17 Burst results for "Papa Peachy"

"papa peachy" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

04:30 min | Last month

"papa peachy" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"To mention an affront to logic. The riot culminated in a rock style. Kick line of drag queens facing off against the riott cops now. This one is true. The stonewall uprising lasted for days with the violence giving way to more organized protests including unbelievably a kick line. No there was not a kick line at stone. There are many clients stonewall. And i'll be glad to give you the lyrics. We are the girls we wear a hair in curls. We don't wear underwear to show our pubic care. John to the tune of how duty theme. It's howdy doody time you're right. It is so what are we left with what was thrown and who threw it and does it really matter not really. The conflicting accounts from witnesses dismissive media coverage and fifty years of articles. Books and documentaries have led to significant. Lgbtq infighting over ownership of the rebellion different factions. Want it to be someone like them. A butch lesbian a drag queen trans woman a gay man. A person of color. Someone who has their same adjectives. Stonewall has become in the words of preeminent v. v q historian susan stryker an arena in which different identity groups go at each other often vehemently making historical claims that are ultimately objectively unverifiable to wage contemporary struggles and this squabbling obscures the fundamental importance of stonewall. And that's where we run out of ideas at least for today the stonewall rebellion or riot or uprising. Whatever you call. It was crucial precisely because we can't say it was one lone person fighting back against the police violence. The real lesson to take away. Is that a racially diverse. Group of st queens drag kings gay men and more rose up against the stanic persecution unlike earlier riots. Movements stonewall gained world historical significance because it was the first time a diverse group of lgbtq people fought back together. thanks to our guest quote. Readerswe david from papa peachy rupert hughes tyler donors th ruined heroes and being this person thandi from.

fifty years John tyler david today first time susan stryker Stonewall trans one lone person Lgbtq queen gay stonewall st rupert hughes lesbian queens
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:09 min | 3 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And i'd love it. If you help someone else get started to and now for this week's interview. Welcome this week's episode of papa peachy this week with me. I have dr gertrude. Mantra and you can call her g. G. is a biomedical scientist. College instructor science communicator and author. She's the host of the create and prosper podcast where she interviews experts and shares tips on how to make money as a writer and author g also started the bold biomed a youtube channel that provide steps on the phd life career and productivity for students in the biomedical sciences. When she's not doing any of these things g enjoys a good spy movie. Welcome to proper. Pg thank you so much. David i really appreciate you having me on. Well i really appreciate you having accepted my invitation. Because we're going to have a conversation about all you've been doing in this domain of helping these as you know pop up the mission of the podcast is to bring. Phd's like early. Hd's almost finishing these people with information insights on how to deal with all of the the unknown that that comes especially by the end of a phd. Just before just after but also tips and tricks to make the most of their life as a as a researcher. So i'm really grateful that you're here today and Well i must say. I'm really really grateful. This beginning of twenty twenty one. Let's let me just stay gratefulness for something a little bit larger than me. Which is the community on lincoln. It's amazing that's where we met this where we cross paths and i'm really grateful for how how much love how much help you can find in a in a community you know. If you're an academic or young ph student you might think oh. This is a business network. It's not for me no absolutely. I think i think you know y- having both of us have been through the process. You don't you outside of the university walls outside of academia. You don't see much you don't see a of a phd's of on other career paths. You don't hear about the enterpreneur paths or you don't care about how the left academia so and and definitely when i was was a phd felt like my only choice was sustained in academia rights. And i'm an you feel a sense when when you realize well maybe my only -demia you begin to feel Sense of helplessness. As you realize that maybe you don't like research and and you don't wanna go on that path so really what. I'm passionate about a passionate about so many things but one of the things. I've absolutely passionate about is leading. Phd students and even letting graduates also realize that there is so much that your does for you and so many doors phd can for you and that you just have to explore that and so i'm excited to talk about that today. Me too. And i'm i'm really want to go at dive into these questions that you ask but let's start by the beginning. How did you. How did you get to where you are today. What was the the journey of g mantra from. I don't know being a bachelor student into going to her. Phd and now getting to where you are. Today writing teaching about writing but also coaching people and helping people go through their graduate school life. Yeah yes agree questions. I want to say thank you for having me again. David privileged to be on the pc podcast And so a little bit about me. I in two thousand twelve thousand nine. I started as a phd students at temple university in philadelphia pennsylvania and when i started my thought process. I had already gotten a bachelor's degree in nursing. And i thought i want to maybe teach or i wasn't really actually now looking back. I don't think i was completely clear. On what my professional path was. But i did know i wanted to get more education. I knew that appear was going to be a good pass. I applied for the program And it was great. I had a great adviser is a good experience but somewhere along the line. I realize that research wasn't the path i wanted. I didn't want to become a principal investigator of a lab. I didn't want to run my own lab because my was in microbiology. Immunology and we have labs and we run experiments but then what actually even got me on the path. I'm on now. Was i think this was in twenty eleven or twenty twelve. I went to the lab. One saturday evening to do an experiment and i was on internet. So won't month things at the time was even though i was earning some money as a phd student from my stipend. It wasn't a whole lot especially because he's married in at the time my husband Had lost his job so there was a little bit of financial stress. Incisive i wanna find something that i can do. Maybe on a weekend maybe one or two times a day on a weekend to make some extra money rights and even able to make some extra money then always looking for that time. Was i just wanna make be an extra hundred dollars and if i can make an extra hundred dollars that would take care of some of the financial stress. Well when i went online what. I found kind of shocked me because i found out that the where people actually Doing all kinds of Work on line and getting paid so it was from there. That i about freelancing may talk about islands about blogging and how people would put affiliate links on the on their websites and make money through affiliate links and you could essentially blog about anything and be able to not just anything but anything that people were interested in creating haunts around and issue did a good job of providing for you value than you could monetize to maybe offering your coaching often. Freelancing services selling digital products like e books to them. So that's how. I really got started. Right how i got interested in this whole world of online. I wasn't really an online person. I think back then. I only had facebook and i've even check it out that much you know. So when i found out. I started a blog on the different experiments. I was doing in in them. Online business world into. I would do something in our right about it and do something about it. And over time i built upon audience doing that. That was my first look. I i no longer run that blow but at the peak of that blog. I think i was getting around. Twenty to thirty thousand visits per month so it it became pretty Big so then somewhere twenty seventeen. After at this point i had finished. My phd moved to san diego california and again i was looking for some of way. 'cause i always been very enterpreneurial. I guess and s like okay. I already started this blog. It's beginning to do well. So what are some other ways. I can Can begin to make some money. And i landed on freelance writing so in twenty seven seventeen. I started a freelance writing. Business that was a lifesaver because twenty eighteen. I post doc at a university. And i was told that funding had run out in so in ninety days. Will all lose our jobs.

