18 Burst results for "Paris Conservatory"

"paris conservatory" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm naomi lewin. Eighteen eleven was called the year of the great comet because a comet lit up the sky for over nine months and eighteen eleven was when franz liszt was born this came from writing which is in austria now but back then it was part of the austro-hungarian empire lists father worked for the same hungarian prince haydn had worked for years earlier. He wasn't a professional musician but he played several instruments including the piano list was six. His father started giving him lessons and list played his first concert in public when he was nine. Local members of the nobility were so impressed that they paid for him to go steady in vienna. Which was the center of music there. He took lessons from carl czerny. Who had studied piano with beethoven when czerny saw how talented list was he started. Teaching him for free list also started studying composition and he had his first piece published when he was eleven after a while czerny told list he had nothing more to teach him so list and his family moved to paris when he tried to get into the paris conservatory. They wouldn't take him not because he wasn't good but because he wasn't french list continued to study privately and to give concerts around europe since he was also very religious. He thought about becoming a priest instead of a musician but his father said you belong to art. Not the church. In paris list met three musicians who changed his life pianist. Frederic chopin was just a year older than list. Who thought chopin was great. Composer actor barely owes wrote program music. Which tells a story without using words that fascinated list and then there was niccolo. Paganini a violinist. Who was the first musical superstar when list saw how audiences reacted to pack amini. He decided he would be the pack anini of the piano. People went crazy for list. Not only did he play well. He also looked interesting tall and elegant with long hair way before there was bieber fever. The german poet heinrich china coined the term list oh mania. His fans wore jewelry with his portrait and may jewelry out of his broken piano strings and one woman even picked up a cigar but he threw away set in diamonds and wore. That list spent eight years giving concerts all over europe. He made a lot of money and gave a lot away to charity then when he was thirty. Five a polish princess convinced him to stop touring as a pianist and spent time composing so he settled down in weimar germany to conduct a court orchestra. Not only did he. Invent new ways of conducting. He also came up with a new musical form. The symphonic poem another thing lists specialized in was taking other people's compositions like songs and operas and turning them into pieces for solo piano speaking of opera lists daughter cozy my wound up marrying opera composer. Richard wagner after lists other. Two children died. He moved to rome and finally studied to be a priest. He spent the last two decades of his life teaching masterclasses which he invented in a masterclass students. All sit together taking.

czerny naomi lewin prince haydn carl czerny paris conservatory franz liszt amini paris austria Frederic chopin heinrich china vienna niccolo Paganini chopin europe weimar germany Richard wagner rome
Who Was Franz Liszt?

Classics for Kids

01:53 min | 3 months ago

Who Was Franz Liszt?

"Eighteen eleven was called the year of the great comet because a comet lit up the sky for over nine months and eighteen eleven was when franz liszt was born this came from writing which is in austria now but back then it was part of the austro-hungarian empire lists father worked for the same hungarian prince haydn had worked for years earlier. He wasn't a professional musician but he played several instruments including the piano list was six. His father started giving him lessons and list played his first concert in public when he was nine. Local members of the nobility were so impressed that they paid for him to go steady in vienna. Which was the center of music there. He took lessons from carl czerny. Who had studied piano with beethoven when czerny saw how talented list was he started. Teaching him for free list also started studying composition and he had his first piece published when he was eleven after a while czerny told list he had nothing more to teach him so list and his family moved to paris when he tried to get into the paris conservatory. They wouldn't take him not because he wasn't good but because he wasn't french list continued to study privately and to give concerts around europe since he was also very religious. He thought about becoming a priest instead of a musician but his father said you belong to art. Not the church.

Prince Haydn Czerny Franz Liszt Carl Czerny Austria Vienna Paris Conservatory Paris Europe
"paris conservatory" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

CRUSADE Channel Previews

05:51 min | 5 months ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on CRUSADE Channel Previews

"To excerpts from the magnificent saint matthew passion by johann sebastian bach. Now to lighten things up just a bit. A collaboration between bach and the french composer charles kuno who lived one hundred years later. Buck wrote two volumes of so-called and few for keyboard each in a different key and pairing a rather free solo keyboard piece called prelude with a stricter kind of piece called a few which i will come back to in a moment the first prelude from the first volume. Nc major consisted of a series of our geos that is broken chords outlining an attractive chord progression. But no real tune here. Let's just listen to a little bit of that If you thought you heard a little noise in the background there you did. That's the eccentric piano player singing along. And if you want to know more about that. Check the show website about the performers on today's show but in eighteen fifty three later on a young french composer charlotte guno g. o. u. n. o. D. was listening to this prelude being played by his fiancee and he began improvising. Attune over it on his violin. Well it so happened that his fiancee's father was a professor at the paris conservatory and was listening in the next room. He ran into the room and made guno play his melody again as he took dictation and wrote it down in music notation and the rest as they say was history so over time various attempts were made to apply lyrics words to this melody so that it could be song and eventually it was the ave maria prayer in latin that one the one that stuck and in just a minute. We'll hear it. If you've just joined me i'm your host michael curic and i hope you're enjoying catholic ventures in great today featuring the music and story of composer johann sebastian bach here on the crusade always on air and always online at crusade channel dot com this and all episodes of catholic adventures in great music are available on our web sites at crusade general dot com and the show website and a facebook page at www dot michael curic dot com slash adventures. That's michael curic k. u. r. e. k. dot com slash adventures and. Come to the show website and learn about the performing artists on the shows. Because we don't take the time to announce them on hair again. Michael curic dot com slash adventures. So now let's listen to this wonderful version that has emerged as the definitive version the vocal ave maria with by charlotte guno nineteenth century. French composer married to the accompaniment. If you will the piano part from one hundred years earlier from yawn sebastian box well tempered clavier prelude number one in c.

charles kuno johann sebastian bach bach michael curic Buck charlotte guno first volume two volumes nineteenth century first prelude one hundred years later Michael curic french today French charlotte latin eighteen fifty three each one hundred years earlier
"paris conservatory" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:38 min | 1 year ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome Wilson and I'm Holly. I have a confession to make holding then with me quite a while. I have always been jealous of Sarah and Dobalina having already covered the rite of spring. Riots on our podcast. A whole story is just so weird they already covered it back in twenty eleven. So I've had my eye out for some other kind of weird musical story to cover as sad consolation prize. This is not a sad consolation prize. This is actually awesome. It is about a musical mass hysteria that is from the mid nineteenth century and that is listed mania. Yeah it's delightful. I mean there's no way around it. I feel kind of sorry for the guy the same time. It's pretty great so before we start as as often happens. I need a little note so today. The word mania definitely has psychological connotations right. It's used to describe this excessively elevated mood or really hyperactive mental state and I can also extend daily physical hyperactivity and other behaviors and usually. It's used this way in the context of like bipolar disorder other mental and emotional. Disorders are definitely folks. He would really prefer. The word mania not be used to describe more generally being really excited or busy but it at the time when the word list. Oh mania was coined. The word mania was really a physical description. It was not a psychological one and so list. Oh Mania was considered to be a frantic and dangerous physiological response to being around Franz Liszt and so when we use the mania in today's Day with that is the context that we are talking about all I can think of is all those shots of the women in the crowd is the Beatles landed in America since very well and to be honest. I saw the Boston symphony the Boston pops specifically do a whole night of the Beatles and it was amazing I was. I was really there and seeing John Hodgman. The what's it called the the introductions orchestra for young people. Oh yeah that yeah. It was hilarious and there was a there was through the whole thing that talked about among other things. Beatlemania this moment. Like if we did a podcast on Beatlemania I can figure out a way to make that feel legitimate so this feels a lot more legitimate and also very fun so to give you a little bit of background and set this up. Franz Liszt was born in Devarajan Hungary which is now rating Austria although it is still referred to as Dorian if you become very in on October twenty second of eighteen eleven and debris on at the time was rather small it was basically a market town and most of the people who live there were both German. Speaking and ethnically Hungarian or Mehtar List was the only child of Adam. List and Anna. Maria Logger list worked as a clerk for Prince Nicholas Esterhazy. Who was a musical patron and lists? Father was also an amateur musician. You could play several different instruments including the cello and the piano. Franz Liszt father had also spent two years in the Franciscan order so Frans grew into a religiously pretty devoted child. Liz already showed a really distinct love of music by the age of six and his father started to give him music lessons. Franz was just enormously talented and he really progressed in his musical study extremely quickly. By the time he was nine he was giving public performances as a concert pianist and after his first performance local bigwigs actually donated money to fund the next several years of his musical education. Soon his prodigious ability outstripped the resources that were available in debris on so lists father asked for an extended of absence from his employer and took Franz to Vienna there. He studied piano with Carl. Czerny who himself had studied with Ludwig von Beethoven Liszt also studied composition with Antonio Salary was much more famous for his relationship with and rivalry with Mozart. Both of these teachers were so impressed with his talent that they refused to be paid for their work with him. Franz his first public performance in Vienna was in eighteen twenty two so he would have been about eleven years old at this time and he was described as quote a little Hercules fallen from the clouds. He started writing his own compositions that same year the next year. Franz met Ludwig von Beethoven for the first time and according to one possibly Apocryphal Account Beethoven Without Charm. But he kissed him on the forehead. Eighteen twenty three was also the year that list moved to Paris. This move was another one that was made so that he could continue his studies with other musical masters and while the Paris Conservatory declined to admit him on the grounds that he was not French. Czech composer Anton Russia and Italian composer. Ferdinando Paer taught him privately. In addition to his studies he put on extensive public performances and he really started to develop quite a following however in eighteen twenty six when he was fifteen years old. Franz's father died suddenly of typhoid is. Father had really been his primary source of support during all of this musical training and performing plus the boy was only fifteen years old. He had not always had good health up until this point. And this whole series of touring studying had been really fatiguing. After his father's death Franz had to share a one bedroom apartment with his mother and grieving and exhausted. He turned to teaching piano to try to make a living. He actually fell in love with one of his students. It's going to set a trend for his later life. When her father forced him to end their relationship he became so ill that newspapers printed obituaries for him afterward. He retreated from public performance for almost four years and he spent most of this time reading and teaching music. He started to compose music again in eighteen. Thirty following the July Revolution in which King Charles? The tenth was overthrown and succeeded by Louis Philippe. In his mother's words quote the canons cured him and afterward he met several more famous names in the musical world. Including Hector Berlioz. Niccolo peg Anini and Frederic Chopin. Liszt met the married COMTESSE Marie Dogu in eighteen thirty three when he was twenty two years old in spite of her being married he fell in love with her and they were to be together for twelve years. They eventually had three children together to avoid the scorn of Parisian society over this affair with a married woman they left and spent the next four years traveling through Europe including Switzerland Italy and other nonferrous parts of France. His travels and his love for her started to inspire him to compose and he wrote a set of suites for Solo. Piano which became the highly praised on Ned. The PILLAR NAUSEA OVER. The next few years lists reputation as a musician grew just dramatically. He gave tours and performances and really made a name for himself is a virtuoso composer and pianist and as well as extremely charismatic and very expressive performer also became known for being quite generous with his music and his time. He oftens hot. People also accepted official posts for free without pay and then he would donate the proceeds from his concerts to charity. He also developed a different reputation thanks to his behavior. Offstage James Hundred. Nineteen eleven biography in chapter two which is called aspects of his art and character begins list. And the ladies. It's like this is like the headings so it's like one with and the lady the Feminine Friendships of Franz Liszt gained for him as much notoriety his music making to the average public he was a compound of cazenove Byron and Guetta into this mixture could have been added the name of stint. How Liz Love Affairs Lists Children Lists Perlis? Escaped from daggers pistols poisons where the subjects of conversation in Europe three quarters of a century ago as earlier Byron was both hero and black sheep in the current gossip of his time. Let's just add to the subjects of conversation right now that he was also extremely attractive. Like I'm having trouble picking out with extremely attractive. Picture of Franz Liszt should accompany our blogs in our show notes and episode itself because there are many and he looks like he looks like the boy at your high school. He was very sensitive and soulful and wrote terrible poetry and made all of the girls think that he was just so tragically. Attractive like that. That's what he looks like. He looks like every guy in every movie about teenage forlorn. This as well that like. He's so beautiful. No one will ever understand him. Yup I've not this kid. He is a pretty thing. These experience you.

