hours twenty seven years old and that first eight years of my life with Parkinson's added absolutely nothing to educate myself on the disease right. I knew Michael J. Fox had it. I took a pill or two or sixteen to be exact. Took sixteen pills a day and I just went on and I lived in. I figured you know what if ignored it. It would just go away and of course as you mentioned it doesn't go away but then you know at some point. I hit rock bottom and that was when I fell down. I fell down the stairs carrying my infant son at the time so this was in two thousand ten. My son was just a little less than one year old and fell down stairs and my wife and my daughter Witnessed it When I looked up and saw their faces it was just one of horror. I knew then something had to change. I was two hundred and forty pounds really overweight. I walked with a cane because I couldn't keep my balance And I was just in my mid thirties and I am. This is not the life that I had visioned for myself and my wife when we got married Sort of the things that you're looking for how to stay relevant and how to be a leader in workplace growing up. I had a I worked in the family business as well. I left my professional life and in the family business. I've owned a restaurant with my family but One thing that I realized now that I didn't know before. Is that the more that? I shared my story that with the general public but with the people who I consider my inner circle. My immediate family My closest friends the people that work for me the more shirt my story with them the more they know about the disease in Des Moines that they know about how I live with. Parkinson's the better understanding that they have ended the better understanding that they know what you can take on their can also help them better understand whether or not sometimes if it's you talking or if it's the Parkinson's talking so just listening to you speak. It's it's brought me back in terms of my own disease in my own life progression up to this point you're saying that you're the inner circle help you more open away going through which. I have so much trouble especially these people care about the most who care about me the most who can get hurt by watching me go through some of these things. How do you do it in a way that people see the real? What's going on? But they said depressing them and is a real pity. I don't want pity and depressed for me today today. I share everything everything that I'm feeling if I'm if I'm not feeling well I would tell my kids. Hey you know what would i? Don't WanNa play right now. Daddy can't play right now. I just simply can't and they understand you mentioned you have young kids. I have a twelve year old and a ten year old myself But they understand that but only because they. They haven't lived a life where they have not known me to live without. Parkinson's now when I say your inner circle And seen probably is very familiar with us like gatherings at parties right There's always that awkward. I call it the Parkinson's elephant in a room. Where somebody comes up to. You could be your best friend could be your brother or sister and say hey. How's it going and you really don't know what to say so you say yeah I'm Gonna I'm fine and then you just kinda stare at each other noddy and then you kind of walk your separate ways right and then you kind of avoid each other. You avoid that topic now. What did that conversation there was familiar to you these that way? Yeah I never know what to say. Yeah you never know what to say but now what if we what if we just change that conversation a little bit right and I always try to describe things to them in in everyday terms like okay. The stonier students ever had a feeling Charlie horse. Yeah you know that feeling now. Imagine having that for four hours right. There's there's more of a shock and all you know Coli crap four hours of Charlie horses. That's that's terrible right but at the same time. I tell them that you know I I'm not experiencing that right now and then I'll also let them know how I deal with it when it happens. Okay Hey you know if you ever see me move. Very slowly okay. that's an indication that the stony is is onset. If he ever see me doing this so again you're giving them little tidbits of information that they may not use right away but next time they see you and hear moving a little bit slow there like Oh that must be that. Estonia thing that he's talking about then you know what let's walk slower with him today as we talk and walk instead of an days then where you're moving better than they can just be themselves if they understand just by by if they can identify what you're going through then that awkwardness melts away. Slowly diminish over time because they understand what you're going through from a symptom visual symptom perspective. Okay and it's things about making little changes that add up. You know we talked about you. Talked about having these these little things around your life that added up and became a burden to your friends and your family especially your your wife. Now you can start making small changes that add up to remove the burden so to speak in other ways. It may not be still can't tie my shoes. I'll behind us. My shoes are Untied Right now. As as I'm looking down But other things that I can do and you have already mentioned like spending more time with the kids being there in person with them being yourself in front of them really takes a lot of that physical burden.

Parkinson Progressive Auto Progressive Casualty Insurance Charlie Des Moines Michael J. Fox Jimmy Choi football Estonia puget Jo
"parkinson" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

