22 Burst results for "Panton"

"panton" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:35 min | Last week

"panton" Discussed on WTOP

"For more information Meadows farms lent a little happiness This is WTO news Ten 23 a pair of police officers stepped up to help a woman deliver twins She had already given birth to one of the girls when the seat pleasant officers spotted her early yesterday along east capitol street After the officers convinced the woman to come with them to a shelter she then gave birth to a second girl in the back of the police cruiser with the help of the officers The woman was taken to a hospital in both babies are said to be doing well A 21 year old man from Silver Spring has been sentenced to 19 years in prison for his role in the killings of two men more than three years ago Dante hunt had pleaded guilty to being an accessory to first degree murder armed robbery and conspiracy 23 year old Jordan radway of Laurel in 24 year old Christian Roberts of Silver Spring were found shot to death in a crashed car in white oak in January of 2019 one of hunt's co defendants Andy panton who fired the gunshots got two life sentences Loudoun county school leaders are apologizing after kids posted offensive comments online in a school system sponsored chat room According to a message from the superintendent hateful in derogatory messages were made and observed by middle school students in a Google chat room administrators got word of it from students and automated monitoring software the chat feature now is turned off the matter is being investigated and parents are being asked to talk with kids about proper use of electronics Let them know keyboard shouldn't be used for bullying disparaging or threatening behavior He also emphasizes loudon schools.

Meadows farms Dante hunt Jordan radway Christian Roberts WTO Andy panton Loudoun county school Silver Spring Laurel Google
"panton" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

04:33 min | 7 months ago

"panton" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"She walks me through one of the highlights of the exhibition. An installation named light and color, a sequence of beautiful color coded rooms that showcase over a hundred designs. The installation is air architectural tunnel in a way. You go through these 8 rooms with all his designs, furniture and lamps mostly. You start in the light green, room next on to the dark green and so on. That's mirror in both ends. So all the lights and all the colors will just, you know, embrace you. You can stand still and just feel the color and the lights, but you can also take a walk and be in a movement and feel the contrast from one color to another. There's different furniture and different lamps. It's very retrospective. Because when a pent and he picked out all the things by himself, he made four tapol for this gallery space, back in 98. And today we put it up again. So we collected all the items for this exact installation. There's 110 designs in this installation and we manage to find 109 pieces, which we are. Happy about. For many both in Denmark and abroad, then upon isn't about immersive interiors that interact with the senses, but rather one or maybe two colorful pieces of furniture and lighting, many of us like to decorate our interiors with. Here in Denmark, pantone's flowerpot is one of the most popular lamp designs that can be found in homes across the country, a small pendant designed in 1968, made up of two hemispheres facing each other. I paid a visit to the offices of tradition. The design company that has produced the flower pot for over 20 years, where it remains the firm's bestselling lamp. I meet designer and researcher Henrik lund Larson, who himself knew about on an introduced the flower pot to in tradition. I always loved the design of an append. I always think he was extraordinary. For my home, I bought some old car parts. And then by coincidence, I got the chance to produce it. And now it's been in the new production for 22 years. And has sold ever since it has been a successful company of the flower part and to us, of course, here in in tradition. I asked him what makes the flower pot so special and relevant today, and for.

Denmark Henrik lund Larson pantone
"panton" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

01:40 min | 7 months ago

"panton" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"The designs of Verna panton might not exactly look like what's many would think of as Danish design. Forget an abundant use of wood or reliance on soft and muted tones. Instead, then a pantone who operated between the 60s and 90s rejected the rigorous functionalism that many of his counterparts adhered to at the time. Because for pantone, design wasn't about one single product, but rather about engaging with the senses. He often talked about this idea that a piece of furniture or lighting shouldn't just look good and cater for those with a good taste. But rather, provide a sensory experience that interacts with the user. Today showcasing panton's work in what is the biggest exhibition on the Danish designer to date? Museum of Modern Art in Denmark is recreating panton's vision of what design meant to him. The exhibition explores the designers take on the relation between color and the human senses. I cut up with curator Sarah stone sayer, who spent the past two and a half years during research to put this together. For me, penton is very important because of his total interiors. For many generations today, pension is about, you know, a chair or a lamp. But with this exhibition, we actually managed to create a lot of these spaces which he actually did throughout his career. Starting from the 50s, and it's.

Verna panton panton curator Sarah stone sayer Museum of Modern Art Denmark penton
"panton" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

04:21 min | 8 months ago

"panton" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Stitcher spotify other places. Where wherever you get your podcasts. How's that so Listen y'all we decided to focus on a story this week that we've actually covered in the past. And actually we have a contributor. He's actually written for latino rebels about this issue regarding john panton considered to be the father of the anti immigration movement. I think i'm underestimating. That description but we can talk about it with. Our guests are fabulous from a virginia. Who's been on with us in the past and has written for latino rebels in the past so fabulous guests from virginia. Say who you are and what you do on why. You're here a julio. Thanks so much for having me on again My name is hudson ahmed. I am an immigration lawyer and advocate and plaintiff in a lawsuit that i filed and twenty seventeen against the university of michigan to unseal the papers of dr john. Panton whom as you said was the grandfather the architect the puppeteer puppet master behind the modern anti-immigrant movement. Yeah let's break this down so hossain Before we get into the updates of the case for people that are just walking into this for the first time. Let's get some necessary context about why you decided to file a lawsuit and against the university of michigan and ny. Tannen sure halil. Well you know. I'm an immigration attorney. I've been practising for almost twenty years and it seems like every single year there's new policies that come out which make immigration harder and harder for people and trapping them you know within the law and you know at some point. I got curious where these policies were coming from..

john panton hudson ahmed virginia university of michigan julio Panton dr john hossain halil Tannen ny
"panton" Discussed on The big d zone

