21 Burst results for "Papp"

"papp" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"papp" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Bangle is a favorite, right? Yes, PAPP Ass isn't a bad thing. Hey, and all the bread Brent Mussburger had never seen this. Have you ever seen somebody tried to sneak the ball in from the one yard line with the offensive line is in pass protection. That had to be a miscommunication that full. I hope so unless they hate him missing by the way you haven't mentioned and I've been listening to show all that. But you haven't mentioned what is the most frustrating. Thing for me at all of all and jumping offside when you're yelling at the TV. They're not gonna snap it. They're not going to snap it, and then they jump outside. That is frustrating. But the worst thing for me is when, when teams have third and long or fourth and long, and I mean 14 yards or more. And you have the roughing the passer. Yeah, even if you know you're right on him. And he throws it out of desperation. It's probably not gonna be complete. It's 4th and 23 or something. And then you you rub you throw the quarterback down. It. Sometimes I think it's a ticky tack call by the officials. They say. Well, you brushed him. You know if if you touch Peyton Manning, you're going to get a penalty of that kind of deal, But But when you really you know, then pile drive somebody down with him. Are you It's just just you're not prove it. They're They're just happy that I can get to the quarterback like a dog. Get no ball. I got the ball. I got to the ball to the quarterback. I'm gonna smash him. What? I don't understand it touched down. It doesn't matter what he said. In the huddle. I've see the ends of what I don't understand is when it's 13 20 or longer. When it is check the ball down the field. The flags fly all over the place. All you need is a flag to get a first down. It just drives me nuts when teams just did Unless it's gonna draw and see if we could get like five yards. Every blue moon somebody'll busted run, and I'll get like 21 yards barely get a first down through a complete pass its way in front of the sticks. Never get it. I always say, Hey, let's just run all verticals. If the court if you're under duress is a quarterback. This chuck it we gotta punt it anyway. But if you get some protection, Hell, just throw it down the field that they pick it off. They pick it off and we'll probably end up tackle him like a punt. But we made him getting a flag. That happens all the time getting flags, But nobody seems to know there must be something missing there. That's another stupid thing by the weather. You just made me think of and that is when it's you know, it's it's third Nate or fourth and eight and they chuck it down the field. And and and or let's say it's fourth and eight and they chucked at 48 yards downfield. And the guy intercepts it goes out of bounds. It's like no, No. You understand that you wouldn't have caught. You would have probably can't be this far but way up there. You better be able to have a first out instead of back here. You intercepted that ball. Yeah, but everyone direct. I get paid for the reception. I get it. The other one You reminded me of now that we're on the fourth down is when the quarterback takes 1/4 down sack. Oh, that's so crowd pleasing. I really, really especially at the end of the game. The end of game game would be over. You got I don't care if you got to turn twist. Throw it over your head. Throw it somewhere. Just get rid of it. I don't care what it looks like, Just give yourself a chance. But when these guys go down, and they take a sack, or that my all time favorite, I still remember his name Reggie Ball. He was the quarterback for Georgia Tech Georgia Tech against Georgia one year and they're driving down trying to get a touchdown. Toe hit the back door cover, and it was like fourth and seven, and here comes the rush and Reggie Ball rolls out. And guess what he did. He did what you would do the other three quarters of the game. Which may be smart on third down, which is get outside the pocket and chuck it into the hedges. I'm like what? What's up? Why? Why?.

Brent Mussburger Reggie Ball PAPP Ass Peyton Manning Georgia
"papp" Discussed on THE RAYHART RUNDOWN

THE RAYHART RUNDOWN

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"papp" Discussed on THE RAYHART RUNDOWN

"Yeah, exactly. Let it let it be that don't try to go up against it right nice wallets and theaters. Don't try to force feed a Justice League when nobody has seen the Aquaman origin story and nobody's seen the Wonder Woman origin story. You know, I'm saying right and you force-feed this month this compilation of Heroes that nobody seen yet. It's kind of like watching Suicide Squad. Nobody gave a crap. Everyone was kind of rushed into watching how they came about birth. You see I'm saying so I think Warner Brothers should have done in my opinion is just went ahead and said nope, keep up with our own pace and we'll put out each one of these even they could have probably cut time. They could have cut the time down instead of putting one out a year or two out of year. They can put it one movie out every three months, right, you know I'm saying and then that would have gave him for a year. And then by the time you know by the time a year or two have gone by they would have gotten too far away from being able to put out Justice League. I think them force-feeding Us justice league. And now now there's going to be a Snyder cut which is a four hour of patient. Yeah. I can't really can't wait for that. I can't I got have literally have HBL Max one of those reasons, but I think I don't know man. think that this Flash movie is actually going to happen to be really awesome. Now. My question is is that are they going to have Robert Pattinson? I don't know if they're talking about all these other Batman's are they going to just bring in Robert Papp as it stands right now? They're not going to have any him that on there at all. They had to stop filming his Batman because he caught covid-19. Oh, that's pretty sweet. It's a great deal how to vote a tool created by democracy works. It breaks down the options your state offers for casting a ballot empowering you to decide when.

Justice League Us justice league Robert Pattinson Robert Papp Warner Brothers HBL Max Batman Snyder
Coronavirus: Australia sends 1,000 army personnel to Victoria to fight outbreak

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:44 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: Australia sends 1,000 army personnel to Victoria to fight outbreak

"We Begin Today's program in Australia which is preparing to deploy its army to help deal with the surging corona virus cases in the state of Victoria public health workers are knocking on the doors of thousands of homes, offering free tests. One regional health minister has warned his residents don't go to Melbourne well, let's get the very latest now with Karen Middleton. WHO's a Saturday? Papers chief political correspondent in Cambria Carrot, welcome back to monocle twenty four. Could you just bring up to date, please? Yes. Indeed, we've been down. Congratulating ourselves a bit here in Australia that we've been doing well with reducing the infection rod across the country, and all of a sudden in the state of Victoria capital of which is Melbourne as you mentioned. They have seen a reversal of that for the past nine days. They've had double digit infection rates now of course, compared to the rest of the world, and particularly some hot spots around the world. That's very very small, but we all know that the virus stopped small and spreads fast and so double digit infection rights can quickly guard glory to more than that, and in fact yesterday they. announced they had seventeen new infections and today is struggling time that that number is thirty three new infections, so you can see these exponentially growing again, and that's going in the wrong direction as far as the government is concerned, so there's now an all out effort to try and taste the people in the hot spots around Melbourne. which is in the northwest of the city, and in the southeast of the city to try and find out how this is spreading, and to stop it as quickly as possible. You said they sort of all out attempt. It seems to be very rapid and very thorough people knocking on doors and the army being boughten. Yes, that's right I. mean the testing regime is more intense than it was at the beginning of the pandemic, because here in Australia, just like everywhere else the capacity petition as much more now than it was early on when the whole country with on higher alert, so these inability should test more people now that it will include people who aren't showing any symptoms any respiratory symptoms. Symptoms that might indicate covid nineteen, so they really trying to get as many people tested in those hotspot areas as possible. They're recommending that people don't move around the city and Dart Melbourne. If I particularly come from those areas people in other parts of the country, being urged not to go to heaven, so we we do have a slot pariah situation for one stage, but. The attempt is to try, and really could title that infection and as you say. The army is being holding interestingly tonight. The request for the army that came from the state government has been scaled down somewhat. It's evening here in Australia and earlier today, the premier of Victoria had for about a thousand troops to come to help with. Tasting and transport and other areas like monitoring hotel biased quarantaine. He's now scowled down that request to any about one hundred and fifty from one thousand, so to be unclear, exactly how many will do, and whether there will be involved in the knocking on doors, and the army has been doing that in other parts of Australia. Pandemic and date was called out to help with the bushfire crisis earlier in the year two, so the first time, the army's beat out, but it does indicate that these some urgent situation. How much faith is that in the authorities to do the right thing and act promptly, because it's always a question of trust, isn't it between the Guardians of the station, those who live in it. Yes I think there's a considerable degree of confidence here. Because a strategy has will seem fiction, writes the rest of the country with the exception of Sydney which still has. Reasonable numbers of infections compared to the rest of the country and the rest of have have next to no new infections right across Australia and I think that's a combination of the swift actions of the government, and also the response of the people who were willing to keep themselves in tain and Steinheim and wash their hands and do all the things that were asked to do and that has. Managed to keep the infection rate in check so I think people do trust the government. Unfortunately, though in some parts of the country, and clearly in these parts of Melbourne Win, the restrictions were eased a little bit. There were some people who didn't observe social distancing requirements anymore. The government in Victoria saying it was largely attributable to be family groups that were meeting and catching up. At the time the restrictions were lifted in PAPP's not staying as far as they were required to so. The now, GONNA enough. Ice With this new infection at the hubbing doesn't turn into a full blind second wife.