11:19 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Sloane welcome to the show thanks for having me I appreciate it so we are here. You're boxing gym here in Tulsa Oklahoma engine room boxing. And we're GONNA talk about boxing but you have interesting twist on it but before we get to that twist. How'd you start it with boxing? What's your story? Well my I think like a a lot of the guys got into their fathers or grandfathers. My grandfather was a boxer when he was young. So you always talked about boxing and we'd always watch you know. Watch the fights together Mike Tyson. He likes so you know maybe Lebron. Toil went out to go to the convenience store and buy the rent the little box you bring home put on the TV and watch the and watch the fight right so you know. Of course anything he was Kinda my hero and I looked up to him so anything that he was into. You know that's kind of what I what I was into so I was always was interesting curious about you know. We're just kind of the background that I came from. We were Kinda main rough little kids anyway and we get out in the yard and box with the little sugar ray Leonard Boxing gene gloves and wrap my grandma's dish towels around her hand. Our hands and boxing in the yard and so that kind of got my interest up and as as I got older older wanted to pursue that started you know seeking out local. Boxing gyms and and probably started when I was around. They start actually boxing when I was seventeen. Did you ever compete you. Yeah I competed for about four and a half years only amateurs I never did. Any any pro steph box at the north also boxing club here in Tulsa and my trainer was Ed Dunkin. WHO's the decently known coach? especially around. Here he trained a quick Tillis and Dell Cook and you know some of our other bigger name guys is actually they came out of Oklahoma. And someone did you transition from fighting to training. When did that happen? You Know I. I was boxing a- at an early age and looking back on it now I understand that you know. We didn't travel a lot because our our coaches and our program didn't have much money to travel so we were just. I did a lot of training and didn't get a whole lot of fights you know. We didn't travel nationally or anything like that. So anger got a decent job in sales and that took a lot of time so I just kind of phase myself out of the box even even though I I wanted to do and continue to do it as more of a hobby for me. I didn't have a grand aspirations. Have Gone on and been a a world champion fighter or anything like that. I just I I just enjoyed the sport so got involved in sales and fast forward. You know several you know ten years ahead and decided to go to nursing's goal when the construction market slowdown sylvestry spy sale. So that slowdown in I. I ended up. Put myself through nursing school and getting out of that wanting to You know exercise and stuff. I start thinking about boxing again and I didn't WanNa course too old to compete and I was maybe thirty. I think thirty five. I've been in ten years now so about thirty five years old thought. Well maybe if I started coaching some kids or something like that. It would give me my fix for boxing and get that. Get that part of it. It kinda let me play a little bit in the sport again. So I rented like a little basically a story building storage unit in a oiseaux outside of Tulsa and opened it up on on a few bags in it and and the ad in the paper and the next thing you know we had a lot of school kids come in so so you started trade school kids but then you sort of training different type of client and this was clients with Parkinson's disease. How did that happen? Like we're we're GonNa talk about this program. You develop a boxing program for Parkinson's patients but how did you start. Training people with Parkinson's disease in boxing. I told you we started the gym and Eloise so and it was mostly just a you training like I said Gee Choe competitive kids the box but but you know Tom I was there for a few years. We had people asking them. Maybe fitness training and I had a girl that I'd I'd worked with that had cerebral palsy. Actually in out there and so having my nursing background and then doing this boxing it was it was kind of in the back of my head to do something a little more health related but I just started started on this nursing career and I just never entertained the idea of so we fast forward a few years and I've had five years of coaching experience running the gym and and kind of started deciding. You know I'd like to try to make a push in this full-time I'd trained a few boxers. That kind of made it to the national level and I knew if I was gonNA coach those guys at that level all. I needed to have more time to do it. You know I couldn't be working part time any more than they could be working a lotta hours. Either you know so we moved to Tulsa. We opened this facility and I was here for about a year and One of the local doctors Had A patient that had been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and he had seen you know that. Of course it exercises this is is one of the we can talk about later. But exercise is one of the main things that slows down the progression of Parkinson's disease and so he recommended that he come into the boxing gym and gets yet Start Training here. So Bobby Moore's his name and he came. Probably I guess maybe three and a half years ago and I started personal training with him one on one just for his his fitness and I think we did maybe twenty four sessions and he went and visited his physical therapist and the physical therapist did notice. What is such an increase in his ability that he reached out to the Parkinson's foundation of Oklahoma and had those guys contact me about if I wanted to start a class? So and that's what what ready to fight. It's all about when before we get into more about the program. What are you you tailor? The boxing program for these guys. Let's talk about Parkinson's general for those who aren't too familiar with it so reminder listeners. What has Parkinson's disease? What are the symptoms? We know what causes it. Things like that Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder. So once you get it. It's there's no cure for it. It's GonNa continue to get worse over time. Said disorder affects our central nervous system so it primarily targets motor movement. uh-huh anything that's a motor movement as going to be affected by it so it can affect of course your your balance your speech your handwriting. Usually most people would pitcher Parkinson's Disease Aziz with a tremor course in in one hand or sometimes both but usually just want one side but there's more patriots shaking their rigidity. Somebody like Michael J. Fox Freddie Roach is who they think of. But there's a lot of other things that go along with it. Just as a general slowing of movement people lose their facial expressions Like I said loser spacious lot of of a sleep insomnia Goes along with it and just you know a lot of dementia. That can come along as a certain point time so it do we know. Does it affect men or women and more or is it about the same now. It affects a lot more men than than women think. I think it's a seventy percent I thanks to the number. That's affected more men compared to women. I really don't know why it affects more men than women but it most definitely does genetics. Play a part in in developing the disease they know you know maybe fifteen percent and then chemical emiko exposure. So there's if you're supposed a lot of pesticides where you've been like in the in the Gulf War a lot of those guys that were you got affected by chemical some of the chemicals and things that were used over there but the rest of the people. It's kind of a a known unknown quantity. They really don't they really don't know yet. Why target some people and not others and yeah? I mean definitely affects effects significantly the quality of life of an individual. I mean absolutely right. So let's talk about what the research says. It has no cure for it for Parkinson's but what does the research say that. What can help help? Parkinson's patients well. I mean primarily. We know that medications. The frontline approach so Parkinson's patients suffer from either. A lack of dopamine Maine are the ability to use it so Leyva Dope Auriol Dope is going to be almost every Parkinson's patients going to be on on dopamine their surgeries and stuff like deep brain stimulation. Also as toil but next to the next line of Defense is exercise. So it's proven without a fact you know clinically that exercise slows down the progression and and it helps the neuropathy in our brain helps us re regenerate neurons new pathways and it also helps the ability for us to uptake and regulate our opening in better and it needs to be a fourth intensity exercise. Exercise is good but once a force intensity and and when I say forced intensity I don't necessarily mean it has to be hard. It means means that it has to be something. That's not at your own pace so I I compare a little bit You know if you went and walked outside at your own pace it's not as beneficial as vice stick you on a treadmill on set you at a pace so it it just. It affects the brain differently when it's forced intensity so so you won't find any hardly any Parkinson's client that hasn't been recommended exercise. And there's a lot of forms of exercise. People do dance and they do cycling and boxing. While we're talking about here you know here of course today but there's a lot of a different exercise that they they push for for clients to do in. What do you so boxing is definitely? There's a fourth intensity there because I've done the stuff the heavy bag workouts and I just WanNa die after it so there's definitely forced intensity but do you think there's something else going on with boxing the movements movements you do in boxing that sort of like it's a secret sauce that can help Parkinson's patients at the idea you know and and that's what we're I think most people's Kinda come into consensus at that boxing's kind of the gold standard of exercise for Parkinson's disease. There's some other Parkinson's boxing programs out there. Of course as well. We thank to our sisters superior because of some of the changes and things that we've done with it but I kinda tell people I don't know how familiar you are. Our listeners are with boxing. But you said you've tried had the box before so you know that there's a certain movement that goes along with that and you see a boxer and he's moving and it's real flood and it's it's it's like watching a ballet dancer in it's it's A lot got a rhythm that goes along with it and so when you're coaching you see I say sometimes that's one of my coach and I see people come in if you came to the door and you want me to teach you how to box you. Don't move like a boxer yet and so then I get a person with Parkinson's disease it comes and they can't move like a boxer yet to me. You both have movement disorders. I mean so I need to train both. Have you had a move and be balanced and fight like a fighter. So I'll take that approach with all of them. It's not I don't WanNa run a acute program. That's only just a good program that were Oh. Yeah we're training Parkinson's people the box and they get by with everything. No if you come to box I'm GONNA train you like you're a fighter. No Matija Jabex correctly and so I think with our program. It's it's made a big difference that approach with balanced reaction time hand an eye coordination and boxing's count just as is built for Parkinson's disease on accident. If I put a client on a speed bag. They're getting the hand eye coordination from that takes a lot of hand in coordination to do that and nobody can hit hit us feedback when they first started as a matter of Parkinson's disease or not but that bag is a speed bag is a forest intensity exercise because of the rhythm of it once you hit it it's GonNa come back and you have to hit it again and so it's telling you when you're going to hit it you can't make up your mind when you're GonNa hit it only has one rhythm you're going to have to adapt to that rhythm and order bill to hit it and all all the bags in the gym. Were the same way if you heavy baggage swings and so what it swings back you gotTa hitter. You got to move or it's going to push you off balance and so the the equipment in itself you teach them the right techniques are going to challenge the the the symptoms that they have and then in boxing. You're throwing a lot of your did a lot of twist emotions so Parkinson's his patients suffer from horrible rigidity. So they gave her..

boxing pitcher Parkinson Parkinson's disease Tulsa Oklahoma Mike Tyson Sloane Lebron Matija Jabex Dell Cook Tillis dopamine Michael J. Fox Freddie Roach Ed Dunkin Bobby Moore Eloise Gee Choe Tom I
"parkinson" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