The big d zone

05:40 min | 8 months ago

"panton" Discussed on The big d zone

"You're not going to stop me for celebrating my birthday home on approved ship. I have more of what i am. Now you stop me. He will match. What do we have money on that going back home. I am and he'll get cut. Stop me now. Turn to take another that they can. You've been toll you hear people say yet because you're oh you're the senate minority leader of the senate minority leader. You had you had to always say yes sir. Yes sir yes sir yes sir. When time to tell you no hell no table here need help. A lot of people that's going to be home with a lot of people that are starving. A lot of people that temptation all-male. Because you wanna drive into attack the like the data movies you want to make it into the data movie. You want to beat the evil that you already are. I knew i never liked you your work. I don't know who you are pearson. Sheraton panton took out unemployment tune. And that we're not even gay healthy you. It will meant. Let's our good for nothing. Excuse for a so-called leader. That's right. I said a salad. Still for unforeseen second leader. What got voted for you again. I will never know and now for standard bow of not getting money. What's down another barrel running out of money and plus the government shutdown if you got a oh oh democrats have to do it alone up. I don't ever want to hear you talking to some of the people that play your awful. I eat a fat florida or or cut it off completely. I don't wanna hear your mouth. I don't want to hear it. All little pretended.

senate Sheraton panton pearson florida
"panton" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

Don’t Get Me Started

05:55 min | 11 months ago

"panton" Discussed on Don’t Get Me Started

"Nbc adobe honda old navy facebook pinterest. Hp warner brothers. Sony net flicks absolute alex cells that abbas had drink the legs. We'll a wicks ultra. She is at giant spoon where she has been now for over seven years prior to that. She spent time at allowed. I think that must have been your startup right and last night at my failed. Start up a lot. I want to talk about that. In a second. Overawed and our pa prior to that prior to that twa disembark with tiger woods foundation national festival for talented youth and graduated from chapman university with the npr and advertising. And did thank you now. There's so much for agreeing to talk with me. I'm super excited to talk again. You and i had a conversation a little while ago about this. Welcome to don't get me started. Thank you so much for having me. And i'm so glad will for people who are seeing the thumbnail right now or both laying orange. I feel like we're on the same wavelength here. I think that says something. I don't know what that means. You know it's interesting. We had a person speak at school recently. Who's a color expert and actually has predicted the last five panton colors of the year and she could tell she could tell you why we're wearing orange. She she would know. There's something about hope and light and there's something about doors opening i think probably and maybe we're subliminally Were unaware of why we make these decisions but we're making them based on some sort of force that that that were there. The strings are attached us by someone. Were just puppets and some bigger plan. All right so question question questions. Let's start the conversation. So i wanna hit two things first off the bat one is i want you and part of this is going to be a little bit redundant from if anyone's listen to you on we next some of these some of these. These bits might be lowering on it. But i think they're super profound really important. This may be a combination question. It might be two separate questions. But i wanna know. When did you know. When did you realize that that you're a strategist at heart. And the other part question. Is i wanna talk a little bit about. And this is something that probably starts when one is young but also continues into professional career the the phenomenon the impostor syndrome. So whichever one of those..

Hp warner brothers tiger woods foundation nationa pinterest abbas chapman university twa Nbc honda Sony npr panton facebook
"panton" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

Lights Camera Barstool

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"panton" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

"I don't know who's like i mean. Obviously the big name in this cast for may. There's there's a name for everybody. There is an actor actress for everybody in this movie Liotta heads guess what you're in luck. He's in it harbor. Heads he's Del toro of stands is in. But if you've been frazier hive for as long as i. This is the this is the moment. I mean the last couple years have just been a slow build back into the age of frazier to point out and i really feel like this is the moment like it's been building to here in right now. Is going to be the critical mass. Where like a lot of people. A lot of people know. Have been talking about brandon frazier for a while. But i feel like for more bain stream group of people outside of the frazier hive. This is a good chance to bring people back into the frazier high than feel like it's going to happen right here. And that's why. I'm very excited about this and know how to know how big the role is bought will will see. He's also going to be doing a twenty four movie I'm not sure on. That's coming out if i remember correctly. He's paying playing like a four hundred pound man or something like that. The way i you know. Keep that mud and that means. That's aeronautics ski too. So talk about like working. I mean he's he's a star of that one. This is more or less in the soderbergh movie but too big directors fraser's being going to be working within twenty twenty one and i couldn't be more excited me to next thing up in the heights. Released their eight minute long opening which had a big song and dance numbers Sort of thing. It was awesome. It was a great great opening very very carful entertaining very lively. I guess is the best way to put it I'm i'm very excited to watch this. Because again we talk. I feel like a lot about well. and just how. He's a lot of his side stuff. Doesn't necessarily pan out the way we wanted to because we don't think we agree on this like he's not as good of a singer as is like a showrunner slash writer director. Whatever you wanna call it. But like he and stuff like this where he's not not letting himself take the forefront like he's letting a guy like romo's take the forefront and other actors and actresses. I love this and i i'm super super pumped to watch this right in a anthony ramos is the right like i. I don't think linneman will I don't think he would have cast himself in this movie. Rama's is the right choice just in terms of visibilities and i'm excited about that. Like i. he was on the original recording. It involved in hamilton is is Phil panton in a john lawrence very good in that but he could have been given like even bigger role in hamilton..

Phil panton john lawrence eight minute four hundred pound Del toro Rama anthony ramos twenty Liotta last couple years linneman twenty twenty one brandon hamilton four
"panton" Discussed on Way Too Broad

Way Too Broad

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"panton" Discussed on Way Too Broad

"Me. Her Story? Genius. Help. Just By. Funny and my body yet. Wall. Talking boss. I wished. Look at see your face because this. Isn't GonNa like. telegraph wealth to this audio medium, but like I was listening to the you sent me the song good life today. I was listening to it. It's very good. Life, but I could tell I could picture you making exactly the facie for making listening to it. listening that's longer just like I know I knew exactly what you looked like when you listen to this. She's. Like she's just like it's just like the. I'm really feeling like either. fucking music. Soga yeah his making. Sammy Ray. The way that I found out about her, actually was My coworker I share music and my co worker sent me like my horoscope playlist, and then also her OROSCO playlets. Modify and I was like Oh. You're really out. Here's the same may be said. Well called Leah this'll be your jam. And then she was like looking at a other like other artists people that also listen to on. Page in Samya was on there. She knew of Sammy and was like Oh i. think you like same your way. Yup. Now. Be Several. I felt really stupid that we didn't mention her. Last week. We were recommending black creators to pay to listen to like. She's amazing and. We've talked about are a lot already, but like listen be said well like jets like as stat. Standard message of the POT has. Money as an artist in listened to be steady, well, yeah. Obviously obviously. I opened my time. Can Choke on IT I. Yield my time for what is the fuck you? Wouldn't. On overtime time Sewed good. Rhythm to furrow after people compare it to Shakespeare. Chabahar No, but it's very like it's got. It's an excellent rhythm to it in any my job. Hope not now. She would've loved. You can catch it. You can catch it on the edit or God. I said I am Dick Panton Mater. No I didn't hear that sorry I am Dick. Ham Ham.