Franz Liszt Ludwig von Beethoven Liszt Vienna Liz Wilson John Hodgman Ferdinando Paer Beatles Sarah Paris Ludwig von Beethoven Hector Berlioz Boston Paris Conservatory Louis Philippe Mehtar List King Charles Adam Maria Logger
"paris conservatory" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Ed Hey how we are back in. I gotTa say it was a fun. Conversation with Paul Heights of seven days very gifted political writer real smart guy and covering the Bernie Sanders campaign. And it's good to get his insights on what he's been hearing and seeing and feeling on the campaign trail out there. I've got an another good segment ready to roll right now. Which is Karen? Cover is the brains behind the capital city concerts. Which is a concert series? It's been going on. In Montpellier now for a we'll find out in a minute. Karin how long because I don't recall but it's been more than a decade and the these concerts bringing world-class of music to Vermont classical music and they are doing a Going to be doing a great job with that week and a half or so from now. The weekend of the seventh and eighth of March The Paris piano trio which actually has graced our our local here in the past. Couple Times is going to be making a return engagement and maybe for one of the last time these musicians are getting up there in years now and they are going to be joining together to play in my as I mentioned in going to find out all about it from Capela. Who's on the telephone with us this morning? Good Morning Karen Dave how are you doing? Well how are you doing? You must be pretty sight to be looking forward to this concert and about nine or ten days now these concerts. Can I wait? I'm so excited. This is a dream come true and I can't imagine a better way to celebrate our twentieth season. We're twenty years old twenty years old. Okay said more than a decade so I was a little. I try to underestimate people's ages. I find networks in my favorite sometime so maybe concert series as well. But Tha twenty years old. That's right and the parents trio has been a Has been a fairly I don't WanNa say frequent but they. They certainly have been here before. How many times this'll be the can absolutely say frequent. I this morning thought that you would ask me this. So I went and I look through our history books Seven Times well this. This will be the eighth time. Yeah and in you know. Twenty seasons It's not quite half of our seasons but I'm almost and they are so so beloved and and really for good reason I I tend to be enthusiastic about the musicians. We bring to capital city concert. But I am a total diehard groupie. Comes to these guys. They're just I think the best piano trio honors and and for for those who who are probably scratching their heads saying three pianos Probably worth explaining that a piano trio sort of confusingly actually is an ensemble that consists of one piano and violin and a cello piano. That's right and I remember the let's see the personnel. I remember the name raise pasta. I think he's a violinist correct. Yep and help me with the energy of the year. Don't have it in front of me. Sure the cellist is due and the pianist is Jean Claude Panetta And these these three musicians have quite a history Jean Claude is the oldest member in the group Regime is the youngest and they met when they are all students at the Paris conservatory. Even though there's kind of a spread in their age they they met because Resist with this unbelievable whiz. Kid Who Was actually enrolled at the Paris conservatory. I think when he was eleven years old while they met that yeah he he absolutely was a prodigy and you know was was discovered by by some big names At the time Isaac Stern David. I struck Nadia Boulanger. They all took an interest in him as did the guy who became his teacher. One of the great violinists of all times. You know Francis Scotty so Anyway three three of them met at the Paris Conservatory. Really as kids and they started playing well mayor quite young and they continued and they went on. They all became faculty at the Paris. Conservatory had long careers there and have all retired in recent years from teaching at the Conservatory but they continue to perform together and also independently but We are so thrilled to have them back. And and you know quite honestly. I'd be very surprised if if we can get them back again. They're getting older and it's it's just more and more difficult for European musicians to travel and perform in the US so we are very lucky we are in fact they're just coming for these two concerts that are happening. So if you WANNA hear the Perez Piano trio in the US the only place you can hear them is in Vermont in my peeler at -Tarian Church next week and that's it no shows in New York or Boston or Chicago.

Paris conservatory Karen Dave Vermont Perez Piano Bernie Sanders US Paris Jean Claude Seven Times Paul Heights Jean Claude Panetta Capela Nadia Boulanger writer Montpellier Karin Isaac Stern David Francis Scotty New York -Tarian Church
"paris conservatory" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