David Twenty Today facebook ninety days youtube both hundred dollars today san diego california this week first look twenty eighteen one G. twenty seventeen papa peachy thirty thousand visits two thousand twenty seven seventeen
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

02:47 min | 4 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"With <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> you <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and that's week for <Speech_Music_Male> this episode of <Speech_Music_Male> papa phd. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> If you enjoyed my conversation <Speech_Music_Male> with jessica <Speech_Music_Male> steinberg <Speech_Music_Male> and appreciate all <Speech_Music_Male> the practical tips and <Speech_Music_Male> advice. 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"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

06:38 min | 4 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Really want to share. Maybe what if if you have seen changes between when you went through grad school or university and what you see happening today in terms of you know being a woman being a woman of color being being non binary woman of color. Can you talk a little a little bit about the good things that you're seeing happening and how they compared to maybe some experiences that you've had. Yeah yeah so so i. I did identify as women for most. I've always identified as gender queer. But like i've i've occupied women's spaces and had that experience for most of a career and i. It's it's a tough question so it's changed and it hasn't changed. There are definitely. I've seen a lot more top down. I've seen a lot more Administration and kind of structural changes that go in positions. The committee Just this focus on evaluating truly evaluating. How faculties students are are engaging in participating in diversity in in most importantly inclusive efforts which is a cultural shift Not just numerical ship. So i've seen a lot more of that and that's really great. I think it's feel personally. It might just be where. I am in my career and the kind of accolades. I have behind me at this point. But i feel much more comfortable speaking out when something is not okay than i did before I feel like even. If i was an i often am the only black person in the room and somebody says something and no pun intended off color. I feel like if i were to stand up and say something. My white colleagues would be in support rate. That's something that. I think certainly didn't happen to grad school for so that's nice. I like to see that. But then there's also i think we haven't quite had the collective realization about how much has to change War to to actually make a truly inclusive environment And so in that frame. There's kind of like at the individual level at at like the bottom up like who however we rallying to really care about that that's still lacking again because i think we frankly just don't sit down and have the practice of thinking about what the future is. What's it gonna look like. What's what's the classroom physically going to look like. what's lecture actually going to contain. How all of these things. It really sit down and quantify so much scientists as thinkers. But we're not sitting down to quantify what that actually what's it gonna look like. What the end result. How do we actually predict. There's no practice of that And so it's kind of like this. Big hand wavy gray mass. We're like yeah. We're making it better but you. You can't actually make it better if you don't have a goal in mind and so there we really need to see that progress still feels like we need to have some inclusiveness you x. specialist user experience versus to kind of model. What it's going to actually feel like for the for the users war in this case the the students. Yeah question are there. You've you've had to clearly from what you're saying deal with some some some difficulties some exclusion in or you know in your in your path. But were their strategies. Were there things you did or poor people in your path that that were helpful and that you can You know the yeah. They were helpful with that. And are there. Is there some advice for someone who's now at this institution or even in this group sometimes. It's just there's group dynamics writers group culture that is those somehow not so accepting and and that's that's difficult. Is there some advice you can give based on your experience of overcoming these obstacles and coming out stronger after yeah and my advice is echoed by research have a support group has abort group has support group having support group. Have people you can go and go back to your base code. Go back to that natural language. Drop your guard you know. Be yourself be really comfortable. You gotta have those the especially as any sort of minorities especially as intersectional a have your support group for intersectional people. I will acknowledge it. Super hard like for me. For example. Black spaces aren't always queer friendly spaces. Queer friendly spaces aren't always black friendly spaces as really hard thing to navigate. Still even if you're not fully relaxed even if you can't find a black. We are space for example at combination. Even those little bits that you get steps to single person even it goes so far There was one fellow who i think about as mentor. I can't i know his name is added. can't remember his last name but he was a new faculty. he was working in molecular biology at u. Dub i was in bio so we were in the same hallway and i would see him in the hallway. We kinda wave at each other walking by and then when he pulled me aside we just started chatting and anytime i saw him. We would just like stop in the hallway and chat for two or three minutes. Maybe we got a coffee and it was just this idea. It really created this sense of of of culture for meaning academia of what. I really nurtured a thing i needed. And it set the precedent right. Like here's someone. When i see someone frequently you're part of my community. I should have relationship with you to some degree and so in that that. That's someone that i think about a lot. That's a it's a behavior. I think about a lot. How can i bring that forward And i think things like that are also really important like looking at how people give you the cultural needs. Meet your cultural needs and how you can help that with some. Bring that to somebody else.