Sammy Ray Leah Dick Panton Ham Ham Samya POT Soga
It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 2 years ago

It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

"It broke my heart. It was devastating. There are no words in the English language that will convey the despair that I felt watching that man life. Leave his body and him scream out for his mother. Here. Get Justice for my city. My city has been going through a lot of pain. This is not the first second or third time you see all this other than this is what we have to do to get hurt. All over the country, people are filling the streets to protest police brutality and the death of George Floyd a black man who died in Minneapolis while a police officer. Kneel down his neck. Disturbing video of this was seen all over the world. We are all seeing so much pain and anger and outrage. In this episode I spoke with the Mayor of Atlanta. Key Chalance bottoms about how she's dealing with the crisis as a leader. As a mother of four children. All unfolding against the backdrop of a global pandemic. Most of America caught sight of her recently, she gave an incredibly powerful press conference this past Friday. We are better than Nisus. We're better than this. As a city, we are better than this as a country. Go home. Go home. Born and raised in Atlanta Mayor Bottoms was a lawyer and a judge and has been in office since two thousand eighteen. She's only the second woman ever to hold the job. Heard. There were rumors about balanced protests in Atlanta. Idea with a mother would do I. Call My son and I said. Where are you? I said I cannot protect you in black. Boys shouldn't be out today. I spoke to her about this important moment in history as black and Brown America, disproportionately face to deadly threats. Police brutality, and they global pandemic. I'm Dr. Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent. And this is corona virus, fact versus fiction. Thank you again. Mayor Bottoms I very much been looking forward to this. Let me just ask. How are you? Are you doing over the last few days? You know I'm doing okay. I think I'm doing as well as all of America's doing right now. It's Um. It's very stressful in exhausting time for all of us but I'm doing okay. Thank you for asking. Have you been worried for your own safety for the safety of the people that you love it all over the last few days? In s Sunday. That's a good question, the one think. Carrying heaviest on my heart right now is my eighteen year old. Because he's, he's eighteen and he very much to be in the middle of everything. That's happening. Anna I know that they're so much. That can go wrong so much that we've been watching. Go wrong across I I want to ask you a couple of questions about protests in the midst of a pandemic I mean we are truly going through something that is unchartered here. We don't know the impact that these protests will have on the pandemic itself the spread of the virus. There were some powerful moments of solidarity. Though during the protests people came together. They sang a hugged. They were walking hand in hand. Those and the images. A lot of people will see. At a time when so many people are hurting like this? Are Those moments worth suspending the physical distancing mandates. Feel. This is just this convergence of where we are. Globally like I, don't we? Any of us will see again and our lifetime. Getting a covid nineteen tests today. Because everything that we've talked about over the past two months. just became secondary or has become secondary so. I just I just hope that people will get tested and will remember that we are really. We're still in the middle of Panton. Our communities are sick in their tired. In they're dying dying from covid nineteen, dying from poverty dime from police. Brutality! We're exploding. These forces seen unseen covid. Nineteen is the one that's that's unseen. Police brutality is the one that we can say. I I. DO Wonder How how did you navigate? the policies regarding the pandemic in Atlanta specifically, which at times seemed at odds with the governor, the data for example in the state of Georgia did not show a fourteen consecutive decline, which was one of the guiding criteria for reopening things. As a elected leader. How do you? How do you balance that on Friday governor? Kim Call in as asked me. What do we need in Atlanta in what he can do to help and he's provided the assistance from the state that we've needed. And I think you know when you're in leadership it. You can't take things personally. I didn't like the decisions made about covid. Nineteen and I'm sure the governor didn't like lab response. To the decisions he made. But it didn't stop him as a leader from coming to me asking me how we could help. How the state could help in I wouldn't too prideful to go to him and say we need your help. Your the mother of four children mayor, three sons and a daughter. You're having conversations with them. I'm sure as many parents are with their children across America right now. I heard you talking about conversations. You've had with your own mother back when you were a child. Historic Times back then, and it feels like these are historic times as well all. I feel like sometimes. You don't know how historic something is at the time you're going through it. Does the gravity does the importance of what's happening right now? Has it settled in with you and your family? In terms of the conversation you're having. I asked my husband the other day at What will this moment in time be call and I don't think any of us know the answer to that. I just know it something extraordinary that we're witnessing and I said. In my remarks a couple of days ago. What we say in happening across Atlanta. We didn't see when Dr King was assassinated. And so we know that this is this. Is something different? And not only is it happening across America will now see a having the globe. And the question will be what will be the difference on the other side of this moment. Will. We continue to see the disruption and all that we've been saying over the past few days or Or will truly be a revolutionary moment, and I think about the words of Audrey lowered quite a bit. Revolution is not a one time event. Do you remember the moment when you first

Atlanta America George Floyd Minneapolis Dr. Sanjay Gupta Cnn Brown America Dr King Officer Bottoms Panton Kim Call Anna Audrey Georgia
"panton" Discussed on I Never Cast For This

I Never Cast For This

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"panton" Discussed on I Never Cast For This