13:46 min | 1 year ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"See you again welcome everybody and thank you so much for giving me a corner of your weekend to do this and to you know get into that over stuffed chair or maybe you're over stuff shares a moving automobile at this point I hope you've got a fire going if you're in the house in that overstuffed chair with a drink in hand of whatever kind a snack and this is one of the joys of life where we're talking about things that you like you might not be completely familiar with what we talk about the you've got some indication of it and everything really reflects on you know what he can do for you your own enlightenment and enhancement is what they show is all about I never heard from a listener yet that they went away from speaking of art feeling diminished and you're certainly going to get that are feeling today I think with our wonderful guest our guest is the wonderful associate professor of music at the university of Michigan flint Christopher Haidar Ike Chris is here to talk about an upcoming concert that's taking place later this month at washing all community college call the art of music and this is one of those opportunities that we talk about a lot on the show we're again it's not just about you know art on the walls or sculpture architecture but it is about going to concerts going to artistic to create of events and becoming a part of that I was contacted by a Chris one of your associates writer number that's correct are right and he was telling me about the concert I do I just read a few senses and I said this has to be on the show not only is it a fabulous subject to be able to talk about artists like Picasso and and and and others through the medium of music talk about being inclusive and being relevant to people but being able to do it at one of the country's best community colleges Washtenaw community college where you know I I taught for a number of years and could be teaching the transitions course in our history during the spring term beginning again there my association with it has been fantastic I know students who go there other you know parents family members you know who have had wonderful experiences there I and I can't think of a better place than this concert to take place in that washer communicable age there in the towers we auditorium welcome to speaking of art well thank you thank you so much for the invitation to to be here today well Chris eight how did this idea get started the the art of music was it a deliberate attempt to to link the plastic arts so to speak with music bay it basically making something very Sir realizing something that people have linked together prize that there's a commonality between all the genre headed reject I started thinking about the programming of music and trying to be more specific in that programming about twenty years ago when I was a teaching high school and with each program that I brought to my students because that's really what I was doing was bringing my music first the music selections that I picked to my students and then we learn those pieces together and then we would present them publicly I started thinking about ways that we could not not only art but just other ways that we could tie pieces together whether it's through theme whether it's through composer it and it's led me to this point where I'm seeking now with the community band to to find a universal idea kind of a year long theme and then make smaller many programs of that many of that major themes so for example this year the first by the way not well it it sometimes puts you in a corner but sometimes it's a good corner you find pieces that you don't know about and I think that's what it really forces me to do because I'll pick the over arching theme sometimes it's because I want to do a particular piece one of the band members came to me about two years ago she loved this piece by Norman dollars oil that we're playing calls scenes from the loo and it was written for the composer was asked to write the music for a PBS special nineteen sixty seven I think and the special won several awards and he took that music and he pulled it out into the suite of five movements that he re wrote for wind band and she said to me I'd really like to do this piece sometime maybe we can do it and and so it started with that idea okay if we were to do an entire program and then expanded if we were to do an entire season and sometimes it's a stretch for our Halloween concert it was the the art of animated characters and and there's a real there is a true art form there the rock about it on the show yeah and it was a very interesting program we we did some Mario brothers we did some Aladdin we did some different things that all had this cartoon animated feature idea but it really did start with this P. scenes from the loo that was going to be a part of this program and then it just expands my horizon I guess you'd say in going to the sources that I know contacting colleagues just keeping an eye out okay which piece not only fits the program but which piece bits our audience in which peace bits are banned and makes the best sense for all of us that actually is is fantastic that idea of that striving for relevance among the genre and like I have a question coming up about that but I just want to point out that original music that you just described about the loop I have used that that documentary whatever about the live with that fabulous background music even though it was kind of old in the sixties for my introductory classes in art history and humanities and students loved it and I remember the fifth interesting that you've given an affirmation right here I was struck by the beauty of the music accompanying the the images and it really was a whole ensemble FAQ and he was after renaissance tunes which is why you have that sensation when you listen to that piece you won't necessarily think renaissance when you hear the way harmonizes or the way he workers straits but there is a basis on those renaissance ideas and all of the music that you hear in the selection there's a painting in that it's one of my favorites at the aloof from the town of late medieval period early renaissance by capital the PA TA and it was one of those things where it's like seeing a movie that spectacular but with with with actors you haven't really seen that it so it really makes an impact they had not seen that painting before that in the music was fantastic and I I get the idea that that is the kind of impact you're trying to give these are things that are unfamiliar and they're gonna make a big impact and I going in the right direction yeah I believe so I believe you're accurate and when you look at the history of wind band it's relatively a new genre it's only been a hundred years you look AT orchestras you got four hundred years vocal history you go back thousands of years really and so when we look at whim bands we've only had the last hundred or so the first win bear all women program was only nineteen forty two so were really a a the newbie so to speak one with jazz mostly I think has to do with just the evolution of things the instrument inspect himself right the incidence of Beethoven's birthday weren't capable of doing the things that are instruments of are capable of today the saxophone hadn't even been invented yet and so these the combination of these instruments coming together really took place are about eighteen ninety or so when you finally saw the three valve instrument on brass you finally saw the the chromatic abilities of all the woodwind instruments and the ability to add other keys on the double horn wasn't invented until nineteen hundred so all these things have come together relatively recently so I think that that's why this fascinating genre you know just before you arrived got an email from a listener who loves an interview we did part my mentioning an interview we did early last fall with the dot worth on if the winds are brass brass band right you're actually brought in the law long **** and it looks like it it at an elongated baritone horn sure just stretched out in the sound of that in here reverberated I got calls from people saying what the heck was that instrument and I just heard from before you came in can you please send me a CD or MP three of that which I'm doing in one of the points from that I remember was these instruments would not be here unless they were products of the industrial revolution and they came a little earlier mid eighteen hundreds as you now that seems to be a big impetus for instrument or instrumental development from that point on I might well is that right you do have the military association first and back in the day shoot the drummer man you were killing the signal guy the guy who was calling us blank laughter flank right was the drummer and so these brass instruments they came along didn't have the capabilities that we saw during the civil war and you're correct that that the industrial pollution particularly in Europe had a strong impact on the the way that these instruments were being manufactured the Europeans wanted to make sure the guys didn't go to the pub after they are working in the factory so they were great at creating these brass bands and that really solidified the cornet as kind of a melodic instrument the works of art one of my favorites yeah Jon Batiste Arbon writing his trumpet treatise basically about the trumpet can be like a violin came about during this time because of what was happening in all these amateurs making music and how they were making more and more of the the direction of the way these things were going so again that time frame of eighteen ninety eighteen seventy of all these things coming together really made the brass instrument equal to what the woodwinds had been doing for about fifty years but now this combination of things was seen a military bands and kind of came together in in what host saw in his first suite in nineteen oh nine absolutely and I'm just listening to host the other day beautiful range we did in the bleak midwinter is sure sure now and talk about the instruments the instrumentals in that were fantastic as was the choir you know it is it safe to say that they would not have been jazz as we know it without those developments in the second half of the nineteenth century the infrastructure so to speak was there that's absolutely correct that's absolutely correct you you saw in New Orleans this combination of music readers and non music readers and this mixture of European instruments with non European instruments in the way that the players of those European instruments said well maybe I can make my instrument do what that instrument is doing an imitation of it and of course the altercation was the voice how can I make my growl on a trombone sound the same as the growl that someone's trying to saying and and then you have that strong religious ceremony that we that we saw with groups taking the you know the typical Mardi Gras type parade going to the cemetery one yeah coming back the opposite way and then of course the the economic factors of we had sailors that we're in an area that needed entertaining and so the way this thing kinda brewed together was yes the combination of the way the instruments came together in the way you just had to you very unique area in New Orleans you know what I'd love to have us that read a study about or just have one of your presentations about would be the French influence not only through language and culture in Louisiana but maybe that being one of the first places the United States to get those developments for France here and how that sound those instruments influenced New Orleans jazz well there's no doubt the saxophone with its strong ties to France and the Paris conservatory with its strong background in instrumentalists period a most of those instrumentalists came out of the French Revolution that the bands of the French Revolution where the political voice so to speak they were the rallying cry these groups could be two three hundred players everybody re a leading the people exactly and when when the revolution finished we had all these musicians and they kind of congregated so to speak in this area Paris to form the basics of the Paris conservatory in your right that connection had direct ties to what happened in New Orleans and that's absolutely fascinated Lehzen John Meister Christopher hi to write of the university of Michigan flint the noted musician and conductor he is going to be he's responsible for along with his collaborators for conducting something you have got to attend at Washington community college as you know one of the greatest community colleges anywhere with a fabulous tells we auditorium there which is from your previous concerts has been totally filled we've we've been what's the term yours for the outside area well I was just crying room the crying okay and they put screens up there right that's correct okay so that's I guess you can sort of make it think like what you're kind of like in the boxed area at the stadium or something right it's right it's exclusive right even though you're outside that's right okay we are was a way of looking at things that are hollowing concerts have involved so to speak and so that's been one of our more popular ones and as a result in order to keep everyone happy on campus and that all important fire marshal we started this extra overflow room but it's also a great place if you have children that are tent that it like to be that arrest restless and I don't like to settle down is a great place for them to hang too because you can hear and see the concert in a separate environment and it is going to be a fabulous concert are taking place at house we are during the.

