35 Burst results for "Papua"

All About the Thylacine

Your Brain on Facts

02:04 min | 1 year ago

All About the Thylacine

"The thylacine one only two marsupials known to have a pouch for both sexes. The other species which is still with us is the water possum. From central and south america the pouch of the mail file seen served as a protective sheath for their genitals making them sort of internal external genitals roughly two thousand years ago the pouched predator behind to disappear from papua new guinea and australia perhaps due to competition from the dingo the dingo is considered to be the first introduced species sienna though. No one's quite sure who introduce them. Among the front runners are indian mariners. Who may have traveled to australia. The seafaring lupita people who spread eastward into the pacific from east asia or traders from t- more and taiwan who sailed through southeast asia. The dingo began out competing. The thylacine centuries before european settlement at which point there were around five thousand of them left. Things got markedly worse for the tigers. In tasmania after sheep were introduced in eighteen twenty four. The european settlers took a dim view to native animals eating the livestock. They'd introduced into the predators environment within a few years cash. Bounties were offered to encourage people to hunt them despite contemporary evidence that stray dogs and poor ranch management were killing most of the sheep. Nope gotta be these animals. We didn't ask for to the bounty hunting. The combo punch of extensive habitat destruction and invasive diseases like mange and the population diminished rapidly. The last living thylacine was captured in the wild in nineteen thirty three before being taken to the bowmer assu also known as the hobart zoo the remains of which you can skulk through today if you're into urban exploring and don't mind the risk of being arrested for trespassing

Australia Papua New Guinea South America Sienna Mariners East Asia Taiwan Tasmania Tigers Asia Hobart Zoo
"papua" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"papua" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"'cause my both my parents a not like yours but in my father who is a compulsive gambler in in organized crime and my mom was in denial about it and and dismissed and kind of not even on. My mom was a very intelligent person. I mean they lost me at a racetrack when i was three years old so For what was before days so So i mean you know. How can a mother do that but again everybody's messed up but with that perspective that you just gave me. I could say you know what maybe it wasn't such a bad parent. Yeah but this is how i know the to waste so i used to always say the disease stocks here that something you say when you first all under twelve step program an my older child will say yes. The disease stops here. So my kids have generational trauma. They definitely have stars from my scars. It is what it is when you when shit has happened to you either. Give it to them when he works out to give it to them that you give them something else But my kid is like you have made a good and my younger child. This is how i know. i've done. Alright he hates. When i talk about it like he doesn't watch these and he's at college. Nobody was home last year before i came downstairs on. I said i talked about you. Today was interviewed any civil. Would you say. And i said well. I said that i'm a he'll to raising my children. Because i do know that i healed myself loving my children in the way that i was able to and i said when i had kids the only thing that matter to me was that my kids knew that they were loved and cherished whenever i didn't and he looks at me goes. Why don't you love me any dad bus me. I know mimi loves me. In papua zeke are my parents. They love me. But i really. You'll love me wore out. Which know that. He's so knows. I love him so he's so comfortable that that's what he can say knows it. I i know him with that much. I learned the both coming on saturday the driving from the midwest. And i'm like i am going to be all over. You guys like my oldest shelter pet pet my kids when they come home touched. So did you. Were you open to having your parents in your children's lives because he probably had to be a little nervous about a boston. It was kinda like with a you know. Yeah i get it. My dad's he might do. Something really wrong is still alcoholic. Drug addict friends or with my mom. It was like again..

mimi papua midwest boston
"papua" Discussed on The Retrofuturist Chronicles

The Retrofuturist Chronicles

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"papua" Discussed on The Retrofuturist Chronicles

"Sometimes we just forget where we put things. That's what happened in this case. The ship didn't mysteriously disappeared in the bermuda triangle it had been diverted to papua new guinea. The ship was fine. Somebody just forgot to update the paperwork so no one knew. Oh yeah. I know boring end to the story but the epilogue is better. The sisters crisis not only went on to write a best selling book about the disappearing object phenomenon that funded our operation for decades to come but we started a seal program. You mean like navy seals. no not that. We had such success with our penguin program and artika that we began working with sales. We train them to be very much like bloodhounds. But in the water it turns out that a well trained seal can track the scent of missing ship for thousands of nautical miles. Seems they'll do just about anything for a few herrings and look at this. We didn't lose any socks in the laundry. Perhaps it's a compensating shift in the cosmos. You find your socks but lose your journal.

papua
"papua" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"papua" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"And we need your help. Help us riddle that down, But if you give this hour, your Bibles will be matched Bible for Bible. So if you give a $150 gift that's a $30. That's a 30 Bible gift normally That turns into 60 Bibles because you give it in this hour, so 1 809 379673 809 379673 Michael Woolworth is back with us and Michael. I love the stories that you come armed with because they literally do represent what the Bible League is doing all around the globe. Take us to Indonesia. What's going on there? Yes, I do that. Let me say thanks to Jennifer of Cambria Heights, Windy of Brooklyn. We've heard from Florence of Kid alone. Thank you for these gifts each one match because of that Bible for Bible match That's employees of this hour. You know, back in February before Koba 19 hit really hard in the lockdowns came, I was able to travel to Indonesia beautiful part of the world. It is the largest Muslim majority countries in the world from my colleagues and I went there wondered, Okay, if the stats are true, you look around 10 people on average, eight will follow Islam. They break that down in the thirds top third radicals, moderates and then nominal Sze. If you were to ask him, why are you a Muslim? They say Well, you know, my parents. My parents were most of my grand parents. They they would fall into that nominal category can tell you we were treated very, very well. We were not permitted to go to places like Papua Indonesian about seeing Papua New Guinea but Oppel Indonesian So this pastor, this man you're going to hear from in just a second Taani came to us with an absolutely amazing story. This is Pastor Tandy. And he is in Papua Indonesia. Thiss.

Indonesia Michael Woolworth Papua Indonesia Bible League Papua Pastor Tandy Florence Brooklyn Jennifer
"papua" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"papua" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Earthquake strikes of the Pacific Monjack Kelehan Fox News a major earthquake striking just offshore from Papua New Guinea, the island nation north of Australia. US specific tsunami warning center, estimating the magnitude at 7.3 and warned earlier of a possible tsunami, but now says that danger has passed. The quake reported just offshore from the northeast coastline of Papua New Guinea said to be very deep, which could lessen the amount of damage done the corona virus still surging in some southern US hot spots. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the Corona Virus Task Force says We're missing something. Look, what's happened. There really is no reason why we're having 40 50 60,000 other than the fact that we're not doing something correctly. Dr Fauci and a Facebook live interview with Mark Zuckerberg says he is not calling for another shutdown and is very optimistic. That researchers are close to an effective vaccine, but someone likely a foreign government is trying to heck Corona VIRUS VACCINE research. The United Kingdom's National Cybersecurity Center says it is 95% certain Russian government intelligence services are behind hackers targeting medical research. UK. Intelligence officials identify the Russian hacking groups as a PT 29. The Dukes and cozy bear cozy Bear and another hacking group Fancy bear are accused of infiltrating the Democratic National Committee in 2016 they say throughout the year, Russian hackers have been targeting organizations in the U. S. Canada and U K. It's unclear if the hackers were successful functions Rich Edson at the State Department. India, with the third highest number of reported Corona virus cases, has just passed the one million case Mark Georgia's governor, Brian Camp, suing the city of Atlanta to block it from enforcing a mandate to wear masks in public are doing. Atlanta's mayor, Keisha Lance bottoms, has overstepped her authority..

Papua New Guinea US Dr. Anthony Fauci Earthquake United Kingdom Atlanta Pacific Monjack Kelehan Fox Ne Mark Zuckerberg Keisha Lance bottoms Democratic National Committee National Cybersecurity Center Facebook Australia Rich Edson India State Department Mark Georgia Canada Brian Camp
"papua" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

Ubuntu Podcast

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"papua" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

"Yeah that's that's I really like is the. There is a younger generation coming through her excited to create things. Make things okay. He's remaking a desktop from before he was born not makes us feel old. How are we doing this forecast? Yeah exactly yeah so that's cool anyway. What's spotting well? There was an interesting article out this week. The that pose. The question is should Microsoft by canonical. How Own Jessica yes. It's time to come round again. It's quite an interesting raid. is it quick Chris Pitch Man I think he pronounce his name From build five nines Dot Com wrote up a rather good so of insightful Pace the was more deep than most of these questions. They really so put some thought in it and just click by. Yeah so so I mean mark. You've read this. What do you think do you think Mike? Social by nautical. I'll reserve judgment on that but now I think just some of the things that he explores her interesting. I mean there's the office things about a very popular. What is your and they're doing. Wfl But then he also looks at things like if it happened. How much might they pay for it? Based on what they paid for things. Like get hub when you look what canonical revenue is and how that scaled up when they bought other things and also talks bit about whether Marshall Worth would remain a see if Microsoft by. And if not what would his role be would he have some sort of leadership role within? Microsoft instead already. Just take all the money and go to space. Can who knows I think the thing that I find fascinating about this is usually comes up as a either April fools joke or the reverse April fools joke which is can run cool by Microsoft Rightey jerk articles all people writing semi serious articles about. I think this is the best one. So far like he's he's actually put some four into. It's a little bit better than most of them but People keep asking when these articles come out. They poke people who work for can articles. I always gonNA happen. You'll going to yoga. How would it feel if you were working for Microsoft? They always poses questions and I also have no idea. This is all obviously way above my pay grade. Get sure they could be conversations between people at these companies like. There's no way I would know that. Yeah I mean the shoot Microsoft by canonical. I mean the article does say this unlike every other article on this topic before which is designing one person that cannot whether this would happen. That knock because canonical as a privately held and so it would all be down to him. And I'd be amazed if people have approached mark over the years spent in out trying to make speculative acquisitions. Well people have a word with me on occasion. But and you never know what they've offered either know whether it's been the three billion or two pound fifty and Alpha Panda Grapes somewhere in between who knows anyway next up own. Ge until you have an article about system seventy six Papua Papua's twenty four and the title is twenty four is here and it boasts impressive news features one of the main..

Microsoft Mike Papua Papua Alpha Panda Grapes Ge Jessica Marshall
Trevor Cole

Photography Radio

06:41 min | 2 years ago

Trevor Cole

"Low Hallo photography lovers. How's it going today? I have another fascinating conversation for you. I talked to a British travel and landscape photographer today. Coal Trevor Publishes Images in magazines calendars and carts in the December. Two thousand eleven he presented to the Royal Geographic. Society has also exhibited in Ziada in Switzerland Ireland. He reached the final of the travel photographer of the year. In Two thousand ten eleven thirteen and fifteen and was also a finalist in the wanderlust magazine travel photographer of the year in two thousand thirteen without any further. Ado here is my conversation with Trevor Call. Hello Trevor I'm so happy to have you today. How doing very well. Thank you very nice to meet you to lash the first question. I often asked. My guess is very simple. How do you stay inspired? What's the number one thing that makes you go out there and photograph as a really good question for many years of my life? I told Jugular Vein International schools overseas so for me. Photography was always a part of that so all night photography established from geography and travel. So whenever you see things you have new eyes of men therefore the photography becomes much more meaningful so I guess. Travel is my main stimulus. Okay so and you are traveling all over the world. I have seen so many amazing images in your portfolio of people and landscape of different cultures and of of those people in their environment. So what is it that fascinates about those those people? Are there any answers you are trying to get you know to your photography when when photographing them? I've always had an interest in indigenous able those that have beaten in situ on the spot for a very long period of time I e the tribes of southwest Ethiopia and. I've just come back from a trip to Papua New Guinea. Where I went to the highland. Show it on. I guess it's the way they live. And the way they still connect to nature something that's been lost largely in our more developed world. It just fascinates me hobbies cultures. They're very similar in many ways and yet they're very different but the way they interact with the the earth sky above the elements and manage to look after the environment. And there's always been a little bit of the environmentalist in me jumper. I lived in West Africa for a year teaching and I live for four years in Ethiopia. So I'm particularly familiar with southern eighth yoga so I try to return there and take little voters there Once the air or once every eighteen months I real soft spot for Ethiopia in particular but also photographed different look different locations or all around to drive yesterday of an. I love together Namibia. I also love landscapes I mean. That's the other part of my geography really is just beings have more which so incredibly beautiful and Iceland or where I live here. My own country of Ireland is stunningly. Beautiful the perfect perfect place for tigers to capture light and landscape. Let's talk about landscape a little bit more later on on on the show here. Let's get back to people because it's really fascinating for me especially that travel to visit those different locations. Instead of one thing you would say that kind of stays the same when it comes to people standing in front of your camera like do you experience similar emotions or reactions when when photographing them. Actually actually no. I mean in in for example. I've only been to Papua New Guinea Than it's fresh in my mind the people are just loved. Having their photograph taken that were very receptive but some other parts of the world. I've traveled to Somaliland on travel to eastern Ethiopia. Where cultural differences make it a lot more difficult to take photographs a lot more challenging due to other religious belief or a certain shyness towards being photographed so sometimes sometimes you have to look not more I really think is important. Is Spending time with people not just going in taking your shot leaving. You have to know people you have to feel something on even those. That are difficult to photograph culturally. If you spend time with him you know you often get that little chance that maybe others don't get shots than becomes a possibility but this this first step of knowing those people better is is not a barrier which is also very difficult to cross. You have to kind of enter private sphere of someone or maybe a family. How do you start such process with people from different cultures different languages and so on while I always take a local guide? I always use local Enterprise people who know the people and that is my way it take find a good guide opens doors that otherwise you would find closed in your face some places. You just cannot go alone you wouldn't you wouldn't get up. She wants to get so someone who could translate to sit Iran with you and you can ask questions using their skills as an interpreter and that makes a lot of different so that first step becomes easier.