david Colorado Chaz colorado Mendez chaz today atlas institute cu boulder single parent papa peachy each Latino latino Twenty four seven steam Black dr z. denver fort collins one half
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:28 min | 4 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Realize that my there was nobody to look forward to to say. Okay this is how you do it. This is what the decision is. Because what i wanna do is not really something that's been done before Not exactly otherwise. Why am i doing and so it stops being looking ahead and seeing who's advanced who's further. Who's better who can tell me things and start looking to the side. And saying who's doing something different power. They accessing their paths of success. Howard bay managing their work life balance. How are they succeeding cooler. Who are my allies. Who are who are people who i feel safe around as we move forward together. Welcome to pop up each with david. Mendez the podcast where we explore careers and life after grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules. Get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of papa phd. Welcome to today's episode of papa peachy today with me. I have has more chaz neuro- engineer and steam coordinator at cu boulder looking to revolutionize access to steam learning hsieh's creating innovative interactive tools aimed at intersectional minorities middle school students outside of work. Chaz has a penchant for creative. Coding snowboarding baking bread and woodworking. Welcome to apiece says. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. It's good to be here. I'm super happy to have you here. And i think it's it's not going to be difficult for listeners. To consider the idea that diversity is is a very present question in our society. And i think it's something we'll have to focus in the near future and then going forward and that's why i'm super super excited to have you here because This is something that is very close to your heart and that you work on. And i think it's going to be really interesting to have this conversation because i've i've just recently a day. We're recording published an interview for example about a woman in academia and you know having kids etc etc and inclusivity is something that i think the the field the team feels gain with. But there's there's a culture that may comes from far behind. That has some resistance to this change and this why. I'm really really happy to have you here today to talk about this. I'm i'm so excited to talk about it. It's such a. it's a cool time. Now to see it being brought to the forefront and seeing so many institutions really taking it seriously and really trying to take risks dec- how they can make these changes in start to integrate a little bit more and so yeah. I think about it a lot. I work at pretty much. Twenty four seven in all these different avenues. I'm really excited to get into it. Yeah so to begin. Maybe just give a little introduction of who you are as a neural engineer. What's what is it that you do. And specifically i would really love you to also give a view of what you do relating to this aspect of of inclusion and diversity and also you mentioned that you see things happening around you. I love you to share a little bit about that too absolutely so i'm chas aka dr z. by pronouns are them nonbinary I am a narrow engineer. I work at the atlas institute which is a creative tech institute at cu boulder and as narrow engineer. I like to build design fantasize gadgets that will augment or help explorer our nervous systems work And so primarily. I've most recently. I should say. I've been using a vr and three d gaming platforms like unity three d to create these tools for exploring vision and other scientific explorations so kind of taking these tools. That are amazing. In powerful people are using them really entertainment and catering them designing them for a more scientific exploration. I came to this path quite. Interestingly i really love neuroscience i have a phd neuroscience. But i i realize looking back at my all of my projects. The part that i did the best was coming. Up with the experimental setup building wind tunnels making these vr arenas All sorts of devices building devices making all sorts of designing my own circuits writing my own code really creating the environment And then moving forward thinking about where. I can actually make an impact in some progress. That was really it. It wasn't really so much. What's the assessment that i can make. It's what's the tools. I can build heavily. Best answer this question which leads really nicely into diversity and inclusion which is kind of so one half of my job is creative. Portion making all of these tools and gadgets for exploration in learning neuroscience learning neuroscience learning about how our bodies work and then the other half is helping atlas institute get better integrated in various levels of community so integrated through cu boulder integrated in the tech community. That's burgeoning in the boulder. The front range areas that's boulder denver fort collins and then Also integrates in in the general public. Where what's our online presence like. What are we doing in the actual physical community And boulders a really interesting place to do this Colorado's really interesting place to do this. Because it's demographics are not very. It's more typical for the south west but not typical of the like the demographic of the country Where we see. The the largest minority group in colorado is out Latino x. community and then. There is a pretty sizable asian pacific american pacific islander community. And then there's a fairly small black community and of course a very small indigenous community. It's a different shift where a lot of people tend to Reach for the needs of Black communities which they absolutely shed cure the target in what people have been working on and looking at. Who's around us has been linked the latino community which is a whole wealth of problems to solve for me. Which is it's a fun. It's a fun way to expand and see what's out there So i'm integrated thinking about diversity all of the time with my Very brand new company create. I'm making these informal stem kits that and comics that feature kids from really their kids from the hood. Their kids from all over look like all different. You know. there's a muslim character is character in a wheelchair We have a single parent household. We really just trying to get a an image of what my childhood was really like and so now with cranny eight. I'm creating these tools that are kits that help these students that really are not included in the educational studies Which is a lot of. Lgbtq kids it's hard to find data on how lgbtq plus kids learn in the classroom especially in them who is in stem like like that. That data were not collecting that data as in general and low income other other minority groups Black indigenous pacific islander latina Just trying to make something for them by them and see what what is your version of stem. And how does it show up in your life. And what are the problems that stem helps you solve. And that that's really where where my heart lies is a.

david Colorado Chaz colorado Mendez chaz today atlas institute cu boulder single parent papa peachy each Latino latino Twenty four seven steam Black dr z. denver fort collins one half
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

04:35 min | 4 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Logging and mining activities so Environmental impact. I some of our offices in boston. A work with nasa on You know by a derived from the experts in hurricane modeling try and now they work with nasa on things like the mars probe to predict weather and where they should put down. rovers and all sorts of cool stuff like that i so we have our hands on a lot of different things. It's it's a good company to work for. I think we treat our employees well and there's lots of research and development opportunities. I think we have two to four hundred data scientists now and a lot of other people in our indeed that are technically data scientists. Okay well this sounds very interesting and again. It's really cool to see how diversified the same kind of the same company can be in terms of what problem. They're trying to solve but that the the brains behind it ended up end up having to be to be doing the same job of looking at a problem in finding finding solutions for specific objectives like mars. Who like predicting weather on mars. I wouldn't have imagined that. sure ceylan. Thanks a lot for your time. This was a great conversation. And i think beat for people interested in data science or not. You know we talked about things that i think. Apply for anyone who's doing a phd in thinking about their career. After so so yeah i would just want to thank you. Happy to have Been invited and this is a really fun conversation. So thank you. And that's it for this week's episode if you want to reach out to kaelin or thank him for. He shared doing this interview. Follow the link in the show notes. You'll find them papa. Peachy ford slash ninety eight. And be sure to follow papa peachy on twitter and instagram at papa peachy podcast and also on facebook n lincoln and now it's time for this week's and now it's time for this week's podcast discovery segment with length apology and deer grad student. Do you love plants. Don't be silly of course you do. You might just not know it yet. I'm vic rhumba league. The host of the plant their apology. Podcast the show where we dive into the lives and careers of some really cool plant. People join each episode. Is i chat with students. Scientists and professionals in the natural sciences and figure out what keeps them coming back for more. We'll explore their work. The ways they got into their fields why they love plants in nature so much and why you should love those things to plant their apologies laid back and conversational and we'll keep you laughing and engaged whether you're a scientist or not follow along for this adventure in the sciences and keeping a really cool playing people. Hi i'm alana. And i'm a fourth year p. h. d. student. I'm more than likely re editing not manuscript for the twenty second time or maybe i'm in my fourth zoom meeting. Today i can tell but mostly i'm probably working on my podcast. It's called dear grad student. And it's a podcast for grad students to celebrate commiserate and support one another through grad school. Each week i interview other grad students and academics about their experience from imposter syndrome sicom dealing with mentors racism academia. Or you know all the other joys that come along with grad school not a grad student. Maybe you're thinking about grad school. Maybe you just finished and you really want to reminisce about the painfully glorious days. Either way. I think you should come check it out. You can find the podcast. Dear grad student dot bus brought dot com twitter dot com slash dear grad student or under favorite podcast app. New episodes are posted every monday. And until my warmest regards best wishes sincerely alana.