"In one thousand, nine, hundred five I with the creators update. Microsoft is planning to completely just remove. Don't not offer any support whatsoever for versions. For. Money could tell they're not going to. Put a replacement in replace. It's got some people up in arms. Just simply because it was a quick and easy to to you know what I mean at pictures. Weather is to create memes or Or whatnot on the shape without having to pay for stuff like Photoshop. So the fact that they're actually removing these are. This program is pretty big news as far as the history of windows, gusts. Wasn't Microsoft's argument because they already have some kind of paint program with windows ten. Already, have a similar program already. Will they still have panton there on because I use it. They do have another one I haven't seen as far as more thousand, really advertised yelling and I think it's a lot more advanced than the regular paint was and I think that's the issue is like you like you were saying like the simplicity of the first one redesign to make a quick picture, quick medium or something? I mean. It's been around since nineteen eighty five. Let's let's a very long time and I use it when I was a kid and I'm sure you used it when you first start using peers in the eighties to growing up. But. Yeah, so it's. Sort they have a reason for it. Like what's what's the main? Why are they in his house? That's Microsoft. That's GonNa streamline the whole thing and not means removing dead, but as I said it's a, it's a weird choice to for something to remove at because a lot of people do still use them. I still use it on occasion to Yami pictures or whatever it's a crop. Pictures. Yeah, so it's it's just bizarre to me yet. Oh, for sure if I'm making a a youtube, thumbnail or something that's that's the firstly I'd do it. Sounded figure out a new way to do that..

Microsoft panton
Lafayette 148 New York: Fantastically Vertical

American Fashion Podcast

09:35 min | 2 years ago

Lafayette 148 New York: Fantastically Vertical

"We are a global luxury lifestyle brand Led by women for women and the whole purpose of starting. The company was to be a vertical operation vertical. Meaning that we make everything ourselves So from start to finish we. We're able to control the process of manufacturing as well and you know we although we were founded in New York City. The company sort of outgrew the building and also knew that. We wanted to reinvest in some retail and in order to do that A. and Being a privately owned company. We're quite conservative. We decided to if we moved over to Brooklyn our rent. When I started the company it was nine dollars. A Square foot Twenty three years later it was ninety dollars a square foot so expensive so kind of expensive. So we we just you know. How do you re- reinvest in Your Business Model? So you know the number one expense for the company. Is the product the number two expenses? The people and number three was the rent so we went for number three because we didn't want to touch one into And found mazing hundred thousand square feet in the Brooklyn Navy Yard which is eight minutes by Uber from Lafayette Street and we collectively made a decision that this was great and we went to save money. But what we found was being on one floor completely changed the communications and the dynamics of how we work as a group so the culture which I think in today's world is such an important part of a business Our culture got better. It was good but it got great. Can you talk a little bit more about being a conservative business? Because I think a lot of people think about financing immediately when they're starting a business lately but but you haven't touched much of that well you know the first five years were really hard for the company and so not being Not Having the capital investments that may be other people had. We had to learn to live within our means. So what we would do. Is You know what we make. We would reinvest into the business. And so what what does is your growth is is more organic. Because you decide how you're going to grow how you're gonNA invest in in different areas when you want to grow and you don't WanNa you know. Look we all make mistakes? There's always a percentage of rnd and things that happened in in our business that you didn't predict but you know definitely we thought we needed a million dollars to start the company and ten million later we ran out of money and that was weird ca fears. You know the first five years Taught us a lot about what we didn't want to do in the future and you had to co-founders in the beginning I did and the Chinese AMERICANS SO MR and Mrs Sue were husband and wife team that manufactured clothes for me throughout my career Working at La's clayborn Donna. Karen Dana Buckman. So they were always there. They were always that jacket factory and yours needed great jacket in our industry That I could count on. You know they. They might have not been the cheapest factory because they were in New York City but they were reliable. Their quality was incredible and they were really nice. People that you could count on and so that relationship I kept throughout all the years whether or not I made close with them. 'cause it eventually. I moved to Hong Kong and started working for Germans and Italians and they didn't WanNA manufacturer New York so we just stayed friends and when it came back they asked me if I wanted to start a business with them and just the thought of not having to travel all over the world finding cheaper factories and being able to control the quality. The delivery the products Was Right up my alley. And they were just amazing. People that moved to America when they were in their teens they are forty years in America. They were you know They were that generation. Just like my parents were that came to the US to sort of you know. Build their dream In funding and in this case they ended up having to go back to their hometown. After forty years to rebuild our dream because in order to be competitive we had to move the factory if we wanted to stay vertical and you have an amazing sustainable complex in China. We have a fabulous. What you've built there. Yeah talk about that from the beginning and just training and what? That was what that was like. It's kind of fascinating okay. So you know We went over. Actually it was right after nine eleven and by the end of two thousand and one Mr Mrs Sue went home for the holidays and then he called me and told me he wanted to move the factory and by May of two thousand and two He flew me over there for one night to see the factory which consisted of three sewers a cutter in oppressor and just wanted to know what I thought of the factory. I was pretty speechless but I was smart enough to know that you know I could count on him so I asked him what he thought. And he said we're going to be just fine and he made sure we were justifying. He went from Ten Thousand Square feet to twenty thousand to forty thousand to the next time I visited him. He pulled up to an empty lot. And said what do you think and it was like? What did you do any says like bought the land And we're going to build our own facility. I want a building that is earthquake. Proof that sustainable. That's got solar panels on the roof for energy that that I can be comfortable Building in so he proceeded in less than two years to build a two hundred forty thousand square foot manufacturing facility that is state of the art incredible and today houses fifteen hundred people twelve hundred of which are sewers And you know anyone that visits it and plenty of important people have been from you know from the president. Fit's been there to to Mac Baucus. Who was the US ambassador to China and they all come there just to see what we've done and you know You know in our industry people just assume. Oh is it you know. Is it an acceptable factory? It's beyond acceptable. It's it's the pride of his hometown. So him and her really made a difference in their hometown. So was there a lot in terms of how he built the Culture In the quality of the factory in New York that was also taken there. And then you also side how to go so much. Further in terms of technology like to that. Just come naturally. No those are great questions. Because you know Mr superbeing factory New York City Was was getting smaller and smaller over the years. So technology was always a really important part of staying and surviving. So he was. He was ahead of his time in investing in whether it the Italian pressing machines or or or automatic cutting machines like all of this was sort of early. It was in his culture. Anyway you know when I think in East West Culture you know he used to. The First Holiday Party I went to I was there was only two people that weren't Chinese at the party. And he said turned to me and he said someday I wanted to be fifty fifty and you know he got he. He dreamed he dreamed really big but he wasn't a dreamer. He was a man that also taught you how to get the job done. You know you can rely on him and so he went back to his hometown and brought an American culture of manufacturing and also started teaching some of the local factories. How he would do it how we would do in the USA so you know. There was just an incredible ability to give back to the town. I mean after the factory was up and running of course we started to become profitable which was extremely exciting because after five tough years it was like wow when we could do hand embroideries and we could do leather in knits and things that we couldn't do in New York so it really helped us build at lifestyle brand but along with you know along with that You know he. He had to set up everything everything right. You know. Every there's eleven floors in the building each floor has different Sort of manufacturing system. You know there's there's a jacket floor. There's a blouse floor. There is a panton skirt floor. You know he built a building without columns in it and I don't know if anyone can say they've seen a modern building in China with twenty thousand square feet per floor without columns. But that's what you get to do when you build your own building you. You didn't have to figure out how the machinery would be laid out around these polls. So you know He. He was very amazing man.