"paris conservatory" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

12:09 min | 1 year ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Part of it I think is the fact that it was orchestrated. Syllabi interesting to have them. Then listen to this piano version When they come this weekend They will hear exactly the same music but now in a different instrument and I think it's kind of cool to think that then the whole of the orchestra can be condensed into ten fingers. It is it is remarkable that You know there are so many different approaches to to an individual musical piece like that that you can develop a truly spectacular as I recall it orchestral work from from what started out as a as a piece for solo piano isn't as majority wrote it and Now Walk us through a little bit if you could Karen in just Kind of what the field is going to be like on Saturday and Sunday And and by the way refreshes the concerts are scheduled for I. I know the one on Sundays. Four PM what was the one Saturdays at seven thirty. And we're doing a Saturday night right and evening performance at seven thirty. Okay okay. Four and And so Tell me a little bit about will the James Blair. Photographs is an children's artwork. Both be in both be displayed on the On the stage during the performance of the mosquito no no oh now so so so The concert which is not especially long probably an hour and a half will actually open the piece that will stand on its own without any images And and that's Carl Reiner Kaz Sonata on Dean for for Flute and piano. It's is a piece that actually Jeffrey Kellyn I recorded a few years ago And this is actually to me very much. A A piece that tells a story it's Incredibly colorful it's kind of a Mermaid's tail based on On Dean from Greek mythology so that opens the program. And then we go to the the Charles Kershaw and Fourteen little pieces that I mentioned and those fourteen pieces are matched reached with fourteen photographs by Jim Blair and so that's where that happens and then we'll have intermission and then the entire second half will beep deep pictures at an exhibition and it'll be seeing. Dozens of of image is created by by children from local schools. Okay so no. I'm I'm glad I'm glad we got that straightened out and I just didn't. I wanted the unconfirmed about what's a win. How this unfold? So it's been a little hard to do Pity because as they head. It's kind of okay. Yeah so much going on and there were so many ideas and we really a lot. Lots of lots of moving parts Empty Anderson of you. Have you ever participated in anything like this before where you were helping to put on you know amusing slash artistic extravaganza. Yeah I've done it a bunch of times and you know actually With Karen years ago we did a A midsummer this eve concert of music for Midsummer's Eve by twentieth century composers then with With another author we we put together texts about that night for example and we would read between things and I've done a bunch of Sort of curated concerts of of that sort. The combined texts in music DOWN ON CAPE COD and in Boston and that kind of thing before. I'm really a huge huge music fan and I feel like oftentimes these creators these composers are friends with the authors of their time. And therefore there's all this motion back and forth so you we're talking about their work so it makes sense to kind of pair them into show the comparisons between them and in this case This is the first time I've worked though with Images News and music and it and as Karen said it just it makes so much sense to have these explosions of color that these kids are drawing very very fun paintings they're drawing Full of just sort of imagination and wit and you can tell how hard they're listening to the music So One Funny Story Actually A teacher from Berlin Told me is that You know there's one movement of this thing that depicts an ox cart very slow going through the Polish countryside and apparently a bunch of the kids chose that because they wanted to draw cow. She's like yeah they're from Mont Kids. They cavs so the candy. Handy ox-cart was quite popular. I thought it was going to be. You know the there's one about an old graveyard. What about a castle but apparently the cows were really popular? Well you know it is Barada after exactly and I love that the fact that you know in nineteenth century sort of Saint Petersburg Russian composer closer can still speak to us here in central Vermont and Twenty twenty and you're you're mentioning of composers and and writers talking together picture them back in the day in the salons of Paris or in some you know Vienna cafe or something and and and So that kind of synergy I mean the seed for it I guess is laid there and and and And comes to flower here in Vermont in in a concert that Ma- that mixes music and art and You know couple of hundred years later so why not right. Yeah and a lot of local groups I feel alike are starting to move in this direction. Like having say poems by David. Bud Bill read in between you know musical pieces and I mean he had A. There is an opera that Erik Nielsen Created that was based on his work and that kind of I mean there is this sort of. That's in the air here. I think it's great that is I I think the arts should reinforce each other and then also should be about the. US should draw in the community that they are based in particularly. I think thank kids I got an email on Friday from one of the teachers who has been involved in creating this artwork with with her students and she said we decided this afternoon. We wanted to go back to Creating more art work and listening to music. We've decided that every Friday. We want to listen. Listen to music at draw and I thought wouldn't the world a better place if we all did that on every Friday afternoon. Yeah that's it. That's the new the new rule in every workplace. We'd get two hours off on Friday. We're GONNA draw and listen to music that'll be fun. That's a great idea and I think we're on a something here so you heard it here first today Graham show. WD FM and am and tell us a little bit more about You you have a this concert of coming on the eighteenth and nineteenth and What what else is on the capital city Concerts planner here for the remainder under of this current season. Here Karen I have to do this off the top of my head but in there somewhere end of March seventh We have returning the Perez Piano trio. Which one of the favorite favorite ensembles Of all of our twenty years. It's a it's is a kind of being deal and they are coming really out of friendship just to do a masterclass in a concert just for us. They're playing nowhere else. And there are limited tickets and they've been selling really well so we've been trying to stress to our audience if you hope to come to. That concert will be likely the last time time they come to the states to play Definitely come and do it. These these three guys were faculty at the Paris Conservatory. But they also met met there and they are now in their seventies. They've been playing together since they were teenagers. And I have never ever heard an ensemble that plays so much as this one as the three guys do so so that's coming up in March and then at the end of April we have our twentieth anniversary concerts. the last weekend in April To concerts to different concerts You can check that out at our website and we also are are are returning to actually a David Bud. Bill inspired concert. That's a collaboration. With our friends from scrag mountain music at the end of May but all of that information as well as our our on-line ticket box office can be found at capital city concerts. Dot Org wow and yeah that that website obviously is a key resource for anybody who wants to follow what these musical Events are what musical events are being brought to Vermont by Karen Cabraha in her capital city concerts crew. It's such a great endeavor here is I can't S- can't stop San And now Do you have anything in anything that might involve them more of Mt Anderson Coming next year or too early to say I I think so. Yep Kobina's is actually a member of our board and I've been I've been kind of leaning on him to to be involved for a number of years I am just tobin. I'm so grateful to have you on the board. And I love the way that you inspire and and make ideas sparkle. So we're already scheming for some possibilities for next year. But in the meantime we should just say how how grateful we should. Also it'd be also that the that the kids central Vermont are in fact so creative and everything in these kinds of endeavors. Like I don't know I just think We have great kids I'm not a parent but This area I saw not boasting but we know this area has great children and who are so interested in the arts and in music and I think it's just wonderful our area here you know where the what is it. The the the women are good looking no matter good-looking. The women are strong in in all the children are over. That's that's according to another radio host. Ed Mention any names here but the and I I I just I just we just have a couple of minutes to go here and and I wanted to Ask Karen now. You are You're SORTA dividing your time. Now you've moved. You moved to the far west or something over there in Addison County and And and you are putting on some concerts than Middlebury twos Iradar title rematch area. Yeah occasionally I'm actually staring out the window right now at the adirondacks and it looks like there may be some weather coming way Yeah Yeah I About three years ago Moved from Mont Pilat which I was torn about Montpellier is and always really will be home to me but I have a second home now. I live We're involved with My wonderful husband. We have done some Capital city concerts performances. Here in in Middlebury. We don't have any scheduled for this and it's a possibility we might be looking at again. for next season. But you know sometimes perform our things pop up invited to Ari Wolfe for my jealous perspective. I'm glad and you're still focused on Mafia and putting on your your performances there. Because that's I. I have my own bias here. I've got to confess so there you go. It's hard to walk. Lock to two Middlebury. I've never done it. I suppose it was possible but it would take take some time for sure. Well Hey Karen camera and and Mt Anderson. I WanNa thank the two of you very much for joining me this morning. It's been a fun conversation Break.

Karen Cabraha Vermont James Blair David Bud Mt Anderson Middlebury Mont Kids Dean Carl Reiner Kaz Sonata US Ari Wolfe Boston Jeffrey Kellyn Bud Bill Charles Kershaw Erik Nielsen Addison County Paris Conservatory Images News Graham
"paris conservatory" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:01 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I love you so you play flute and I'll just start by saying you've played flute alike on TV and on videos a lot of people thought like oh it's done by somebody else you can't possibly play like that she's not a classical person I don't know what people think that's races yes yes yes I'm very funny videos answering that but suit to tell us how you started to play flute like this is our fifth or sixth grade did you choose the instrument or did a teacher say you got to play flute in this other person gets to play trombone yeah they chose the flu chose me I remember I was in band in fifth grade and we were sitting down and there was one girl name is miss Johnson and she was a fluke specialist I really think she was like just going to college and was trying to get some extra credit and he was like Mr Browder was like who do you want in your flu class who do you want to play flu is she picks me and I don't know why she picks me I think later on she was like you know you just have a good embouchure I could tell you have a good flute embouchure which is you know your mouth but I don't know and I was like grateful because I've wanted to play flute I thought it was the coolest instrument but you know who could have known all the cool girls play clarinet anyway what what do you think the flu was the coolest instrument I don't know what I thought was so cool about it but it was cool so how serious were you about a career as a flutist flautist let us always flower you know it's crazy how we send flowers and one day some think it's polluted from light show the but I I was very very very serious I study flute I played it every night I when I was a senior in high school or junior I started studying with the principal flutist of the Houston opera and she was also a professor at the university of Houston so I was studying with Sydney Carlson for years and she was kind of like priming me to go to your fate she got me my scholarship to you of age and then when I was studying with her there she was setting me up to study at the Paris conservatory well and I was going to study flew at the Paris conservatory and I was gonna really just you know wait in line for that first chair I saw a life of concert black in Boston pops and traveling the world and when that didn't pan out for me I was very depressed I was very sad and I don't really know what happened I think the pressure of those two worlds kind of got to me because I was waking up every morning at like six AM for marching band at U. of H. and then I would go to the go to the rehearsal hall and then I would practice in this tiny room for hours and then at night I would stay up in rapid fashion shows and try to stay up to keep up with all the fraternities and sororities and that was really taking a toll on me and I was like who are you you know at this point you could you could you could do it all through high school but you're in college now you're about to be we are going to be for ever and now who is that so did you choose rap over over a classical career or was the choice made for you I chose rap how come because to me it was the most instantly gratifying I was I I was in college for music performance degree but I was already performing and I thought might you know everyone thinks they know everything when their nineteen twenty I was like I'm already performing what do I need a music performance degree for and I just stopped so you grew up in Detroit what music did you grow up with in Detroit I grew up with a lot of gospel music I remember we would listen to a perfect and praises over and over and over that was the Marvin Winans of family album and they would always come out with family albums and we would just listen so that like it was strictly gospel I didn't really listen to secular music or like radio music but mind you I was still very very young but it it shaped who I am today on stage like you get a lot of Hallelujah moments from me and that's from Detroit and growing up in the culture church which church the church of god in Christ which is co Jake so when you weren't listening to secular music was that because of their church did your parents not want secular music in the house I mean well you know was the devil so my parents so the funny thing is is you know my sister and my brother who are older than me they remember different things like my dad he really loved Elton John and my mom love Stevie Wonder so you know we would have those types of things hall and Oates you know queen my dad love queen so like those things will filter in here and there well for the most part you know we tried to listen to gospel music music makes people feel things and it made me feel things in church that I knew that I could I could bring to my music you know I'm trying to say so like for instance there was something about the way that the the the on was it because like a revival song gore shout music shout music is when the drummers are going off and the bases I do noon on and on and on you know and then at that point everybody just running around the church and everyone shall in like that reaction that visceral physical reaction that you see in people that's driven by the music like the pastor talking can make you say amen all day but there's something about that driving music that makes you want to get out you'll see your run and I knew that music had the power to move people physically even emotionally but especially physically so I don't think it's just because we talk about Jesus because even in those bass lines the bass lines I talk about Jesus the baseline is running and it takes you to god everything you don't understand is just our vessel and so I want to use my music as a vessel to get you where you need to go to a positive place so I know you met prince when you're living in Minneapolis ends on his album yeah and you did a track on the on on on on one of his last term electron sectional that drum with third eyed girl and so how did he find you because he invited you to perform for him he asked you then to do a track for section electrum so I know you when you move to Minneapolis after college after dropping out of college you became a kind of important part of the music scene there but so how did how did he find you how do you hear you okay so there was a documentary being made about burgeoning musicians and also like you know yeah I think it was his burgeoning musicians actually in Minnesota and it was on one of the like local news stations and it was us me and my best friend my DJ Sophia heiresses group the Feelin who won the voice and plectrum electro whose princes band and and I think some of the people to that I can remember and they did a piece on us and the day it aired the current the radio station in Minneapolis called in our Saint Paul Minneapolis they called and said they had us up and say you know you won't believe this but prince just send us an email asking for you all's contact and we were like what and mind you this was maybe two years after I moved to Minneapolis on and I was owl couldn't believe it I was like well give Omar an email would be for and the email just simply said I would like for you to come to Paisley park on Easter Sunday and is Sunday well yeah I was pretty it was amazing and to work to to work on a song and we went and it was magical and from then on we had a relationship with Paisley park and with him where we would just he would ask us to come perform for his his parties and we will come and perform in we also had a she you know talk about me in interviews he was like you know lose those wonder what she's up next when nobody was checking for me he was checking for you know young black girls and young black artists and giving us a voice and gave me my first big check I mean I have a I have a lot of respect in the deep profound relationship with one of the greatest artists of all time so that's a lot to say about that my guest is rapper and singer at Liz though her latest album is called because I love you will hear more of the interview after a break but first I want to remind you that there's a membership campaign in progress if you believe it's important to have a place on the radio where musicians writers filmmakers and performers have a place to reflect and share stories about their life and work please support this station I can't think of another place on the radio except public radio where this happens thank you this is fresh AIR thank you very much for listening and thank you for your support this is the final day of W. N. Y. C.'s fall membership drive if you have already made a donation we thank you very much if not there is time for your.