two Today instagram facebook nasa boston twitter fourth year alana this week peachy each episode twenty second time four hundred data scientists com fourth zoom kaelin vic rhumba league Each week twitter dot com
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"But if he can come from. Like i love myself and i can do great things. Even though looks differently might plan. At least you're being gentle and you don't need anymore criticism during this time it's true. It's a very simple one. So i think people should take note of it because it's two three minutes right so the song so super easy and Yeah and the breathing. It's through that it's a it's pacifying and this thing of loving yourself in graduate school you can easily fall into stop comparing with others. But i think. I you know i've had enough interviews on papa peachy that listeners know now that a lot of pizzas are doing different things exciting things in different domains and so also talking with someone who who has followed this path that you're now looking into that has done it And that's That's Someone who either or either you. Maybe not that you admire that you feel that it's accessible to you now. It's easy to even on lincoln. Go to reach out to someone just knowing that someone out there has done what you're thinking of doing an it's having a great life and is fulfilled and and is a great person that will probably also help reflect on you and and love yourself a little more instead of saying. Oh my god. I'm a failure look at my colleagues their publishing and they're going for post. Docs and i'm not yeah. Yeah and also like when like when you're in it so when you're in graduate school it feels like a like it's a but like it feels like a bubble right. Phd right now and she was talking about this idea had and she shared with a professor and then i think he shared the idea with someone else and now the other person is changing their thesis to bring in my friends idea and like she's talking..

two three minutes lincoln peachy
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:31 min | 6 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"You have at least one main take home message. One actionable item. You can implement in your career exploration this year. I want to bring you more with papa peachy. I've recently started to have listener. Check ins on instagram. Where i let you share your academic journey so far and answer some of your questions live also for you who are new listener. I've just curated themed collections of episodes. I call starbucks to allow you to catch up on all the conversations and easily find the ones that interest you you can find them by visiting. Papa need dot com for slash. Start and i have big plans for the two thousand twenty one like improving the accessibility of each interview by having someone prepare and applaud clean transcripts or being able to better than guests for their generosity and time coming on the show with the gift for example bringing up a phd to you every week in the current format is a lot of hard work so to help. Keep the project float. I've set up a new way for you to support the the patriot on to be clear. You don't have to be a patron to listen to the beach. it's free and it will always be and you have my profound appreciation for tuning in each week and for talking about the show with your friends but for you who want to help you maintain the quality of the show and potentially bring to life some of the cool ideas i have for it. You don't have a simple way to do so. Just go to papa..

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:17 min | 7 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Hi there and welcome to the last papa peachy interview of twenty twenty this week. I'm bringing you my conversation with eric. James stevens founder of change hired a platform. Where in the summer of twenty twenty being unemployed. He set out to help each understand their value. Through livestreamed events and workshops that ended up bringing many thought leaders into the discussion and having over two hundred fifty registered. Attendees with him. I discussed the pressure. Covert has brought on the higher education space. And the change. These pressure means for considering their career options. Today understand that what you can do with the experience that you have is amazing and.

papa peachy James stevens eric
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:32 min | 9 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to another episode of Papa Peachy. This week on the show we're going to talk about uncertainty. Particular employment uncertainty in academia and outside of it in the current pandemic context. Now in between jobs after her third post doc. My guest will share her journey up to today and we'll talk about how confinement led her to take on new projects, teach herself new skills and double down on her investment in networking. And Remember, I have to new podcast discovery trailers share with you this week. So be sure to stick around with US until the end. Last year I have doubled to my linked in connection. I think in the past I had the mental barrier thinking I shouldn't ask anyone who I've never met. My lengthy profile should be statement like facebook page friendship like only know this people in real life and I only connect with these people and I have taken a long way to break that mental barrier that I could. Make friends with pimple that I haven't met yet in real life. But guess what these people ended up like maybe I would say five to ten percent of them had actually given a phone call and tell me about the stories become relationships that you're. Welcome, to Papa PhD with David Mundus the podcast where we explore careers and life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules..