12:33 min | 11 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Bram show on this program September eleventh two thousand and nineteen eighteen in it's a Wednesday morning in this next segment I wanted to devote to one interesting and sometimes difficult topic for folks who are experiencing dancing. Parkinson's degree disease and that is the speech and swallowing problems that often come with Parkinson's and We have a the interesting. I saw an interesting piece of news from the University of Vermont last the last week it came in and talked about how the University of Remind Mind Medical Center has been listed as the as a recipient of a grant money to help deal help patients deal with who the speech and swallowing difficulties connected with Parkinson's disease. We have a speech pathologist from the University of Vermont's Senator Medical Center on with us this morning to talk about all of this. I WANNA welcome Ashley Michaela's to the program Good Morning Ashley. Thank you so much. Dave and I. I tell us a little bit about Parkinson's. I think a lot of folks are vaguely aware of this disease and tell me how prevalent is it and and what are its main symptoms or or the way plays out in the people's lives. We're dealing with it sure so one in every one hundred adults over the age of sixty will be diagnosed with Parkinson's disease so it is a fairly large portion of the population and there are four cardinal symptoms uh-huh for Parkinson's resting tremor slowness of movement impaired balance and rigidity or stiffness and an individual can can be given a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease if they present with two out of the Four Cardinal Symptoms I see and the in your we're area of course is is a speech pathology and so that is one of the issues. Parkinson's patients deal with guessing. It's one out of one hundred folks in this this country. How are you have people over sixty have Parkinson's that the total number has to be in the what hundreds of thousands or even millions I believe so yes and in the speech and swallowing difficulties. I see you sort of mentioned together are they. Part of the same mechanism yeah so Parkinson's itself is characterized by reduced amplitude of movement of the muscles which means that you will develop smaller walking smaller writing smaller voice and those smaller movements can also develop that smaller swallow. Oh and so the the muscles of the voice and the swallow are the same and so the smaller movements can disrupt the the voice on the swallow. I CNN what percentage of Parkinson's patients have a specific problems along with the with the with the voice and swallowing during the progression of the disorder up to ninety percent of individuals with Parkinson's. We'll develop speech disorders and up to ninety five percent of them will develop swallowing disorders. I see wow and so it's it's pretty universal in the part in the in the the group above folks who were developed Parkinson's although it may not come on right away the other symptoms may appear I true yeah so we you may see other symptoms prior to the swallowing or the speech difficulties but typically most individuals with Parkinson's. We'll develop speech and swallowing difficulties during the progression of the disorder sorter. I see and so you have a little you have a Parkinson's patient. WHO's coming to you as a practitioner in this field what are you typically doing with with this patient to try to address these problems so there are a number of treatment approaches that we can use a speech language pathologist to target these he's smaller movements there is a program called the Least Silverman Voice Therapy loud program and that's a program that has been around for a really long time and is highly researched and effective and that is a program that the University of Vermont Medical Center has offered for a very fairly long time there's also some traditional speech swallowing treatment options that we can utilize and then recently we started offering speak-out and loud crowd program as well thanks into this grant program through the Parkinson Voice Project and the speak out loud crowd grant program what what is different about or how does that enhance the answer change your what you do on a daily basis yeah so it provides us with another option for and individuals with Parkinson's not everybody presents the same way so it's really important to be able to offer a variety of really highly researched and and well effective options to our patients to ensure that they get the best treatment possible and the most effective active treatment for them so when a person comes in we often do an evaluation and see what they would benefit from the most and we kind of filter I told them through and figure out which program would be the most beneficial for them. I see and tell me about your I mean obviously Parkinson's is is one cause of people presenting themselves in your office what what are some of the other disorders that you deal with a speech pathologist at Uvm Yeah so speech language pathologists deal with quite a wide variety of different disorders I think when people hear speech pathologist apologist are speech language pathologists they think we might just deal with peaching individuals to say are thousands or teaching somebody ready to speak after a stroke which is definitely part of our program and part of what we do but we also deal with and specialize in the evaluation relation and diagnosis and treatment of other communication disorders things like a traumatic brain injury or Chemo toxicity which is where you have difficulty with your cognitive communication skills following chemotherapy we deal with variety of voice disorders as well as swallowing guess orders as well so it sounds like some of the science behind your your work is going to be connected with sort of physicality of the mouth within the musculature around the face and the throat and so on and some of it's going to be connected with really with neuro and brain sciences at right. Yes yes we do deal with both both wow that sounds like a fascinating field in one in which you have to be quite well educated to to enter in in working. Is that right that's right. You have to have a master's degree to be able to practice as well as a professional licensure nationally and it is just one of those jobs that changes day to day and even our to our you could be seeing something different and so it keeps you on your toes. Yeah it does sound like now it it and so in your in your in your daily work. What percentage of your patients are Parkinson's patients. I actually see it quite a fair a bit of Parkinson's disease I am one of the therapist who applied for the grant and so I have the training and the speak-out and loud crowd program and so I get quite a large variety of those patients myself however within our department I would say that we see a really wide variety and so it it definitely greatly varies and it tends to fluctuate so some some days we'll we'll have a high caseload of Parkinson's and some days we'll have a high case load of maybe swallowing problems due to cancer or we'll have some patients come in who have shuttering and it tends to kind of flux but it but it sounds like it's it's that there are sub specialties almost within the field live speech speech language pathology and if a patient comes in with Parkinson's you know the people there might say well. We'll we'll send this patient to Ashley because you she's really trained up on this whereas as if somebody comes in with another speeches order caused by some other disease course or whatever that that they might they might go to different person is that right that's it can be yes and no they there are sub specialties within the field and and people tend to drift towards is one thing or another. I got into the field because of voice disorders and so and my grandfather had Parkinson's. That's kind of an area. I'm passionate about but we try to be as general as possible so there are other feeling pathologists here who do specialize in Parkinson's sends as well and other things and I do see a lot of brain injury and and Chemo toxicity as well and concussion so oh although it is a high percentage of my caseload it does fluctuate and those patients can kind of see a number of different specialists within the department. I don't see how how large is the parameter speech language pathologists. Do you have there. Yeah we have twelve speech language pathologist who between the outpatient inpatient patient rehabilitation and acute care setting I see and and tell me a little bit about the the hospital industry in general is a AH Vermont's even smaller rural hospitals are they all going to have speech language pathologists on staffers something you need to go to Burlington get specialized treatment. I believe that most hospitals will have a speech language pathologist on staff depending on Howrah WPRO. I'm not entirely sure actually moved up to Vermont recently. I Florida so I'm not as familiar but I do know that most hospital systems will at least have one speech language pathologist. They may not be as robust. Is the Department here. Yeah I get it. I mean as you get more rural. services services thin out quite a bit that is that's the the truth in in in medicine. We actually had a segment on the other day talking about the difficulty in finding public defender here is you know in the law in the northeast Kenya where reminding so it's a it's Kinda thing. Any Professional Service tends to get a thin out. Shall we say in the more rural parts of of the territory so but let's get back to the the discussion about the about the treatments here and the patients when they come in and and also the the grant money. How much can you tell me how much the university ruined has received from the out and loud crowd grant in program so to speak out loud crowd grant grant program. Yeah so the the grant program is through Parkinson's voice project and we're our fees to grant recipient for the speak out loud crowd grant program which allowed us to provide professional training two two who of the other speech language pathologists in our system as well as our graduate student clinicians who come in and study under us it also provided us with therapy Europe. Supplies that we can use during our treatments and during the loud crowd and we also get a a thousand dollars to use towards funding are loud the crowd program I see in any of the money devoted to helping patients soup. Perhaps might have difficulty affording these services before them so as far as the money that we're getting for the Grant Program I. We have not decided yet exactly how we're going to allocate eight the money. It's it's supposed to be used towards are loud crowd. I did speak with another speech language pathologist who was a grant recipient it last year and they managed to do something similar to that however I.