Australia Army Melbourne Victoria Karen Middleton Dart Melbourne Cambria Papp Sydney Melbourne. Tain Steinheim
"papp" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"papp" Discussed on KOMO

"Closure of most businesses during the pandemic has been especially challenging for people who are homeless a nurse in Puyallup has been volunteering to help them for weeks now but she's just been blocked from that city sanctioned encampments here's como's Carlene Johnson with more of the parking lot of the New Hope research center in Puyallup is now the city's sanctioned camp on the parking lot does have sinks and toilets some people have been able to shower in weeks course local churches where they've been able to do that are closed and they can't get warm inside a library those are also shut down the nurse and Papp off Wallace's spent the last several weeks checking up on the sixty people who live there in this crisis a lot of them have not had access to food water sanitation they are very confused about what's going on with Coleman and last Friday the city said she can't go anymore it's about social distancing with other volunteers also kept out for the nurses and giving up she tells the Tacoma news Tribune she still offering rides to treatment and doctor appointments waiting just off site for the homeless who come to trust her to walk out for a ride especially since transit has cut back so much on schedules Carly Johnson come on news six weeks of isolation and social does since you have left you feeling anxious or depressed YouTube psychologists say you are not alone and now they want to hear from you in hopes of helping others here's como score one Hey we're social creatures we humans isolation is bound to feel weird says uta professor Jonathan cantor if you are one of those people who is just fueling this really strongly we're sort of waking up every morning and feeling more anxious and overwhelmed and you can't quite put.

Puyallup Carlene Johnson New Hope research center Papp Wallace Coleman Tacoma news uta professor Jonathan cantor Carly Johnson YouTube como
"papp" Discussed on The Queens Fortress

The Queens Fortress

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"papp" Discussed on The Queens Fortress

"Them back with it came from better than what they will when they understand but she's never recognized itself was a feminist and feminism has never came knocking in that in the aid of those girls in the eight of those young children because feminism is exclusive it sits down has conversations with certain people bridesmaids certain people from certain place with certain political views. You know but it is. It's not as inclusive as we want it to be all we want to deal. Version of. Feminism is not having compensation than a movement a step in the right direction absorb enough to repeat the question. Like you're saying people have conversation about feminism. Minute invites a certain type of women and exclude. Certain people is that still not a step in the right direction. Feminism I don't think so because then what implausible include. It's impossible yes it's impossible to wonder. I don't know I think you. Ah PAPP's undermining Humanity. I think you are. I think you are undermining what people can do. Okay because feminism is not the only way to solve problems and in fact I in my honest opinion I have not personally seed in feminism. Help anyone I think people have done things To pro to to okay to to say how can I put this okay? So there's feminism. I say let's say this is a brand in order to advance. This brand people have said and done things and said that it is it is in the name of feminine right so they are basically a pushing for feminism. What modernism in itself and my personal experience. Right I have not seen feminism. Come in and intervene in actual people's lives and move obstacles and shift things and radically change people's lives because what feminism is is conversation is discourse. That's what it did. That's what I have a problem with so it so at the moment it promotes it promotes separation division. Between people were now I have to say okay. I'm not a feminist because this and this or I'm much IMF administ- because that in that and there are different types of feminism that we that also exist out there by virtue of being different types. That's also part of it creating division in his religion threats to equality because what you just described as the whole institution of religion feminism. No you've listened is the same system. No no no. That's the Newsham does religion. I was talking about the system. Of how the besides the separate brand fillers talk about Hamas. Let's talk about you. Speak of segregation. You speak off people starting their own movement. Okay let me let me pose it back to you all right right what. I just said disagree. No we can notice up on the shop. That's Polish up united. Let me work on my rebuttal of the replay yourself. I'M GONNA I'm GonNA come for you. You're picking thing that you posted. Okay your favorite. Drapeau could write lyrics on a soap on soap in prison and still not have boys Hashtag gooby. Oh you know what I think is what happens in particularly in what happens in hip hop is hip hop hypothesis existed in fees and since the late seventy s when it started. So there's been a phase of the lowest of the little call that you found the Gangsta. You know everything. It's no one member rape loot and right now in the era of Mama wrap it. Seems like everyone who is who is not mumbling is considered a good Rapa Which is not which is not necessarily live true. Personally I represent South Africa. Who made a great name for themselves who've done great things in the name of hip hop I just don't think agreed rapids. I think we know who you taking. I'm not going to mention names of people who I think are great rappers. Top TO GRANT I. I don't know if I can do a top two. I can give you two of some of the people I think there is a lady by the name of. You can black rock on mazing okay. Lyrical Law Right. There is a rabbi. The name of proverb Amazing to you never listened to any of a work. Go listen to you can block. Rock is just yeah all right things are hated and poetry and twenty sixteen. Yeah People who perform sitting down and people who performance sunglasses he has the list grow somewhat. But I think other things just nuances and various it down one day. What does he make? Those two. Things are very disrespectful to your audience and generally in performance if you are unless it's part of the performance unless you are acting and this part of whatever you're doing but if you are just guys classes and then you start so I went to get. My mother said no so. We should not sit down. Arcade disarm also industry not personal preferences. But I can tell you to meet when you do that likely to walk to walk out. I'm just looking at like eighty five ninety percent chance of just of just working out in the middle of your performance and come back. Someone else comes because I feel disrespected. Yeah right if you can't if you can't respect me enough vice for you to go and put all of you in there and you know you have to put on sunglasses. I don't even like people wouldn't shade and talking to me is reading something that irks. She didn't feel like the performance not putting Manila Sunday. No and yes so. There are some times where I'm a person will read because they just decided not to prepare and you can tell And there are times when a person will read for effect that happens. There are times when people will read as part of a longer said and reading does not irk me as much as sitting.

Rock Hamas PAPP Manila IMF Drapeau rape South Africa
Greta Thunberg sets sail to US climate conference on carbon neutral yacht