New York City USA China Brooklyn America Brooklyn Navy Yard Mr Mrs Sue New York Karen Dana Buckman Hong Kong Mrs Sue MAC LA Mr Superbeing Donna President Trump Baucus
White Nationalism in the White House: Katie McHugh Kept Receipts

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:28 min | 2 years ago

White Nationalism in the White House: Katie McHugh Kept Receipts

"It's no secret that members of the trump administration up to and including trump himself are parroting the views of white nationalist and white extremist groups. These organizations are tied into outright media outlets like Breitbart and others where they spread this propaganda to the masses. We're going to try something a little different today. I'll be joined by a guest. Co Host. Hossan Ahmad is an immigration attorney and anti white nationalist activist from Virginia. Hossan has been deeply involved in obtaining the archived writings of John. Panton one of the men. Behind the current white nationalist movement in America Hossan connected me to Katie McHugh. Katie is a former white nationalist. Who has renounced her views in his working. Hard to undo the damage. She did when she held them. She's a former staffer for Breitbart and other alt-right media where she was in constant correspondence with Stephen Miller at the trump white house. She's exposed those emails and the deep ties of Miller into the white nationalist movement in America voice box he's overlap between trump's message white nationalist ideology he has shown us that the majority of Americans support are sort of message. You know what yeah make. America great again fell the wall. Pick these people out. This is my country. This this all belongs to me. Trump demurred when asked whether he'd condemned supportive comments from former Ku Klux Klan. Leader David Duke. I have to look at the group I mean. I don't know what group you're talking about. You wouldn't want me to condemn a group that I know. The person is dead and nineteen injured after a speeding vehicle drove into a group of protesters. Your leader downtown Charlottesville very fine people on both sides so we just got a new batch of emails from Breitbart reporter Katya Q. The Southern Poverty Law Center has made public excerpts of emails sent by White House. Senior adviser. Stephen Miller was a key figure shaping immigration policy or president trump the email messages for fifty thousand sixteen. Show Miller support white nationalist website and ideologies. My name is Katie mccue. I've exposed eight far-right extremists in the past fifteen months by working with civil rights groups and legendary nonprofits. I'm very excited now. In the stage of my life to help the most vulnerable in society including people of Color immigrants those who practice Islamic faith and those who this car presidential administration opposes the mouse and seeks to punish through use of authoritarian policies. Sorry Not Sorry so katy you spent a bit of time in the alright. What is the difference if you can explain to US between the alright a white supremacy and white nationalism? What are some of the core beliefs that you're aware of as part of this movement? Well I can say I think we should begin with aristotle here. I don't want to sound pretentious but everything is on a trajectory this is also just basic calculus so one of the things. Aristotle spoke about was habit and one thing you witness with the outright because the media treated them as a truly humorous force that's just online and it's backing Donald Trump and it's young people. The fact is everything that they said. Ironically I'm making air quotes eventually became ironic so whenever people thought they were quote unquote trolling about saying the nineteenth amendment should be repealed and you had white supremacist media figure. Richard Spencer eventually meeting. No I don't believe women should have the right to vote all these memes and things you see on twitter and the way that these mobs were organized so much so that they became. It was almost like blunt force trauma when it came to harassment for media figures. They were not joking. And in the case too with someone like Stephen Miller who's one of the most powerful people in the US government especially when it comes to people who are not white. So who is Stephen Miller? And why is it so important that we understand his thinking? Stephen Miller is one of the closest advisers to president trump. He is the architect of trump's immigration policy and also has the president's ear on foreign policy matters. Stephen Miller for his entire career had anti immigrant. Leanings for some people philly with the alright because it's an amorphous group and doesn't have a membership roll with you. Know I mean. They viewed on white people and people who practice the Islamic faith as not only dangerous individuals but an existential threat to the country. And this does tie into eugenics which unfortunately America has a very dark history with eugenics Ray Science and a history which John drew from and help shape the anti immigrant agenda that has sought renewed energy from the emergence of the outright and renewed energy from the trump campaign and which we now see the full force turned against the most desperate vulnerable people in the world for punish purely because of their country of origin their ethnicity in the face that they practice kitty. You seem so articulate and passionate and human and when we paint these pictures are head of the other side we sort of create these villains. I think I WANNA be respectful for your privacy and safety but I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about how you got caught up in the movement so that we can have a better understanding as to how other people get caught up in the movement. Thank you for asking that because I think that everyone's path is different but buying could help explain some of the groundwork for other young people currently trapped in this. Who Don't quite know how to get out. The outright on the far-right are very much like a gang. You know there's a no snitching policy and I think that many many young people especially let's say trump does not win reelection in twenty twenty this year. A lot of young people are going to wonder. How do I get out of this? And how do I reconnect with other people again and have a healthy loving life full of good friendships? Good connections across backgrounds. So I will just say that I'm from Pennsylvania regular conservative town and I was raised like I think the joke is. You're born a lapsed Catholic. So that was my upbringing. Regular childhood must very nerdy was constantly reading and I was politically inclined. People always talk about two thousand four election. People were very excited about George W Bush. Because it's a Red County and two thousand eight of course with the banking crisis. Things got much more serious and of course the Iraq war still going on so I was chatting with one of my best friends. Her Dad and I was regular Republican fully supporting the Iraq war in in the war in Afghanistan and he said well. Why don't you read this person named Joe So brand? Joseph O'Brien was a former senior editor for national review. He was fired by William F Buckley because he could not control his anti-semitism. I ate him alive. Almost like a neurological virus and I'm eighteen. I had never met someone of poop practice. Jewish faith Jewish background nothing. I didn't understand anti-semitism and I was reading the Essay. That was recommended to me. Call the reluctant anarchists sing. How all government is evil in the constitution has already been so violated. We just need to go back to something. Like pre articles of confederation. Okay this is very important to understand. Is that there is a serious libertarian. Too Far right pipeline very serious and the far right of course is just steeped in. Eugenics steepen utterly discredited on Justifiable Race