Parkinson Parkinson Voice Project Parkinson's disease Ashley Michaela University of Vermont Vermont Bram University of Remind Mind Medi Senator Medical Center CNN University of Vermont Medical resting tremor Kenya Dave Howrah WPRO graduate student Chemo Burlington ninety five percent
"parkinson" Discussed on Spit

Spit

10:31 min | 11 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Spit

"I was diagnosed at a very young age. I was only twenty seven years old and this was back in two thousand and three my wife and I had just gotten married and we're starting our lives together. We had a mortgage right. You're grown up. We're finally adults <hes> back then. I knew nothing about Parkinson's. I was active. I played golf <hes> so I'm going to be stiff especially. I refuse to ride in the cart. I always walked for now with Kerry forty pounds of clubs in my back back so being a little stiff after walking eighteen holes is normal right. I worked in. It industry this is back in the early nineties in the DOT com boom so so being stressed at work is very common minor twitches here and there can explain away these things that I'm feeling I was losing my balance and you know I just always thought maybe I was this is not paying attention being a Klutz so everyday life can be used to explain away the things I was feeling. How did you decide that this. Could no longer be explained blamed away. Actually I didn't someone else did I bought life insurance and of course what comes with a life insurance insurance physical right the insurance physical. Oh the the nurse that came in did the physical actually noticed some things about me. Then all started with the dilation of my pupils being really slow and then she explained to me that hey you know I do insurance turns physicals on aside and I actually work in a neurologist office should never said the word Parkinson's. She never said anything else except that I should have a discussion Russian with my doctor about the things that we're about to talk about which is all related around the way that I was moving and the things that she was noticing. I wasn't swinging my arms. When I walked across the room and back my peoples are still leading really slow and I would have stiffness and minor twitches here and there one UH referral after another a easy four to six months later in Hell diagnosis process. I was finally told that I have Parkinson's. What what did they discover in your body. That confirmed that it's Parkinson's GonNa know. There's no blood test for it. There is absolutely no blood test for Parkinson's. There is no single thing that you can do. Ooh The tell you that you have or don't have Parkinson's. The most reliable thing back then was what they called a Dat. Scan and brings can that essentially looks for changes changes in the area of the brain where dopamine being produced and even that is unreliable. They say that would be an indicator and then after we look at the scans then they said all right. It looks like you might have something so here's some drugs to take and these are Parkinson's medications which is Lever Doper Carbon Yoga if my body reacts positively to these drugs then that's how I was diagnosed and that's exactly what happened. Yeah so you find out four to six months later you you have this disease and you don't do anything about no absolutely. I can get my head around it. I always thought that Parkinson's was for older people. I never knew view that someone who's twenties can possibly have it. I was convinced myself that my doctors are wrong after three opinions yes all three neurologists were wrong. I convince this myself. I convinced myself that I would just push through it and it would go away. Just like everything else is thought you could shake it. I thought I can just shaken walk-off. Lock it off exactly wrote some dirt on it and we're good to go for the next eight years. I didn't go back regularly the only back when I needed refills by took the same dose of medication. No changes didn't even open a pamphlet that they gave me. When I was diagnosed. I went into full denial L. Mode. How is your wife responding in this period where you both know you. Have this but you're doing the bare minimum to manage it. She didn't even know it. I I didn't tell her for a couple more months after I was diagnosed only when I decided that I would have to take medication regularly that tell her how did that go. I think it was shock and it was more disbelief on her part like what you kidding that can't be right and I think she took the same approach that I took because she's getting her. Choose from me and if I'm not displaying any signs that need help then. She didn't think she needed to help at the time right eight years later under my disease has progressed to the point where I was walking with a cane because I kept falling over. I became very inactive. I weighed actually two hundred and forty pounds. It's two hundred and fifty pounds at one point like a fifty percent. Increase in my weight has gotten so hard to move to this point that I just stopped moving. I would have put on weight without the cane. I could fall so that's how I live my daily life one day coming down the stairs at home carrying my infant son. He was ten months old. Wow by went started preceded downstairs in I of course I fell tumble down the stairs with my son. So you're desperately trying to save his life life. Yes protect him. Even though the act of carrying him down the steps was putting him in danger. Absolutely I had quite a few thoughts immediately. After the fall yeah number one was is he okay number two. I looked over my wife and my daughter both witnesses and the looks on their faces was probably the most disheartening thing that I can see see at that time. My son was OK. Thankfully yes but at the same time. I now realize that I've become a safety issue for kids in my mind. I've become a burden to my family because now not only does my wife have to worry about the kids. She has to worry about me yet so would you do. I thought about throwing in the towel to be honest. I'M NOT GONNA lie it was it's the dark time in our lives frustration anger depression all that stuff simply because I couldn't move. I couldn't play with my kids. I couldn't live <hes> quote unquote normal active lifestyle but then after I thought about a little bit I started doing research and for the first time I started to look an open pamphlet. I have never opened well. I finally opened it yeah and then my wife wife and I started talking about the things that we need to learn about Parkinson's. We studied it together and we learned yeah. I noticed that there's no cure out there obviously but also notice that there's a lot of clinical trials available. They were all starving for participants. Nobody's signing up for these things so that's what I told my wife I told her hey you know we both know. I'm not smart enough to find a cure right. She should not have had immediately. We obviously can't Fund A. Cure 'cause. It takes a lot of money so that's what I was going to do. I was going to give up my body for Science Alzheimer's sign up for as many of these clinical trials as I possibly can take part in them somewhere as simple as answering questions some involve experiment therapies so I did them. All whoever wakes up me I did so you go from hyper passes into hyper active yes yeah and hyperactive in my education and one thing that I had noticed doing these clinical trials that everywhere I look exercises mentioned all the time and this was mind blowing to me because I have a movement disorder yeah right and they want me to move that was crazy yeah right but then it turns out that we now not today that high intensity exercise is the only treatment proven to slow progression of Parkinson's. Tell me what that feels like in your body. I always say that it's that moment. Of How do you describe it that moment right the just moments even yeah. I had to build my way up. Brian I started walking and then I started jogging started running but I was doing that long enough to develop what they call the runner's high and that's essentially release of endorphins in your brains that makes you feel oh happier than you really harm right because let's be honest. Running sucks for keeping unreal yes. I'm you know I'm not saying runnings for everybody but you know I was doing it because it was making we feel better yeah and it had to do with the runner's high but more I exercised the better I felt. It just made me WanNa do more. It really did become my drug in more ways than one. It was a therapy drug and it's also almost like narcotics because I wanted to do more and I couldn't get enough of it so I just kept pushing. I've read your stats feel like I'm looking at a sports program. At all players. Cardi's got one ultra marathon fifteen marathons one hundred half marathons on American Ninja Warrior two seasons three seasons see that's well. I always joke that on a playground nobody ever ever pick me but I think that's the mindset that have today. That allows me to do a lot of these things I mean. When I started running. I never run anything more than a mile but my first five K. came in two thousand twelve and ever since two thousand twelve. Iran all those racist you mentioned and then some 'cause there's also triathlons in there. There's also century <unk> bike rides in there. In fact I was the first person on record with Parkinson's to complete a hundred mile bike ride and under five hours and that's holding twenty miles per hour for five hi powers and that was able to do these things because I kept pushing myself. I kept putting one foot in front of the other and my motto was what can I do today. That's better than yesterday because I'm going to have good days and I'm going to have bad days and on those bad days. I'll be honest. I don't even want to get out of bed. I just WanNa lay down and I just want to sleep or I just wanted to rest but even those days I have to make myself get up. I know in those days. I'm not going to get more than yesterday but at least I'm up and moving moving and then when I come back the next day if I feel better than I go after it. Can you talk a bit about what's taken to emotionally. Retrain yourself mentally retain in yourself. One of the things that I I learned is that this is not a hobby so the mental preparedness that I have to tell myself I self to get after it every day to do my regimen whatever it is exercise stretching keeping track of my medications so I can keep a log from my doctor so we can both work better together to develop the right dosage and the right treatment plan for me because only person that has this data's me and my doctors. There's a smart enough to help me but I have to provide that data so you have to be disciplined to exercise to take your meds to keep track of what everything is and then provide that data so that you can to help yourself so this is a lifestyle change does that.