FT News

09:35 min | 2 years ago

Greta Thunberg sets sail to US climate conference on carbon neutral yacht

"Greta tune bug. The swedish climate activist made headlines this month by opting to sail to the u._s. Rather than travel by plane choice reflected a growing recognition that air travel carries a heavy cost to the environment you need a convoy are transferred. Correspondent has been looking looking at this problem and the aviation industries response to it and she's here with me now to discuss this along with our environment correspondent lesley hook you nina you spoke to anna hughes an environmentalist who pitta misers this new growing hostility towards flying. What did she tell you well. Anna hughes has founded a flight-free twenty twenty campaign in the u._k. Off the back of other campaigns exist in other countries and she's encouraging people to commit to not flying in twenty twenty aim is to get one hundred thousand people to sign up to the pledge so far she's got three thousand and she's found that when she speaks to people <music> the quite often aware of the effect flying has on the environment she is concerned because it's not obvious how the aviation industry can realistically decarbonised when is in the long term and a hughes is tapping into the trend of flight shame driven by the likes of greta which started scandanavia and on a huge herself south actually committed to not flying ten years ago and doesn't fly anywhere she tries to get everywhere by bicycle or public transport and encouraging people to perhaps when they think holiday today's stop thinking flight and papp's consider u._k. Destinations if that's weather based or even tried to get some of the european cities that they used to fly into by train in because once you take into account security cues immigration queues etc getting to the airport which is usually out of town. The train doesn't necessarily take that much longer and if you organize snuffing book in advance it can be a cheaper option so that's what she's trying to do is quite big. Trend 'cause we do think when we think of holidays we will think cheap travel. Let's go to spain so let's see what's the evidence. I mean how bad is flying compared with other pollutants well. It's really interesting because in terms of global carbon dioxide emissions aviation is only two percent don't which doesn't sound that bad but there's a raft of research over the last few years that show that the emissions airplanes not just carbon dioxide but also oh night trajan oxides also the contrails they create. Those are those white ice vapour clouds that you see in the sky when you see that white line behind the plane. That's called the contrails israel. All of that has an impact on global warming. That's much greater than just the c._o. Two impact so most of the studies show that the warming impact of planes is about twice the amount that you would expect just from c._o. Two alone because of those other factors so closer to five percent percent of man-made warming can be attributed to aviation the reason that climate activists are so worried about this is because it's an area. That's growing very very quickly. Kley so well in other sectors like power. We have wind and solar farms. Many countries in europe have already been decarbonising their power sectors or your our dr electric vehicles are growing with aviation. It's not really clear how it's going to decarbonised as you mentioned and also this is a very fast growing industry street. People are just travelling more than they used to so. You need to use spoken to a number of airline to executives. What's the industry doing then to combat this well. There are several several things they're doing in the short-term. They're often investing in more fuel-efficient aircraft and also there is carbon offsetting but carbon offsetting. He's not decarbonising so kabanov fittings when you purchase a tree also one industry insider told me that customers don't always realized that they can carbon offset or they choose not to carbon offset and it's quite difficult to sometimes encourage passengers to click on that bit of the website light when they're booking a ticket but in the long-term various airlines are looking alternative fuels and electrification but realistically these are aw long-term solutions which aren't going to happen in the future certainly at scale is anybody. She's investing real money into the alternative fuels could have been electrified. Haitian is quite a few years away. I mean nobody's predicting we'll be flying from london to new york anytime soon if all by twenty fifty in an all electric airline so these sort of alternative fuels are they investing lots of money in these people are investing. There are various airlines like b._a. Left-hand sir are working working with projects that will create biofuel or synthetic fuel united airlines is another company which is heavily involved in developing biofuel and is trying to really scale it up but looking at it globally. The investments are relatively small and it's not enough but there are airlines which feel about particularly in the u._k. Governments need to start stepping in and incentivizing <hes> lines to switch to other fuels because the problem in the moment is that jet fuel is much cheaper and so in terms of business model. It's very difficult to justify moving to an alternate fuel which is in some cases three times more expensive than leslie other any environmental sarmento concerns about some of these fuels. I think biofuels has become very very popular for the aviation industry to talk about. There's headlines lines about used cooking. Oil from your house can fuel this plane isn't that cool and snazzy and it is but what the research shows is that to actually create and produce biofuels at the scale that would be needed for aviation or for other forms of transport that can't be easily electrified at the moment. You would really need so much land to do that that it wouldn't be feasible at the large scale so the i._p._c. report. That's the report art from the u._n. Intergovernmental panel for climate change that came out earlier. This month showed that to limit global warming to one point five degrees would require prior seven million square kilometers of land for bio energy and seven million square kilometers the size of australia so this is a lot of land when bio fuels are done small-scale. You could grow a crop. Perhaps on some land wasn't being optimized or wasn't being used for food crops but if you think about twenty year's time global population is going to grow food needs are going to grow and if demand for biofuels growing along with that puts a lot of pressure on available arable land and is there an issue also with the of energy density of some of these biofuels. I mean i guess one of the issues again. Switching from kerosene does have a very high energy density which gives you that thrust thrust the airplane. I mean do they match up. I think looking at alternative views of the whole electro fuels if that can take off electro fuels are approach that does much that nc of kerosene which is why if it can be produced at scale in a sustainable way that could be a real breakthrough biofuels at the moment tend and to be used from what i can gather anyway tickly in the case of united for example the bio fuels are often a drop in fuel which is blended with kerosene so it might right behalf and hof lizzy. Can you explain what our electro fuels. Electricals also called synthetic fuels. The idea is using power from renewable. Oh energy like wind or solar to drive a chemical reaction that yields a synthetic fuel so rather than extracting fossil fuels from the ground. You are synthetically creating a product that basically can match kerosene very very closely using the power from renewable energy. Let's just go back to electric. Electrification people do talk about electric flying taxis which should be in the air by twenty twenty five. I just wanted how do you see that you nina talking to various. This people working on this and airlines for example easyjet is working with right electric to develop an electric aircraft which would be viable for their business but even an the likes of easyjet who quite bullish on the development of electric aircraft even they say the earliest electric aircraft aren't going to be in service until probably the twenty thirty s mostly because of certification it takes years to certify a new aircraft pilots will need retraining certain areas of airports pulse will need to be reconfigured to deal with the new demands of a completely different model of aircraft and even if we do see the first electric planes in the twenty thirty s. I likely to be hybrid so there might be elements of the journey that still run on fuel so possibly it might need fuel to get in the air and and then the electric will kick in when it's cruising but that remains to be seen. It sounds like it's all quite a long way off. I decide one final question. In terms of policies. I mean are there any the policies that the government should be putting in place now to advance all of this so at the moment the u._k. Has a passenger tax and i think it generates about out four billion a year but that goes straight to the treasury and is not designated for anything in particular is just tax on tickets and the chief executive of heathrow airport who i spoke to not recently has called for the government to start allocating at least some of that money towards developing a more sustainable aviation industry so i guess one other sort of conclusions. Is that it flying. We'll have become more expensive. If it's going to be greener in the future it remains to be seen but the way it's looking probably thank you very much. You need leslie and thank thank you for

Anna Hughes Twenty Twenty Lesley Hook Spain Treasury Easyjet Greta Papp Europe Leslie Chief Executive
"papp" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"papp" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Way to make hurricanes. Let's damaging in west deadly, I'm all ears, and this is a case during the plowshare program were a airforce meteorologist named Jack Reed had an idea to potential use nucl-. Weapons to either blow the heart out of a hurricane essentially to disrupt the wall. So the hurricane self would fall apart, but failing that which he would have because a hurricane has more power than hundreds and hundreds and hundred weapons plan B would be to use nuclear weapons of Papp's change the direction of a hurricane so that it would move out into the Atlantic Ocean before it hit landfall. This is likely the more practical purpose of the, the only problem is, there's no way to test. The only would actually test. This would be to do it on an actual hurricane. And of course, if it stales, which it probably would have. But if it stales all of a sudden now you have a two hundred mile an hour wind radioactive hurricane about Miami. So I'm pretty happy that the test this program. Because there are several chapters in this book that would have ended up in me not being born, and this is probably one of them, because my parents lived in Miami, around this time when they're attending university of Miami, any deal active hurricane probably would have been really problematic for my future. Lice. So Jack Reed had an interesting idea. But I'm very glad that intestine, what was there. Also an idea I seem to remember from talking to you before about dropping a nuke on Australia to build a harbor. Well, that was one plan that actually made a little bit more sense. I mean, the idea was you could wouldn't dropping knew he would actually bring over there. And you would blast open a artists harbor side of Australia. And that was a plus.

Jack Reed Miami Papp university of Miami Australia Atlantic Ocean
"papp" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"papp" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Think of a way to make hurricanes damaging in west deadly, I'm all ears. And this is a case during the plowshare program were a airforce. Meteorologist named Jack Reed had an idea to potential use nucl-. Earlier weapons to either blow the heart out of a hurricane essentially to disrupt the eye wall. So the hurricane it self would fall apart, but failing that which he would have because a hurricane has more power than hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of nuclear weapons. Plan B would be to use nuclear weapons of Papp's change the direction of a hurricane so that it would move out into the Atlantic Ocean before it hit landfall. This is likely the more practical purpose. The, the only problem is, there's no way to test. The only would actually test. This would be to do it on an actual hurricane. And of course, if it stales, which it probably would have. But if it's fails. All of a sudden now you have a two hundred mile an hour wind radioactive hurricane about Miami. So I'm pretty happy that they didn't test this program. Because there are several chapters in this book that would have ended up in me not being born, and this is probably one of them, because my parents lived in Miami, around this time, where they're both attending university of Miami, any do active hurricane probably would have been really problematic for my future. Lice. So Jack Reed had an interesting idea. But I'm very glad that intestine, what was there. Also an idea I seem to remember from talking to you before about dropping a nuke on Australia to build a harbor. Well, that was one plan that actually made a little bit more sense. I mean, the idea was you could wasn't probably knew he would actually bring over there. And you would blast open a artificial harbour side of Australia. And that was a plus.