Ethiopia Trevor Call Papua New Guinea Royal Geographic Wanderlust Magazine Jugular Vein International Sch Ziada Switzerland Ireland Namibia Ireland Iceland West Africa Iran Somaliland
Voice and Wearables with Dave Kemp of Future Ear

Voice First Health

07:37 min | 2 years ago

Voice and Wearables with Dave Kemp of Future Ear

"Also have a blog. That has now Formed into a podcast as well future ear. My podcast is the the future ear radio PODCASTS. And really what I'm trying to do is cover the intersection of Curable technology stemming from my background in hearing AIDS which are like The preeminent curable And Voice Technology. So I I you know I do too podcast week where I bring on people from the world of audiology the world of the world of voice technology and sort of just have this guy. Tried to create a cohesive narrative around this budding intersection. That I just find to be absolutely fascinating. That's amazing end I've listened to your podcast and it's fantastic. I think you're a great interviewer actually have said that you before. So I think thank you. Questions are really great and And you're in your prolific content producer as well now because you're doing it twice. That's I know that takes that takes a lot of a lot of consistency effort. So good for you. Let's talk a little bit about the intersection here of here. Both in voice technology. We'll get into the exciting news that we have the book in just a moment but I love to get your take on. How did you first see that interaction with voice technology? And what's the what's the origin? Story there sure So the very first time I like started coming around the voice technology You know like world was the the Alexa Conference back when it was called the Alexa conference very proud that I can say that I was one of the Og Alexa Conference people back when it was in Chattanooga Public Library It's so funny. It's like when we were at project voice this year which which has been reprinted in to see many familiar faces. And it's just so cool to think back on this small group inside the Public Library and it just keeps growing and growing and growing and The reason I was there was because I started to really research What was going to happen Due to the fact that hearing aids were all becoming Bluetooth enabled so back around. Twenty fifteen twenty sixteen there this massive shift In terms of the type of hearing aids that were coming to market Everything was Bluetooth enabled and because of that I started thinking. Well this is a really big deal because then you basically unlocked the whole smartphone economy the economy and all that but I kept thinking. What else are you gonna be able to do with this and Like so many people you know I always find it interesting like who was the person that really got you interested in this and a lot of people would say Gary Banner Chuck for me. It was Brian Romilly. I came across him on twitter. I just Kinda got into a rabbit hole. Read his stuff and I was like. This is a really really interesting premise. In the way that I thought about it was okay. So if this You know the way that he describes it as the sort of paradigm shift into the way in which we interact with technology. Every you know ten to twelve years you have sort of this new interface that emerges And this idea of voice made a lot of sense to me because you know it's this idea of simplifying everything back to the basics and being able to have a four year olds communicate with this type of technology or ninety five girls and that to me was like the Big Aha moment so what I started think was okay. Well if this is going to be a thing in smart speakers continued to proliferate and people continue to increasingly depend on them for more and more things I thought that what would it be likely that they would then want that type of functionality on their person and so I said well. What better of a home Then these new Bluetooth connected hearing AIDS that you're wearing all day every day Not to mention sort of the consumer side that was just starting to take shape largely being ushered in by air products. And so. That's how I got into this whole thing was just this notion in this idea that I thought it was entirely possible that the evolution of The way in which we interact with our smartphones would be unbundled to the more like peripheral Peripheral wearable devices In having voice as you know not only the user interface also the voice assistant serving as the actual operating system. Yeah that's great and and it's clear You know hearing you speak in following your work that you're now one of the leaders in this area of technology and here ables and it's such a historic. It just makes sense to me. You know an intuitively that with with speaking. There's listening as well and part of the part of the oral type of communication so I think that's really exciting because of that You know it's. It's really wonderful that we've had the opportunity to work together on this special project on the voice technology in Healthcare Book and You are one of the chapter authors. And I'd love for you to share with us a little bit about The process and of course you know little bit of information in terms of what did you write about. What did you learn out of it and your your thoughts on on that whole that whole deal? Yeah for sure and first of all I wanNA thank. You WanNa thank the whole group Harry Papua's and David Metcalfe and everybody else I. This is just an amazing opportunity in so regarding the process. What's interesting is at the time when you approach me about this. I had been writing what I called the daily updates so I was midway through. I'd probably written about seventy five eighty of these so I had actually got into the habit of writing daily and I think that it was good timing because I was like I felt as if I was kind of honing his craft of writing and being pretty religious about it. And so when you presented me with this idea of like can you write a ten thousand word chapter on You? Know Kinda like everything that you're passionate about wearables. Voice Technology in the Medical Setting. Rice said that sounds like a challenge. In so I'll be perfectly honest. I had a good idea in my head of of the outline. I sent you the outline but when push came to shove Like so many other people you know something. That's kind of daunting like that. I kind of procrastinated and when I finally did is one day. I can't remember. I think it was like a Sunday. I just like went into my room. Close my door in a got into like this Into this almost like trans. Yeah exactly and I just cranked it out. I actually wrote it in one day while I obviously edited it afterwards but I remember I would. I was writing And I told my girlfriend that I was going to be doing this. I was like I'M GONNA go. I'm GONNA just knock out ten thousand words and we'll see if I can do this. I think I can do it. I read about a thousand words every day. So it's just like basically writing ten types of articles that are right but I gotta do it and so I did it and I just went in there and I was texting updates from like six thousand seven thousand so it was. It was actually pretty a pretty cool process and it was a pretty cool thing for me to like. Be Able to tell myself like you can do this So as a writer because I have journalism background. This was one of the this was like for me. Like if I was a mountain climber like this was the highest peak that I've climbed yet so I really appreciate the opportunity of even getting the chance to do this and the challenge of Of doing it and So that was sort of the process of of how I how this thing came to life and then after I wrote it I went back through. I mean there was it was kind of messy so I had a really clean it up in. You know rearrange it a little bit but But that's how I

Voice Technology Aids Og Alexa Conference Public Library Twitter Content Producer Brian Romilly Chattanooga Public Library Writer Rice Harry Papua Medical Setting David Metcalfe
The Conjuring - The Haunting of the Perron Family

Ghostly

06:57 min | 2 years ago

The Conjuring - The Haunting of the Perron Family

"Welcome to ghostly was the parent family home haunting as always. We're your host. I'm PAT and I'm Rebecca ghostly as a podcast that examines. It goes story from all angles. We go over the history in various evidence of the ghost story. Then we let you the listener decide if it's real or not. Today's episode is going to be huge but We do have business to cover before we get to the episode. So Rebecca. Do we have any listener mail? Of course we do. I WANNA hear it. Okay okay. How's Your Week Bennett? Are You doing okay? I am virus free right now. Okay so all probably I probably have some virus but not the virus. Gotcha I just wanted to check in do you not that I know of. I keep checking my temperature though just to be sure. Like how often are you checking your temperature? Well I guess I checked it earlier this week. 'cause I had like a scare moment but that was wait scare moments like I felt flush for some reason and so then I went and I took my temperature and it was Way Ninety eight point six normal. I was like ninety seven point nine or something like that. So you're dying right so you're pretty much you're becoming beyond debt. I think so. Wow that is not the podcast for this now. They are walking dead walking dead podcasts. Which if any of our listeners. Listen to walking dead just in case you don't know Patna also do walking advant cast which is me. Find that weirdly appropriate right now They can find it anywhere. They find. Good podcasts It's just searched. The walking dead podcast. Dv M. p. e. 'cause that's the network the network the D. vm production. And all right. Okay here we go. This is another listener mail. Ghostly society facebook group so if you haven't joined this is the time just ghostly sleep society on facebook and I join you know. It's it's a lot of fun there. I mean seriously I enjoy seeing other people like interact on these same topics and use the same critical thinking that we've been going over. Yes 'cause they'll be like. Hey this is something happened to me. What do you guys think? And then people kind of debate it. It's well I'm I'm especially proud of the moments when people are like you know I used to. Just be a straight up believer in all this but now I question it and I usually still come up to be a believer. I take time to think about it. And that is that makes me proud me too me too. Yeah all right so. This is one of our top listeners. Whitney top listeners. She is our top is awesome. She is awesome and she's always posting and got a lot of fun stuff So she says Pat You will probably have a field day with this my friend and roommate by the way she did get permission from the room. That's it took us a few weeks before we read this Who her roommate goes by the name of Rabbit Rabbit has been an actual rabbit or is it no named rap person named nicknamed rabbit okay. I'm fine with that. All right has been seeing and hearing things his entire life. He has many stories but one in particular still ongoing from when he was a child. He believes that he's being plagued by Mitch mischievous spirit that he is named Bob. Oh I am too. Yeah by Bob Anderson from Bob after dark spirit that just plagues you keep putting these micro-climate ideas in my head. Yeah Over the years Bob is made his presence known to all of us. Rabbit claims he frequently moves things to a place where they should not be for. Example rabbit used to smoke an old fashioned tobacco pipe. He always placed in his bedside drawer and in his nightstand. Before going to sleep one morning he woke up and it was no longer there. Robert searched Oliver's room but he could not find it anywhere. I needed to go into rabbits room to borrow a cord to charge my phone as my court shorten it and I would not be able to get to the store until much later I went nowadays. You can't get to the store at all well though this was. Yeah you can tell. It's dated story. That was when we could go in Papua stores. I went searching for because they normally do not go into his room. And have no idea where you normally puts things. Even though he's meticulous about where things are put so he can find them quickly when he wakes up. That sounds like you pat. I couldn't find it in any of the spots. I thought were obvious so I looked in the drawer under the foot of his bed. There was his pipe when he got home. I told him I found the pipe. And where where? And he just looked at me confused. He never uses that drawer for anything in his door. Stays locked due to pass issues with things going missing from his room so no one besides him myself and my husband could have moved it and none of us did. Bob also seems to get frustrated with my husband. My hubby is firmly on the Hashtag schemes. Team skeptic side. Oh I like her husband. This is despite the fact that Bob throws things that John from time to time. Especially if we've been talking about him recently and John has voiced his opinion that he does not believe Bob exists normally a short Shortwhile after this declaration something that John is place down near himself will fall to the floor. Once it was a plate of Spaghetti that he had put at the back of the wide of a wide dresser that was against the wall. Everyone in the room was more than arm's length away and it fell off in front of the dresser face down. We know it didn't just fall off the edge because the dresser was much wider than the plate also the Renault animals in the room at the time because we were eating in the door was closed to keep them out. Wow sounds very mischievous yeah. Poltergeists definitely in the Bob thing really rings true to me. Yeah I think Bob you know since his psychic powers to like knock play. Spaghetti off my my dresser too often things missing you believe in. I like to put Spaghetti on my dresser. I think that is the appropriate place for Spaghetti. It is the appropriate place table no dresser. Yeah totally yes there. There's our listener mail today. So that's exciting. If you've listener mail send it on over Info at ghostly podcasts dot com or you could message us on any of the socials you got it facebook and STA INSTA- instead I just caught I g Graham. I call it a G G or twitter tweets the tweets the twitter's. Yeah that place to yes. You could send it anywhere or you could even go on our website. Ghostly PODCAST DOT COM and you can click on the contact us button and there's a form right there you just fill out. He's ended off. It is definitely while I wanNA think Whitney for sending that in. That was a very good

Bob Anderson Rebecca Ghostly Facebook Whitney Pat You Twitter Rabbit Patna Bennett Papua John Mitch G Graham Robert Oliver
Ethics and Responsibility in the Jewelry Industry