Parkinson Kerry dopamine movement disorder Lever Doper Carbon Yoga Iran Cardi Brian I forty pounds eight years six months twenty seven years fifty percent fifty pounds five hours ten months one foot one day
"parkinson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"And then there's the real world how it actually is. And sometimes we get caught up like thinking. So for instance, he's eighty four she's struggling sounds like our health is declining because she's struggling in those ways, you're probably gonna have to align your expectations with the reality. That's what you're gonna get. She's probably going to continue to move. Slow probably even slower as you continue to work with her. I take her doctor's appointment, and she has Parkinson's and that's getting worse and she's trying. That is. Going downhill. So is it is there part of you that thinks like she shouldn't be going downhill right now, she should be. She should be doing better than she's doing right now. No. I know she doing the best. She can. And it's aggravating me because she said, why did you like, for example, everything goes into free frigerator, and it has the day and the date on it. Breathing. She said she put the day on it. Right. Right. So how 'bout so let me ask you this. It sounds like she's trying your patience. This is really an an a personal client. You're working with its trying your patience in the past. When you've had people who've tried your patience. What have you done to kind of regroup and come back and say, okay, this person, obviously needs a lot of compassion needs. A lot of patients. I got a slow it down. What have you done to reset yourself in the past? When you've come into, you know, run into clients like that. I'm a certified laughter leader. I take people to laugh so I can make them app, and I can take laughter. That is my God, you believe it. Oh. Because I can't talk. Sation right, right. So do you think part of your frustration stems is it possible that part of your frustration stems from not being able to fix the situation because in other situations, maybe you kind of make somebody laugh you could make the situation better. But here it gets really frustrating because you're trying everything, you know, to try, and it's not working because of whatever is going on with her cognitively or mentally or, you know. So so maybe that part. That's where the frustration is probably coming from. And that can certainly lead us to being more impatient. For sure. Yeah. Definitely. I can't hold it. I can't make it. Right. I can't make it better. I can't even deal with it. Because no matter what I say. Going to argue. And I mean, I don't even argue is her right? Right. No. But that's it. Like, I think that you hit the nail on the head like it when you can't fix it. When you cannot when you can't fix it. Then it's really hard because we say I want to make I want to make this person better. I'm seeing her suffer, and I can't make it better. And and I think yeah. And I think it gets to us when we see people suffering. We can't fix it. But I want you to know that you being there with her, and you giving her patience is the absolute best that you can give are you giving her compassion, you giving her patients like that is the that's the unconditional love and peace that you can be that so transformative it.

Parkinson
"parkinson" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Science Friday

"Circumstances contains an abundance of this clump protein with socio with Parkinson's disease. So what distinguishes a parking since patients from a healthy. Individuals is not the presence or absence of this clump protein as we once thought, but perhaps a difference in the ability to manage this pathology. So if if if in some people were to accumulate in excess and travel up nerves that connect the GI track to the brain this could cause Parkinson's disease. If there is a a definite connection or or a strong connection. Why is the percentage is not different much higher percentages? A twenty percent or forty percent something like seventy eighty percent. So Parkinson's is is really an umbrella term for a, you know, a disorder that involves multiple triggers sites. So for some people I may start in the GI track. And so there's evidence that the pathologist Osceola Parkinson's disease seen in patients even years before the onset of motor symptoms. We also know that the this pathologies this clump protein called ALPHA's, I knew Clinton is protein that doesn't like to stay put it's able to travel between neurons neurons nerve cells to nerve cells. And there's a new of a fiber that connects our nerves the connect the GI track to the brain called the vagus nerve, not the longest nerve in the body, but certainly very long one. And we know that this protein can travel up this nerve and enter the brain and seed and spread from there for other individuals, the disease might start in the praying or elsewhere in the body, so Parkinson's disease, you know, encompasses multiple trigger sites. What's the pricing is that some of those triggers sites might be at side of the brain surprising. Isn't it? Uh-huh. I says. This amazing. I'm trying to digest supposed to speak digests. We talk a lot about the micro Biomed science Friday are so we're sort of connecting it in with the microbiome here. Are we not? Right. So the microbiome Parkinson's patients is known to be different and those changes are still being described. But these differences seem to be you know, differences in the microbiome can affect brain health. So it can affect the singling of of nerves. It's also known to change mood like anxiety and oppressive symptoms. So there's other symptoms in parking's disease such as the non anonymous symptoms which involved things like depression. So you could have the microbiome regulating the nurtured I've aspects, but also the cognitive or the the enzyme symptoms as well on the depressive symptoms. So the microbiome is a is a complex thing. It's you know, it's made up of different bacteria, and if the bacteria ecology where to shift to say a pro inflammatory microbiome, and if that pro inflammatory microbiome or to be house and say the appendix which helps regulate the gut bacteria in the rest of the. Track that could be have disastrous consequences. The other thing that I want to mention is that the appendix is really important in the immune system. And so inflammation has also been tightened to Parkinson's disease inflammation, specifically in the GI track and in the brain, and they know that if there's a lowered risk that's associated with Parkinson's disease in people that take a compound that reduces GI, track inflammation. We also know that different illnesses like Crohn's disease have a greater risk. This is a disease that involves GI track inflammation, these individuals have greater risk for developing Parkinson's disease. So there seems to be connections related to the immune system, the microbiome and this clump protein called office. I knew Clinton and its ability to seed and spread. So what would you like to know? Now that, you know, this where do you where do you go from here? Well, we were really surprised to find the pathology associated with Parkinson's disease is clump protein off signing Clin in the appendixes of of of healthy individuals, and we looked at young individuals under the age of twenty older individuals inflamed or non flame, it was an everybody. And so that made us realize that Parkinson's disease wasn't defined by this pathology. It's very normal to be present in the appendixes of of people..