Jack Reed hurricane Miami Papp Australia university of Miami Atlantic Ocean
One Month After Australia's Un-Losable Election: Dissecting What Happened

Between The Lines

07:24 min | 2 years ago

One Month After Australia's Un-Losable Election: Dissecting What Happened

"It's been a month since the federal election and the live apart. And the commentaries they remained in a state of disbelief and despair. This was, we will told the unlivable election. So just how did the pundits get my so badly? Roan is it fair to just blind? The polls will the coalition scare campaign as if scape campaigns never happened in politics. What do you think was this election reminder that many commentators, especially in the camera? Chris gallery. They really do. Leave in a bubble. Well, one veteran columnist consistently believed that the coalition had a pathway to victory and he's my guest today. Jared Henderson, now you've no doubt seen him as a regular guest on the inside, as you can read these call them every Saturday in the Weekend Australian, and he publishes a Wally read blog called media watch dog. Now, jeff. Rod is one of the leading historians of the liberal party. He's books include Menzies child, liberal party of Australia and Santa Maria. A most unusual man as published by immu p the Papp's Jared's. Mine work is executive director of the Sydney institute. Jared, it's great to have you on between the lines. Thanks for the invitation to them. Now, what are the punditry get the election so badly? Wrong, what I think you've got to look at brief contemporary history here. We know that the polls go to wrong with Trump's victory. The polls got it wrong with bricks and the penetration Australia should have been aware that Paul's aunt, who is reliable. But in a in a sense, I think must of the commentators in most of the journalist wanted the coalition defeated, and there was a sort of projection onto the electric of their own views. They didn't believe that the coalition was worthy of government. They didn't believe modem timbale should have been overthrown. They wanted the. Coalition replaced, and I think they projected onto the electric debuts day held without checking out what the views the electric hill, and I think biolog-, many of them are out of touch some common title is on the lift such as professor Judith Brit, from Latrobe university shoot. She took to the cover story in the monthly magazine leading up to the my I election. And she said that this was the headline laced self interest groups, the liberal party has little lift, but appeals to the hypocrisy on her lawn was that the liberals must be hoping that enough of it supporters. These are woods hours, morally bankrupt as it has become happy to try the planets, and they children's future for pocketful of Silva. Judas breath is very often wrong on these matters. It's twenty five years ago. She predicted the end of the liberal party that didn't work out too well, and then I saw her piece in the monthly, but it's rather superficial. Peace and innocent Sasol fractious pace because what she's saying is that Australian shouldn't be primarily consumer their economic interests. Now, I always sought before the campaign during the campaign that essentially Australians would those on their economic interest, because that was the only thing that can really determine about others thought that they should vote on perceptions of climate change who perceptions about the liberal party. But that's not how have worked in the past and, and make sense. If, if you'll someone on on modest to listen, modest means you're gonna look look after self. And, and I think it's wise that you do that. It's not simply self. It's also you family. I think there was a tendency of many of the commentariat heated look down on other astray ins they thought privately I thought they wouldn't express it they thought they went as. Well educated today with I wanted us in a sense that as morals with wanting, the real big issues. I mean in, in a meeting, I did very few discussions before the vixen vetted, one, one business Madiun, David Maron, Jennifer Hewett, and David Meyer. Showed me, the whole election was going to be decided on climate change and suggested David that he might drive out to the suburbs. So into some of the regional towns to find out what people really talking about about. He didn't do this and I didn't finish to the MAs of the will that they, they are get out clause now is that, well that would just following the polls and the polls consistently said that the coalition would not win the election and raises the question. And we saw the same phenomenon happen both with Brexit and Trump. And we've talked about the shy Trump factor that people feed and meeting, I'd vote for the Republican nomination, because he was socially unacceptable during the twenty sixteen Brexit referendum Paul's pointed to remind. Find victory millions of. Scheib residencies unite crypt into the Pauling booze. I voted leave you'll saying the same phenomenon heath. Well, we are saying the same here, but there's another factor. It's wrong to blame the Pels in in this insulin, usually, the Pels arrived, this time, the weren't right? But in any event, the magin was fifty one and a half to forty eight and a half. And that's still within the magic mirror. So very unwise for any journalist to say, well, look, the coalition's behind by that, much, of course, look at ninety ninety three when Paul Keating won a come from behind election victory Johnson. That was a classic wasn't it. Well, it was in 'cause pull ditties victory speech out in the western suburbs. And he come into the second eleven of journalists being sent. All the I live in was hanging around waiting for Joan his victory speech, which he, which he never delivered. So in a column, I did the Australian before in the period of the election said, Labour's, he went from a position on three occasions, not seventy two with Gulf with him. He was not a popular figure, but a huge figure then with Bob Hawke, who was both very popular figure, and a huge figure. And with Kevin rod who wasn't a huge figure, but a very popular figure. Now, when you look at it that way, Bill, shorten wasn't at that level. And then there was this fixation among sections of the press. Go raise it, the review among sections, the prescription some other commentators, that's okay for the liberal party to have a later who might win provided his name, Malcolm Turnbull, preps. Julie bishop. They didn't believe that the term should have been replaced, and therefore, they didn't believe that Morrison could win because they predicted they've you of turn belong to the electorate. But the electric didn't have that view of timber all guest is Jared Hinson is a columnist with the. Australia now on election, not the vanquish Tony Abbott. He talked about a political realignment in this country. Let's heave from the former prime minister. There is something of a rail lineman poets going on rolling around this country. It's clear that in what might be described as working seats. We are doing so much better. It's also clear in, at least some of what described as wealthy Sates way undoing it tough. And the Green Left is doing better. They will be gripe deal of analysis of the pot that climate China deal did not ply in the ring outcome. And let me just say these says, my first word if not necessarily my last word on this subject. Climate change is

Liberal Party Australia Paul Keating Jared Donald Trump Kevin Rod Brexit Jared Henderson Roan Chris Gallery Jared Hinson Monthly Magazine Sydney Institute Gulf Bob Hawke Jeff Latrobe University Executive Director Julie Bishop
"papp" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"papp" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Hi. You have a question for us. Sixty five years old. And history me when I was thirty three. And I'm pad pets MIR's owner regular basis. All these years. And I just had a new gun colleges that I saw told me that I don't have a uterus. There's no need for me to have pets mayors. And I just would like to get that cleared up through more false that is actually very true. And so very true. That is very true. So the reason for that. So one, I guess my question is why did you have your history back then? Prolapse uterus and five broad. Okay. And so, because you had your hysterectomy for what we would call benign reason than cancer, concern there. And because Pap smears are a screening test for several cancer because you don't have your cervix anymore. That is not an Sern for you. Now, it'd be different. If you've had history of abnormal Papp's, if you've had a procedure on your cervix called a leap, or cone that may require continuing Pap smears even after having a hysterectomy. But based on what you've just told me you're gonna call correct. You don't need to have any further Pap smears, and that is actually the policy. The recommendation of the American college Jiwei down. So your physician west correct. And telling you that we would still encourage you to come if you had any problems such as pelvic pain. Do you still have your ovaries? Yes, yes. If you had pain or problems with abdominal distension those are things to get a pelvic exam not necessarily a Pap smear. But just the manual exam and possibly some imaging test to, to check. If you had pain or something like that. Okay. Really appreciate that. You're good news. Nancy, thank you so much, and two for women. We've got about a minute here for women who have perpetually come back with a good Pap smear. No problems. Is it somewhat common to maybe have women like that of any age, maybe every other year or something like that? I mean not necessary every year. If you've had three number ones in Rhode then you could go to every other year every third year as long as you're keeping up. We still want you to and in our office, we still want people to come every year if they're on any medication. So we can make sure that still appropriate that's contraceptives, and I mean you obviously need a prescription renewed, -cation hormone therapies are things, we're still going to be falling even if the path itself has not done ever year. Exactly. All right. Nancy, set the bar, high great question. Great answers by Dr Mora doctor. So you join the conversation today. We're here on the weekly check up until five o'clock, four, oh, four eight seven two zero. Fifty Ashley Frasca, infra, Dr Feinberg. We'll be back right.