Donald Trump Stephen Miller Breitbart America United States President Trump Hossan Ahmad White House John Katie Aristotle Katie Mchugh Panton Ku Klux Klan Virginia Katie Mccue David Duke
Keith Recker on Color as Narrative

American Fashion Podcast

09:06 min | 2 years ago

Keith Recker on Color as Narrative

"Guest in the studio is Keith. wrecker who is the author of a new book true colors world masters of natural dyes and Pigments Heike. Hey how are you both pretty good Keith how did you get into color. I have to say it's been a long and winding road I come come from a background of poetry and literature and of course you know when you have that background you have to do something and I ended up having to separate careers. Maybe three three one and big retail as director of home furnishings at Saks fifth avenue gump San Francisco and Bloomingdales Direct Response and another career nonprofit as head of aid artisans As founder of the hand Eye Fund and hand eye magazine and currently as pro bono creative director of the international folk art market based Down Santa Fe and my third career has been in Trenton color forecasting with Panton. WGN A little bit with Stylus of really trying to inject a sense of adventure creativity relevance to their client base. Now when we did our episode where we interviewed Donna. Karen that was was She had part of the international folk art market in the urban store and and we were surrounded by products from that market But she didn't really talk about the interview. Can you tell us a little bit about the international folk art market. Yeah absolutely you were surrounded In the urban zone holiday market by I think it was twenty nine different artists from all over the world mostly textiles in that In that collection and the things ranged from the most amazing handspun Kunia hand-knit by artisans in Argentina And the group. That does these. Things is part of have a biosphere management program in the high dry plains of Argentina where Kunia are an essential part and the Kunas harvested the incan way where the village surrounds the Vicuna. So that there's no sense of panic. They slowly move in until the animals can be sheared It's a really touching story so you have. You were surrounded founded by twenty-five stories with that kind of depth and historic resonance And the folk art market is an annual event in Santa Fe. Happens every July. We bring together between one hundred sixty and one hundred eighty artists from all over the world fifty plus countries and they're bringing the best of what they make from a traditional point of view view sometimes from a personally adventuresome creative point of view sometimes from recycled and cutting edge social point of view. It's a real mix of creativity city that from our us-based experiences seems very out of the mainstream and therefore terribly exciting and motivating they must get a lot of just going to that and and meeting each other and seeing what they all do all around the world you that that must be just such experienced for an artisan who works in the community services that do the same thing and then meeting artisans who do wildly different things from other parts of the global. You've already understood the thing that the artists themselves I liked the best about it. They love exchanging topics with each other. Whether it's how to whether it's Oh my God you should try this. Sometimes they get together and collaborate after the market so somebody shares of an all white Chikan embroidery piece from Lucknow and they send handed off to one of their new friends to be dipped in indigo to be Bandini tie-dyed to to be transformed into something subtly and beautifully different so the exchanges which is really the magic plus the sales a lot of folks walk away from the market with a years worth of income in their pockets based on a twenty two hour event. We sell a around three three point. One two three point. Four million dollars worth of product in twenty one hours and all. The skit paid out Two days later so in five days you go from setup to pay out and reviewed archie. It's an amazing operation. It sounds like a really tight knit community than really so. Is it hard hard to join that community or WHO's finding new artisans for that. It's a very tightly jury. Joe Artists from all around the world apply online pictures and text and their two juries. There's a group of academics from museums around the world. Mostly around the. US who look at it from the point of view is of is this this really rooted in a cultural assets right that we recognize that there's techniques color languages languages motif. Is it routed somehow in community entity heritage and then the second group answers the question. Is this gonNA connect with the market. Does it represent a product. Does it represent a look. Does it represent a price is point and of course is it super beautiful. I mean that's that's the first question that we have to answer before we even proceed to the further analysis so those two groups are responsible. Secure eating something. That really is unique in the world. There's nothing like in the entire world so between that and what you're describing in your the book about being in touch with all these natural colors ways of getting color from the earth from plants a lot of this is about being in touch with what what you're making an and how it's being made and we talk about the supply chain a lot but most people aren't really at the root of their supply. I Chan they don't they don't go back to you. Know Not alive designer. Spent much time in cottonfields looking at different types of cotton as they're growing what the fibers look like in different fields. They get finished product. Kind of textiles What does it do for the world? If if people are more in touch with this I would love to answer your question in a complicated way. Cleans that's what the show is more. I think we need to look at the heritage Jane even as we look at the supply chain If you look back at how how we got where we are today in terms of what we make and how we make it into textiles especially The eighteen fifty six invention of the first synthetic dye. Mo- Oh Wien right by a teenage English chemists Perkins totally by accident. He was working with coal tar to try to find a synthetic Quinine quinine substitute right to treat malaria and the colonial era of of the British empire and he discovered that something that he was making Would dissolve Alvin Water and color rags in really very attractive sharp Purple Reddish purple. That unleashed the willful exploration exploration of using a lot of petrochemicals to substitute what were centuries thousands and thousands of years of heritage so for example the company that became. BASF right the maker of the cassette tapes that some of us are old enough to have fetish started off by making making synthetic indigo and interestingly the synthetic indigo they made did not appeal because they had not really captured that the full charm of indigo go went beyond just the indigo molecule. They had to go backward and realized that. Indie Ruben. A red molecule that would form in the process of indigo dyeing was needed to give the color depth so they had to go back and explore. Why Nature was so much more beautiful than what they were at first capable of making in any case since eighteen fifty six we have lost so much knowledge? If you and I walked down the street today and Looked at what people are wearing down the street and we asked ourselves well. How would you ever get that color? Are we using anything other than a chemical would have zero insight. Chances are right. We've left all that behind so the heritage chain I think has impoverished the richness understanding That we used to have about what comes from our world and how it's made and how valuable it is. We've gotten to a point where we're so distant from our heritage chain that things have the virtue of plastic bags of disposable valueless product after they've faded in the washed twice were done. There's a statistic out there that eighty percent of the clothing we buy ends up in a landfill within one year. And it's because we're so oh distant from people culture heritage skill invention and talent that the things we buy are not worth holding onto so then we go to the supply chain right and there really is in as an extension of this heritage chain a set of material knowledge judge that is still relevant in making textiles. It still relevant in making clothing and it's waiting for us to study at more and to really really incorporated into responsible valuable fashion creation.