US Papa Peachy Papa PhD facebook Grad school David Mundus
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:48 min | 10 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Find interesting in the conscious I've had a at universities is i. feel that even universities now are. Getting the message that that. They need to prepare the students for this reality of not everyone can become a professor and it's it's as simple as that not not everyone apart from not everyone just a small percentage of people have and I think even now with with all this, the the the problem with covert and and with the pandemic, the closing up of of universities all of that is even getting more access to those positions is getting even more more difficult. At this time. Yes. So I mean, typically the UK something. Like fifty percent if PhD's Austin academia three and a half years after they graduate and so yeah. With a bit of a split of. some some deeper obviously doing research work still. Stuck some people are doing teaching lecturing, but probably half of will pay. Something, somewhere in administrative positions. Awful pasties will be working outside of academia. When you tell that to especially like first and second year Steve's they, they can't believe it. It's mind blowing and. Even even when I talk to people about. People and they introduce myself southbound PhD or something, and they say, what? What are you working Oxford Cambridge you've got to pay. That must be what you should help in doing and it's it's. It's it's interesting this powerful expectation, but it's trying to educate people really about. coolest. Sometimes, like career consciousness developing conscious beyond just just wha- who's around you. But actually this whiter this way to picture when you tell people the statistics I think. That that is real sort of netter them. Because the important thing and. Busting the time but is this doesn't mean? Stop. And go do something else doing up she is something that's going to this to a lot of value to your to you as a person. To you as a contributor to society later on just don't. Just expect that. It's not a given that you're going to end up being professor but like you said, you can say India all act college, right? The alternative academic career paths that are out there. There's a lot of things you can do in around the university but then. The. The job market out there needs sometimes the in I. It's funny. I'd love I'd love to have your input on that maybe another conversation. Industry doesn't know they need pc's but they do and when the interview these people they're like okay. Oh, this is actually a very good candidate I'm going to take them. GonNa take them in. It is interesting because PhD's like we need. We need like a branding agency got something. Totally. I think in some ways, what I've been trying to do with jobs on taste really is elevate is like how do you? How do you rebrand the PhD? Some the? Different to the people who are doing it, and so people outside I think it's very hard. It's very hard. Job Employers it's kind of it's going to. It's kind of impossible but I think we have done a good job and I say things in the media now, which I would never have seen about about as being light multi skilled and flexible knowledge workers who can kind of what we were saying they switch from project to project. What we are capabilities very much fit the kind of. The the job market of today I think as long as we can. We've. PhD's can make the. League employers can also drop center that prejudice is a as well definitely the the. Love imaginative leap because. You picture yourself in that position, allow yourself to picture yourself in that position and then go talk to the people. The things you said he didn't didn't do per se but but go go. Find people around you who know someone who does that job that interests you they'll be happy to and know especially if they have a PhD to, it'll be happy to take time to take coffee to have lunch with you share their story and maybe point point you towards something that might interest you. Chris Yeah, we really have reached the end of our time. If. People want to want to reach out to you want to You know a C-, whatever you you've been writing lately. How where can I reach you? Why can they reach you online? What's the best way to to be up to date with the with with what you've? Up to The faces to go to jobs on toast DOT COM. Nastase. My my website were probably published an article every every two months but Yeah you can say I'm on twitter so that's just Job On toast So yeah, I'm. Trying, keep up a putting out content on twitter by sharing content, but it was sharing some of the best. Stuff. RAPE HD careers. As well, so yeah, there's places where you can where you can find the excellent Chris. Thank you so much for for having a to come to the microphone and chat with me a definitely I would have talked. A full other our. Because this we know there's so much talk about. Who knows if we can if you can have another conversation maybe on a specific theme I, I'd love to but thank you I i. it's really an inspiring path the to the to have a an inspiring journey that you've had and to me it's especially inspiring that you you take time. To apart from your professional life family life, keep trying to bring this message to people in graduate school out there that there's A. Whole Universe of things out there that they can do after graduating and that they will be fulfilled at doing and and you intellectually stimulated and part of. A productive part of society and? I think that's very precious and it's very noble. My statement weren't enjoyed talking to you. Thanks for inviting me on. High again. I, hope you enjoyed the conversation and that you took at least one take home message from it. If you did make sure to subscribe on your podcast APP and to share Papa Peachy with your friends. I'm sure they are asking themselves the same questions in that they will enjoy it too. Before, ending the road, let me introduce you to podcasts that you might also enjoy. Plants by pets a podcast about plants in about the research around them. And the lonely pipette. Sounds like we have a team going this week. The brand podcast aiming to help scientists do better science and roll the tape. Delay Plan. Like really really likes them. Do you wish you could get a glimpse at how they work on the inside, how a growth flower avoid problems like rotting meat and how they defend themselves against the tax. Too. That's why we applied to pets explore the fascinating to know workings of Balaji in our podcast and on our blog. Know that bumblebees can control the flowering time of by gently watching on them or that soap bubbles are grateful plant pollination. We are Teagan and your to plant scientists with allowed bring you the hot near reset without all the scientific jog. Lost, we talk about topics, diversity and equality academic system. And Brings Fun Science Bachelor last week, and we talk about cuts and.

PhD Chris Yeah professor twitter UK Austin Oxford Cambridge Steve Balaji RAPE pc Papa Peachy India
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:02 min | 11 months ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"You just need to find a way for yourself to deal with stats do not stake all that personally like you not getting a scholarship, you not getting into a conference or your article being dismissed. Doesn't mean that your failure it doesn't mean anything about view person right and that's what we're saying bt is a lifestyle, but it isn't the only thing in your life you need to find these other things that important that are important to you. So, if one paper gets rejected. That sides. You need to deal with that are allowed to cry over DADS to complain about it to be sad. That's all right but you also need to. Gear up get back out there on the stands that you are not a failure. And that's something that I've learned I think that's the biggest thing I've learned from us. Then I I almost don't want to say anything else because at the end of the episode I always like to. For a last word of advice and I think it was just so beautifully put what you just said. That unless you would have something else that you wanted to add really I was just going to ask you like if people want to reach out maybe you can share also how to listen to the podcast but if want people want to reach out how find you On Social Media Cetera. Did you want to add something else because this message that you just said is one of the most important ones and I just don't want to spoil it by by wanting to tax something to the. And Yeah no I think that's the most important thing and if you WANNA learn more about how I've come to learn that you're not a failure that rejection is okay. As something we're going to have to deal with than I just WANNA mention go and listen to our both costs doesn't only like yours focuses on the career, but also about the academic journey itself so you can find us first of all on social media. Murray boast about our guests ends about their research See what we actually look like on facebook twitter instagram. And, you can listen to our episodes by finding us on spotify also new tube on the Minerva Channel and on any major both costs platform such as Really. Anything audio have Google stitcher. These are all the big ones that you know. Exactly. yes or find us there. What are you going to do with ads or at sports? Are you going to do what to do without where to spell this? The number two again, I love leave all of those links in the notes page. Then he had a lot of fun hearing about Your Story I. Think we touched upon different things even unexpected things. that I found a very important and and thank you and thank you for sharing some really really important message especially this last one about. Rejection and and about not over identifying with your work with your research. The research is something you do. It's not something you are. You're you are. Much richer being than than just the scientist and that's why it's important to also cultivate these other sides of your life the social physical activity for some people, it's going to be creative aspect. Do that and you'll see it'll being it'll make your whole graduate school experience much more balanced one. So. Again, thank you so much for having come on Papa Peachy and I just want to remind everyone that there's a sister episode that's up today. At the same time on what to do with that. Thank you. Danny you're welcome. Thank you. Thanks for listening to part two of my conversation with Danita his now find what are you going to do with that on your podcast APP and listen to the sister episode. We're Danny interviews me. and. Season one of their podcast where they have great conversations about life as an academic researcher with diverse and interesting guests. This is the last episode of season one of Papa peachy. Thank you for being a fateful listener. If. This is the first episode you've listened to do go and explored the conversations I've had with over fifty guests. In this first season I'm sure you'll find inspiration in many of the stories shared strategies to apply in your academic and professional journey. And if you do like the show, show your favorite episode with a friend. Word of mouth is the best way you can help in deep casters like me. I'm currently interviewing you guests for season two, which will start on September twenty fourth. So mark the date on your calendar is expecting you. Have Great Summer happy listening and happy sharing. Thanks.