pelvic pain Nancy abdominal distension MIR Dr Mora cancer Ashley Frasca Rhode Sern Dr Feinberg Papp Sixty five years
"papp" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"papp" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Birth center in women's wellness clinic, Dr Amy Johnson grass Dr Amy good morning. I always appreciate to come in because I think about you often, first of all, because I still use so any of the products that you suggest that can help us on our road to health and wellness. So I have a lot of the protein powders, those things that I think of all the time in the suggested them, but I also think of you because whenever I have one of those scenarios going is this, the right health or wellness? Guideline for me. Does it make sense for me or my family like wind down? I can always call. Dr Amy so thank you for coming in with us here on the mob show. Absolutely. And so what? Are we going what's going on over a health foundation's right now? He has. So we are getting ready for spring. And so we're so excited that it's nice and warm out, right. Flowers are starting to bloom, but we are just really highlighting. I think the fact that amount of women's health that we do, right. We really wanna reach out to women and let them know that you're women's health care experience, can be different. Right. And when I say, different, what I mean is you can feel heard and have time spent with you in a comfortable safe environment and come to a place where people know your name, right? Yeah. And so I think that really feels important, I know when I'm looking for my health care when I wanna go into a healthcare setting that I want to be recognized and known and be listened to. And I think all of those are things are things women are looking for we always encourage our mytalkers to go to your website is health foundation's dot. Com. And I understand what you're saying where even if you think the to have a decent relationship with your OBGYN, sometimes you feel as though they don't remember your storyline as a person where every time we come in there you re introducing yourself. Right. And I think building that relationship is so important, right? Whether you're coming in for kind of your annual exams when that happens or breast exams, or if there's something going on the Mark concerned about right? And I think especially as women, there are so many different. And you've mentioned this before, on the mom show, Dr Amy there is so many different points in your life, where it may be appropriate for you to transition to something else, because it doesn't it's not the same every year after year. There's different different things that we are focusing on as we age gracefully. And I think to what the, the one thing that I see women assume and say is well, I've been saying this provider four. X amount of years. Right. So maybe, for like they're Papp's or women's health concerns, and then when they get pregnant, they just think oh, I'm just going to stick with this provide. Right. And maternity care is not like going in for cold, right? Because if you go into a clinic and see a provider for cold more than likely your experience will be similar or your treatment will be similar across the board. Maternity care is not like that. At maternity care isn't McDonald's. Correct. It's not a one size fits. All right. And I think it's important for women to hear that is to do your to do your due diligence to Riley, ask questions and investigate a little bit more to make sure that you're really getting experienced that you want, and I wish that I had known that when I was going through my journey, because it was exactly as you said. Remember going in there and going, okay, I'm getting ready to have a baby, and it turns out that my particular nurse practitioner who I loved couldn't do it. So I had to use the other providers. I thought I use the word hat. I thought I'm like, well now I have to start with somebody else who's already in the building when I transitioned out of the building altogether. Right. Okay. So I don't think a lot of women. No, that's an option where they might be hurting the feelings of their provider. And I think it's important for women to really feel comfortable with the providers that they're seeing and really going to be getting the maternity care experience, that they want, really what we're talking about today. We're talking about why center might be right for you. But really, you know, even if in person or doesn't sound like it's a good fit for you. Stay tuned, because we're still we're going to be really talking about questions to be asking your providers that you're choosing about them and about why you're delivering. So you can make a really informed choice. Okay. And you get the experience that you're looking for. We're also always open to your questions. You can call the mom show at six five one six four.

Dr Amy Dr Amy Johnson Papp McDonald Riley
Kenneth Branagh talks 'All Is True'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

08:14 min | 2 years ago

Kenneth Branagh talks 'All Is True'

"Everybody. I'm Peter Travers this popcorn where we tell. You. What's happening at the movies? And we have a movie now called all is true. It is the story of William Shakespeare in his later years. It stars my friend here Kenneth Branagh who also directed it. And did God knows what else, you know? Can I think it's kind of amazing? We were talking a little bit before about when I first encountered you which was you playing a Henry the fifth onscreen, which he directed as well as started Oscar nominations for both things. This was a Henry who was just filled with youth and vigor and was going to take on the world and everything and it was. This fresh vigorous approach to what Shakespeare is. And now, you're playing Shakespeare himself in his later years has that make you feel on usual. Unusual very privileged. Because the in a way, you know, Henry the fifth was a it was an amazing opportunity to have as a young actor, and a sort of virgin filmmaker and really was any possible because there were lots of other equally sorts of adventurous maverick figures in terms of the produces and an all sorts of other people who were taking a chance on me. I remember talking to the late. Great psalm. Go when junior when we were releasing that film in America saying cannot, please please, please. I I know I'm I'm I'm twenty I'm nobody another, but complete can I make two requests on the post police. Could you include two names, one is Judi Dench who I promise you people will know about sued they will know about and the other one pleases William Shakespeare, without whom none of us would be here. Why credit the writer well, just different additional dialogue anyway. But it was he was just too concerned about what was going. To get people into the side. No problem listening to a smart, man. He news who knew his market. But I suppose the send if things I keep sort of saying the same thank yous to people like Judy Dench shoop stuck with me through a journey through shakes. Things have you done with her? I mean we worked about together by seven times. And she's directed me. A couple of times and I've directed her. I've always learned from her and a couple of years ago, we did Shakespeare's play the winter's tale, which was really a prelude to making this film. All is true because she played Pauline a- a woman who speaks truth to power, and she puts my character in that play on a man who makes stupid mistake and loses a child as a result. She puts into the test puts into the sold, and that sort of ten ship became a starting point for Ben Elton thinking about how might Anne Hathaway and William Shakespeare's relation be after twenty years of him being away as the most famous of the agent and coming back to face the family. That's the the whole crux of the story. He's got this wife who he basically has neglected. Fully and two daughters and a dead son memories dealing with. But I always here we know nothing about what really happened in terms of what was going on and Shakespeare's life. So how does this come about that you get to play him at in sixteen thirteen when he's basically retired after the old gulp Peter burns down. He's going on. Well, belts looked at the existing facts factual as we knew them that appear in the Public Record Office. And so you'll find that on on a day in June of sixteen fourteen Joan lane stood up in the church. Holy trinity church in Stratford, and he called Shakespeare's daughter a whore. And he said she had gonna RIA and that she was sleeping with the a man who was not her husband. This is in public record quite clear. Everybody knew about it created a sensation because Shakespeare was returning celebrity and in the case of of someone so creatively prolific to come back to a tiny town. And a long way from London, and and after thirty seven plays in a great success workout, what to do even let alone what to say to a wife and daughters, who as you say been neglected, and who have if you think of in terms of the plays that he wrote we're to have plenty to say about what he might or might not have done or said in his terms. He's gonna he's gonna come to terms with how that sits, you know, the the this idea of what it's like for genius to deal with old and rely was also in the in the core of what we were trying to look at Ben Elton who did this works on in a very humorous way. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yeah. But that's it. He's coming up and people are saying who the hell are you, you know. And I think what again one of the fascinating about Shakespeare's. How elusive he is. You know, there are probably about twenty five about him in the public record of his places. He was things that happened during the course of his life, but many people find it hard to join the. The idea of the fellow we present who may not have gone to drama school comes from a relatively lower class and REO in small country town and goes off into the world and can write plays about Rome and Egypt. And and it's Lee, and and and politics and religion and do so without having had the classical education without being as whether classical idea of genius, lured by remand bad and dangerous to know living glamorous life of public scandal. That sound great. I'd buy some of that. But Shakespeare seems to go pups, you know, exemplify what flow BAC, hold when he described the autistic life and said, you need to be boys watering, your private life and revolutionary in your creative life, and you might argue that about Shakespeare, but but that that that's sort of contradiction tension between the ordinary man and the man capable of extrordinary creative output to me you so touching so point. So Shakespeare because he he often in his own. Own place. He pulls the rug from under the feet of grandiloquent people saying, you know, what? In the end, you're all going to need company. You're going to need help at the end of your life. You're all going to require a you're all you need a support that comes from very simple contact with human beings. It isn't all about being some grand Queen or king. Even if he writes, very well about them his genius. I think he's writing about the nitty gritty in love, isn't it? Yeah. It's kind of amazing that in terms of film television. Whatever we don't really get that much of him. We really don't. So you I'm watching this. And I'm thinking, okay. Here's the he's coming home that heroes coming on, and nobody really wants them. Yes. Everybody's white says really, you know. And also that they were illiterate, basically, women just weren't taught obsoleted. So so a lot Benneton I think to give a modern voice in the film to women who. Had not been listened to. And it didn't matter to them that father, even then was lauded as the as the poet of the age, his, you know, clear and present responsibility as a parent, and as a husband with something that they they challenge, and and they challenge indeed as most families experience, even with the most high-achieving mother or father out there in the world being spectacular comeback to your own, you know, kitchen table, and you're just a member of that family and people are are unimpressed in the tension. That accrues is important one of the things I admire about Shakespeare is that he does come back to stop. But he does he does. He does fess up. You know, he he they stay married, and we investigate and explore the idea of what what it meant when this is true in in Shakespeare's will he left his wife? His second best bed and many people. Regard this great slight or a snob or in front. We take a different view that might have that might actually be a layer of meaning in that that suggest Papp's. It's a it's more than a friendly. Gesture might even be a loving gesture. The title was originally