Osceola Parkinson Parkinson's disease Crohn's disease Clinton micro Biomed depressive seventy eighty percent twenty percent forty percent
"parkinson" Discussed on podnews

podnews

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on podnews

"In the latest pod news. I happen to be forty six year old. Happily married proud dad of a nine year old with a great career and Parkinson's. I shake yet. I can't shake this. So what do you do with life? Gives you Parkinson's. You tell your story while you still can ten million people have been diagnosed with it, but few people know much about it when life gives you Parkinson's launches tomorrow co hosted by Larry Gifford a thirty year broadcast veteran who was diagnosed in August twenty seventeen. It's with curious, cost, Parkinson, Canada, and Omni studio. Paul squad is a new app designed to help small independent podcasters build that audience, his more efficiently on social media that hoping together feedback from as many podcasters as possible. And you can sign up to be part of the beater on their website. Podcast addict is now adding support. This podcast links, the author announces that the start the app is looking for patriot tippy and anchor link. WCHS rather than the rally quos payments standard, but who knows what the future might be at the end of the AB podcast up front last week was a chat with Bob Pittman who is CEO and chairman of media, and y'all Mon who CEO of National Public Radio willing to it in print form his a question from the moderator, how do you ensure the podcasts don't cannibalize terrestrial live radio? You'll guests are an opportunity feel podcast growth, say, radio public, a two part series, and in a survey, adobe analytics claims that forty eight percent of US consumers. We'll have a smart speaker by the end of the year. Apparently thirty two percent of US consumers have one. Now, the Lincoln tech crunch article to the full research is no longer working. If you'd like to dig a little deeper into those surprising numbers. Oh, and the US military have develops a microphone and earpiece that clamps to your teeth. You will find more details on this at pulled news dot net.

Parkinson US CEO Larry Gifford Bob Pittman Omni Canada Paul adobe chairman forty eight percent thirty two percent forty six year thirty year nine year
"parkinson" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Big 98

"As you mentioned earlier you know not as not as well known as some other diseases that get a lot of funding to take anything away from those diseases but we'd like to have increased funding for parkinson's for all the reasons that we've been talking about that's my next question whenever we have these types of conversations i always especially especially this year where you have a new central administration where there have been a lot of cutbacks in in budgets as far as as far as federally funding research efforts where what's your sense of how much attention that you are getting from washington is it more is it less obviously you always want more but as far as where you've been in years past and this administration want to make this a priority say that the nih it's been a great partner of ours and actually funding for neurological diseases like parkinson's and alzheimer's in particular has been increasing to that that's the good news the but as you mentioned earlier the number of people who are affected by these neurological diseases is is large and what's happened in the last year is sadly a number of large pharmaceutical companies have gotten out of the neurological degenerative neurological faith so the federal government i think recognizes the importance of this and has increased funding but some of our industry partners have stepped away from this disease because i think in their estimation neurological diseases diseases of the brain are very difficult to solve and that's why i think the the role of the parkinson's foundation is so important because you know when these these pharmaceutical companies step away that's that's the time for.

parkinson washington nih partner alzheimer
"parkinson" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The World Transformed

"But looking at your piece is death our only option i was struck by the first two items on the list both improved health and delayed death i mean those are those are the biggies that we think about when we think about making making people live longer if we're gonna make people live longer it's to really put a dent in it we're going to have to do something about these diseases associated with aging these diseases associated with kind of this breakdown of the body and that and that's going to be cancer and diabetes and heart disease and and the neurodegenerative stuff alzheimer's and parkinson's and those kinds of things and if if you take a bite out of those if you make serious progress on those it seems that even if you don't look at how long life lasts you've just made a huge improvement in quality of life for everyone on the planet right if those things don't have the impact that the currency do exactly exactly if if i want to live longer we have to hear you have to be able to fully repair our body from accidents i mean every year we have four point four million car accidents injuries from our accidents year in the united states and so we have we have a society that's been brutalized by the transportation system that we've we've just grown to accept the constantly crashing here and there and and somehow we rather than just getting close to fifteen a broken bone in me and the helpful we we need to actually get what's fully repaired that i think is is what everybody wants.

alzheimer parkinson united states
"parkinson" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on WGTK

"Parkinson's disease so there's a lot of things vive vive don't completely understand about ultimately the um the path of his apology but uh avi do have some clues and we're very excited about dr and coming to town and he's going to be talking about breakthrough therapies for parkinson's disease so we'll be hearing more about them out owner here smokers other grocery other are benefit should of smoke and but there's so many other things that smoking adelaide land bad debts certainly don't mean to make a case was mugging here now what what's can someone is they get older signs to look for in the imo like the very beginning stages of parkinson's disease sore so a lot of people didn't notice there are like one of a hand split start shaking a little bit maybe just a thumbed better the bad so that's often a common early sign and then just generally the the shuffling gait can often be a give obeys saw your spouse my tell you kind of stay up stray then pick up your favorite shuffle as much so so that's kind of common things often people also complain of shoulder paid interestingly and that's usually the future of fact leadville arm of one arm dozen swing as much of a joint dozen get us lubricated so hun michelin on slowing lahser um hunched posture shuffling gait shoulder pain tremor cut very common early signs while another evening you can do i guess there's nothing you can really do to preventitive zor so they don't have a vague really um as far as v now to really cure parkinson's or prevent ads on said however.

Parkinson adelaide parkinson's disease
"parkinson" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Four decades parkinson's disease has only been diagnosed when it's symptons start to show there is no specific test for the degenerative neurological disorder but joy milne might be the key to changing all that the retired nurse can detect parkinson's disease before symptoms even are observable using her nose this milne can smell parkinson's disease now she's working with a team of scientists to identify what it is she smelling and turn that into an early diagnostic test for parkinson's we reached joy milne in perth scotland joy what does parkinson's disease smell like it ready heavy oil lima now it don't like the moscow for plant it is definitely anonima and what was the first time you detected this odor my husband was about fifty two fifty three on i started seeing to them you know you're smelling you're not showing enough but that wasn't the case and in the end he became quite noise just me and i just said to be quiet well it's his death and your husband did he smells is kind of ard isn't it yes yes and you stop mentioning it but the smell didn't go away new eight go vista of one he was diagnosed with parkinson's 45 and he went on to and medication it did get better but each time the medication wasn't strong enough it came back again when did you finally start to think that this smell this muskie older that you detected was somehow related to his disease we went to a parkinson's meeting um we go home and i trust them dan tomb we had a cup of tea and i said to him villa's other people smelt.