"paris conservatory" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"By many composers including the most famous version by maurice rebel but this is the original version for solo piano and it's it's kind of description of <hes> a walk through an art exhibit stopping along the way to look at paintings of a all manner of things from the great gate of kiev. There's a movement called the ballet of the unhatched chicks <hes> so there can i really colors interesting movements and what we're going to do with this is where we have an outreach program in which <hes> school aged artists <music> are going to create artwork on each movement and those will be projected over the stage during the performance and we're yeah we're continuing that sort of multimedia idea <hes> with another piece by lesser known composer charles kirkland who wrote <hes> fourteen pieces for flute and piano that i've been playing most of my life that are there kind of for me like musical postcards. They're they're there are also musical soundbites. They're quite short. Some of them are only about twenty seconds long and i become friends with <hes> james blair who is a retired national national geographic photographer who lives in middlebury. He was the resident photographer on board. Jacques cousteau's calypso wild wild and his photographs are just stunning. He just had a an exhibit that just closed at the museum at middlebury college but i went to him and i said jim can you match some of your photographs to these pieces so we actually sat down together <hes> and and did that we matched fourteen different photographs and <hes> did actually a short concert a few weeks ago middlebury college and they're beautiful <hes> recital hall to a standing room only house and it was so well received in such a wonderful tribute to jim who's eight so the spotlight will be on him to through and and <hes> you know it was so so well received and <hes> such a such a beautiful <hes> set of images we're excited to be bringing that as well and then <hes> we skip over to march early march remote welcoming back the perez piano trio. I have to admit this is what i'm most excited about. <hes> these three musicians <hes> this is a violinist regimes pesky a cellist elyse hollander do and paneth's jean claude panetta a._a. These three guys met when they were teenagers. Students at the paris conservatory went on to have big careers and and became distinguished faculty there and they have been playing together all of their lives. They're now in their seventies and they play as one and you will not hear a better piano trio than this. We've had them on the series. Many times comes over the years but it's been a while and they are coming back for this one concert. They're coming <hes> out of friendship <hes> <hes> as a way of saying happy birthday to capital city concerts so this will be their only performance while they're in the state so we're actually encouraging people to start buying tickets now because that will surely sell out that's the weekend of <hes> that's march march eighth and and they'll also be doing each one. We'll do a masterclass <hes> <hes> with advanced student musicians all right that on the saturday unfortunately just about a minute to go here so you're gonna have to give give us the scared so on whatever's coming then afterward <laughter> okay. I'll just say <hes> we have a a weekend of two different programs of our anniversary concerts on april twenty fifth been twenty six and these are favorite performers over the years doing big works <hes> and then finally were ending the season in may with collaboration performance with our friends from scrag mountain. Music and folks can go to our website order tickets. Get all the details and be concerts dot org dot org karen kevin..

Jacques cousteau maurice rebel jim middlebury college middlebury charles kirkland kiev scrag mountain james blair elyse hollander paris conservatory jean claude panetta paneth twenty seconds twenty fifth
"paris conservatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Liza's new album because I love you we'll be right back this is fresh AIR this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is Liz she has a new album called because I love you so you play flute and I'll just start by saying you've played flute alike on TV and on videos a lot of people thought like oh it's done by somebody else you can't possibly play like that she's not a classical person I don't know why people think that's races yes yes yes I'm very funny videos answering that but suit to tell us how you started to play flute like this is our fifth or sixth grade did you choose the instrument or did a teacher say you got to play flute and this other person gets to play trombone yeah they chose the flu chose me I remember I was in band in fifth grade and we were sitting down and there was one girl name is miss Johnson and she was a fluke specialist I really think she was like just going to college and was trying to get some extra credit and he was like Mr Browder was like who do you want in your flu class who do you want to play flu is she picks me and I don't know why she picked me I think later on she was like you know you just have a good embouchure I could tell you have a good flute embouchure which is you know your mouth but I don't know and I was like grateful because I've wanted to play flute I thought it was the coolest instrument but you know who could have known all the cool girls play clarinet anyway what why do you think the flu was the coolest instrument I don't know what I thought was so cool about it but it was cool so you started in like five gives a fifth or sixth grade but then later like in junior high or high school you started like forming rap groups with friends there there seems to be this like you just connect routine your interest as a a flute player and your interest in and rap music you don't hear a lot of flute and wrap you do you hear a lot of flu in rap and people keep saying that to me I'm like ya have yard to J. Dilla have you heard a metro Boomin like these producers use flew all the time like one of the biggest hits was mask off and it just had it the course was just a flute solo I think we don't see rappers play flute we hear it in we we don't sub consciously put two and two together I think it would have been way more it impacts what is the future actually playing the line on the flute to mask off but he wasn't I think that flew in hip hop or very sexy I think the flu in hip hop have gone together for a long time I think is just the first time you actually see the artist actually playing the flute and there wasn't a disconnect you know growing up in Houston in and freestyle rap in was very first nature to me like that was what I wanted to do that's what you have to do is a rite of passage like I was very nerdy in the fact that I knew how to freestyle on the bus or freestyle in the cafeteria and bang on the desk just gave me a little get out of being a nerd free pass so I did it like everybody did it you know Houston I think is like the king and the queen of freestyle like that's the city the freestyle really found a swag and I'm just lucky that I was a part of that while it was happening and also a classically trained flute player I think this is weird to everybody else but is now we are to me well how long was it into starter bring influence your flute two gigs well I will say that I was playing the flute in my rock band when I first started playing shows I play the flute and we got I got nominated for best alternative instrument in the Houston press awards for flu and I will put a little girl out just are playing the new freak out but I think it was more it made more sense to bring it out in a progressive rock band I didn't start bringing the fluid out in my rap career until at least from my solo career way later and I think it was like something that I did so for instance my first tape ever little bangers all of the flu on the album which there's a lot of flu samples I replayed because we couldn't clear the flute so I had to actually replace the flute on that on those songs so I've been playing flute former projects for ever but no one knew it was me until now so how serious were you about a career as a flutist flattest flowers I was flawed you know it's crazy how we send flowers and one day some think it's polluted from white shirt but I I was very very very serious I studied flute I played it every night I when I was a senior in high school or junior I started studying with the principal flutist of the Houston opera and she was also a professor at the university of Houston so I was studying with Sydney Carlson for years and she was kind of like priming me to go to your fate she got me my scholarship to you of age and then when I was studying with her there she was setting me up to study at the Paris conservatory well and I was gonna study flew at the Paris conservatory and I was gonna really just you know wait in line for that first chair I saw a life of concert black in Boston pops and traveling the world and when that didn't pan out for me I was very depressed I was very sad and I don't really know what happened I think the pressure of those two world kind of got to me because I was waking up every morning at like six AM for marching band at U. of H. and then I would go to the go to the rehearsal hall and in our practice in this tiny room for hours and then at night I would stay up in rapid fashion shows and try to stay up to keep up with all the fraternities and sororities and that was really taking a toll on me and I was like who are you you know at this point you could you could you could do it all through high school but you're in college now you're about to be we are going to be for ever and now who is that so did you choose rap over over a classical career or was the choice made for you I chose rap how come because to me it was the most instantly gratifying I was I was in college for music performance degree but I was already performing and I thought might you know everyone thinks they know everything when their nineteen twenty I was like I'm already performing what do I need a music performance degree for and I just stopped my guest is rapper and singer Liz so her new album is called because I love you after we take a short break well listen to more of her music and just talk about meeting prince and the impact he had on her music and career I'm Terry gross and this is fresh AIR.