William Shakespeare Henry Peter Travers Ben Elton Kenneth Branagh Judi Dench Oscar Public Record Office Holy Trinity Church America Writer Joan Lane Papp London LEE Egypt Rome Stratford Anne Hathaway Twenty Years
"papp" Discussed on Lift Your Eyes � Forget the Channel

Lift Your Eyes � Forget the Channel

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"papp" Discussed on Lift Your Eyes � Forget the Channel

"Which creates a new humanity chapter two verse fourteen to sixteen. Christ is also the one who came and preached the gospel. He's prison with these people through mission and vandalism which brings us peace with one another and the common access to God chapter to the Sydney. Do I t. This all helps us to see how Christ Jesus act says I Kona Stein in this gospel, preaching building process crust is the subject of the preach gospel. He's also the person making sure that the gospel is preached is not a gospel that people can make up for themselves Jesus Christ and the truth about him provides the standard and gives shape to the process of mission and vandalism. Said believe is people who were built on a foundation the preaching of the gospel with standard reference point the truth about crossed. This is all relevant to our local church situation as we encourage on another in the gospel and Shay that gospel with others. But it's also something that matters beyond any individual local church. This is Paul's point in the next phase. Invest Twenty-one pulses that increased every active building being connected, again ah causes gripe into a holy temple in the Lord. Paul wants his raiders to lift their is from the local situation to see that. There are lots of building prices going on. It is crossed as the CEO of a construction company will Papp's a confederation of construction companies. The building work that is the preaching of the gospel. And the building up of believe is in the gospel is happening all over the place and h active building is connected. Hell. We've already seen invest twenty h construction has the same foundation the preaching of the gospel. And we've already seen the construction has the same standard cornerstone Christ Jesus, and I twenty one we see that each construction has the same purpose growth into a holy temple in the Lord. Pull isn't talking about physical building. He's not saying that crossed crosses building. Literal temples with altars will ever the place. He signed that as the gospel is preached and believe and his wife given and brought into relationship with God. And as we arised with crossed and might holy given. Hope we come together as holy people. And so I hope temple it means that God's with us, and we precious to God, pull talks more than one Corinthians chapter three. That's an amazing privilege, isn't it? But it's not just for our selves pulls point here is that this happens wherever the true gospel of Jesus Christ, his preached and believed. This verse helps us to lift our eyes beyond ourselves and beyond our own individual church community building projects to see how Christ is doing this building every way. And when we lived there is we can see how connected we are to Christians throughout the world. Invest twenty two Paul returns to his raisin says that in crossed U2. being built into a dwelling place for God by the spirits..

raiders vandalism Paul Kona Stein Shay Sydney CEO Papp U2.
"papp" Discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

"And so he said someone face to. Yes. And look you, and I look we started the year talking about positively on social media. And I and I said, and I'll say it again, you know, I think everyone is entitled to constructive criticism. If you feel passionately about something, you should also be able to put that in a message that is getting your point across without having to resort to name calling and bullying and harassing and all the rest of it stuff that usually social media is very quick to to bring out in people. Yeah. And I think it's because partly station media does allow people to say things Papp's they wouldn't ever same face if they met, and I totally agree. It's it's it's takes me is great when you can have sensible conversations, we will have different points of view and. People can kind of respect other people's different points of view. But when it's named cooling, and even I find even when I try and explain things people ask, and I try and explain things, and then constantly being called names or no, you're wrong. You're wrong, New York. Well, okay. I can only say that certain amount of times we're trying to explain the set amount of time. And then frankly, it's just not worth engaging which the shame because I've always really enjoyed engaging with people and social media. But I think that you know. As Emily Nash said, my good friends of mine and his Emily said Jewish Kotei young children, and it it's just she's got better things to do. It starts affecting your mental health say Kate and make an William and Harry started the heads together campaign all about chocolate after mental health and trying to be nicer to each other. And do we really think that they would want their fans to be doing this? I think it's great that think campaigns like this get the conversation going. I know there was some some comeback predictably on social media against the campaign because people were saying actually, the problem isn't here the fan groups, the problem is the press. I think when you're looking at the bigger picture everyone has a role to play in this. Whether you are one social media user with a follow following of ten people or you are a national newspaper or TV organization with millions of us. Every. Has that responsibility to think before they right or put a headline to something whatever. And of course, we have seen a lot of negative stories about Meghan pretty much since the day that she came on the scene some of those being avert racist, some Susser and some not at all merely just being kind of bitchy in the way that tabloid magazines and newspapers can be as specifically online where it's all about really, you know, we call it. Click pay, but is trawling, you know, a lot of these stories that kind of trolling for attention. Yeah. I think everyone. Hey. Hey writes about royalty and celebrity in general Rayleigh has to look at their role. And I definitely agree. I think the major have to look at that role. And what that during I think people who all she say, whether you go won't follower million followers. You have to be responsible for actively what you're publishing in public. It's and I think I think all of us have got to look at what we do. And you write some of the trolling against Meghan. And some of the things have been cited being horrendous. I find it quite upsetting. Some things have been said about Meghan. I on the Frazier fight pregnancy. I mean, I really hope that will. We know we know that she has seen some of these things it's been upset by them and all would be upset by them. And the fact that if she were not of mixed raise these things probably wouldn't have a racial edge. They would probably still be ninety horrible things. But in a way, the fact that she's. Of mixed race gives everybody an opportunity to stop think. How miss be proceed how other people read this? Maybe I might not think this is mean or Snyder racist, but actually, maybe other people might think, and actually let's stop and think and try and see this opportunity to improve standards everywhere..

Meghan Emily Nash Papp Rayleigh New York Snyder Frazier Kate Harry William
"papp" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

Go Beyond Disruption

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

"It's you can't just look in rear view mirror and tell your business partners. What happened that is information? They cannot chains. They aiding of the business by looking at at at those information. In order to be an effective business advisor, you have to use data analytics analyze the data of the business looking at way, the company's going and use things like predictive analytics effectively like forecasting. What your news will be focusing? What your expenses are going to be the dine gift some indication to your business partners of way, this businesses aiding? And also as you've made very very clear, your business partner may not necessarily be or direct clients. They may be the communities which will business does business in where it's physically located the the wider society, which can be changed by government legislation. So you have to make sure that you're adopting a collaborative but intuitive engagement with. The states as well as the people that may or may not be run direct client. So it's it's quite fascinating certainly moving beyond the data, but retaining your intelligence over and beyond what you see directly on the screen in front of you now for anyone who'd like to find out more about the topic of going beyond data analytics being a conventional business in unconventional world. Papp's people want to find out more about your work in particular. Where would you recommend that they look would recommend the first look at aftermath website through that data is on the report got a save report on ener biases that I include in the report, which is also available on our website is in contact. Details are also on our websites. If people are more curious on the topic. Welcome to give me a call of. That's all we have time for at the moment. Peter, but before we wrap up. What's one message to leave for those listeners in the accounting and finance profession. It will help them go beyond disruption. My one message is that going skills. Analytical skills is not the end. It's not only skills that you need. It's only the base to be an effective finance professional. You need you need some soft skills leadership skills to add to your accounting skills as companies grow and the business environment is becoming more and more complex this more legislating coming in you have to rely on a team of people. You can't do everything on your own you, you don't have the knowledge of all in facing the business. You don't have the relationships with all your stikers, you need to rely on a team, and and and to manage the team effectively you need to have good leadership skills and good interpersonal skills loss. Lastly, remember that financial figures are the result of decisions, and you need to be involved in the decision if you want to influence, the financial figures, and of course, we'll make sure we include links to the resources you've mentioned in our show notes. I thank you very much, Peter. There's. Obviously much more to explore around the topic of growing conventional business in this unconventional world. And in addition to the results as you've mentioned,