Dressed: The History of Fashion

06:46 min | 2 years ago

Ethics and Responsibility in the Jewelry Industry

"I have a fun fact. Did you know that between the two holidays? Valentine's Day and Mother's DAY CASS. American spent get this on average a staggering ten billion dollars every year on jewelry. Not Surprising. And that's just those two holidays alone. That's not including you know the winter holidays including birthdays anniversaries or engagements. That's only on Valentine's Day and Mother's Day which is incredible. I had no idea. Yeah me neither. And that's actually just a small fraction of the three hundred billion dollars exchanged globally from the mining of approximately ninety million carats of rough diamonds and sixteen hundred tons of gold every single year. And of course with that colossal sum of money on the line well. Human Nature can and does falter sadly succumbing sometimes to unbridled greed and avarice often quite literally on the backs of others. How many of us have really truly considered the true cost of our jewelry. I mean we may very well recall the price that we paid for it. But what about this other price? The human and environmental cost cast in twenty eighteen activists organization. Human Rights Watch published a study which is called the hidden cost of jewelry and it highlights some really heartbreaking egregious instances of human rights abuses and environmental tragedies stemming from unscrupulous mining operations such as when in two thousand eight members of this and Bob Way military staged a bloody takeover of the diamond fields and the country's Murang`a district and they slaughtered some two hundred civilian miners for the next six years. Certain factors of the government's armed forces military and police oversaw a brutal and ruthless program of torture and forced labor including forced child labor and their class to pilfer the diamond fields in two thousand eleven. Human Rights Watch documented a pervasive program of sexual violence against workers at the hands of the private security company hired to protect the Tara Mine in Papua New Guinea. While Canadian Gold Mining Company began mining operations in the Maroteaux district of northern Uganda without even notifying or securing the necessary rights or permissions from the indigenous Karamojong community. The grim reality is that gold around your neck. The silver on your wrist the platinum on your finger or the gems in your ears may very well have come for one of these mines or others like them but do not despair dress listeners. Because today we're going to bring you an episode which hopefully informs and educates you about some of these issues that are going on in the jewelry industry and we hope to shut a light on the ever growing movement to write these wrongs and also to institute responsibility and transparency all along the supply chain in the Jewelry Industry today. We are joined by jewelry designer educator and activist. Bliss Lau to talk about ethics and responsibility in the jewelry trade and what we as a consumer can do to effect change. Bless all welcome to the show bliss. Welcome to the show thanks I'm happy to be here. Yeah we're so excited to talk about Jewelry Today. But before we delve into what? I think will be some rather surprising subject matter for a lot of our listeners. I'm hoping that you can tell us a little bit about your own background. And how did you become a jewelry designer and specifically when did you begin zeroing in on some of the problems in the jewelry industry that we're going to cover today sure I? I went to Parsons as a studied fashion design and then I actually started off as a handbag designer and I did that for several years and I used to have this handbag that had the chains down the front of it that looked like the cables of the Brooklyn Bridge and at some point because I studied fashion design. I kind of was procrastinating. And for fun I made myself a body chain with a chain that had used on my handbags and it became like a huge explosive interest in the industry. Basically like what we would call viral. Now that was actually I was viral and it was the first time I ever heard the word was when it went. Viral eventually made myself actually. My first ring was a ring called the kaleidoscope bring which is still in my collection and because I studied apparel I wanted to make a ring that referenced apparel in the sense of when you get dressed you get up every day. It's a form of identity so you choose to put on your shirt and your jacket and your outfit and is who you are and when I wanted to enter into jewelry space. I didn't want to create something. That was an imposition on your body. I wanted to create something that in that same way would give you choice. The kaleidoscope ring is one ring made a four pieces so every single day. You can choose to wear it differently and it can evoke personality. That's what I love about it. I actually am mostly a bespoke bridal designer now and I have moved into fine jewelry in around twenty fourteen and I did that because it wasn't really a plan My now husband proposed to me with a sketchbook and asked me to design my own rang and it was actually at the Metropolitan Museum at the Alexander McQueen show Oh lovely because he knows I love fashion and it was the first experience that I had in picking out a gemstone and thinking about fine jewelry and then learning about fine jewelry and eventually I stopped making costume jewelry and just fully dove into making fine jewelry and bespoke bridal so we know each other quite well so I know your work quite well. You have been struggling a lot personally with some of the ethics within the jewelry industry and this is like one of the new major directions of your work. So when did you first start becoming aware that there were problems? I mean all of us we. Everyone knows that there are certain issues when it comes to gold and diamonds and things like that but it feels like a really big idea and when it's a really big idea it doesn't feel like you can do anything and one of the things that I love about. The jewelry industry is that your industry is essentially made up of a millions and millions of independent small businesses myself included. And when I started one of the things that I did that really made me realize that I could make an impact with my design and also simultaneously made me realize how challenging it can be was

Jewelry Industry Valentine Canadian Gold Mining Company Bliss Lau Metropolitan Museum Alexander Mcqueen Bob Way Uganda Papua New Guinea Brooklyn Bridge Karamojong Community Maroteaux Parsons
Sean O'Beirne

Published...Or Not

09:53 min | 2 years ago

Sean O'Beirne

"Short stories are the perfect way to address a range of issues in an immediate and succinct. Way Sean Ben has done just that in his collection entitled a couple of things before the end so sean welcome to three. Ci thanks very much for having me. Now what sort of did you have in mind? It's a bit ominous sort of title. Yea Well I wouldn't be the person I mean just about everybody's GonNa soonest ought to be thinking about what the next ten twenty thirty forty s log and if you begin to read even in the mainstream press you'll start to get warnings that if the sky gets full of more particles that make the earth hotter and hotter parts of the Middle? Part of the Earth are going to become more or less uninhabitable this century and serious water and food shortages will come along with that. I mean this is nothing else but what anyone who gets anyway. Nissim Sci. He's starting to tell us Now then the question would come. Kenneth fiction serve that what can fiction do Without saying the same thing over and over but what what to do with that was really interesting to me was what would the people I grew up with. I love And also people who weren't exactly like the people I grew up with. How are we all going to be with this? What he's going to happen to to quite the people I really know once serious privation serious shortages dot to happen all around us. There's one story at the end Bunka which goes into that. We'll come to that one but there are other sorts of ends in mind here. The gained the a period in your life The end of communication is another one. That comes up. So let's delve into some of these stories and hopefully it won't be all that ominous Because there are some fascinating things here you did. The first story is called scouts. Were you ever a boy scout? I have to go ahead and say that I was a boy scout. I was a boy scout in the nineteen seventies I was very. I was particularly bad at sports which were an Australian boy his special problem but one thing I could find do with me was put me in cub scouts. And that work that worked I was especially bad at what we in. The nineteen seventies was called foot clinic Stood there disconsolate. A very small boy. Seven or eight years old in the middle of big muddy oval. And all I wanted was people might remember this. You GotTa be game at the end but for me it really was standing around in an hour on a on a baddeck not understanding really what to do with the football. I remember years ago. Michael Looney telling the story that when he was boy out in the country he was sort of Eilly united and confused by football. What you were supposed to do when the ball came down to woods him he picked it up. Held it to his chest and ran through the goals. Naturally as as one would. But it's a right of passage in some ways you know learning the not earning the badges miss but at what point do you sort of. What will does it come to an end? If we want to talk about ending but you transition the development there what was I suppose one of the things that got some pythons about being a scout? I mean they certainly some comedy as well but what was what was maybe saddle. Poignant upbeat about being a scout in the seventies wars you were participating in the system in. You didn't exactly think about lock these you'll participating in a system that was actually dying all around you which was the old British USTRALIAN loyalty. Oh British Astrid Unite. The revolt was valuable. Said they weren't sort of nineteen seventy seven nine hundred seventy eight nine hundred seventy nine a NI- uniform saluting the flag And trying to be sort of good junior soldier. Boys in a Y. Or at the very least the kind of good boy that you would have. That Biden Powell know if people remember Lord Biden Powell the founder of the Scouting Movement. But if you go back and look at scouting for boys it's the idea of kind of purposeful cleanliness in a little boy. That's also always turning into the effort to sort of locate and destroy aliens. But Tom and I don't mean I don't mean from outer space I mean the ones we leave this a militarist element. This is it. So it's it's playing soldier but it's also got an idea of self theirself idea of self control in it. There's a list of things that are good boy does that a scout does a scout prepared but a scout is also sort of honest in a tainted in some ways and I don't mean to mock all of that hopefully the thing about that stories. It's not all pissing from a high on the scouting movement. It's getting to something. Which was that? There was something in that I mean. I know we feel like this a lot now. But there's something in that old idea of self control. Which is such a daily on fashionable idea. Now the scouting movement held onto a part of it. But of course to us. It just looks ridiculous that you would wear your little uniform and your little hat and salute a flag on a Tuesday night. It's not so much ridiculous. One eventually which happens in the story eventually grows out of it yes and reevaluate says you grow older so it has its purpose in its place but as you say a lot of traditions a dying as well and they've got a reinvent. I mean the notion of a boy's group alone today. Isis audience changed another thing. That's changed the royals. You've got him on August news lead. There is an incompetent. Monarchist Focus Group pretty early in the and that comes out of the Scout Story too. Which is it goes to the whole idea of the Shia strangeness of trying to make an England down the bottom of Asia which we really did try and do. I went to London for the first time. Not that long gone about ten years ago. I had that thing that many many strengths must have had. Which is the shock of recognition that once you get through cock fosters on that train and start to going to London accord. It looks exactly like Hawthorne it looks. Exactly like Moldovan down to the last and you begin to understand why that you had before that we that that the F. It was really just to make these places again. The idea of Kemba well below Laos below. Papua we really tried for that and again I think one of the things. That's hopefully interesting about growing up. In the seventies I think the seventies there was a was a real transition time where that old idea that we could somehow Cape together an England down here began to break up and wash away and so and then then I mean then I think plenty of people listening to this would know this. But in a way the bill for that wasn't paid until the nineteen ninety s in the nineteen nineties. We had that exuberant Tom where we thought well. No no money in this and we'll just be Australian. It's all we can let England going by the nineteen ninety by the Howard years. You had the understanding that it was actually going to be something that we felt a lot more Sarah about a lot more angry about and we're going to punish somebody else but we still had politicians bringing back knighthoods and such luck. And that's you that's interesting but that was what was interesting about the Abbot Attempt. In about the time of that story about the top of that royal story where it really much to light now and even people that you wouldn't expect or the I thought the idea of Sir Prince Phillip and the first strategy night. All that's right it will be Prince Philip. Did you give Edinburgh that? The whole country in two thousand fifteen couldn't take that But just as Australia was reinventing itself oil or imagining its identity. Which is a growing sort of evolution. The monarchy is sort of caught in the same bind. Harry and Meghan done Mike it into the story necessarily only slightly but they trying to establish their own identity in a new ish. Can you hold on to the monarchy? This is where I think I mean. I think this is still true. This little against what I just said but I still think it's a strain schizophrenia. What you would think of is the oldest. Dr Steele holds a lot. Hold on a lot for monarchy and foreign idea of England that still does persist in one of the places it does possess these in those people in that royal family in the Queen and to some extent. Now I mean we tried Diana but now much more and William and Kate but the thing that Tom the thing about that he says it's just getting hotter and hotter for any family any group of individuals to actually be able to carry off what you need to do to be a barely successful enough royalty in the face of the sheer amount of virulent attention that the entertainment system is GonNa WanNa put on you. It's it's pretty much going to be impossible to be monarchy in the next fifty but also the the monarchy speaks to a tradition that goes back centuries which hasn't necessarily evolved and changed with the Moore's that go on today which is it's appeal. Which is the thing we desperately hope for that. You could point to any one group of things and say you want change will you? You'll stay the same. You promised The problem is is that as you say with them. What Harry and Megan is it. They couldn't take the deal that will often because the deal starts to get so strange which is listen. You'll be a representative of what is good in a sense. He's more self control. This idea that we're after over and over again but at the same time will pretty much persecute and you will be at you all the time. You'll open your door in the morning and hundreds of us where we tried to watch you and I I can't understand. I don't get a sense of whether this is to their credit or not. They just refuse that. Were like this is so awful. This is more or less like a kind of strange it privileged. But it's also a persecution and can leave. Just leave

Scouting Movement England TOM Sir Prince Phillip Harry Football Sean Ben London Monarchist Focus Group Biden Powell Asia Edinburgh Michael Looney Representative Laos Lord Biden Kemba Papua
The Basque Carnivals