Argentina Director WGN Keith Keith. Wrecker Bloomingdales Quinine Donna Hand Eye Magazine Karen San Francisco Lucknow Hand Eye Fund Santa Fe Kunia Panton United States
The Business Behind The Color Of The Year

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:25 min | 2 years ago

The Business Behind The Color Of The Year

"Today's indicator is Nineteen Dash Forty fifty. Two that is the exact shade of Pantheon's official color of this year classic blue and it had a lot of competition. Pantalone has identified more than twenty three hundred colors. It print them out on its famous color chips in a factory in New Jersey. Pretty the people that work there have special vision tests that ensure their ability to expertly distinguish subtle differences in shade and tone. Laurie pressman is is the vice president of the Pan Tone Color Institute. She's worked there for twenty years. She's been there basically since Pinto unsorted picking out. Its colors at the year. She is a bona fide color expert. So I- astor astor. Radio and color is a color. I asked her to describe classic blue to somebody who could not see it so when we think about classic Blue Tanto One thousand nine hundred fifty two classic blue. If you think about the sky at dusk think about a blue that speaks to the end of the day. It has that that reassuring qualities that we associate with blue. The dependability the stability. Because it's something that we see every day and yet there's a little bit more color depth to it. There's a little bit of a a red undertone but please don't mistake this classic shade to be that Cardigan sweater or that university jacket. Because it's more more modern I was just GonNa say like Navy blue. Yeah I was just GonNa say that. That's a fascinating. Look into the mind of a color expert right. I mean I don't know anything about color As you know card if I were like black and gray basically every day I try to blend in with the pavement but as I was looking at this colored there was something striking about even to my untutored eye. And that was that you know the colors for the last few years have been very vibrant and lively and this one just isn't last caller was called living coral bright and lively In two thousand eighteen there was pretty lavender color your before that was this kind of Kermit. The Frog Green and then they came out with classic blue and I wanted to ask ask her about it because it just looked so kinda Blah yeah this blues like it doesn't seem that young to me. It seems a little Lake Doc. It's the color of my bank card. Now see okay and I say you have to go back to the red. And that's the really interesting I would say taint or undertone or influence to this color so I don't think of it as corporate you know this is not your IBM blue. That's not what this is. This is a really fresh and more vibrant blue so it has all those great things that we love about the blues. The reassurance the calm that we're looking for the confidence inspiring us to connect at the same time. There's an energy I don't know it looks like a bank card to me. Here's here's a sample of the color which Panta sent me so this is printed out on their printers and I am now putting my chase bank card right on top of it. And they're close. I think the chase bank blue is slightly darker but other than that distinct cards more vibrant. I think you're right and it's more metallic I don't know honestly when you I know. Pan Tone has turned and color precision into this multi million dollar business companies from all over the world in all kinds of industries. Actually pay pan tone to help them choose colors for their logos and their spring bring lines and their packaging and their products. Barbie Victoria's secret tiffany schweppes. They have all worked with Pan Tone to develop their signature color color. The year is supposed to be more of a cultural statement though. Panton collects data from all over the world to see what colors are being used and tries to think about why certain colors are becoming more popular. What what are you looking to to get that? It's really product what we're seeing in movies. It's art you know it. All the different materials we see coming through do all the different Focus on different travel destinations and once the color set everybody pays attention. That's according to Regina Blah's check. She is a professor of business history at the University of Leeds. And she's the author of the Color Revolution. She says hand tones color of the year becomes kind of celebrity within the industry. I think antone has made a color into a celebrity for this for this year. I think I think that's what it's about and much like celebrity. Classic blue has some high profile haters a lot of articles of come out saying Classic Lewis Boring and Corporate Regina's. Yes it is and it was really a brilliant choice my lean. Okay okay so I am so interested here because to me it just looks like my bank card like it is. That's what caught your bank card and I think that's the whole point is it. Looks like your bank card. It looks like the IBM I b. m. logo it looks like the binders that are lining up here in my office. It's very safe very safe and very secure and very very familiar. And I think what they're suggesting is that in this era of turmoil that we need to have there is a desire an underlying desire to move towards some stability and that Bankcard blue suggests that stability and it is bankcard blue that will be featured in a million million product meetings all over the world as clothing companies home decor companies carmakers hotels electronics makers and countless other businesses. Consider it in their buying decisions. Any business today Who is concerned with producing products for the consumer is concerned with with the latest color trends? If you're an Taylor or banana republics you WANNA be on trends you WANNA follow the trend and so and and what do you think uh of classic blood you like it. I think it's an interesting color. I like blue. I wear blue and green and pink. Because I'm blonde so works for me. Oh interesting saying okay Do you buy stuff and classic blue. I just bought a classic Blue Blazer. So I'm all set you did is it. And by the way Cardiff Panton does not just consider classic blue a color. It's a whole experience in ambience. They sent a box of like a handled handled. It's like the smell of classic blue and some Jelly that's the taste of classic blue and was also blue and grows Sorry and the feel of classical and they also have the sound of classic blue. It's so here is the song that is supposed to be the sound of classic blue