Liza Liz one day
"paris conservatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It'll be it'll open up but he the title track of Liza's new album because I love you we'll be right back this is fresh AIR this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is Liz she has a new album called because I love you so you play flute and I'll just start by saying you've played flute alike on TV and on videos a lot of people thought like oh it's done by somebody else you can't possibly play like that she's not a classical person I don't know why people think that's races yes yes yes I'm very funny videos answering that but suit to tell us how you started to play flute like this is our fifth or sixth grade did you choose the instrument or did a teacher say you got to play flute in this other person gets to play trombone yeah they chose the flu chose me I remember I was in band in fifth grade and we were sitting down and there was one girl name is miss Johnson and she was a foot specialist I really think she was like just going to college and was trying to get some extra credit and he was like Mr Browder was like who do you want in your flu class who do you want to play flu is she picks me and I don't know why she picked me I think later on she was like you know you just have a good embouchure I could tell you have a good flute embouchure which is you know your mouth but I don't know and I was like grateful because I've wanted to play flute I thought it was the coolest instrument but you know who could have known all the cool girls play clarinet anyway what why do you think the flu is the coolest instrument I don't know what I thought was so cool about it but it was cool so you started in like five gives a fifth or sixth grade but then later like in junior high or high school you started like forming rap groups with friends there there seems to be this like you just connect routine your interest as a a flute player and your interest in in rap music you don't hear a lot of flute and wrap you do you hear a lot of flu in rap and people keep saying that to me I'm like ya have yard to J. Dilla have you heard a metro Boomin like these producers use flew all the time like one of the biggest hits was mask off and it just had it the course was just a flute solo I think we don't see rappers play flute we hear it in we we don't sub consciously put two and two together I think it would have been way more it impacts what is the future actually playing the line on the flute the mask off but he wasn't I think that flew in hip hop or very sexy I think the flu in hip hop have gone together for a long time I think this is just the first time you actually see the art is actually playing the flute and there wasn't a disconnect you know growing up in Houston in and freestyle rap in was very first nature to me like that was what I wanted to do that's what you have to do is a rite of passage like I was very nerdy in the fact that I knew how to freestyle on the bus or freestyle in the cafeteria and bang on the desk just gave me a little get out of being a nerd free pass so I did it like everybody did it you know Houston I think is like the king and the queen of freestyle like that's the city the freestyle really found this way and I'm just lucky that I was a part of that while it was happening and also a classically trained flute player I think this is weird to everybody else but is now we are to me well how long was it into starter bring influence your flute two gigs well I will say that I was playing the flute in my rock band when I first started playing shows I play the flute and we got I got nominated for best alternative instrument in the Houston press awards for flu and I will put a little girl out just are playing the new freak out but I think it was more it made more sense to bring it out in a progressive rock band I didn't start bringing the fluid out in my rap career until at least from my solo career way later and I think it was like something that I did so for instance my first tape ever little bangers all of the flu on the album which there's a lot of flu samples I replayed because we couldn't clear the flute so I had to actually replace the flute on that on those songs so I've been playing flute former projects for ever but no one knew it was me until now so how serious were you about a career as a flutist flattest flowers I was flawed you know it's crazy how we send flowers and one day some think it's polluted from white shirt but I I was very very very serious I study flute I played it every night I when I was a senior in high school or junior I started studying with the principal flutist of the Houston opera and she was also a professor at the university of Houston so I was studying with Sydney Carlson for years and she was kind of like priming me to go to your fate she got me my scholarship to you of age and then when I was studying with her there she was setting me up to study at the Paris conservatory well and I was gonna study flew at the Paris conservatory and I was gonna really just you know wait in line for that first chair I saw a life of concert black and Boston pops and traveling the world and when that didn't pan out for me I was very depressed I was very sad and I don't really know what happened I think the pressure of those two worlds kind of got to me because I was waking up every morning at like six AM for marching band at U. of H. and then I would go to the go to the rehearsal hall and in our practice in this tiny room for hours and then at night I would stay up in rapid fashion shows and try to stay up to keep up with all the fraternities and sororities and that was really taking a toll on me and I was like who are you you know at this point you could you could you could do it all through high school but you're in college now you're about to be we are going to be for ever and now who is that so did you choose rap over over a classical career or was the choice made for you I chose rap how come because to me it was the most instantly gratifying I was I was in college for music performance degree but I was already performing and I thought might you know everyone thinks they know everything when their nineteen twenty I was like I'm already performing what do I need a music performance degree for am I just stopped my guest is rapper and singer Liz though her new album is called because I love you after we take a short break well listen to more of her music and just talk about meeting prince and the impact he had on her music and career I'm Terry gross and this is fresh AIR.

Liza one day
"paris conservatory" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Of lizards new album because I love you. So you play flute and I'll just start by saying you've played flute on TV and on videos and a lot of people thought like, oh, it's dubbed by somebody else. She can't possibly play like that. She's not a classical person. I don't know why people think that's racist. Yes, yes. Very funny videos, answering that. But so tell us how you start to play flute. Like this is what fifth or sixth grade. Did you choose the instrument or do the teacher say you get to play flute in this other person gets to play, trombone? Yeah, they chose the flu chose me. I remember I was in band in fifth grade, and we were sitting down, and there was one girl names MS Johnson. And she was the flu specialists, but I really think she was just going to college. It was trying to get some extra credits. And he was like, Mr. broaden was, like, who do you want in your flu class? Who do you want to play flute, and she'd picks me, and I, I don't know why. She picks me, I think later on. She was like, you know, you just had a good Ombu. Sure, I could tell you have a good flute, Ombu Scher, which is, you know, your mouth, but I don't know. And I was like, grateful because I wanted to play flute. I thought it was the coolest instrument. But, you know, who could have known all the cool girls play clarinet, anyway. What did you think that flute was the coolest instrument? I don't know what I thought was so cool about it. But it was cold. So you started in, like I forget, you said, fifth or sixth grade. But then later like in junior high or high school, you started forming rap groups with friends, there seems to be this disconnect between your interest is a flute flair and your interest in, in rap music. You don't hear a lot of flute in rep. You do you hear a lot of flute and rep? And people keep saying, that's I mean, I'm like y'all. Have you heard of J Diller? Have you heard of metro booming like these producers use flew all the time? Like one of the biggest hits was mass coffin. It just had the course was just a flute solo. I think we don't see rappers play flute. We hear it, and we, we don't subconsciously put to into together. I think it would have been way more impactful to see future actually playing the line on the flute to mask off. But he wasn't I think that flute and hip hop very sexy. I think the flute and hip hop have gone together for a long time. I think this is just the first time you actually see the artists actually playing the flute and there wasn't a disconnect, you know, growing up in Houston, and, and freestyle rapping was very first nature to me like that was what I wanted to do. That's what you had to do as a rite of passage. Like I was very nerdy. In the. That I knew how to free style on the bus or freestyle in the cafeteria and bang on the desk. Just gave me a little get out of being a nerd free pass. And so I did it like everybody did it, you know, Houston. I think is like the king, and the Queen of freestyle like that's the city that free style really found swag. And I'm just lucky that I was a part of that, while it was happening. And also a classically trained flu player. I think it's just weird to everybody else, but it's not weird to me. How long was it until you started bringing flutes your flute two gigs? Well, I will say that I was playing the flu in my rock band. When I first started playing shows, I play the flu, and we got an I got nominated for best alternative instrument in the Houston press awards for flu, and I will put that little girl out and just start playing. And they were freak out, but I think it was more it made more sense to bring it out in a progressive rock band. I didn't start bringing the fluid out in my rap career unto at least for my solo career way later, and I think it was like something that I did. So, for instance, my first tape ever Lizl bankers all of the flute on that album, which there's a lot of flu samples, I replayed, because we couldn't clear, the flute, so I had to actually replay the flute on that on those songs. So I've been playing flute on my projects forever. But no one knew it was me until now. So how serious were you about a career? As a flutist flouts, Florida's hours, flout. You know, what's crazy, always have Florida's one days? It's flutist. I'm like shut up. But I, I was very very, very serious. I studied flute a plate every night I when I was a senior in high school or junior, I started studying with the principal flutist of the Houston opera, and she was also a professor at the university of Houston. So I was studying with Sydney Carlson for years. And she was kind of, like priming me to go to you, vague, she got me, my scholarship to you of age. And then when I was studying with her there, she was setting me up to study at the payers, conservatory. Well, and I was going to study flute at the Paris conservatory, and I was going to really just, you know, wait in line for that I share I saw a life of concert black, and Boston pops, and traveling the world. And when that didn't pan out for me, I was very depressed. I was very sad. And I, I don't really know what happened. I think the. Pressure of those two worlds, kinda got to me because I was waking up every morning like six AM for marching band at you avait. And then I would go to the Goto the rehearsal hall, and I would practice in this tiny room for hours. And then at night, I would stay up in rapid fashion shows, and try to stay up and keep up with all the fraternities and sororities. And that was really taking a toll on me. And I was like, who are you, you know, at this point, you could you could you could do it all through high school. But you're in college now, you're about to be who you're going to be forever. And now who is that? So did you choose rap over over a classical career or was the choice made for you? I chose rap how come. Because to me, it was the most instantly gratifying. I was at was in college for music performance degree. But I was already performing, and I thought, my, you know, everyone thinks they know everything when they're nineteen twenty I was like I'm already performing. What do I need a music performance degree for, and I stopped? My guest is rapper and singer. Liz, oh, her new album is called 'cause I love you after we take a short break, we'll listen to more of her music, and she'll talk about meeting prints. And the impact he had on.

flu Houston Florida Ombu Scher university of Houston Ombu MS Johnson J Diller Paris conservatory Liz Sydney Carlson Boston principal professor one days
"paris conservatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Like these producers, use flew all the time, like one of the biggest hits was mass coughing. It just had the course was just a flute solo. I think we don't see rappers play flute. We hear it, and we, we don't subconsciously put to into together. I think it would have been way more impactful to see future actually playing the line on the flute to mask off, but he wasn't a think that flute hip are very sexy. I think the flute and hip hop have gone together for a long time. I think this is just the first time you actually see the artists actually playing the flute and there wasn't a disconnect, you know, growing up in Houston, and freestyle rapping was very first nature to me. Like that was what I wanted to do. That's what you had to do as a rite of passage. Like I was very nerdy. In the. Fact that I knew how to free style on the bus or freestyle in the cafeteria and bang on the desk. Just gave me a little get out of being a nerd free pass. So I did it like everybody did it, you know, Houston. I think is like the king in the Queen of freestyle like that's the city that free style really found swag. And I'm just lucky that I was a part of that, while it was happening. And also a classically trained flu player. I think it's just weird to everybody else, but it's not weird to me. How long was it until you started bringing flutes your flute two gigs? Well, I will say that I was playing the flute in my rock band. When I first started playing shows, I play the flu, and we got an got nominated for best alternative instrument in the Houston press awards for flu, and I will put that little girl out and just are playing, and they would freak out, but I think it was more it made more sense to bring it out in a progressive rock band. I didn't start bringing the flute out in my rap career unto at least from us solo career way later. And I think it was like something that I did. So, for instance, my first tape ever Lizl bankers all of the flu on that album, which there's a lot of flu samples, I replayed, because we couldn't clear, the flute, so I had to actually replay the flute on that on those songs. So I've been playing flute all my projects forever. But no one knew it was me until now. So how serious were you about a career as a flutist flouted Florida's, I was flouted, you know, what's crazy, always have Florida's one day? It's fluid like shut up. But I, I was very very, very serious. I studied flute played it every night I when I was a senior in high school or junior, I started studying with the principal flutist of the Houston opera. And she was also a professor at the university of Houston. So I was studying with Sydney Carlson for years. And she was kind of, like priming me to go to you avait. She got me my scholarship to U of H. And then when I was studying with her there, she was setting me up to study at the payers, conservatory. Wow. And I was going to study flute at the Paris conservatory, and I was going to really just, you know, wait in line for that I share. I saw a life of concert black, and Boston pops and travel in the world. And when that didn't pan out for me, I was very depressed. I was very sad. And I, I don't really know what happened. I think the. Pressure of those two worlds, kinda got to me because I was waking up every morning like six AM for marching band at you avait. And then I would go to the Goto the rehearsal hall, and I would practice in this tiny room for hours. And then at night, I would stay up in rapid fashion shows, and try to stay up and keep up without a fraternities and sororities. And that was really taking a toll on me. And I was like, who are you, you know, at this point, you could you could you could do it all through high school. But you're in college now, you're about to be who you're going to be forever. And now who is that? So did you choose rep over over a classical career or wasn't a choice made for you? Chose rhett. How come? Because to me. It was the most instantly gratifying. I was I was in college for music performance degree. But I was already performing, and I thought, my, you know, everyone thinks they know everything when they're nineteen twenty I was like I'm already performing. What do I need a music performance degree for, and I stopped? My guest is rapper and singer. Liz, oh, her new album is called because I love you after we take a break. We'll listen to more of her music, Entra talk about meeting prints. And the impact he had on her music and career, I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air. Exactly..