parkinson neurological disorder joy milne moscow vista Four decades
"parkinson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Fact that if we want to stay healthy and we want to keep those songs regenerating then of course we have to provide them with the ingredients they need and he points out that so many of us are deficient today in those basic ingredients ingredients like i had on zinc and various others that are vital and crucial to the five royd first of all the fire loyd is unfortunately a much under studied organ of the body that for most of us according to the attendance is deficient in what it does for us and mostly it's because of the ingredients that a lacking and so he talks about replenishing those ingredients in order to provide the cells with the basics that they need in order to do the job right on nato we all using the bio transducer the by much later and the red and near infrared devices spoken about last week in our practice in order to produce results that are unprecedented in my own many years of experience of working with brain injury with the dementieva's with conditions conditions like parkinson multiple sclerosis all of the other types of acquired brain injury that can occur to the brain that can include traumatic brain injury stroke or all the others toxic exposure et cetera okay we're coming up on another break and i'm looking for your kohl's pleased to give us a call raise you'll topic let's uh why don't you challenge me too whether these instruments that i'm.

parkinson nato
"parkinson" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on WLOB

"You have parkinson's you want are you suffering from parkinson's and that's why you want to smoke or do you want to smoke because you uh you want to smoke and listened this debates going to rage on today the president's going to dress the country and i again i'm not even a you're not going to get a big fight for me i get that a lot of people like legalizing marijuana mitch i it's it's you know just a different perspective and i hope that we continue to uh to take a long hard look at people who are addicted to heroin and opioids where did it start what did they start with it seems to be a little bit foolish to take to remove that part of the equation altogether also the manhunt is continuing this guy a first degree murder charges filed against ian mccarthy of clinton missouri officer gary michael was shot and killed after pulling over a driver according to a news release from the missouri state highway patrol officer michael pulled the guy over for a traffic stop the guy jump shot of the car and starts firing away at the trooper there'd been a lot of shootings in police involved shootings in las vegas i watched a video last night of a guy sitting in a truck broad daylight and he was in his truck and he was arguing with the officers an argument in arguing they wanted to step out of the car step out of the car turns out that the truck was stolen the license plate was stolen this guy had a semi automatic weapon and starch blasting away at the officers and thankfully they got him before he got them one of them was shot in the chest one of the officers but he's going to survive hit his bulletproof vest on it's another issue of our time where we i mean we're seen a dramatic increase in shooting deaths of police officers on very very proud to continue to work hard on behalf of these officers families through our foundation gallagher's army the fallen officer fund we try.

parkinson president gary michael missouri gallagher marijuana heroin first degree murder ian mccarthy clinton officer las vegas
"parkinson" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"There i think there were seven known seven to twenty known psychoactive substances that were illegal in the year two thousand is something like four hundred now because labs all over the world keep tweaking the molecules right because molecule is illegal so chemists just shifted a little bit and they have a new hallucinogen and which might be finding might not be because now in their new can produce a chemical that's unbelievably dangerous sentinel sort of like that there is a drug awhile back that i kid named i can't remember the name was an acronym it was a fun drug if you took it once it gave you permanent irreversible total parkinson's disease so people would take it and they were frozen and that was it so mp tp i think it was called so it because it destroyed the same area of the brain that the parkinson's destroys accepted did it right away so all you know designer drugs right a little caution is in order how we might approach the issue of hallucinogen use in a mature manner well that's a topic for an entirely other discussion i'm not even necessarily sure that it can be approached that way although i would say at minimum determining what it is that you're up to if you're going to experiment would be a good thing like what is it exactly that you're serving they're not party drugs and not for fun right whatever they are that's not what they're for and so maybe they could be used by people who were carefully orienting themselves towards the good although i wouldn't say that that should be read as a recommendation.