Travel with Rick Steves

06:24 min | 2 years ago

The Basque Carnivals

"Let's start with a look at the Mardi Gras and Carnival celebrations going on in Basque country. The customs and street parties will vary from town to town one of the oldest cultures in Europe. The Basques include some interesting public festivities in the days leading up to the fasting period of length traditions. That sometimes go back further than anyone can remember for a peek at how they do carnival in Basque country. We're joined by Claire Noah. She's from Hess Barron in the French Basque country and a Gustin lives in San Sebastian. On the Spanish side of the border. Welcome Claire and Augustine. Thank you very much so first of all. You're both from best country. Claire who are the Basques just very briefly and the basket is one of the oldest civilization in Europe and we are divided on those two parts one in France in another Barton Spain and Augustine. Those the language of Basque people yes. We speak Basque language which we call Skater. Who Scatter I WANNA talk about. Carnival carnival basically is the blow out before lent that leads up to Holy Week and Easter. It goes way back to even pre Christian Times on trying to get through the winter and there's a hope for resurrection for new crops in the fields for the end of the hunger time and the darkest depths of winter. I think the meat was going to go bad. And they had to eat it. All or something or carnival. Carney is the word meat and that led up to forty days of denial lent and then Easter so we know Mardi Gras in New Orleans. That's basically fat Tuesday in French. And IT'S CARNIVAL TIME RIGHT. Turn tell me about carnival. Because it's a big deal in Basque country. A Gustin what is carnival in your perspective. As a person in Basque country we have to waste of Celebrating carnival the more more than Christian celebrations. There are more popular on the Spanish side on the more traditional Pagan celebrations. That you can find in the past country of France. The difference is the recent history. I mean this pagan celebrations were banned by the dictator Franco for thirty five years He banned the use of the language and all kind of Celebrations related to pass or and this was banned. Sue was probably lost the in that time. So let me get this straight. You've got Basque culture. Which is a lot of ways? The same in France and in Spain but carnival is a mix of Christian and pagan traditions. And when you see these crazy creatures jumping up and down in Europe in many cultures it's pre Christian and it's a way to integrate the the indigenous religion in ancient times with the Christian. The newer religion and Franco was allied very carefully with the Catholic Church in Spain. He didn't want any pagan influence in the Spanish Basque country so he said this is a Christian festival none of that Pagan stuff but in France they were more free to have let loose with the pagan craziness. Correct correct Franco considered himself the highest representation of the Catholic Church and turn the country into a religious state Now clear I would imagine in France. Then you have some pretty wild costumes when people dress up during carnival especially where the Pagans go crazy in the French side of the border. What is the carnival? Can you just were on radio but paint a picture for look like for me? It's colorful with many natural things so we will have flowers leaves and we will have ribbons. We will have a chilling chuck which is a small bells everywhere. So you have to hear the carnival and you have to say it's an explosion. Okay of joy. It's just a moment where you go out from last year and everything that went wrong and you wish something really good for the next one so you just have to explodes yourself and just let it go. Go out with your animal part of you. Let your animal free and you're inside and we all have this side in so we have just. This is the perfect moment just to and then you start again so you dress up. There's music there's staying up all night. What's going on in different places? You've got different carnivals into French part of the Basque country three provinces for example Nepali which is really famous. You've got cash Celtic. So those people are going from house to house every weekend before carnival low even after they go to each house. They had get to know the neighborhood. So it's kind of ritual and they'll go to every house they sing. They play music. They DANCE. They share several cups of wine. And then it's a big party the tired but it's it's really nice. This is so interesting because I've been going to the best country for a long time and I have to be honest. I feel there's more character and enthusiasm in Spain because the French Basques are more French to me. More controlled by Peres but here on carnival. You let that ask animal that when you hear Claire. Talking about that from the Spanish Basque side on Carnival do you relate to have an animal you're gonNA lose all And fortunately now we have just a couple of little towns in the north of Navarro which are having the celebration in which the these men are carrying big belts that are bouncing and making big noise. Dig Like cowbells accounting. Yes huge cultures. A lot of this You know animal caretaking in the Malki. As the purpose of it is to wake the nature awake. The youth. Springtime is communist very much related to the end of winter. Welcome in the New Year and also we can in the nature and the spring is coming. So he's very much really. That's something you can see in two different towns in the north of Pamplona Navarre and also a couple of towns in the area outside San Sebastian. When I think of eastern Spain anyways I think of processions solemn processions like in savvy and so on some Amazon Too Holy Week Carnival feels a little more. Just apart and in. Holy Week is more sacred. Yes especially in the spiny side. You'RE GONNA see is big. Parades like you'd like him to turn off taller than most popular. One people go from all the areas. Go and see this parade. Our guest from Basque country are Agustin Cerita from San Sebastian Spain and Claire. Moya from aspirin a little town outside zone in the southwest corner of France.

France Spain Claire Europe Franco San Sebastian Claire Noah Christian Times Gustin Hess Barron Catholic Church San Sebastian Spain Barton Spain Mardi Gras Navarro New Orleans Augustine Agustin Cerita
New opportunity to boost Indonesia-Australia economic ties - The Jakarta Post

Between The Lines

12:55 min | 2 years ago

New opportunity to boost Indonesia-Australia economic ties - The Jakarta Post

"Few international problems in the post world war. Two era have proved difficult for our nation as development of friendly policy towards indonesia. Just think about it. Jakarta's annexation of west papua in nine hundred sixty to the attempted coup d'etat and successful counter-coup by the indonesian army that was nineteen sixty five the invasion of as. Taymor seventy five. The dili massacre ninety. One the east team or mission in ninety nine. And who can forget the controversies over terror. Attacks live cadillacs bullpens successive wives of boatpeople this spying revelations and drug trade and of course those executions so has president jarkko daito or jacuzzi or jacoby as he's known has. His visit marked a new era in australia. Indonesia relations this week to cowie was only the second indonesian leader to address a joint sitting of parliament and he came to camera bearing a gift. He's approval of the trade deal between our two countries. Greg feely is associate professor of indonesian politics at the australian national university's college of asia and the pacific and diming kingsbury is professor international politics at deakin university in melbourne. greg damian. Welcome back to our in. Thank you now damien. Does that you kelly visit this week. Does that maka a dramatic breakthrough in australia. Indonesia relations look it's a really positive sign and it does mock an improvement in relations but i don think in itself comprises an entirely new relationship. It's just a step in the right direction. Okay so the the relationship still presumably dogged by bitterness and suspicion but it was obvious support and even warmth towards education from both sides of politics gregg fairly. Yes that's right i think The y.`all would characterize it is the jacobi visa was building on the breakthrough which is the comprehensive economic partnership agreement. That was signed early last year. And what saw with dakota's visa was. He's personal preparedness and preparedness. He's government to really put its white behind the agreement. I think a lot of people think the agreement in pie terms is very good but the question is canopy implemented properly. Can the red type be cleared away in indonesia. Can we persuade australian businesses to invest more Generously in indonesia and i think the jacoby visa guy very positive signs for that still a lot of things to done for that The potential of that agreement to be realized but it was really good. Move in that direction. Again it's been said that. The many lingering suspicions profile in jakarta indonesians still resent l leading role insecure in a team os independence because it was more than twenty years ago. Yes i think One of the ironies here he said indonesia now has very good relations with east t- more and he's teamer leaders Fighted in fact when i go to jakarta and the strata is still has this legacy of suspicion towards indonesia. I think you have to back. Partly in history this great saints vulnerability that Many asians feel that logic countries or large countries around them at trying to split up their country to conduct. Bulkin is it and the ace taymor. Even though he's team always not part of the original borders of the dutch colony. Die still feel that as team will confirmed that Other countries have these designs upon the country and upon its unity and after his team. More focusing shifted to papa. This strategy may still want to divide papua dining. You've written a lot about west papua and at the heart of the standoff in two thousand and six paul showed that something like seventy five percent of australian supported independence for the former dutch colony. This why the indonesians are uneasy about estrada's position. He certainly one of the issues in the makeup of mistrust and complexity in the relationship There's there's been longstanding depths in jakarta's to either strang government doesn't do more to acquire pro-separatist Sentiment in australia. They believe the particularly the ngo sector has played a role in stirring up separatist sentiment in west. Papua and there is Continuing concern that australia has too much of a focus particularly on eastern indonesia which is also the poorest part of the country. Well how then do we bridge. These divides greg. I mean to. What extent is this new free. Try deal. This is the so-called indonesia australia comprehensive economic partnership agreement. Ten years in the making to what extent does that he'll these divisions. I don't know that it heals the divisions poseidon. I think many of the the list of things you you sit out at the beginning of the interview. I think we have always had the potential. I knew things like that to occur but one of the consistently underperforming parts of the bilateral relationship has been the economic ties and so this comprehensive agreement will hopefully see much more economic activity between the two countries and that in itself might provide some kind of deepest ability but if the economic relationship expand by site thirty to forty percents in the next few years diamond. Wouldn't the free try deal really mocking important development for the relationship a look. There's no question that it's an important step in in in strengthening relationship. This guy is back to what gareth evans was talking about in the nineteen eighties. Where he said we needed to add ballast to the relationship unbalanced. He meant if we can get a strong economic relationship between australia and indonesia implies than the rest of it will follow behind because there will be a an upfront primary interest in preserving the economic relationship. And that's always been a difficulty. In the relations destroy and strength companies have invested in indonesia but not to a great extent. The head found difficulties. There this free trade agreement certainly opens up more opportunity for investments and tried but again and again as greg has alluded to. I think the question will be. How much strategies is to take out this opportunity and whether or not they say the the problems of doing business in indonesia over combat is free trade agreement whether or not there's going to be impediments to a greater degree of engagement. My guests greg. Feely from new in camera and damien. Kingsbury from deacon in melvin. And here's a little fun fact. This is according to the australian this week. It was chris. Bowen the library from benca podcast on iran and between the lines. It was chris bowen in his shirt who walked away the most chuffed with these brave. Jacoby interaction we he. The president complimented bowen's flawless fluency in indonesian. Little known fact chris. Bowen speaks indonesian now. A few years ago china's president she addressed indonesia's legislature to great fanfare. So the fees guy. Now what's the nature of the relationship now between jakarta and beijing greg. There's a lot of similarities between indonesia's relations with china and distributors Janis niger economic partner for indonesia. It's also niger investor in the country indonesia's increasing the Pot of china's belt and road initiative. So it's getting a lot of development money. These increasing penetration of lodge chinese corporations building infrastructure for example hospitalized row link between the capital jakarta and the regional capital abandon So there's a. There's a lot of economic activity happening and president. She has very good personal relationship with prisoner jacoby but they're also tensions. One of the tensions is chinese fishing boat incursions into indonesian territorial waters In near the south china sea in the name of the island of tuna and that causes a lot of angst in indonesia sometimes confrontation between Nio vessels of both countries. Another problem is a fairly high level of underwent lying suspicion towards the chinese in indonesia so this often bubbles politically to the surface in indonesia and people say that indonesia is at risk of losing some sovereignty to the chinese and so this is always a break for a leader. Such as jacoby who badly needs chinese investment and the development expertise if he saying as Ext doing that excessively will then he will be attacked for that. Well could chana's rise than i mean. It's obviously threatening. The integrity of sovereign states around the region diamond could could china's roz helped draw camera and jakarta even closer. Yes look there's been a discussion now going back several years in canberra about a closest security relationship within the news yet it seems to be a natural hartman in the region Geography i think determines that to a large extent but our strategic interests similar in relation to china about countries want to have a strong economic relationship with china We want to have china's investments and tried to sell into china but we also want to limit china's expansion in the region strategic rich particularly in the south china sea and In relation to them turner islands which is at the southwest of the south china saying there is neither lapping climbed by china and indonesia. And that's what to the tensions of mid january this year. What we're seeing though is. Indonesia is welcoming china roman hand but in terms of economic growth and development but in terms of china's growing strategic runyon ambition. There's a great deal of skepticism. I think in indonesia as the reason chinandega familiar story. Now let's turn finally gentlemen to indonesia internally. Let's get your reaction to something. The indonesian journalist. Julia sirak osama. This is what she told my. Rn colleague andrew west. This week joey. His record on democracy and human rights has declined and in fact now many activists think that not just activists observers think that democracy indonesia has lowest point in twenty years. It is ironic since when we had the reform era after suharto stepped down. That was supposed to be the beginning of democratization in indonesia but that has opened up a pandora's box and released all the traditional religious conservatives and mainly religious groups has sacrificed human rights. And what he says in a book phobia and intolerance for the sake. Offline call stability. Indonesian journalist julia sura kasama on iran's religion and ethics program. This week diming kingsbury. Look i think that Jacoby has moved in a couple of areas which have raised eyebrows. About his commitment to a plurality and human rights particular around the issues of religion and religious tolerance and so on. But broadly. I think jacoby is an inheritor of the reform tradition particularly that started by cecilia among indiana and that he really is deepening and embedding democratic practice. If we some limitations around the edges. Yeah well greg failure. I mean it's often argued that indonesia the fourth because nation in the world. We tend to forget that. It represents a persistent triumph of democracy this the nation journalists big for a lot of activists when she says that the indonesian ideal of tolerance really has been destroyed. So i think it's probably i'll i think she's somewhat. This is always a matter of the bites. Don't mean any disrespect to julius Sort of kasuma but Under jacoby in fact. Religious tolerance has somewhat improved on democracy. Some of the things that jacoby has initiated have really harmed the quality of democracy and there are several things that are being discussed by. he's government wrought now and by the parliament which if implemented could be a considerable reversal. He wouldn't stop indonesia being a democracy. But it would reduce the quality of the democracy greg damian and important discussion. Thanks so much again for being on our end