Houston Sydney Carlson flu professor rhett university of Houston Florida Terry gross Paris conservatory Entra Boston Liz one day
"paris conservatory" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So you play flute and I'll just start by sit. And you've played flute like on TV and on videos, and a lot of people thought like, oh, it's dubbed by somebody else. She can't possibly play like that. She's not a classical person. I don't know why people think that that's racist. Yes. Yes, I'm very funny videos answering that, but so tell us how you started to play flute like this fifth or sixth grade. Did you choose the instrument or a teacher say you get to play flute and this other person gets to play, trombone? Yeah. They chose the flu chose me. I remember I was in Bandon fifth grade, and we were sitting down, and there was one girl names MS Johnson. And she was the flu specialists, but I really think she was just going to college. It was trying to get some extra credits. And he was like, Mr Brown was, like, who do you want in your flu class who do you want to play flute, and she'd picks me, and I don't know why she picked me, I think later on. She was like, you know, you just had a good Ombu. Sure, I could tell you have a good flute, Ombu share, which is, you know, your mouth, but I don't know. And I was like, grateful because I wanted to play flute. I thought it was the coolest instrument. But, you know, who could have known all the cool girls play clarinet, anyway. What did you think that was the coolest instrument? I don't know what I thought was so cool about it. But it was cool. So you started in, like said, fifth or sixth grade. But then later like in junior high or high school, you started forming rap groups with friends, there seem to be this disconnect between your interest is a flute player and your interest in, in rap music, you don't hear a lot of flute in rap. You do you hear a lot of flute and rep and people. Keep saying to me, I'm like y'all? Have you heard Jay Dila? Have you heard a metro booming? Like these producers, use flew all the time like one of the biggest hits was mass coffin. It just had the course was just a flute solo. I think we don't see rappers play flute. We hear it, and we, we don't subconsciously put to into together. I think it would have been way more impacts to see future actually playing the line. On the flute to mask off. But he wasn't. I think that flute and hip hop are very sexy. I think the flute and hip hop have gone together for a long time. I think this is just the first time you actually see the artists actually playing the flute and there wasn't a disconnect, you know, growing up in Houston, and freestyle rapping was very first nature to me. Like that was what I wanted to do. That's what you had to do as a rite of passage like I was very nerdy. In the fact that I knew how to freestyle on the bus or freestyle in the cafeteria and bang on the desk. Just gave me a little get out of being a nerd free pass. And so I did it like everybody did it, you know, Houston. I think is like the king, and the Queen of freestyle like that's the city that free style really found his swag. And I'm just lucky that I was a part of that, while it was happening. And also a classically trained flu player. I think it's just weird to everybody else, but it's not weird to me. How long? Was it until you started bringing flutes your flute two gigs? Well, I will say that I was playing the flu in my rock band. When I first started playing shows, I play the flu and we got an got nominated for best alternative instrument, and the Houston press awards for flu, and I will put that little girl out and just start playing, and they would freak out. But I think it was more it made more sense to bring it out in a progressive rock band. I didn't start bringing the fluid out in my rat career unto at least for my solo career way later and I think it was like something that I did. So, for instance, my first tape ever Lizl bankers all of the flute on that album, which there's a lot of flu samples, I replayed, because we couldn't clear, the flute, so I had to actually replay the flute on that on those songs. So I've been playing flute all my projects forever. But no one knew it was me until now. So how serious were you about a career as a flutist flouted, Florida's hours, flout, you know, what's crazy, always have Florida's one day? It's flutist. I'm like shut up. But I, I was very very, very serious. I studied flute played it every night I when I was a senior in high school or junior, I started studying with the principal flutist of the Houston opera, and she was also a professor at the university of Houston. So I was studying with Sydney Carlson for years. And she was kind of, like priming me to go to you, eight, she got me, my scholarship to U of H. And then when I was studying with her there, she was setting me up to study at the Paris conservatory. Wow. And I was going to study flute at the Paris conservatory, and I was going to really just, you know, wait in line for that I share. I saw a life of concert black, and Boston pops and travel in the world. And when that didn't pan out for me, I was very depressed. I was very sad. And I, I don't really know what happened. I think the. Pressure of those two worlds, kinda got to me because I was waking up every morning like six AM for marching band at you avait. And then I would go to the Goto the rehearsal hall, and I would practice in this tiny room for hours. And then at night, I would stay up in rapid fashion shows, and try to stay up and keep up with all the fraternities and sororities. And that was really taking a toll on me. And I was like, who are you, you know, at this point, you could you could you could do it all through high school. But you're in college now, you're about to be who you're going to be forever. And now who is that? So did you choose rap over over a classical career? Or was it a choice made for you? Chose rep. How come? Because to me. It was the most instantly gratifying. I was I was in college for music performance degree. But I was already performing, and I thought, my, you know, everyone thinks they know everything when they're nineteen twenty I was like I'm already performing. What do I need a music performance degree for, and I stopped? My guest is rapper and singer. Liz, oh, her new album is called because I love you after we take a short break. We'll listen to more of her music and talk about meeting prints. And the impact he had on her music and career, I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air. Exactly..

flu Houston Paris conservatory Florida Mr Brown university of Houston Terry gross Ombu MS Johnson Jay Dila Boston Liz Sydney Carlson principal professor one day
"paris conservatory" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I may only win welcome to classics for kids today. A lot of women write music, but in the past it was much harder for women to have any kind of career including composing. Seventeenth century Italian composer, franchesca Pechiney lived in Florence her. Father was a singer and court composer for the powerful Medici family and Francesca grew up to become the meta cheese highest paid musician. Around the same time in Venice singer and composer, barb butter us throaty published more music for the boys than anyone else in her day. Lisa Kluge, cayden GAM was the first woman in France to write an opera she was a musician in the court of king Louis the fourteenth starting when she was five. He took a long time for the Paris conservatory to allow women to study composition there. So Louise rank had to take private composition lessons. She wound up being the first female, professor of piano at the conservatory, and she taught them into paying her as much as they paid the male professors. Say see Shami nod was the first woman composer to be awarded the legion Dono the highest honor given by the French government. And Chaman fair was the only woman in the famous group of French composers known as they cease the six. In germany. There was a woman composer who was born over nine hundred years ago. Hildegard fun being was none who wrote poetry books about religion and medicine and music. Around the time of Haydn and Mozart and Austrian composer named Marianna Martinez. Had her music performed all over Europe. Vinnie Mendelssohn and her younger brother Felix both studied music Felix was the more famous mental but fanny composed over four hundred pieces. Amy beach was one of the first Americans to study music in the United States rather than Europe. And she was the first American woman to compose and publish a symphony. When the Chicago Symphony Orchestra played Florence prices symphony in e minor in nineteen thirty three. It was the first time on major American orchestra performed a piece by an African American woman. And there was even a Royal woman composer Lili kalani the last Queen of Hawaii played several instruments one of them the ukulele which looks like a tiny four string guitar. She wrote a lot of songs, including Aloha Hawaiian for goodbye to you. Those are some of the famous women composers from the past next time on classics for kids. Some from the twenty first century. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it for WG UC Cincinnati, please join me next time for more classics for kids.

cayden GAM Florence Amy beach Europe Chicago Symphony Orchestra franchesca Pechiney Naomi Lewin Hildegard Lili kalani Chaman Francesca Shami Vinnie Mendelssohn Venice Lisa Kluge germany Cincinnati Louise Felix Marianna Martinez
"paris conservatory" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin, African American composer, Scott Joplin was born in the middle of the nineteenth century and died in the early twentieth century, but before they're even was a country called America. There were other black composers. Composer of that concerto is known as the ship Jada. Santosh Shiva gay is French for night K in I g h t his real name was Joseph to belong you. But no one ever calls him that his mother wasn't African slaves on a plantation on the island of what loop in the Caribbean. His father was the Frenchman who owned that plan patient the ship. I'll gay followed his father back to Paris where he studied music and PETA great career as a violinist and composer. But he was equally famous for fencing sword fighting almost a century later. There was another black violinist composer, whose father was also French. But whose mother came from Cuba? Jose c vistory Bilas DeLores quite enough. It also known as Joseph white studied in Paris too. He even wound up teaching at the Paris conservatory Samuel. Coleridge? Taylor's, father was a doctor from Africa who married an Englishwoman. So he was born in England the line by the shores of Gichki gloomy by the shining. Big sea water doesn't sound African or English. Coleridge Taylor is most famous for a piece inspired by American poet Henry Wadsworth long, fellows hiawatha. Composer famous one day was actually born in Africa in Nigeria but just before he was thirteen he moved to England where he studied European using. And then worked as both a jazz musician and an organised so one day combined native African music with European orchestral style in his African sweet. Of course, lots of black composers were born on this side of the Atlantic Ocean. William grant, still is known as the dean of afro American composers. His afro American symphony was the first symphony by a black composer to be performed by a major American orchestra. There are also black composers who are still alive like adult hailstorm who's a professor of music at Old Dominion university in Virginia. Reaction to gang violence inspired Chicago composer, James KIMO Williams. One summer three children in Chicago were killed by gangs, including Eric Morse. Eric was killed because he refused to steal candy for other kids, James KIMO Williams, dedicated the piece fanfare for life to the memory of Eric Morse and the other gang victims. One of the most famous American dance tunes. The Charleston was written in the early nineteen hundreds by James P Johnson. Of course, the most famous composer from that era was Scott Joplin whose most famous composition was the maple leaf rag. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Kim latter at W G U C Cincinnati, please listen again next time for more classics for kids.