Papa Peachy Danny bt Danita spotify Google facebook Minerva Channel Murray scientist researcher
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"People want to read about data science. Maybe you can also share that. Sir So, if Google. Medium. Dot Com essence tech that will be where you will find our tech blog. It's now. Hit lease, fifty articles. Many of them by engineers, but also by many of our. Scientists team members including myself. And for professional contact I'd say linked in is the best option so creating Snyder's will should be the very first thing that shows up in Lincoln. I will share both links. On the notes page of the episode great and I had a really great time talking with you, your story super interesting. Thank you so much for giving me time and. And for for telling your story I think it's an inspiring one. I think it's it's very. It's very sensitive of what people can expect today and again thank you for. Being kind of the the window on what being a data scientists is and how you can access the that that space, so yeah, thank you, thank you for having. Come on on Papa Peachy. Just WanNa take a moment to let you know that you can help me and the show by leaving star rating.

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"That's part of the job. And if you can't do that then then then you won't succeed as well as so. You need this amazing skill set which is hard to develop that. It's hard but it's eventually if you if you ended up leaving academia it's highly valued by employers out there even though they might not know that if you ask them like you said. Do you employ peach these or do you hire. Pc's they won't know how to answer but if you ask. Do you want someone who knows. This knows that is capable of doing this. Has this personality trait. They'll say yes right away for sure and I think the part of teaching is giving teaching is giving students the confidence to say. I you know I. I'm not sure I know how to do it but I wanNA have a try and I think that's that's what we need to do as a teacher and I won't even comment on that or rephrase it. I totally agree and and uh I wish I hope teachers out there are think like you because again especially considering that a lot of students are living with anxiety etc and they're only or one even like. I was here in Canada my family's in Portugal in my my father figure. Let's say in a way and you know when your supervisor has your your success in your fulfillment in in Europe world champions new champions you in a way it bolsters you and it gives you that confidence to go forward. I think this is the right point. Actually too because you've given a lot of you know told a lot of great stories and given a lot of inspiring incites but given the Tweeden now reaching the end of the interview and based on all this we said if there are people out there making the stock doc moving their PhD. Who are thinking. I'll tenure maybe is not ten years maybe not materializing in my my losing my time by doing this or am I throwing all my pg to the garbage. If I go to industry what two or three pieces of advice do you have for them to know to keep their their baird pointing north in go in going full steam to finish to defend and then to create that piece of art that their career is going to be hard to give advice? Because when when you give advice makes it look like you worked it all out and one thing that I'm realizing is you never worked out? So so it's always hard to give. It is with vices. If I'm an elder wise elder because I'm still figuring it out myself maybe that's part of the advice is that you'll always be figuring it out yourself but but but as I said before we experimentalist the only way to know whether you can lie is survive and when you right so maybe you'll get right and you'll always get better so I can get up on stage and give a talk but I still spend a lot of time preparing because I can always get better and And my writing can still always get better so but you only do that by by by having the coverage to try you need to step out of your comfort zone and try and so for example in my lab. I wonder when students are GonNA think they're listening to make they're gonNA think he's everyone thinks he's great but he's not really like that. He's a difficult supervisor. Difficult father and all these things so I get all by but I I really do try but I do say to my student some projects in my lab that that we do things that I don't know how to do and they find it very turbine because it would be nice if I said I know how to do that and I'm like I don't want to do things I know how to do because analogy them. I want to do things I don't know today. That's what makes good science. And that was what makes life more interesting so So that just means that. The coaches say. I'm going to do things I don't know how to do which is hard to say and to do but actually makes life much more fun and I think makes for Batta Science. I don't want every paper coming out of my lap tree. Look the same because we've done that. So so sir I think I think you gotTa have the guts to try and most of the a lot of the trying his actually lowest because you're GonNa get a PhD at the end so If you've done some science communication or you got up on stage or will you've Tried to teach even if it's just a high school student who comes to lab or you've given a talk at your local church whatever. It is about stem cells. Or whatever whatever it that you do all those they will all be part of your training and I think the other thing. I really feel strongly about this. Art and dance is is not to say. That's my work. The science work and then and then there's all the it's all part of who you are so you know I'm talking to you now is this. Is this work or playing well and some bit of everything the the boundaries are not always Clinton. But you need to. You need to be able to try. You need to be never scared to do things that you don't have to. That's how you turn a great way to end the interview. Yup I would like to add some data science. Which is I want to thank you because I I really like what you're doing and I and I'm because I'm as said I. I'd like to keep trying to do things I don't know how to do so. I'm just in the process of launching my own podcast so I've been listening very carefully to you. I think he's doing a great job. Really like what you're doing and it's inspiring. They'll be lots of science related podcasts. So as is is going to be called the lonely pipette or or the London pet. We work that way is Piper to repent so and it's going to be helping scientists to do better science excellent. I'm going to keep a neurotic for that for sure. Do you know when it's going to watch it so I have a little time at home. So we we recording the first ones now so hopefully when we come out of confinement we'll have the first packet package ready to excellent. I'll make sure to to share something whenever you launch and then to to listen. I'm super interested in in what that's going to be. Is there any? If someone's listening ends at I'd really love to chat with Jonathan. What's the best the best way to reach to reach? You would be Lincoln so so late in is. I'm very active in Lincoln The easiest way to find me is sir twitter so my twitter is a epigenetics so the French spelling so we didn't talk about epigenetics. But that's something we could spoke of a two hour episode epigenetics disarming them very excited about and very excited about how epigenetics is communicated to the public. So My my twitter name is EPA genetic Or you can find me on Lincoln so those are the two platforms that I'm I'm using at the moment. Perfect I will put that in the show notes and I'm thinking back. Maybe there's a couple of things that I can put in there to the Ted talk and other things Jonathan thank you so much for your time. This was such a pleasure. I'm really Shanty by all the projects that you talked about in in especially seeing that. They're really focused on the students and on their their interests on bolstering them on preparing them. For for what comes after it. It's really it's really Touching and I just wish you success in all your current projects and all the future ones that you might have including the podcast David if you enjoy the insights shared on the show each week and would like to dig deeper into some of the subjects covered. You can now join the Papa Peachy Postgraduate Career Exploration Group. On facebook there you will find like minded listeners but also a few of the guests will be taking part in the.