parkinson
"parkinson" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

14:24 min | 3 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

"Immediate precursor that is a substance that is natural but one step removed which is Leva Dolpa. The brain receives it because it's transported into the brain and brain manufactures document out of that that was a huge discovery and it was FDA approved and sixty nine. That isn't quite the end of that story. A lot of people were nauseated. Took milligrams of Leyva doper to do any good so scientists. This is really a clever Recognition that scientists. May they recognize that Lebed Dolpa before it got into? The brain was being converted to dopamine and there are too bad consequences of that number one. There's a blood brain barrier and dopamine cannot get into the brain couldn't be transported. So it did take a zillion milligram stick it in there. But it's not entirely couldn't get into the brain that is the dopamine it crossed into the nausea and vomiting center. Where there is no blood brain barrier so everybody was nauseated and a lot of people were vomiting so scientists designed another product called in this country Carbon Dolpa in Europe and serious side. Does one thing can cross into the brain and it blocks the conversion of leave a dopey to dopamine by blocking one enzyme so the standard of treatment for the past forty. Some years has been carbon. Dolpa Leva Dolpa the original brand name attached to that by the company Merck Cinema. And so those of you that were in Catholic grade school recognize sinner without emphasis without vomiting. Oh Yeah Yeah and so. That's been the standard treatment. Now what what was recognized early on was that A lot of patients became like brittle diabetics there are a lot of ups and downs and fluctuations and and you know it really took a I think savvy clinicians awhile to figure out that these can be managed and it does take a lot of investment in that and this in this current era savvy clinicians. I think do the best managing Parkinson's disease with carbajal believe adoped alone. And we should mention that to our audience that you if you want the Bible on and you're a patient on the treatment of Parkinson's Disease Alcohol L. Scabs Book Second Edition. It's called the new Parkinson's disease treatment book highly successful. Iso and thank you by the way for sending me a copy. Well I don't know to be honest with you but it's it's downstairs in the mail store and flying show. Yeah Yeah. I haven't seen that as I walked by but yeah but actually everything that I. I know a lot. Parkinson's disease they tried to put in there and I tried to make it readable so I hopefully. It's a useful book from people. That was the intent terrific book so when someone comes in. And we'll talk about how you make the diagnosis. How do you explain the disease to the patient and their family? Well I started off by talking about dopamine. 'cause that's a fundamental substrate for whereas the visible evidence of Parkinson's disease there are things that we know now occur in sort of a subtle way not all people but years before acting out your dreams. That's called behavior disorder. People who are constipated in middle life have a greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease relief people who have been anxious Are at a greater risk of later. Developing Parkinson's disease. Sometimes loss of sense of smell is in early marker. Now that doesn't mean that everybody who has been constipated or anxious gets Parkinson's disease but it's now recognized that there is a significant increase in that risk. If you have those problems so those probably are early forerunners. Parkinson's disease but they fly under everybody's radar screen. What really then becomes. Recognizable would be slowness of movement Shuffling Gait Stu posture loss of animation. Loss OF ARM SWING. And then some nine motor symptoms to. They actually still don't get recognized anxiety common problem of Parkinson's disease even though it's not visible insomnia is another one I mentioned Acting out your dreams well Getting to sleep is a problem. If you have Parkinson's disease as well too. And so those are things that are so-called non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease but what really brings it into evidence would be shuffling gates and things like that. Tremor is that tremor frequent weld occurs an eighty percent of people but in twenty percent. You never see. Tremor is it that tremor or shuffling that help you diagnose the patient then or how you ultimately diagnose them or you take all these symptoms and signs and you can put them together in any package so some people will shuffle. Some people don't some people shuffled with one leg. You know they have a stiff leg Some people have facial masking loss of facial animation. Some don't their occasional people I'll see were anxiety is in spades panic attacks and And yet the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease fairly minimal. And if you look at what goes on in the brain with his dopamine loss. It isn't uniform. You'd think something like this. It should be everywhere the same but it's very patchy loss on one person is a little more here little there in the next person. It's an entirely different sort of a random pattern of that dopamine system. This is a clinical diagnosis. You don't have any help from a blood test or a brain scan correct are. It is a clinical diagnosis. So it's what people tell you and then what you see in the class. There are occasional people. I see who are on treatment and doing well and then I go by what they report pre-treatment because a lot of times what. I mentioned the Carbonaro believable but it gets people almost to normal. I saw somebody yesterday. Who was normal. Wow so it's it's probably Appropriate to say that you have made huge progress in the treatment of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease over the past thirty years. Well have and I think it really gets down to the discovery of Lebron Dolpa then the discovery of Karbi Dolpa in this country and been serious side in Europe so then that makes it tolerable and then I think what's changed has also been the recognition of how to treat it. There's sort of a side story here. Doctors were always looking for something better and better so they started digressing looking for other drugs. And and I've been. I'm one hundred percent in the clinic all day every day and I've tried all these other drugs and they really come up short and I realized some years ago. You've gotta get the carbondale believable but dosing scheme right and it's a little bit of a dynamic to a changes over time you know people are stable for a number of years and then they become tied to each dose that they take so we'll take Joseph Carbajal Pahlavi dope. Ah The new good for a few hours in it whereas off so you have to match not only not only have to get the right dose but you have to get the right dosing interval. And there's a lot of flexibility there so I tell people do not worry about. The number of doses are tablets per day. Find the dose that works the best and then you adjust the dose to match the response duration. And you all of your experience. I'm sure helps. Also not right myth or matter of fact. I'm really interested in this matter of factor all Scott people who have a high Iq are at an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. Is that a myth or a matter of fact. I don't know about any data I Q and most of us. Don't get our accuse measured so it'd be hard to know but it is high though measured or not but me and says they're the one who said where did you hear this all right when. I did hear a one time that the that the population that had the highest risk for Parkinson's disease was physicians. And of course I immediately assumed that it was people at high in there too. But that's what brought the whole issue up and church so I wanted to ask you. Well let me. Doctors are increased risk. Let me say this myth or matter of fact. Doctors are an increased risk for Parkinson's. Well that is true based upon olmsted county patients who are followed here at the. Mayo Clinic and Olmsted Medical Center and so it's sort of a captive audience. You know once you moved to Rochester Minnesota. You never want to leave. I wonder live in Florida when I grow up and I've been here thirty eight years. That's that's a different side story. Why in fact it is true that in Olmsted County when when the group here in epidemiology looked at professions that were associated with Parkinson's disease physicians rose to the top there. That's the group that was the most likely to be diagnosed with Parkinson's disease so intuitively. You might say that. Well maybe it's just because they recognized it and made the diagnosis themselves. But there was another study done on something called Incidental Lewy body disease so it turns out that about fifteen people out of one hundred who are over the age. Sixty and die without Parkinson's tremor dementia or any neurologic problems on post mortem brain examination will have the microscopic marker. Parkinson's disease which is Louie bodies and it turns out that Mongo's incidentally body cases. There were about thirty six I think. Thirty some that in our cohort here and it turned out that guess. What profession rose to the top physicians again? So that wasn't a diagnostic. Kind of confounding factor. These were people that they knew there were physicians. But they didn't know they had lewy bodies so your suspicion isn't so much that this is a bunch of smart people like to believe but that may be Something of the lifestyle of physicians are what contributing contributes to that. That's the sixty four dollar question the exposure as we were talking earlier about. Maybe it's that some physicians never slept during the previous year. Or you know now there. There are rules rules relations. Yeah there are limitations but I- described how when I was a medical intern. You know working one hundred ten hour weeks. Two months in a row is actually expected. Yeah it was expected. And they're that's that's one of the ways that you clear bad breakdown products protein products that are like Alpha Beta amyloid in Alzheimer's Disease Elvis Nuclear and Parkinson's disease. There's good scientific evidence that when you're asleep the areas around the brain cells dilate and you kind of tend to flesh out those bad things that don't belong there so if you're serious about this perfectly serious about that yes. It was published in Science magazine. Which is I mean. One of the most reputable scientific publications in the world. I mean this. This is the how you how you get rid of some of these bad products in your brain. Well that the interviews that we've done in the past that talk about you know the genetics piece in the telomeres on the ends of those gene codes. That sleep is one of the things that helps to protect and restore that so it would make sense that if you're going periods of time with very inadequate sleep that it would end up doing some sort of cellular damage and apart from the telomeres. You know that the thought about what causes all of these Midlife neurodegenerative disorders from Alzheimer's disease to Al s to various forms of dementia and Parkinson's disease. There's a protein at least one in Alzheimer's. There's two that seems to be the bad actor. And these are natural proteins there in all brain cells so Beta amyloid and Tau and Alzheimer's Disease Elvis and nuclear in Parkinson's disease. These belonged there. They have a purpose in the brain cells but it seems that they dissociate from where they should be the aggregate and then they sort of gum up the works so to speak so you want to get rid of those You know there's A. There's a natural turnover of products everywhere in the body. You make them and you dispose of them and in in terms of Elvis nucleus for Parkinson's disease. You probably want to get rid of all that bad elvis nuclear and it's now starting maybe to gum up the works so during sleep. Maybe that's one of the factors these things these diseases Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. They're very complicated. However probably there are many factors weigh into this but I think that's one plausible component of that one interesting thing about a Parkinson's I know that age is is the biggest risk factor. The older you are the more likely you are to get it but there are. There are young people who have Parkinson's disease right. What's the youngest person you've ever seen Twenty s the if you if you get Parkinson's disease before age forty than you have an increased risk of having a detectable gene if it's before age twenty and then it's very likely three knowing genes called Parkin Parkin Gene Pink One. Dj One. So that's that's the only population of patients where I would. I would measure a gene product to see if there's a genetic underpinning for folks that get it in a normal age the likelihood that you're going to detect something isn't very great. What is that age a normal age? What's the usual age? Well peaks and sixties and seventies and kind of depends on on how you look at it and maybe it continues to go up and olmsted county. It looks like it continues to increase. But it's it's rare certainly rare before age forty in olmsted county less than one percent of our incident. Population developed it before age forty less than one percent and then as you continue increase the age and it becomes more and more likely all right. It's Parkinson's disease awareness month. Why is that a good thing for you and for the population in general? Well I think funding for research would certainly be one important aspect of this you know it's these neurodegenerative conditions. They're they're affecting more and more of the population because we're we're getting older and stuff happens when you get older and for just like Alzheimer's disease which has gotten a lot of press we don't have any ways of curing this. Fortunately in Parkinson's disease we have pretty good but not perfect symptomatic treatment. But that's not fabulous forever so we need to figure out how to get it to cause of this and that takes a lot of research and some time and and money to fund it. Thanks so much for sharing your expertise with Parkinson's expert Dr J. Eric..

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