Indonesia Jacoby Jakarta China Australia Greg President Trump Greg Feely Greg Damian Indonesian Army Diming Kingsbury Dili Damien Taymor Iran West Papua Deakin University
Zac Efron falls ill while filming reality show Killing Zac Efron

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Zac Efron falls ill while filming reality show Killing Zac Efron

"First actor Zac Efron has survived a health scare it's life imitating art while filming a show called killing Zac Efron in Papua New Guinea Zac Efron was reportedly nearly killed by a sudden illness Efron was reportedly airlifted to Australia for treatment of a bacterial infection possibly typhoid transmitted to patients by contaminated food or water before the infection hit Efron was seen with a tour guide in Papua New Guinea the store confirming his ordeal on social media posting that he did get sick but bounced back quick thinking his well wishers many of whom fell in love with that from when he was a teen heartthrob in high school musical before taking on more dramatic

Zac Efron Australia Papua New Guinea Papua Typhoid
Actor Zac Efron is home after falling ill in Papua New Guinea

Jason and Alexis

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Actor Zac Efron is home after falling ill in Papua New Guinea

"Efron was hospitalized after contracting a bacterial infection while filming his new reality series and Papua New Guinea but the actor quickly bounced back and was able to spend the holidays at home following the health scare he announced on Twitter yesterday it's unclear what Zac Effron was stricken with with vulture sites reports that may have been typhoid a deadly bacterial disease that spreads through food and water

Efron Twitter Zac Effron Bacterial Disease Papua Typhoid
Bougainville Votes for Independence From Papua New Guinea

Morning Edition

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Bougainville Votes for Independence From Papua New Guinea

"The world's youngest country of south Sudan which won independence in two thousand eleven soon a new nation could be born the Pacific island group called Loganville voted for independence it was a non binding referendum but after an overwhelming vote it's three hundred thousand people can try to work out independence from Papua New Guinea who knows give a couple hundred years and maybe that nation will be as harmonious and stable

South Sudan Pacific Island Papua Hundred Years
"papua" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"papua" Discussed on AP News

"Jenna voted overwhelmingly to gain independence from Papua New Guinea the Bougainville referendum commission chairman says more than ninety eight percent of the ballots cast in the non binding referendum we're in favor of independence the only other option in the vote was greater autonomy from Papua New Guinea independence would still need to be negotiated between leaders from Bougainville in Papua New Guinea and the final say would then go to lawmakers in the Papua New Guinea parliament the process of becoming a separate nation could take years to achieve Turkey is making a big threat in retaliation to possible US sanctions A. P.'s at Charles de Ledesma reports the foreign minister is suggesting the US could be barred from using two strategic air bases in the country the bad news shop the show new comments come amid reports that American lawmakers have agreed on a defense bill that includes calls to sanction Turkey over its decision to proceed with the purchase deployment of Russian made as four hundred missile defense systems now shop the show Lou says in the event all the decision to sanction Turkey the ad basis could be brought on to the agenda he added Congress members must understand that it is not possible to get anywhere with sanctions I'm Charles of this month impeachment debate I'm to McGuire than a P. news minute each member of the house Judiciary Committee has a chance to give an opening statement in the debate over the two articles of impeachment introduced against president trump Florida Democrat Ted Deutch says trump has continually disregarded Congress when it comes to his use of the presidency for his own gain the ongoing pattern of this president's abuse of power is obstruction of investigations refusing to turn over even one document Ohio Republican Jim Jordan says house Democrats have been bent on ousting trump since he took office this is about one basic fact the Democrats have never accepted the will of the American people three weeks ago Nancy Pelosi called the president of the United States an impostor and the attacks on the president started before the election the committee votes tomorrow on the articles which will then go to the full house for a vote next week if trump is impeached in that both the GOP controlled Senate will hold a trial I'm to McGuire AP digital news back in a moment thank.

McGuire Ohio Florida Papua Senate GOP trump Nancy Pelosi Jim Jordan president Congress Ted Deutch house Judiciary Committee Jenna Lou missile defense systems Charles de Ledesma A. P. US
"papua" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"papua" Discussed on AP News

"In the South Pacific now the people in the Bougainville region of voted overwhelmingly to gain independence from Papua New Guinea the Bougainville referendum commission chairman says more than ninety eight percent of the ballots cast in the non binding referendum we're in favor of independence the only other option in the vote was greater autonomy from Papua New Guinea independence would still need to be negotiated between leaders from Bougainville in Papua New Guinea and the final say would then go to lawmakers in the Papua New Guinea parliament the process of becoming a separate nation could take years to achieve a contentious citizenship bill in India which is led to protests in the country's northeast has been approved by Indian lawmakers the measure grants Indian citizenship to non Muslims who migrated illegally from Pakistan Bangladesh and Afghanistan the upper house of parliament passed the bill Wednesday night following earlier approval in the lower house the bill which was first introduced in may by the Hindu nationalist led government of prime minister Narendra Modi E. now needs to be signed by the country's ceremonial president of formality before becoming law Mel nutrition still impacts nearly a half billion people in the Asia Pacific region according to a United Nations report it also says in order to reach a goal of eliminating hunger by twenty thirty millions all have to escape food in security each month data compiled by for you and agencies show slow progress and even backsliding in the areas of child wasting and stunting and other problems related to Mel nutrition report urges governments to combine efforts to end poverty worsening inequality means despite relatively fast economic growth incomes are not increasing fast enough to help ensure adequate nutritional diets for hundreds of millions living in poverty impeachment debate I'm to McGuire than a P. news minute each member of the house Judiciary Committee has a chance to give an opening statement in the debate over the two articles of impeachment introduced against president trump Florida Democrat Ted Deutch says trump has continually disregarded Congress when it comes to his use of the presidency for his own gain the ongoing pattern of this president's abuse of power is obstruction of investigations refusing to turn over even one document Ohio Republican Jim Jordan says house Democrats have been bent on ousting trump since he took office this is about one basic fact the Democrats have never accepted the will of the American people three weeks ago Nancy Pelosi called the president of the United States an impostor and the attacks on the president started before the election the committee votes tomorrow on the articles which will then go to the full house for a vote next week if trump is impeached in that both the GOP controlled Senate will hold a trial how to make one AP digital news back in a moment thank.

Congress Ohio Florida United Nations Asia Pacific Mel Pakistan Papua Senate GOP trump United States Nancy Pelosi Jim Jordan South Pacific Ted Deutch house Judiciary Committee McGuire president Narendra Modi E.
Bougainville votes for independence from Papua New Guinea

BBC World Service

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Bougainville votes for independence from Papua New Guinea

"The islands of Bougainville in the South Pacific have voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence from Papua New Guinea ninety eight percent of the votes const backed independence the poll is non binding but is a step towards creating the world's newest

South Pacific Papua New Guinea Ninety Eight Percent
Bougainville vote could help create world’s newest nation

AP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Bougainville vote could help create world’s newest nation

"A new nation could be formed in the Solomon Islands following a historic referendum the Pacific people of Bougainville are voting to decide if they want to gain independence from Papua New Guinea the referendum will run over two weeks the vote will not be the final word for the two hundred fifty thousand people of Bougainville the referendum is non binding and vote favoring independence will need to be negotiated by leaders from Bougainville in Papua New Guinea

Solomon Islands Papua New Guinea Bougainville Two Weeks
Bougainville vote could help create world’s newest nation

AP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Bougainville vote could help create world’s newest nation

"A new nation could be formed in the Solomon Islands following a historic referendum the Pacific people of Bougainville are voting to decide if they want to gain independence from Papua New Guinea the referendum will run over two weeks the vote will not be the final word for the two hundred fifty thousand people of Bougainville the referendum is not binding and vote favoring independence will need to be negotiated by leaders from Bougainville in Papua New

Solomon Islands Papua New Guinea Bougainville Papua Two Weeks
Bougainville vote could help create world’s newest nation

AP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Bougainville vote could help create world’s newest nation

"A new nation could be formed in the Solomon Islands following a historic referendum the Pacific people of Bougainville are voting to decide if they want to gain independence from Papua New Guinea the referendum will run over two weeks the vote will not be the final word for the two hundred fifty thousand people of Bougainville the referendum is not binding and vote favoring independence will need to be negotiated by leaders from Bougainville in Papua New

Solomon Islands Papua New Guinea Bougainville Papua Two Weeks
Cancer patients in Papua New Guinea forced offshore

Correspondents Report

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Cancer patients in Papua New Guinea forced offshore

"If you get cancer there's currently no hope of radiotherapy even where it might be the best treatment doctors instead have to rely on chemotherapy. Emma therapy leaving patients desperately trying to fundraise to get radiotherapy overseas. It's a story. Our correspondent Natalie whiting has been following since she moved to. PNG A year a year ago. PNG's only radiotherapy machine has been sitting idle for three years as Natalie reports the promised by the Health Minister to get the service operating again Bought October has come to nothing.

Natalie Whiting Emma Cancer Three Years
Meet Two MacArthur 'Genius Grant' Scientists

Short Wave

07:26 min | 2 years ago

Meet Two MacArthur 'Genius Grant' Scientists

"All right kwong scientists show and tell tell me about our geologists Andrea Dutton well we described Andrea as like a CSI investigator of sea level rise but I would also consider her a time traveler to she looked specifically for fossil coral goals from this period called the last interglacial one hundred twenty five thousand years ago Oh so bp what before the podcast gone it's terrible joke anyway last interglacial earth was a little warmer than it is now and her work suggests that oceans were twenty to thirty feet higher than they are today Whoa yeah and by gathering data from the last time Earth got the swarm the last interglacial win ice sheets melted and sea levels rose Andrea can offer insights into how it could all go down in our present day okay that that is very cool and seems relevant Is there anything interesting that she's learned so far okay well Andrew told me about this one trip to the Seychelles this island nation in the Indian Ocean where her team found fossil corals at a really high elevation really high and that freaked her out why's that that's because Andrea new in that moment that in order for the corals have been that high for the ocean who've risen to that point put them there the Antarctic ice sheet must have been melting at that time that's the the single biggest massive ice on earth so when we got this result in the Seychelles I did walk away from the outcrop and I sat down on the beach and I thought myself you know what people are not going to like this because I knew right away meant that in artists have contributed a lot of ice melted and that was not good news for our future because it means that we may be headed in the same direction meaning the Antarctic icesheet may melt and contribute to sea level rise in the same way in our time so we have some clarity on what the future could look like because Andrea is traveling back in time to gather this information from oceans in the ancient past I'm into it I'm nervous about it but I'm into it yeah okay so tell me about the other Macarthur winner tell me about Stacey Stacey Jupiter I'm forty three years old and I'm the Melania director with the Wildlife Conservation Society Melanesia is a region in the Pacific Ocean home to all these island nations Fiji where she's located Papua New Guinea the Solomon Islands just to name a few the water is just beyond her doorstep and I'm trying to get out as much as I can and take my three year old son out as well we love to go for puddle and just show him the crabs on the seawall and we'd go look for sea snakes or raise that might scoot off as we go over them so it's a nice place just to look out and be inspired by the Marine Environment Fiji is spread across three hundred islands stacey lives in the capital Suva where she thinks a lot about how to work with locals around conservation okay how does she do well she not only looks at the hard science of what's happening to say the fish the coral reefs but the environmental factors human activity to for her conservation means not only protecting the land but the people who live on continuing their need for sustainable jobs access to natural resources their physical health or mental health sometimes this looks like formal programs other times it looks like this Oh okay this is my favorite type of sites communication what you're watching is a youtube clip of one hundred twenty five people disco dancing in the streets of Suva organized this flash mob with the motto Moran eggs more fish like all flash they're calling on the government to protect areas where fish come together to reproduce they're kind of like discos okay this frenzy of fish movement as they release their eggs and that's why it was a disco inspired flash mob this is some solid science outreach right here so fun that's not all Stacey has done she's commissioned a comic book why is she having so much fun during science I did not have this much fun well it's because you didn't help commission back in the river so they have this epic journey they come across all these obstacles on the way and to explain this whole process to kids she created a comic book called the adventures of Joe Jacobi he's a little bit precocious he gets lost from the rest of his school and he ends up having to go back upstream with this kind of crazy inventor scientists crab and his sidekicks now and through the story of them trying to get upstream defined his home they encounter all of the different hazards of human impact all along the way like fishing and dams and river sediment and then the Wildlife Conservation Society's Fiji program which Stacey used to run turned the comic book into a puppet show routed to schools and kids loved it I was onboard until puppets got involved you would love this matty in the moment right after the DOJ Gobi puppet encounters Barracuda are you sure it's just not them screaming because there's nobody knows the mysteries of children all the kids were given river-monitoring kits afterwards with the idea of encouraging there virtue of the land one day as adults indigenous people have tenure over about eighty seven to ninety eight percent of all of the land in Melanesia until it re the is those kids when they grow up they're the ones who will be looking after the place because they they own the land and they have the rights to say whether or not they're going to sleep this is pretty amazing like the level of creativity here and engagement and fun I am all for this sands puppets yeah over the phone in before our interview Stacy said to me look I'm trained in science but what moves people is stories each creativity is a big part of how she approaches commercialisation and your field and try to stay within one field and say you are the expert on this one particular topic but for myself I always didn't rebelled against that I really wanted to be more of a generalist and able to look across disciplines across different habitats and I think that and that's what's needed stacy's to tackle these seemingly intractable global problems stacey and Andrea they work on opposite sides of the world but they know each other and Andrea actually works with another macarthur fellow in this cohort Jerry Metro Rica at Harvard he interprets her data about corals so that it can