partner business advisor Papp Peter
"papp" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Welcome to the interview portion of this episode for supper, you're gonna hear from director Robert Mandell, how did you decide to get into show business? I was a chemistry major in college. And a lot of theatre where I went to school, and I fell in love with eater. I wanna came to medicine or theater, I decided on the feeder, and I went to Columbia MSA Columbia worked under Joseph Papp who was my mentor there, and then put me to the public theater, and I worked in New York and regional theatres for about ten years. And then I directed a Jewish piper. Play called knock knock which was picked up by at that time public television and Boston New York with the entire cast that had performed the trinity square in Providence, Rhode Island and. And the refused to consider me to direct it. So I thought I didn't wanna go through that again. So I applied to the American Film Institute, and I knew that acting at by that time was very comfortable for me. But the mechanics of filmmaking were brand new and remember this is before we even had videotaped af I really was responsible for my transitioning from Peter to film, and then I made the short film called nights at over years. Which was my thesis film that. AFI which called a lot of tension and set me off so to speak. Why is it should've? It's a great film. And it was so nice to see creek Watson in that. I'm a few people who Craig Watson was or is. I I have really lost track of him. They were great both. Both of those leads great from there. I got an agent, and they brought me screenplays one of which was the first movie independence day with Kathleen, Quinlan independence. They really put you on the map and just the cast for that movie is fantastic. How did you manage to get all those great actors or were they not necessarily considered the stars? They ended up being at that point. Kathleen, Quinlan was the only known at that point. She had she had done. I never promised to rose garden produce of that some van black had done. I've believe a TV movie with her and brought her to my attention. And of course, I met her. And I thought she was perfect for the role the others. I had seen they they weren't famous at the times. I end we I think this is. Since I film, I knew her because as I said, I grew out of New York theater, and she was at theater actress, she'd come from Yale made a big splash Hedda Gabler. And I just thought she was terrific lift the young. I also new New York he had been in sixteen bones, which was a David replay. That was at the public theater and David Keith I had seen in a movie or two, and I I thought he would. So I would write and I was the lighted to have them marrying Dougherty. Who who I I don't know if you're familiar with. But she was a brilliant casting director at wanna brothers. And because it was the first film of mine. It was great to have her support in twos. Ing those people on even the ramps and Richard Farnsworth. And I love Francis stern Hakin. She is always Fanta St. on she's terrific again. He was New York actress, I knew. She is wonderful wonderful and all of them were terrific and the move the and I really needed. I mean that was truly initiation fire from me because going from student film, which was knighted over years to a wanna brothers movie was an enormous step in warmest. And great to you know, have the support of the cast. The producers were as I recall down my neck wanting to come in a very low number for low budget movie, and the stars of that movie were were helpful helpful in in persuading those producers to to give me while I wanted did independent state make splash, you know, it could not at the time. I not at all pulling kale really resurrected that movie the opening few theaters in New York and Chicago in Los Angeles. I know people saw that time Diane visa shortlisted for an Academy Award about movie, but did not enough nation. So people saw it but not enough not enough. And then after pulling kale thought a y-..

Kathleen New York American Film Institute Dougherty Columbia MSA Columbia Robert Mandell Joseph Papp Peter Rhode Island director Craig Watson Providence kale Boston David Keith Richard Farnsworth Academy Award Hedda Gabler Francis stern Hakin
"papp" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Up straight all of a sudden see as odd rise with pointing out the documentary shows that he the Fussell's remains the other main of our ancestors who lived these perfect on together lives, they have scoliosis in Ramon domestic problems and not era wounds in their heads all things. No. So these idea that we will once perfectly fit everything to about this was idealism. Of course, I accept up sitting on since their ways of improving the whole thing. So fascinating to me because as you've rightly detected immune mix of English this and just by pistol to this. I've I've been shy of it because of lychee that shyness or could nece embarrassment, and and a sense that I don't be necessary that they somehow again, there's nothing natural that is ideal. The natural state is a state of perfect illiteracy and in numerous rally nothing. None of this comes easy to us. The fact that you don't recall how hard it was to learn to read is justed an artifact of the fact that you were lucky enough to be brought up in a culture where you were given that skill early. It was hard work even for somebody with an aptitude for it. Which no-doubt you had. There was a period where you did not know how to read and there was some period of arduous instruction where that got you to this place where now it seems natural to you. Right. Yes. And there are many things you have learned like reading, and there are many things that you never learned. And maybe wish you had and it would be you would feel. Full measure of the ordeal, learning them. Now, if you were to take them on now, and mindfulness is something that you could have learned when you were learning to read, right? So now of said, it would be the ski it would be in your sin you to some degree. And yes, you would have to look back on and say, well, one would hope wouldn't be necessary because I don't I don't feel that of reading right? And I think what I've been confused is that I've often seen Papp's incorrectly. People presenting mindfulness as an end points rather than as a tool, tools, whatever other points, one might have in one's life. And after weeding is not the end points living. Read. Now, I don't have to do anything else. Reading the start of the whole adventure of the life of the mind, and and so on and and I suppose I've seen people think. Maybe some people have got so into their yoga them detention and their various practices. Whatever dispensed. They may be from whatever cultural air is borrowed from adapted that they've become the implant they've become the puppets of their living here rather than two people at the say with Jim, of course, people become completely fixated on all manner of thing that they become newly converted to or CVS pain massive dividends into whether it's for me. I was when I got into Brazilian jujitsu. I was insufferable. I was proselytize injured. I still do it. If if you give started Brazilian needed Brazilian with. Appropriate. Yeah. I used to be the case. Now, you can now you can find a Russian or American or anyone around enough of an close grappling. I believe. Yes. I looked it up when I found it is incredibly fun and addictive. But also, it has the downside of being worse than your chair at this age and causing injury. I've you much better than us as well. I mean, they're European type Americans like my friend, go Vidal, whatever who who like me had absolutely no interest in the body. But it goes back a long way with me to school and everything I so hated what you would call the jokes. You know, the smell of the gymnasium smell the dressing room. The idea of the showers, the rugby cricket football ole of that hated them. Now, love sports. I'm passionate about sport. Everywhere. I can almost all sports, but even minority his dots and snoop szeswith, but at the time because my shame in my. Embody mine feeling that I was so inadequate. So uncoordinated I can run in a straight line with running into a tree catchable throw a ball just felt awfully inadequate and an enraged by it didn't had enough pride. Not to to to mean. The defa just scope in a coma feeding adequate. But I I took on my side as as champions it..

Fussell Vidal Ramon Jim coma Papp rugby
"papp" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Cleaning up westbound fiftieth sunrise boulevard, and it looks like couple of a couple of lanes still shut down back to Hazel avenue. That's where the slowdown begins also an earlier crash on westbound cap city, and it's going to be at Marquel de traffic. There is backed up to watt avenue. So things running very very slowly on some of our freeways next report. Eleven o'clock. I'm Dana Hess NewsRadio. Okay. Thank you. Dana expected a sunny day today with a high in the low sixties forty-nine now in Sacramento, Tim, Lance, NewsRadio KF PK Sacramento's news, traffic and weather the top and bottom of every hour. Newsradio KFB depend on it. And now a look back at this week in history this week in one thousand nine hundred ninety five the first canned beer were sold in the United States in partnership with the American can company the Gottfried. Krueger brewing company delivered two thousand cans of Kruger's finest beer and Cougars cream ale to fatal Krueger drinkers in Richmond. Virginia ninety one percent of the drinkers approved the canned beer, which gave Krueger the green light to produce more. It was so successful Kruger's was eating into the market share of the big three. National brewers Anheuser Busch Papp's and schlitz the big three soon followed suit and by the end of nineteen thirty five over two hundred million cans had been produced and sold jumping ahead this week in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine the dukes of hazzard and television comedy drama about two old cousins in the rural south and their souped up nineteen sixty nine dodge charger known as generally debuts on CBS the show which originally aired for seven seasons Senator around cousins, Bo and Luke Duke and their ongoing efforts to elude their nemesis. The crooked boss. Dog and the bumbling sheriff Rosco p Coltrane an estimated three hundred dodge chargers were used over the years as the general leaf sticking with cars.