Coleridge Taylor Scott Joplin Eric Morse Naomi Lewin James KIMO Williams Paris Henry Wadsworth Joseph white Paris conservatory Samuel England Africa Jada Santosh Shiva Caribbean James P Johnson Chicago professor of music Atlantic Ocean Cuba America
"paris conservatory" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on NPR News Now

"NPR podcasts are now. Available on every platform checkout. All our shows at NPR dot org slash podcasts. That's NPR dot org slash podcasts. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jim hawk at least twenty one people have been killed and dozens more injured in a bomb attack on a Roman Catholic cathedral in the southern Philippines. Reports suggest one bomb went off outside the cathedral on the island of polo, while mass was being celebrated a second bomb exploded as security forces arrived Holo has long been a base for Muslim militants. The BBC's. Howard Johnson reports from Manila the Defense Secretary of the Philippines, dealth in Laurens. Ana issued a statement in which he strongly condemned. The attack an urge the public to remain calm to deny terrorism victory as he put it decades of fighting in the region between you miss alms groups, and the Philippine all me has claimed the lives of Mulan a hundred and twenty thousand people and displaced around two million the island of. Lies in the proposed banks more autonomous region. A political solution to the conflict brokered by the government and the Moro Islamic Liberation front last week voters in the area overwhelmingly backed the new region in a referendum. The BBC's Howard Johnson reporting at the United Nations on Saturday secretary of state, Mike Pompeo called on Security Council members to lend their support to the removal of Unas Waylon President Nicolas Maduro, Linda fassulo reports that pump AO characterized the Madero government is what he called an illegitimate. Mafia state secretary of state on peyot stress that the time is now for the Security Council. Toback Venezuelan opposition leader one Guido and called for the holding of new elections as soon as possible Britain, France, Germany, and Belgium. Meanwhile, said they would recognize quite as Venezuela's interim president if President Nicolas Maduro did not call elections within a days in response. Russia's UN ambassador whose country backs Madero accused the US. Trying to engineer a coup d'etat and described the deadline as absurd for NPR news. I'm Linda Zillow in New York federal workers are preparing for their first week back on the job since the partial government shutdown ended a short term spending plan will only keep federal agencies funded through the middle of next month. TSA agent James mud-rock skeptical. We're tired of being held hostage or tired of being made pawns in a game. Tired of having the anxiety? We're tired of not knowing if we're going to be able to make our mortgages if we're going to feed our families. Going to be able to make car payments. If we're even have enough money to put gas in the tank to come to work bipartisan talks on border security face. A February fifteenth deadline to try to come up with a compromise. President Trump says if they can't reach a deal by then the partial shutdown will resume or he may proclaim a national emergency a blast of Arctic air is invading the upper mid west wind chills as low as forty five degrees below zero are expected through this morning in northern Minnesota that could cause frostbite unexposed skin. And as little as ten minutes. This is NPR. Acclaimed? French composer, Michelle Legrand has died at the age of eighty six NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports he won three Oscars and five Grammys in a career that spanned half a century. French radio has been paying tribute to Michel Legrand with his music and excerpts of interviews. Like, a we within a wing born in Paris in one thousand nine hundred eighty two look on his first Academy Award in nineteen sixty nine for the song, the windmills of your mind from the film, the Thomas crown affair. He won two others for the summer of forty two and yen Tal Legrand wrote more than two hundred film and TV scores and worked with Orson Welles, John Cocteau Frank Sinatra and Edith Piaf in an interview look all said when he was a boy who was bullied at school at ten he entered the Paris conservatory Ngong said it was a wonderful moment for me who hated life. When I first crossed the threshold into a magical world where the only question was music. Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris more people have died after a pipeline explosion last week in central Mexico. The death toll has risen to one hundred fourteen while thirty three people remain hospitalized. Hundreds of people were in the vicinity of an illegal pipeline tap that caught fire and exploded into a fireball Francis. Yellow vest move. And kept up pressure on president Emmanuel Macron Saturday with mainly peaceful marches and scattered skirmishes, it was the eleventh weekend in a row of anti-government demonstrations in Paris and other cities two hundred twenty three people were reported arrested in Paris. I'm Jim hawk NPR news in Washington.

NPR Nicolas Maduro Paris president Eleanor Beardsley Michel Legrand Jim hawk BBC southern Philippines Howard Johnson Security Council President Trump Frank Sinatra Roman Catholic cathedral Washington state secretary Michelle Legrand Madero government Linda Zillow
"paris conservatory" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"paris conservatory" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"FRANZ is first public performance in Vienna. Was in eighteen twenty two so he would have been about eleven years old at this time. And he was described as quote, a little Hercules falon from the clouds. He started writing his own compositions that same year the next year FRANZ met Ludwig von Beethoven for the first time, and according to one possibly apocryphal account Beethoven without charms that he kissed him on the forehead eighteen twenty three was also the year that list moved to Paris. This move was another one that was made. So that he could continue his studies with other musical masters, and while the Paris conservatory declined to admit him on the grounds that he was not French Czech composer. Anton, Russia and Italian composer Ferdinando Paer taught him privately in addition to his studies he put on extensive public performances, and he really started to develop quite a following. However in eighteen twenty six when he was fifteen years old Franz's father died suddenly of typhoid is father had really been his primary source of support during all of this. Musical training and performing. Plus, the boy was only fifteen years old. He had not always had good health up into this point. And this whole series of touring studying had been really fatiguing after his father's death FRANZ had to share a one bedroom apartment with his mother and grieving and exhausted. He turned to teaching piano to try to make a living. He actually fell in love with one of his students. It's going to set a trend for his later life. When her father forced him to end their relationship, he became so ill that newspapers printed obituaries for him afterward he retreated from public performance for almost four years. And he spent most of this time reading and teaching music. He started to compose music again in eighteen thirty following the July revolution in which king Charles the tenth was overthrown and succeeded by Louis Philippe in his mother's words, quote, the canons cured him and afterward he met several more famous names in the musical world, including Hector Berlioz Niccolo peg Anini and Frederic Chopin this the married Comtesse. Marie Duggal eighteen thirty three when he was twenty two years old in spite of her being married. He fell in love with her and they were to be together for twelve years. They eventually had three children together to avoid the scorn of Parisians society over this affair with a married woman. They left and spent the next four years traveling through Europe, including Switzerland, Italy and other non Peres parts of France, his travels and his love for her started to inspire him to compose, and he wrote a set of suites for solo piano, which became the highly praised on Ned. Pillory nausea over the next few years lists reputation as a musician grew dramatically he gave tours and performances and really made a name for himself as a virtuoso composer and pianist, and as well as an extremely charismatic and very expressive performer also became known for being quite generous with his music and his time he often taught people and also accepted official posts for free. So we thought oh this without pay. And then he would donate. The proceeds from his concerts to charity. He also developed a different reputation. Thanks to his behavior. Offstage James hunter's nineteen eleven biography in chapter two which is called aspects of his art and character begins list, and the ladies it's like this is like the heading. So it's like one list and the lady. The feminine friendships of FRANZ Liszt gained for him as much notoriety as his music making to the average public. He was a compound of Cazenove Byron to this mixture could have been added the name of stint. How lists love affairs? Lists children lists perilous escaped from daggers pistols poisons where the subjects of conversation in Europe three quarters of a century ago as earlier Byron was both hero and black sheep in the current gossip of his time. Let's just add to the subjects of conversation right now. He was also extremely attractive. Like, I'm having trouble picking out with extremely attractive picture of FRANZ Liszt should accompany our blog posts in our show notes and episode itself because there are many, and he looks like he looks like the boy at your high school who was very sensitive and soulful and wrote terrible poetry and made all of the girls think that he was just so tragically attractive like that. That's what he looks like he looks like every guy in every. Movie about teenage forlorn this as well that like he's so beautiful. No one will ever understand him. Yup. I've not hit it. He is a pretty thing. I mean, he's experienced beautiful. So basically this all meant that FRANZ Liszt was a nineteenth century virtuoso, piano rockstar. And that's where this mania comes in. We're going to talk about after a brief word from sponsor.

FRANZ Liszt Ludwig von Beethoven Paris FRANZ Europe Vienna Frederic Chopin Anton Ferdinando Paer typhoid James hunter Marie Duggal Louis Philippe Charles Byron nausea Hector Berlioz Niccolo Cazenove Byron France Russia