Andrea Dutton Kwong Investigator One Hundred Twenty Five Thousa Ninety Eight Percent Forty Three Years Thirty Feet Three Year One Day
The impact of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge visit to Pakistan

Correspondents Report

06:45 min | 2 years ago

The impact of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge visit to Pakistan

"Now two time when Indonesia is under increasing scrutiny over its human rights record in Papua much of it from neighbouring Pacific nations it suddenly announced plans to fund an intern and Bukavu that report from Indonesia

Indonesia Papua Intern Bukavu
"papua" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Program in this edition in Papua New Guinea one correspondent considers who's got the right to decide whether to ruin landscapes but make people richer through mining and making a fuss so we need to scientist wondering whether to worry more about malaria bearing mosquitoes or rifle wielding rebel groups and in Serbia we ask a poster a new center and a wood carver with their crofts can really lift the country's economy but first to the United States and its only Lima how do you best engage with extremists people who wish other people ill because of their religion that gender their sexual orientation their nationality or race. I was in the U. S. when a white man gunned down twenty two people in a mostly Latino city in Texas last month that morning the gunman just twenty one years old himself allegedly posted an anti immigrant manifesto online the US citizens on was with shook their heads and dispatched the violence they felt was the consequence of the words the hatred would hang around on the internet and being whipped up by some politicians how could you even talk to people who thought like that they said without shouting. I leave the couple was in Portland Oregon recently to reports on a March in which hundreds of white nationalists from around the U. S. gather together the organizes claims that they did not condone violence so could a rational conversation behind by now I've had many interactions with white supremacist extremists in America and they usually end the same way with a colleague politely suggesting I should step away and leave it's hard for me at least not to stay and try to talk reasons accounts a logical hate filled assertions one man from a group named the kingdom identity ministries in Arkansas told me matter of factly the Jews with the children of Satan another the gathering of the innocuous sounding but ultimately repulsive national policy institute told me old black Americans needed to be deported to West Africa invariably they say the US is meant only for white people and they're usually irrational and in same theories about the inferior traits of other races thrown into. and so I end up being unable to help myself debating with them sometimes for a long time bringing up the usual points they differ Merrick ins were here first African Americans have been here for many generations some of the more than many of the families of the extremist themselves we talk about the accident of birth made them white and often much much more but extremists usually offer ever more staggering an implausible justifications for their beliefs that own radical communities often.

United States malaria Lima Papua scientist Texas Serbia Portland Oregon Arkansas Merrick America West Africa twenty one years
"papua" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:26 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Seven hundred fifty million dollars guy in Australia wanted on drug charges. Tried to flee police planning to travel eighty six miles across the sea to Papua New Guinea on a CDU and new Arizona Cardinals. Coach clicked things berry says he'll allow players to have cell phone breaks every twenty minutes or so during team meetings. At least three people who lost friends or family in school shootings have killed themselves. In the last week, highlighting the effects of trauma, and the problem that news of suicides can encourage copycats to were students who survived the one last March at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland, Florida, the other was the father of a first grader who died in the two thousand twelve sandy hook elementary school massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, Kimberly, Leonard health reporter at the Washington Examiner says they suffered through trauma grief or survivor's guilt, Kimberly. Explain one of the things that experts cautioned against when looking at tragic cases of suicide like these is simplifying their overall cause and effect. It is known that people who've been through traumatic events as two of the students who killed themselves this past week had been through obviously with the school shooting at. Parkland. And also that people who are grieving struggle a lot with mental health issues. One of the things that experts say is that it's important when people go through these experiences to be able to find ways to support them. So that they're getting the help that they need so for people who do this then not so I guess lump them into a category. But are they having what is now like a permanent mental health issues or could this be temporary in which they're driven to take their own lives or mental health issues are very treatable. It's just that if they're not treated, they can certainly get become a lot worse. One of the moms said that her daughter had really struggled with what's known as her revival skilled one of good friends had had died in the parkland shooting. And you know, these teenagers are obviously pretty high profile after what they've been will. They've been outspoken about violence and save also. So you know, really tried to raise awareness about what has happened in. And in more been a lot more vocal than other students who have face these difficulties one of the fathers who killed himself this past weekend was the father of a child who was killed in Newtown back in twenty twelve twenty twelve it seemed, you know, obviously anyone going through that is facing a significant amount of grease, and those kinds of issues can really, you know, cause suicidal thoughts would be considered. Can make some of those spots a lot worse than so that's why experts really emphasized the need to support people over the long term not just right after the tragedy happens. Yeah. Trying to understand the timeline here to for example. The two students connected to stoneman Stillman Douglas high school. This was about a year after that shooting were they were teenagers. And then you had the father writes a little bit of an older adult who did this but six and a half years later. Right. Right. Well, it just it just really underscores how complex suicide is. And it underscores that you know, there's rarely ever a senior issue. That's going on. We do know that people who have been through trauma who and who therefore developing depression, anxiety, how higher risk for suicide. It doesn't mean. It's not treatable. But it does mean that, you know, people who work in the mental health field really need to have an eye out for those who faced trauma. We're speaking with Kimberly Leonard health reporter at the Washington Examiner. She's written a piece entitled suicides after mass shootings. Underlying contagion of high profile tragedies talking about the three people that have taken their lives recently in connection with the shooting in parkland, Florida, and the one in Newtown, Connecticut from six and a half years ago, you wrote to despite the rise suicide policy has not received considerable attention from federal lawmakers who I guess who would like to see them do something. What certainly advocates against suicide prevention say that it's time. And it really is what what's going on. Now is is very tragic, of course. And it's also underscoring a rise in suicide that we've seen over the past couple of decades, roughly forty thousand forty seven thousand people took their lives in two thousand seventeen according to the latest federal data that we have. And we know that suicide is the tense leading cause of death in the United States. We know that among older teenagers. It's actually the second leading cause of death. And so it really is what can be viewed as a national public health issue and needs to be cupboard where a certain way by the media needs to make sure and there needs to be better resources for people who are struggling with mental health issues is what I'm advocates say in order to really push back on the trends that we're seeing Kimberly. Leonard health reporter at the Washington Examiner twenty minutes now in front of the hour.

Kimberly Leonard Washington Examiner Newtown parkland reporter Marjory stoneman Douglas high stoneman Stillman Douglas high Connecticut Florida Papua New Guinea Australia Arizona Cardinals sandy hook elementary school berry United States twenty minutes Seven hundred fifty million do
"papua" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:15 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on WJR 760

"Throw the good doctor curve ball. And he always smacks it out of the park. So good morning. Doc. Paul. How are you? Good. I'm glad we got your volume up right away. So here's the thing. I know what you want to talk about. And believe me, I'm going to spend most of the time talking about it. But I would be remiss in not getting your take on what we've been talking about. Which is it's colon cancer awareness month and this younger onset colon cancer. And then the other story about heart attacks who are forty or younger, the number steadily increasing over the last decade couple of big stories. I think yeah. So, you know, the the interesting incidents changes in diseases than younger people isn't really clear, but you know, we've noticed a force over the last couple of decades that people have become less fit. They have become more overweight. They have taken on more sedentary lives. So, you know, maybe there's something there. There's also some clear diet changes relative. Let's say colon cancer. You know, whether it's eating less, fiber weather, if eating more types of needs, whether it's a change in our. Gut microbiome in the bacteria that populate us. There's something going on. That's obviously very different, obviously, we're also screaming a little bit more aggressive. So we're able to catch things hopefully a little bit earlier. But that's really what it comes down to, you know, relatives so identifying especially colon cancer younger people, you really do have to pay attention to symptoms because right now the guidelines really recommend starting aggressive spray our restaurant, they regular screening until age forty five or fifty. So, you know, you're younger than forty five and you have symptoms if you have diarrhea if you notice you're still if you noticed a significant change in your bowel habits, those are all things that should prompt. You to see your doctor and your doctor can do more careful testing. There has been some sort of a shift. We just don't know exactly what the source of it. It'll be fascinating to see. We've talked in the past switching to what we were scheduled to talk about. I've talked about it. You've talked about it. Everybody has that. Thirty years ago when somebody was sixty five they acted like they were old they appeared to be old sixty five you know, that's ridiculous now, however, what a fascinating study published in Lancet by universities university of Washington folks about the real physiological feelings and issues about turning sixty five and how depending on where you live. It's completely different. Yeah. Exactly. You know, everyone does know that older person that feels are looks much younger. And likewise, you know, some people that are young that seemed to have maybe, you know, taking a little bit of a like taking more of a toll on them. Well, that's holds true. When you look at the health across an entire country. It's sort of what you would consider the help average of the entire country and the results of the study. Worrying fact, surprising because of the the the breath that is a number of years that covered the best aged seniors in some countries versus the other. And what I mean by that is the average age of seventy six year old Japanese person at the average health, I should say of a seventy six year old Japanese person was as old as the average sixty five year old person globally and on the other end the average forty six year old in Papua New Guinea felt like the average sixty five year old person globally as a thirty year difference. So seventy six year olds where like. Forty six year old in Papua New Guinea, Oregon's the other way to put it is forty six year olds for like seventy six year old Japanese. Here's another way to put it. You. Don't wanna be living Papa NEW GUINEA. Well, yeah. I mean, there's there is actually a lot to be said about the way these different countries either approach help or maybe some of the genetic nature to the people in that population. Really an interesting step toward moving away from looking at a person's chronological age that at their age since I really taking a person who's what I referred to help age into account, which ultimately might be more important as we live longer. We want more quality years. And so it's not about living longer and being sick. When you're old, but you wanna have healthy years now here in the United States, we were slightly above the global average. So this was the study was done. So that if they were comparing every country to the global average sixty five year old well in the United States, the global average was sixty eight point five year old that is sixty eight point five year old felt like sixty five year old. So we're about three years fired than the global average. But in ratings that would the United States at fifty four from the top which there were one hundred ninety five he studied. So we're nowhere near the top. And I think the big picture here is that at fifty four. There is a lot of room to. Prove to the number one position, which is Japan. I mean, imagine if instead of feeling like a sixty five year old at sixty eight or sixty eight year old even you didn't feel like that until you were actually seventy six how much better that would feel across the population of the United States. Let me give that let me give that very quickly number one is Japan at seventy six point one years, followed by Switzerland Seventy-six, France, seventy six Singapore, seventy six this is when you feel physically and with the maladies that come with being sixty five don't hit you to your seventy six in Japan, Switzerland, France and Singapore, followed by Kuwait, South Korea, Spain Italy, Puerto Rico, Peru the bottom of the top ten seventy four point three. And we're forty fifty fourth in line. So we have a long way to come. Right. Exactly. Now, you know, it's also interesting to note that although most of the countries with those better health ages like Japan can be. Wealthier nations there were countries like Mexico or Peru or practically United States like Puerto Rico, which had still a much much higher ages than the average American. So it doesn't necessarily have to do with the wealth of the country. It has something to you with, you know, whether it's the climate whether it's the lifestyle the population, genetically there's something there that needs to be studied to figure out how how we can not just extend our lives, but extend our healthy years in our lives. Hey, Dr you killing me, we gotta go. But what's the device the man war to save his life? That's not a new device. But we've probably never heard of it that you guys keep promoting channel four. Well, see that's called a tease again. But it's a life vest, actually, a life vest a light that. Yes. And to figure out what like you can turn into channel four tonight at five o'clock. We'll watch the story Dr Frank McGeorge. Thanks for the call. We appreciate it. Thanks for six fifty four. WJR ever consider advertising with WJR offering a mix of cost effective broadcast and digital media. WJR gets results for more details. Call three one three eight seven three nine hundred ten that's three one three eight seven three ninety eight ten. This would be mollahs.