supervisor twitter Jonathan Lincoln Batta Science Papa Peachy Postgraduate Caree Pc Europe facebook Portugal Canada Ted David London Clinton Piper EPA
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"You can download it by visiting pop a PHD dot com and following the instructions in the website footer i also wanted to let you know that because of some technical issues at the time of the interview with lindy on this microphone her sound is not perfect please bear with us and lisa non it'll be worth it so today we're talking with liliana vitrine leanna describes herself as a former biologist currently a product manager for medical devices in this activity she travels a lot works non stop it has has found along the way and always has time for friends and family welcome to the show super happy to have you on here on papa peachy we've known each other for a long time it goes back to my undergrad in biology and yeah i like to share a little bit about you about how you got from a bachelor's in biology to a PHD into the position you're currently in thank you david for having me today for these ted's so starting back nick on on my days so i need the PD on micro-biology focusing on infectious diseases so so even though i did went to medical school during the i i had a lot to the medicine i collaborated with some doctors so and now that bruce lee valuable experience you know since i've moved from the dan to the healthcare industry though.

lindy lisa leanna product manager david ted bruce lee
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Break. I really love you the audience to play an active role in the show. So there's this team you'd like to seek over on the show or if there's a guest you'd like me to interview head over to Anchor Dot FM for slash proper beach and drop the voice message to be featured on a future episode on the upper poops website. You can also subscribe blind newsletter and get our resource shoots at the bottom of every page and you can also leave a complex. Welcome to part two of today's episode of Papa Peachy again we have Felicia here with us. She has a shared part one her story. Let's say in terms of her academic track and her passions and what drives what what she does today. She has mentioned what what she does today. But we haven't gone into deep into it yet so now Felicia I really like in the second part to really focus and and talk about what healthy brains healthy lives is. You already said how you kind of found In your position and you place is there but now yeah if you can Share a little bit about what the project is how was born. Maybe you can show uh on that and what it offers to to students in this case at McGill University so healthy brain healthy lives or HBO Chelsea will call it for short started in two thousand sixteen. It's an interdisciplinary brain health initiative that was born. When McGill was awarded a Canada I research excellence fund and that started in two thousand sixteen? And since then we've also gained support from the Quebec government as well so. HP has four main areas of focus. One is is a research S-. HBO Offers Grants for Pi's in four different research themes Neuro Informatics Neuro Degenerative Disease. He's brain plasticity and population science and brain health and are often focus on interdisciplinary. Were across the collaborations interuniversity diversity collaborations especially with Western University as they also have one of the Canada. I research excellence. Wind grits The second area which I work mostly mostly on is our talent area. We have fellowships for Grad students and post Docs as well as startup funding for new faculty and and we organized training programs for the students and post Docs so we have some offerings at our exclusive for students that we fund such as is our trainee committee. which is the student government including Grad students and post Docs at have received? Hbo Fellowships so I mentor them. And they organize their own academic doc events networking events make connections with industry and they have their own social media in other communications in addition to that we have workshops throughout the year So up to what. My main job is is organizing those sometimes. I'll teach them for example this year. We have a ten week introduction to coding in Python. We have a Individual Development Planning Workshop series our next event on January twenty Fourth Science Communication Day. And we're also starting hurting some entrepreneurship related programming. We have a wellness day coming up in February so much so much stuff going on a variety of different topics that Can help trainees excel in their research. And also in their future careers the super super cool and it's a lot of stuff and a Hitting all the markings of what I imagined. People need out there How how did you? How does each shell come up with a a kind of a plan? vision for the upcoming year Did you interview students in terms of their their pain points how do you how did you go and build this kind of very complex. Very complete set of tools. That true offering in training program has evolved over time It started when I first started with Idel and beginning of January two thousand eighteen gene so my first job was to do a needs assessment so I started off with a few pilot workshops just to see what the uptake would be. What's more popular than others? What form do people like and what? What's going to get people in the room at the same time? I did. A survey of neuro science students at McGill we had over a hundred students respond to our survey and we asked what their career interests are and in in some different skill areas ranking different topics that they would be more or less interested in so for example in communication. We would have a list of like public. Speaking academic non academic writing social media whole bunch of other stuff and they would rank them in order of what they would prefer. And then we also asked for preferences on programming styles. So would you prefer a workshop in the morning On campus at the Douglas so after analyzing those results I came up with with a few different areas of focus so they were mainly coating was huge. Because that's such an in demand skill the on the job market right now. Science communication exploring non-academic career options. So those are the top ones that tend to focus on. There is also also decent amount of interest in academic writing Wellness in Grad School. So I I have the three areas that are my top priority. But I'd touch on a whole pilot different things to And in addition to that I also looked at what programming already exists at McGill. Because I don't want to duplicate. So where's their opportunity for collaboration where their gaps whereas there something that already exists that I don't need to touch and also looking at examples In other universities across Ross North America for neuroscience or similar science fields. What have they done what was successful and taking all of that together built the first year of programming which was More single session based so come for two hours learn about public speaking and you can come again in two weeks and learn about elevator pitch and then next month it's going to be a career panel So that worked pretty well but I did find that the feedback we are consistently getting adding was these were great but I want more of them and I want to dive deeper into some of these topics so this year removing more towards longer programming so Like a ten week series for coding and a full day for science communication so they can come and really commit will more time and dive deeper super into some of these topics and do bring speakers and trainers from.