Krueger Dana Hess Newsradio KFB Anheuser Busch Papp Kruger Sacramento United States CBS Senator Virginia hazzard Gottfried Richmond Luke Duke Bo Tim Lance ninety one percent
"papp" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Up to date when it comes to the mall kids immediately out of the gates as we do every fifteen minutes we've seen a mixed picture for Asian equities overnights after gains on Wall Street last night, the MCI Asia Pacific index a tad lower now down by about the tenth of one percent. We've seen this index sort of gyrate throughout the throughout the night. It was higher a little bit earlier looking at some of the individual indices in Asia. We're seeing some pessimism shining through in China with the three hundred down by two tenths of one percent, the kospi shots lower earlier by about six tenths of one percent of the Samsung's earnings Papp's disappointed and put some question marks around the South Korean economy. Also, looking at the Hang Seng index is little changed. We have seen some strength coming through in Japan as well as in Australia with seeing both Australian. What has Japanese shares rising than the Nikkei two five index higher earlier by eight tenths of one percent. Looking at the futures. We're seeing both the US and Europe pointing higher this morning. Your stocks fifty futures rising by about a quarter of a percentage point. We're seeing similar gain for both footsie as well as Dax futures futures higher by a little bit more than a tenth of one percent looking across rates and FX. We all seeing treasuries holding fairly steady this morning. The ten year yield pop softening somewhat with the ten year. Treasury yield now at two point six eight seven percent, the dollar gaining some bids here this morning with the Bloomberg dollar spot index rising by two tenths of one percent. We're seeing the euro, Liz Stein. Head down by third of one percent. The Japanese yen also down by almost two tenths of one percent. The dollar-yen rate at one eight spot Eighty-nine Yousef. Yeah. We've got some breaking lines hitting the Bloomberg German, November industrial output down one point nine percent month on month so contraction. Yeah. Estimate was for zero point three percent. So missing estimates sizably, and it comes off the back of driven factory orders, slipping as your area demand. Deteriorated the first key signals that happened yesterday. And now this latest German in December industrial output confirming. Some of those concerns down one point nine percent of looking here at the euro-dollar trade at the moment down three tenths of one percent market. Yeah. Definitely the the the data soft once more from Europe's largest economy now, let's delve deeper into our top stories this morning, and and it's been a day two in US, China trade talks with optimism coming from both sides. Bloomberg's Bryan Curtis reports. Now from Hong Kong, the Trump administration has expressed confidence it can reach a reasonable deal with China, but how do you define reasonable how much ground is China give on structural change to its economy? And what does the US given return at the moment? Markets are fairly tranquil as investors away. Details and for its side, China appears to be showing good faith. Traders say state-owned enterprises have been in market spying US made goods, no one expects a full resolution this week, but perhaps a few small steps of progress in Hong Kong, Bryan Curtis. Bloomberg daybreak Europe. Let's have songs fourth quarter profit and sales missed estimates. That's in part, because of course, in the US China relations falling demand for memory chips. Lie analyst Bloomberg intelligence says Samsung is also facing slowly headset and long term growth reiver's like a in five gene won't help much for now this year.

Bloomberg US China Europe Samsung MCI Asia Pacific Asia Hong Kong Hang Seng Bryan Curtis Papp Japan Liz Stein analyst Australia Trump administration one percent
"papp" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

Under the Skin with Russell Brand

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

"It spreads in all directions from that clan of the deer the deer so attracted to it is searching throughout its life through the forests through the fields trying to find what's actually within himself, and that's very much what life is about in this world where all trying to find happiness. We're trying to find peace and the essence of happiness and peace is in love. If you give a child. Adequate clothing, but inadequate love. She'll look lovely, but she'll live in misery. Ultimately things could give some gratification to the mind and senses, but only love to give love and to receive of gives fulfillment to the heart. And that's universal. Why is that because the nature of the true self is to be an instrument of divine love and every great religion in the world, when we understand its essence, it's to awaken that love it's beyond all sectarian conceptions. There's different historical settings. There's different languages different types of rituals. But they're all meant to reconnect us to that. Immortal love that is our true nature. Evidently, they are also perennial truths that are the recur through our as you said a theistic traditions. However, there is a competing narrative, and that competing narrative, even in our describe as the posted secular world meaningless secularism is to a degree reached a kind of conclusion, and we recognize that the reintroduction of some kind of spirituality is a requirement. There is still a sense that what you are describing as the night longing for God. And in he had quality a need to love the this can be somehow explained a why scientific lay. Now, I don't believe I'm not style. Jake or retro grade perspective of spirituality concede, the famous, maxim, you can't solve twenty-first-century problems with twentieth century ideas. I'm my consent with. The great traditions is that is not even a problem of semantics don't think this is a problem of language. I think is a problem that doesn't take into account the kind of technological and scientific progressive law century Papp's even lost fifty years in particular that I think that the liberally now talk to a. Feasts whenever I can usually though you'll many whom I respect and agreed with a great deal. You con- knowledge is important in as much as faith is important knowledge is important. But usually you'll find some light and ideology some sort of code here. How does humanitarianism resources self if you're an atheist, but you believe that human beings should be calling and be loving to one another. This is an indication of. Divinity has reentered the conversation at that point. Otherwise, nihilism is the only turn if life doesn't matter human beings that the role of the human being is not significant. So my sense is Swami that this time it's gonna be difficult for pay poll to relinquish the powerful hold that materialism consumerism and the ideas of our time have on certainly many western people. Now you live in India in your temple is in India. So you're part of different mindset, even though you are an American man born in Chicago, check out the book if you wanna. You know, in these kind of countries, we know island now, I live primarily in England is difficult to reenter an island in particular. If you start telling people all the answer's going to be, you know, religion fife in our power. A lot of people are going to say here, we go. And. Didn't work out too. Well for us. How are we going to talk to people that have been some cases physically abused? But broadly, speaking jaded by fife, how are we going to reintroduce them? I don't think he's simply bobby's by recognizing the somewhat psychotherapeutic idea that there is a witness to your force. Thank all of us can agree that there is a thing that there is a witness when you think, you know, issues around gender or I am lonely wherever you're thinking who is observing these thoughts we will recognize there is a seed a route of witness to contras actively..

bobby India Chicago Papp Swami Jake England fifty years
"papp" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"papp" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"The so-called romances cafe as you can safely call it wants to carry on this tradition. It's not far from the historical cafe on the ground floor of a high rise building could defense. There's a newspaper stand beside the entrance which contained to sad copies of tiger Spiegel when on a single occasion, I ventured inside. I picked up one of them and immediately felt suspicious except for me there what any other newspaper readers in their place. We're all sorts of imitation marble, Papp's real model. I don't know about it. And if one of the pieces of cake that you could choose from the long display case had fallen onto the floor. You could have picked it up and eaten it without a second thought. But in the so-called romances cafe a piece of cake doesn't fall to the floor. Although actually wanted to coffee, I ordered a Darjeeling tea not simply a Cup, but a pot as if I had to punish myself. My presence on my meat defines. Then attempted to read a story in the target Spiegel about the gas supply in Berlin. But I found it hard to concentrate. The gas supply business in Berlin is a complicated business in the past. I would have had a cigarette although I gave up smoking years ago. I would be very happy. If you were allowed to smoke in the Ramona his cafe, of course, you're not allowed to in theory. You're still allowed to read books. There are coffee table books on the shows between the big windows, which I suspect no one's ever picked up. You might even set the alarm off if you were to remove one of them. A fresco on the ceiling shows how you're meant to imagine. The cafe sophisticated men with cravat imparting in conversation with sophisticated women with hats and as if walking smoking ban slim cigarettes. If you guys out of the large window your attention drawn to the bikini house an elegant elongated building from the nineteen fifties which was completely renovated and reopened not that long ago inside it's all vintage style. The facade reads shop different Berlin 's new concept mall shopping centers. The one thing shopping centers that call themselves concept Nel's are another thing entirely. I've made my peace with shopping centers, but a world in which shopping centers are called concept. Malls is one in which I don't want to live. Now, you might argue that the managers cafe is a tourist trap, and you can't deduce anything from tourist traps like that. Because they're precisely the opposite of what they pretend to be extremely so Fulham tasteful places, but that would be too easy because I couldn't find any tourists in this tourist trap in reality. An old lady was drinking her tea under the fresco and the handful of other guest seemed more likely to be local west Berliners to the reason you shouldn't be too quick to criticise is due to the people in the managers cafe who are more interesting than the meaningless place in which they find themselves. You find these types of people everywhere. No matter how bleak in every bakery and every shopping center in every city in this country. They're waging silent fight there, perhaps not even aware of themselves against the indignity of their environment. And sometimes they read a newspaper at the same time. Can they not simply stop fighting? No because as opposed to. Where they find themselves. They have history. Behind me, two elderly ladies chatting about a friend who still lives at home, but should really go into a care home. But keeps putting it off like old people who live at home, but should really go into a cow. When they started talking about a Persian woman. I couldn't help. But think of the Persian woman in Thomas hearts novel. Yes, however, they were faring to the wife of a consultant who one of the two women in the replenishes cafe had recently seen in the garden, but barely recognized..

Berlin tiger Spiegel Papp Fulham Nel consultant Thomas