United States colon cancer Japan WJR Papua New Guinea Puerto Rico Paul Dr Frank McGeorge Peru Lancet Oregon universities university of Was Singapore Switzerland France Mexico South Korea Kuwait
"papua" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"What was at the heart of all that willful lunar nece? You know, I don't know. I mean, I just didn't really necessarily connect with the normal things. And so in Colorado, you know, all the kids were were playing hockey. I'd be figure skating by myself, or you know, they'd be drinking beer up on the mountain, and I'd be sort of fumbling through the woods on my own. So so I think I always thought a little bit displaced potentially. Would you consider yourself alone? Or now. Consider myself and perpetual conflict now because I I sort of wearing two hats all the time. So so yes, I love to go in and spend time in the middle of nature on my own. And yet simultaneously. I an organizer and I'm bringing people together. It's so it's two hats require almost completely different kinds of lifestyles as an artist you have to spend quite a lot of time alone. But as an organizer you have spent quite a lot of time organising, quite a lot of people. So it's challenging, and I try to mitigate by getting out of New York City, you know, I just drove through Hokkaido Japan. And last year, I went through Papua New Guinea and then the before the depths of Africa. So so I tried to get out, and I try to balance time out or hide it my house, but but it is truly a challenging because I always kind of in between those two things. Now, I knew your father was an avid collector, and you followed suit from what I understand when you were a kid you could often be found digging through other people's garbage and bringing home all sorts of things to arrange in your bedroom. What kinds of things we amassing still do you? Do you get through other people's garbage? You have get arrested of not for that. We'll get to that later for the other things. I'm still doing it. And I and I collect all kinds of strange things. I mean, I have a very strange barometer. I found in the garbage of renovating this New York renovating school books love I still. I mean, this is nothing. Nothing has changed some still bringing home books and furniture and not as much because when I was younger, I would fill up spaces. You know, I was painting on doors painting on mattresses that I would find just about anything. Really, what did you want to be? When you grew up back. Then what you were magic for your future life. When you say back, then how far back like when you were collecting Ross when you were working in the crystal kingdom, and you Anderson, you took rocks payback, then true. Still a obsessed with rocks. I still have rox everywhere. I even bought a forty pound rock back on my last trip in my suitcase. I could hardly put it above thing in the plane. What made you decide you wanted that particular such beautiful? You have to come. See the house is beautiful rock. I think rocks. Tell stories I think objects tell stories I think they almost have histories. And. Absolutely. So I think that's my attraction, I think a rock can visiting coverge. Oh, now, I understand that you had as a kid growing up quite a print election for making money..

Papua New Guinea New York City Colorado hockey Hokkaido Japan Africa New York coverge Ross Anderson forty pound
"papua" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"You are listening to the daily on monocle twentyfold, the organizers of the Victorian prize for literature in astray Leah face. A logistical issue with conveying the one hundred thousand dollar purse to the two thousand nineteen winner bay Bhutani an Iranian Kurdish asylum-seeker currently resident in a detention center on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea Pachon, the also on the twenty five thousand dollar prize for nonfiction at the Victorian premier's literary awards these both for his book, no friend, but the mountains a were he composed by text messages in Persian sent to his translator shawny I entered strenuous asylum system in two thousand and thirteen disgust. He's curious case earlier with monocle Georgina Godwin, Kiara Ramallah and Ben Ryland. This is has not so surprising coming from this side of the publishing spectrum. Anyway. So Victoria, obviously leans a little bit to lift, well, maybe a lot of the left as of the law state election, quite dramatic has. Indeed. Indeed. So it's perhaps not surprising to see this sort of statement popping out. Of victoria. But I do think it is a very healthy won the debate over asylum seekers and astray these immigration policies, which are of course, quite shamefully seen across the world in Australia is a very very reluctant debate for anyone to have an, unfortunately, we do have this confession of the idea of what constitutes border protection with how we should detain people who do come to a stray Leah by boat. The argument is that if you sail to a stray Ilya by boat, and you try to to to obtain asylum that way, then you will never ever be eligible to be resettled in a stray. Ilya the reasoning being that that then destroys the the allure of stralia from the perspective of people smugglers and travelling to Australia by boat is a very very dangerous thing to do. So there is an argument to be made about wanting to destroy the people smuggling market the beat question, then comes up when we ask what happens to those people that we do detain. We can't just lock them up forever. That's what's happening. Now, you've got. Definite detention. And that's that's what's happened to the ruse Bhutani. There's no light at the end of the tunnel for a lot of these people. And you've got you've got children locked up in these centers as well. It isn't absolutely hopeless horrific set of circumstances. Most of most Australians don't want to have this debate. And if it ends if it ever gets brought up politically, it's usually in in the context of well, if we change anything at all you're going to have the floods of people coming back to a stray, which is what happened when Kevin Rudd tried to change it as prime minister for for a while. And that has simply brought both sides of politics to the exact same position on this. And and until we can separate these two things until we can say, yes, it's true. We we need to make sure that we destroy the business model people smugglers. But at the same time, we can't do that at the expense of people's human rights until we are at a place where politically that sort of argument can be put to the Indian people. None of this is going to change. I hope that the awarding of this. Of this literary prize to Bayrou's the Chinese going to put that debate back in the public the spectrum. But unfortunately, we've got an election coming up in probably around may. And that's not going to be one of the issues. That's going to be voted upon certainly notes. Kiara does a gesture like this. This is not to detracted old from whatever literary merits bears Chinese book my possess. I I have not as yet read it. But does something like this actually advance a discussion about this or any other issue or does it just become yet? Another flashpoint around peop- around which people. We'll just loudly yell at each other. What they already felt anyway to believe that culture can have some degree of influence people's perception of things and again apologies. If I keep comparing these situations with my own home country, very reason. Con contradiction..

Kiara Ramallah Leah Ilya Victoria Australia Manus Island Georgina Godwin Kevin Rudd Papua New Guinea Pachon Ben Ryland prime minister Bayrou one hundred thousand dollar twenty five thousand dollar
"papua" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on PRI's The World

"They very much know what it's like to have difficulty in practicing their faith. And so to see their inventiveness to talk about Jesus Christ. Even when they didn't have a church building something that which we rely on so heavily here in the states that they were living out a relationship with Jesus Christ while sitting underneath a ten roof in someone's backyard and send Dino it really stretched, my heart tremendously. I was humbled by their ingenuity and their intelligence, and hopefully, we'll return one day, we take for granted in the US even religion, don't we you said it. I think we can always grow in. And gratitude you going to allow dogs inside the Saint Lawrence church in Tampa. Now, that's an interesting question. I think some people already do bring them in like a therapy dog. We've had a dog or two in the church, and I personally love dogs. So they'd be welcomed their spouse where we wouldn't allow the dog to go like, I don't know if we'd have a dog in the confessional. That'd be awkward. But but no dogs can come into the church. I'd be I'd be fine with that father, Stephen Chuck door Cuesta serves at the Saint Lawrence church in Tampa, Florida. He's been speaking with us about the first new church built in Cuba in nearly sixty years. Thank you very much good to speak with you. Thank you, Mark. Oh, God bless Australia has a tough deterrence policy for asylum seekers who try to reach the country by boat there. Intercepted at sea refused. Asylum and sent elsewhere. Instead, that's how hundreds of asylum-seekers found themselves detained on Manus Island in Papua. New GUINEA many were held for years in a controversial detention camp there barrows knee is one of those people. He's an Iranian Kurdish writer who arrived on Madison island and twenty thirteen since then as he waited for some resolution to his asylum request, he wrote a book, I wrote Facebook on my phone on what fat and hosts hosts by picks beats by who. Oh, my translator Puccini says he did his writing on watts app because the guards at the detention center often raided his room, and he was worried they'd take his work but little by little text by text. He finally finished it last year, the book is called, no friend. But the mountains it's a mixture of poetry and factual commentary about the detention center where he was held Bhutani told the BBC that he had felt compelled to write about what he's been through a writer. So my work is to right. But when I found myself in a real prison like manners prison. I thought that if he's my duty, I should awry, and expose them. I mean, they've been half choice writing this week boot Johnnie learned that his book one not one, but two big prizes in Australia, the Victorian prize for literature and the prize for nonfiction. They're worth a combined ninety thousand US dollars. Puccini said he doesn't feel like celebrating though because he and other asylum seekers are still suffering the consequences of Australia's deterrence policy and stuck on Madison land, but he says he's grateful for the recognition from the literary community off course by dawn blame the nutrition community in what's radio, I should blame. What say down go when they happen. Be this prison camp based off colonial is thinking on the go with him and had use these financial it's political benefits. They ruse any is no longer being held at the detention center on Manus Island, by the way, conditions were so bad that the Australian government was forced to shut it down. But he and other asylum-seekers still can't leave Papua New Guinea, the can't go to Austria. They're waiting for some third country to agree to take them in the latest twists in the plot. The US is considering resettling some of the former detainees and Bucci is hoping. He'll be one of the lucky few..

Saint Lawrence church Puccini Manus Island writer US Tampa Cuesta Dino Johnnie Papua New Guinea Australian government Cuba Australia Papua Madison island Facebook Florida Bucci Stephen Chuck
"papua" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"And you said that you you mentioned you thought that a a loss like that goes on Luke Walton? Yeah. I think I think a loss like that does go and Luke. So how am I gotta figure out a way to beat an eight win team? All right. The Lakers shot seven of thirty four from three. Right. And they missed. Eleven or twelve only shot sixty percent from the free throw line. Not even I don't think did nine point three. How many they miss eleven or twelve they missed eleven they missed eleven. Okay. They lost by six. Right. Right. So they make half of those and they're right there. But that's never going to happen. We're done talking. They're never gonna make half. I mean, no half the MRs. Oh, yeah. No, they're never. They're never going to be a great free throw shooting team. Why not? They're ranked thirtieth ABA explained to me how they're going to be. I. Karen that on you. How what what can Luke Walton do about that? I I've been asking a lot of people how the Lakers are practicing free throws. Right. And I've been told they are trying everything they are stopping practicing in the middle of scrimmages and shooting free throws as if they were in a game. Right. They're making people shoot one hundred. They're making them run and shoot 'em. They're making they're doing drills where nobody can go home until everybody makes them. Whatever they're doing. It's not working. I think they need to try something radical fill used to do stuff like bringing. I've been free throw gurus ring in as little bench code. There were a little bit nutty. Yeah. There are a little bit crazy. The the guys who bring in and you go is that guy nuts, and you go a little bit. But we've read desperate times call for desperate measures. Phil would also say JR. The locker room of evil spirits. I mean, it's that bad with these free throws. I been told they are trying everything conventional I think they gotta go unconventional. They've gotta try some. I mean, they need why not get fills exact guy. I don't even know what that guy still alive, George Mumford. No, no sports psychologist. But the guy they brought him for shack was Ed Papua, Lincoln's or something, you know, you could make thousand throws in a row K, but why not get George Mumford? Then I'm for it at this point. Yeah. I'm a big believer in outside voice, shake things up. Try something different clearly whatever's being done is not working, even if you're doing everything practical, and then some that solution, isn't solving. Let's face it. It's it's not physical. It's a hundred percent mental gotta be it's that's all. Who is a very good basketball player shooting. Forty five percent still it's a hundred percent mental. So get somebody who deals in that kind of coaching because I'll tell you what mind coaching is is just as important as physical coach. I'll give you a weird example deandre Jordan is a career forty eight percent free throw site this year, shooting seventy one twenty two he changed everything. He basically started over his feet or in a different position. His hands are in a different position. And right before he shoots watch this next time. You see the Mavericks play. Keep pay close attention to Jordan. You'll see right before he shoots. He's got the ball in his hands. He will turn to one of his teammates and say something about the defense. He'll say, hey, when we go back down the other end where in his own right or man to man on the other side, or I got so take himself out of his head for correct to get his mind off of it was remember the movie major league they had that catcher. I think it was one of the sequels that the catcher who couldn't throw the ball back to the pitcher. Yep. And they had him like think of of Victoria's Secret. Catalogs to get his head it out of his head. And he threw about I it's time for stuff like this absurd. Ridiculous doesn't necessarily make sense stuff to try with this free throw problem. And I think that they if they're not considering it now, they should they. Absolutely should. All right. We got fasttrack coming up for you in ten minutes. Mason in Ireland ESPN LA. Yeah. I completely agree. Last night was must win for the Lakers. Tea and Michael Thompson agree with you. Did Michael Thomson say they both said it. So I don't know..