McGill University Felicia Canada HBO McGill Grad School Papa Peachy Degenerative Disease trainee Western University Quebec government Ross North America HP Idel Chelsea Douglas
"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

12:35 min | 1 year ago

"papa peachy" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And I wanted to know what this was before going on with the interview. I want to thank you for listening to the show. If like an episode and feel that it helps you inspired you in any way. Cherish with your friends may be willing inspire them to. If you have a question or a team that you'd like to see covered in our interviews you can now simply go to anchor dot FM poor slash Papa. Peachy recorded message to the featured the episode and be sure to follow up a peach. Young as to tutoring instagram and to subscribe on your favorite podcast at the end of the previous section. We so how inish found her way into the domain of cultural promotion. And how she she was about to be propelled into the domain of community support. So I did. I was too tired and I did not know what to do. In the meantime I had two kids not just one I had my second also and they were very small and I had a nervous breakdown. I just collapsed subst and I did not know what to do. It was too much for me. I remember I had the feeling I have all the warriors of the whole community over my head so it was a very very difficult time for me and for a year I could not do do really. I couldn't do properly. Anything and I knew this was a turning point. I had to turn the page because otherwise to to pledge will not turn ever I would stay there forever or not even stay so soul at some point. I had a medical help I had. I want to the upside colleges and I had everything to do. I did therapy everything because it was really a very very difficult moment for me. So after the therapy gathered myself together and I asked myself again the question what will I do next and I know I knew I did not want to continue this social thing and difficult. It was to be this NGO had grown too big for me and I decided to come back to Portugal with my kids and luckily there were old so almost Immediately some Group of people they decided. Okay we'll take your NGO from now on so it still works without me which is wonderful something credit and legacy i. I don't do anything for this. Enjoy and they still work in. This is for me a very very nice thing so I decided to come back to come back to Portugal and you know I I was like my whole life. I had been the best of off these in the best of that and now I'm just I want to go back to to studying and to learn things. This would be a nice thing to do instead of. I'm trying to resolve to solve the problems of the whole community. I'm going to do something which is good only for me just for me you know and maybe it's good for me. Maybe in this way maybe knows indirectly. Maybe I can help others if not. It's okay so you gave a lot. It was a heavy load on your shoulders. Your Body. You're you're you suffered and you had to take a break and then pivot to something different. which was is more taking care of yourself and your your curiosity and your will to learn more right? Yes exactly I. I wanted to do to to do something just for me and to center on my own needs and on my only intellectual needs because after all I I had been away from academia and from University for seven years so I decided maybe I'll go back so I decided to call call one of my teachers from the time. I was awarded back then the best student of the University of every I called him and he's a very very very Renowned an important musicologist in Portugal soul. He's Emily musicologists means is doing research on music music and I. I told him he was very very nice. Invited me to take a coffee at his place and I told him you know I just want to. Oh come back. I don't know maybe I don't know possibilities and he was like you could do PhD PG No. I I majored in. I graduated Eddie in opera and I did not want to combat to opera. I did not want to do something with his. It was this which had been turned so many two years ago so I remember he was okay. Well I don't know what do want a cup of coffee. Maybe we'll talk after this. Can I fix your cup of coffee. Oh yes thank you please do. So he went to fix this Cup of coffee and for a few minutes I was was there in his living room. And I saw these wonderful Portrays and lots of images he had in in this living room and some of them recognized that there were this description of something which happened in seventeen in the end of the seventeenth century as the the Portuguese. Not The queen. But the daughter of the Queen went to She married the King of England. So there was this huge embassy coming from England to Portugal and they took her to go to London to marry the king. And I recognize this image. Oh this is this one. Oh yes and he was. My the teacher came with a cough. Oh yes but to NASA wide. Oh because my my late uncle which had passed away less than a era go by then my uncle. He studied the the seventeenth century. It was some one interest of his. And I remember as a kid too I remember being at his place. And he's showing me this this whole images and talking. You know I I love this thing and I love the to know the the things which the travellers back then told about Portugal Ogle and about what they saw because this was one point at my uncle studied back then so I remember I recognize image because his image depict something that the travelers at the time saw in Lisbon and my teacher told me but there you have you have a wonderful thing to study on your be it that that that would be very nice. What would yes? You could take your German skills. You could read some about the German travelers who came came to Portland to report reported about. And then you have you can do your PG and musicology you talk about music but you you have this a a bondage to your to your uncle and two euro the things you like and it was like oh so I was very very thankful because I thought this. He's a great subject and so I started. It was three and a half years ago so I'm now finishing my PhD in musicologists so About the German gays the music portable in the late eighteenth century according to German travelers. And this is one of. I love the subject. I my whole life now turn to this PhD. Into I spend my whole. Today's just looking at some old eighteenth century German manuscripts in Cohen Shrift which is the their their gothic manuscripts Wave is horrible and I love it so seven years after I stop I I after I ended I did my. I concluded my singing my opera course and manny many years after I stopped my bulge because I came back to academia and I'm writing my PhD. And since then I already published lots of papers in international venues. I do do lots of talks. I get invited to talk about the subject. I discovered that I have lots of things to say about this such which which fascinates me. So now I'm back to the academia writing a PhD about music about the eighteenth century. So this is really a well you know life his moves in particular ways and minded. It's a bit of a roundabout way to come back to the studying into doing a PhD but clearly an and people are not seeing you. But it's something clear you love and you enjoy doing and I guess you could go to sleep reading those things that you just mentioned and and how. How does that translate into meeting New People? Maybe traveling to go to talks the how. How has that impacted? How does that brought new things into your life that you thought? Maybe maybe you wouldn't do because I started a family and now so you came back to Portugal rates to do this. Yeah how is it to be back. It could be now in this other universe and in this theme that you love so much. Well I have to say I am very glad that that my life turned in all this ways oldies confusing curves and roundabout in. Because now I have this maturity which turns out it's very very good for me from pgn for academia. I think I would not see things the way I do if I was twenty years younger because you know in this twenty years between going going to biology for the first time and writing the now I did search An amount of different things and all his work with the kids and everything all this our life experiences which I can use from a PhD. And I do use them. And maybe you know people tell told me that I have this Different kind of way of looking to things and that I sometimes can tell things in in a way they never thought what about and I think this has to do with experience. The thing is i. I'm I'm forty two three now so I started my pg with forty And actually elise a great thing. I'm very thankful in very glad that I did not start my PhD. With twenty or twenty five because I would see things differently in would not have recognized some things you know. I read the text of some guy or a woman who lived two hundred and fifty years ago. Go and of course. There's there's I read what they wrote but are also with what didn't wrote I see you know. He's straddling the hand. Maybe he was old. Oh She oh ooh I know oh maybe Zeller's or or his doing some you know I see yes this intersex quality. It's for let me something very easy to to see because I have two kids because I had a breakdown because I lived in a different country because I did. I studied science because I studied singing because I was an opera singer..

Portugal England inish Portugal Ogle cough Emily musicologists NASA Zeller manny Portland Lisbon London