Lakers Luke Walton deandre Jordan George Mumford basketball ABA Michael Thompson Karen Michael Thomson Phil Ed Papua Mason Mavericks Victoria Lincoln Ireland LA hundred percent forty eight percent Forty five percent
"papua" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Including will Oldham David PA ho they're given permission to play a bunch of rock shows in Cuba out in the open at one of those shows and PR del Rio. Announced. Listen, we're going to send out this next number two Papua, LA, LA and the free keys. Everyone sing along. It would be impossible to draw any kind of causing affected say one thing led to another that would be ridiculous. But. Louis says that back when this freaky were streaming into the sanatorium, Cuba wasn't changing back. Then it started to change precisely because of a hundred gestures big and small he says around Cuba at that moment. There are all of these tiny mostly silent protests taking hold and then you have Malaysia NASA, which was like the first serious. Civil disobedience that Castro had in ninety four were mob in Havana rose up because they were so tired of the power outages Steuer angry at their poor living conditions. They were leading the the city in rafts by thousands by the hundreds Castro literally had to come down to the Cuban Malakand beautiful. Seaside road that circles around Havana, and he he literally had to talk the mob down to at this moment. No late eighties early nineties. Do this breeding ground of discontent? All over Cuba. And I think the self injector movement is best crystallization. We have of that. Thousand points of light. And this is the brightest point right by the darkest point. Frankly, right, exactly. Huge. Thank you to Louis trays of radio and Balante. We were thrilled to collaborate with radio. And thank you for making that.

Cuba Havana Castro Louis trays Louis LA Papua David PA Balante NASA Malaysia
"papua" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To say it. A very punk rock turn because into this cultural war steps a guy named Bob bobble. We we name Heenan Papua Papua Papua the bullet. I really want to say that he tried to embody that that kind of bullet to your brain that wake up. That's Bob, Arianna. He's a professor at southern Oregon university v went several times in the nineties to Cuba to interview Babu who he calls the Kurt Cobain of the freaky. Yeah. He looked very intense. He was cocky, and confidant and just charismatic super tall skinny. Yeah. Yeah. Your way where American flat. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Bandana user to friends of Susan and Lisa Nandes who is also bad made of his now is a Cuando had been always see down Miami. So Lewis remembers the first time he met Poppel, and it was a night that a communist party meeting was taking place right outside his house on site the building outgoing Gwen Bob was coming. He's coming in a bicycle we he's hey, flat. United States flat. He's going on his head. Yeah. My father my father going down. Is your father your father hit when he saw with the American flag on? Byron musical your goal. Logo. Gracie. You flat. Our our head bubbles. Bubble say why why everyone Alseid building silence? Papa.

Heenan Papua Papua Papua Bob bobble Kurt Cobain Gwen Bob Poppel southern Oregon university Babu United States Lewis Gracie Cuba Miami Lisa Nandes Susan
"papua" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

10:20 min | 3 years ago

"papua" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Responsibility KNB are six eighty days. Gary radnich show with Larry Krueger Gerry's ready to go right now. Right now. Ready to go right now. I'm looking at this this lineup. We've got today. Mike Pereira gets normally on Monday. He doesn't work. Doesn't work on Christmas or New Year's Eve. So he'll be on with us. Jim Ryan will be on. And then money pool will come on. And grunt a little bit about the warriors. I have to admit I'm I was I've been I would say pretty good media friends with Ted Robinson. And Greg Papa for I guess thirty five years. So, you know, they're friends, you know, media friends, right? You know, I don't dance on the ceiling with him. But they're both friends of mine. Good guys both talented people and a little bit surprised this morning, but Greg is dynamic, you know, he's he's a dynamic radio guy. But Ken Robinson is going to. Now. Do the do the forty Niner games ever Papua. Ted will stay with the with the organization so good good for all concerned. I've just saying I I was shocked a little bit Notre Dame. Ted Notre Dame? Right. Yeah. Yeah. I think I think Greg Papa belongs in the broadcast booth. I don't think he was ready to to step away from that some forty Niner fans this morning, I've been asking will he be allowed to be as critical because that's kind of what got him in trouble with Mark Davis is will he be a more more neutral voice now on the forty Niners. I think it'd be good in the booth with Tim. Yeah. And there's always more to it. I don't even know if again, this is this is my opinion when you say critical stuff off the the the. Away from the mic that you never know. You know what I mean? Yeah. I mean, if I if I'm running a station, and I ask you to do something. You don't wanna do? There's always more to it that oh my gosh. She said that was a bad. Call got to get rid of a you know, so there's always word of everything. And I Mark Davis. No offense. If I was going to bet my life on Mark Davis making good moves right now. Right. Right. Well, this edit flowers, and that's the other side of this is how to raider fans feel about this. I mean, you you lose your team. You lose your broadcast right now. Not only is Greg hop out of the greater broadcast booth. But he's going to the team that most railfan who disliked they don't even have a place to play. I'm not worried if I'm a raider fan now, and I've been saying this for ever since I knew they were going back to Vegas first time. All right. You were too young. Remember when they left the first time, and you go. All right. Well, Al Davis. My guys say went down won the Super Bowl back and forth in new we we still got a lot to root for but hell they're gonna leave. Somebody a second time. I think even the staunchest fan has got a little twist in. And you know, it's a terrible feeling to have your team up and up and leave now that they're leaving a year before their stadiums. Even done. They should have really worked this out to stay here for at least one more. But if I'm if I'm the forty Niners. I don't want anybody in my house down Levi. Yeah. Not even for the right price. Gary. Well, that's just it. Do they need money? I think that's the one thing you own an NFL team. You're not hurting for money. Isn't that what you're hosting bowl games and Taylor swift concerts to fill? The stadium. Ten dates a year. There is a fair question to with the what did they draw for the the Oregon game on New Year's? I didn't look to me. Yeah. I got you have to answer this for even with the national championship game. I mean, I'm glad we have it just another thing in the bay area. But why would you pick a non college area to host these games? And specifically an area that people really don't care about college football or southern college football today. Yeah. That surprises me because this approach town always has been, and we don't, you know, on the back burner is Stanford and Cal good for you know, good for Stanford. They won the sun bowl. I gotta be honest. I don't know how many of your I did not watch one single play of a ballgame until last weekend. Then you watch the national champion. Yeah. Right. Right. The new year with the big six that they did yesterday. Little bit Ohio yesterday. Something about her on my chest. You know? I just I just nothing rings true to me about him. I suppose to celebrate this guy standing up there smiling with his trophy at the end. Like are we viewing him as like this? Great college football. I caught. I know what he's done is great and the the multiple national championships in the recruiting. But are we really praising this guy? Well, you look at his record. I mean, that's the way life is. If you have a good record. I mean, look at it. Like fourth all time. You know, there's Newt Rodney at the top. And then. It's just something about I don't know. It's something when your thing in life is go out and convince the seventeen and eighteen year old to come. And have me be your daddy. Which is great. And his parents to listen don't get me wrong. It's the way the game is laid. But oh like he goes into these. It's like the old joke. I used to do it Vegas banquets till I did it one too many times. I when they'd say tart just wants to help young people, and then I would go. Yeah. They're all six ten in black. His wife. So that's enough of that joke. She wasn't evident. Well, she'd heard it three times. And then, but it was funny. He got a big laugh every time. But it's true. When your whole when you're thing in life is to go out and convince young people to were down out sometimes well oftentimes, and this has gotta be hungry. That's we talk about this all the time. You son your your kids play all these different youth leagues, and they work hard work hard. But you know, unless you get hungry yourself the kid who this college education is going to set me up for life. That's why you see so many kids, you know, the guys who make it come from backgrounds that aren't aren't ideal so to speak, but we I mean, you were just talking to Polly about like the recruiting at USF. And I mean virtually getting the death penalty in the program shut down and the Grateful Dead on yet. But the the the I got a pack of money on me. I was gonna get Mike is Christmas bonus. And he's not here. Couple off. He wouldn't know what he's missing. No. No. No. Yeah. I'm trying to help you out Gary. No, no, I'm I'm I you know, I came in. You gotta hide your from your wife would he give Larry wouldn't pay his fantasy football fee. Hiding it from his wife. Larry wants that announced when he sick. Okay. Well, that is true. I'm not I'm not abreast of that situation. I know Larry get it back to get it back to him to give it to him when he gets here down the road, take carrier. But no, I it's I still don't know why they would say, hey, are they gonna fill this place on Monday night. I mean, I it's a great a it's Alabama. I saw the secondary market. They're giving away. Tickets now aren't well. When I looked at when I looked at stubhub four hundred and seventy five bucks to sit in the upper deck for the national chains to take another look are there cheap. Now, I can't get rid of him. Again, this is as of a couple of days ago. So they started releasing a bunch of what they do is. They give all the sponsors to handle way. And what you just don't wanna go, right? You check on there. But I don't think there Brian throwing four seventy five to sit on on the roof. And no for seventy rather have Cuyler Murray and it without a better draw. This is a tough. Go ahead, Brian. Well, the cheapest ticket on stubhub right now shows one hundred sixty nine dollars upper corner. Wow. You say one hundred sixty nine. That's when I got when I was checking in on my my stub hub. I was going to buy about twenty grand scalpels. Backing off now. Hey, it's great to have it as a as a fan. Those are the two games. I watched right? Yeah. Little high state yesterday. But there are too many ballgames crazy. We'll and it's like like you said the sun bowl like Stanford fans wanna travel or how are you feeling the stadiums anywhere? Listen to me, and I'll say why I've been doing this. It sounds like a joke. You go to Stanford urine alum, you're pretty smart guy. You do not want to spend New Year's in El Paso. Yes. Yes. What Stanford eight oh. Aka if you're a Stanford alumni, and you go. This sounds fun. Let's go to El Paso. Ballgame get canceled because the lightning you see that one. Yeah. I know they played a couple that was in Dallas. Yeah. Seven nothing. And they said we'll give everybody the tickets next year. They want to come to schools next year. Listen, I understand. That's all ESPN all those bowl games would go away. If he SPN just woke up one day and said, let's just re-run pardon the interruption for nine you know, what I mean? That would be that would be the end of it. It's ready. We're gonna have a good time this morning. We'll come back. You can hang as long as you want. You know, I'm driving in. I got the word that Larry was going to be off today. And then I said, it'd be great to have Copeland on. So I flip on the radio and you're right in the middle of pancakes. Go maybe it wouldn't be such a good idea. Telling you talking about your pancakes. I was ready for him. Then he asked me to stay jelly wherever the hell. You. I was going to mows up in north. Nobody. Anyway, talk. I wanna I wanna get when you've been off for a couple of weeks the giants. I did. I miss anything. No, no, no era. Holland might be a read. That's all. That's the big news. I'm sorry, buddy. All right. We're gonna have a good time. Like, I said this point cope will hang out as long as he can't Kim Ryan beyond. We'll we'll discuss a little bit. I know Tim how far he wants to go. If you have any thoughts on Greg Papa replacing Ted Robinson feel free at eight. Oh, eight are. I I don't buy that thing. Oh my gosh. Greg. Wasted the raiders this. And that when you're good, you're good. You know what I mean belongs in the booth. He belongs. I think he's a good broadcast from any football games. I'll tell you one more. He's so much better on now to me Greg can describe every thing he's his description.

Greg Papa football Larry Krueger Gerry Gary radnich Mark Davis Mike Pereira Ted Robinson Stanford Tim Ted Notre Dame Brian Ted Ken Robinson Papua Jim Ryan Al Davis El Paso