Pan Tone Color Institute Pan Tone Bankcard Blue IBM New Jersey Astor Astor Pantalone Laurie Pressman Pinto Official Cardiff Panton Regina Blah Vice President Lake Doc Panton Regina Navy Panta Barbie Victoria
"panton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:13 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Madeleine Peyroux Veon rose Diana Panton for encore sent me newt and that this is a real work out for that high school French man I feel the muscles flexing gave last teal surreal in may that would be I wish you love five minutes more lovey on rose surreal in a Diana Panton Madeleine Peyroux Stevie Wonder luxury of war the song book on W. NYC remembering said Raymond he was the arranger for gypsy and much honored for that overture John Gielgud actually said I'd take it with me to a desert island it would suit me fine that's all you needed also the West Side Story things in particular the West Side Story symphonic dances which is an extended digestive so many great West Side Story Leonard Bernstein melodies here's one of those that figures prominently in the Raymond arranged symphonic dances Bernstein conducts from West Side Story mom bowl the is that something do and no way soon as just reach down the block on under the miracle do gonna come true yes some comments on if I with with the shop phone jingle open just maybe just holding still the the and it just reach down the block on the beach maybe something's come in Larry Kurt and mambo from the West Side Story symphonic dances as well as obviously a particular moment in the.

Madeleine Peyroux Veon Diana Panton W. NYC Raymond John Gielgud Leonard Bernstein Larry Kurt newt Diana Panton Madeleine Peyroux West Side Story five minutes
"panton" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Big three his force since the opening quarter, and the lead is back down to single digits. It's ninety seven eighty eight curry has it out high around a looney screed circles, it kicks it out to looney at the top hands. The Klay Thompson chase by McCollum who made contact with play trying to avoid instill touch the three nearly went down. No good. But a foul on McCollum his second and three free throws coming per Klay Thompson at the line to the right, again, a father that we see so often. Guys getting into landing area of the it wasn't anything up top CJ McCollum went by. But on the landing. You lands in his face. And it's a three-shot foul Thompson fourteen fifteen in the playoffs at the free throw line to the right? You say it all the time, right? You don't file jump shooter? That was the cardinal rule and specially three point shooter three three throws right now to this guy puts it back to twelve if they both go a huge plan. He missed a shot. Thompson hits the first free throw at the news bolivar's hits the second or more coming and it's ninety nine hundred eight Golden State, how about Klay Thompson Durant and curry all over ninety percent in the Flintoff's. That's kind of a dangerous deal. They're getting tight games. And curry is perfect in the fourth quarter and overtime since two thousand fifteen Thomson hits. All forty three throws in. It's one hundred eighty eight Golden State four forty to go. Mccollum weaving it into the front court picked up like Klay Thompson and off the Rodney hood put him a waist high bounce handed off to Lillard on the left wing Lillard around the screen from cancer picked up by looney outta switch to doubled comes tried to force the past Panton the pain. It's deflect the heart list and not about last touch by the warriors. It'll be four point four on the shot clock baseline, right? Inbound come baseline left inbound coming before you see the warriors stick into the plan. We're putting on Lillard every possession replay showed up probably should have been worried. Well can't review it here. Inbound comes in white corner. Horseless three was blocked by greed outlet curry Thompson. Golden State patient enough on the move going back up by fourteen. And play Thompson. After a rocky shooting night for the most part has ramped. It up ten at twenty four twenty six points and that one off another step out, let's feed with well. The fast breaks have Burt Borland seventeen fast-break points to just to report land of the nineteen turnovers. We've talked about them all night long as thirty points. You know, if it hadn't been for the free throw line. This thing really would have gotten away from his ways your team. Seven for twenty four from three under forty percent from the field yet all that up and reply in the world champs who that are looking for three straight and you're in their building. Probably not going to get it done to be captain obvious. ESPN radio is your exclusive home for the NBA playoffs. Tomorrow Eastern Conference final game number one to Milwaukee..

Klay Thompson CJ McCollum Klay Thompson Durant Lillard Golden State looney Milwaukee ESPN Burt Borland NBA white corner Flintoff bolivar Rodney hood Panton ninety percent forty percent
"panton" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

05:13 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on PRI's The World

"And then when a Hungarian website called index basically asked him, what were you thinking? He submitted twenty two questions of his own. Among them is Barack Obama black enough to perform in Porgy and Bess and what shade of black. Do you have to be on the Panton color scale to perform in Porgy invests to which I say what shade of jerk. Do you have to be to be the director of the Hungarian State Opera for the world? I'm Sarah, burn. Ohio just adopted one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country at bands abortion once a fetal heartbeat can be detected. That's typically before many women even realize they're pregnant it's part of a trend here in some states to make it harder for women to get an abortion. But in some other parts of the world the trend is heading in the other direction yesterday. We mentioned that a South Korean court just lifted the ban on abortion there, and in Rwanda where abortion is mostly illegal. The president Jesse should apart into hundreds of women in jail for abortion, the world's Alison Atta has the story when Rwandan President Paul Kagami pardoned three hundred sixty seven women last week who were imprisoned for abortion, many women's advocates were surprised because it was the second time. He did it Chantal Muhoza is with the rights group spectra. It's not very often that people for different cramped support. This happened twice. It really showed us as. Activists that there was something that was to come into something positive coming. She says Muhoza met with some of the jail women after their release, and she says several of them told her they were arrested after they sought medical help for a miscarriage. They had leading then. Permitted care. Someone reported them had had an abortion undertaken prison. So it was up to them to prove that they didn't actually have induced abortion. And if you can feel that in some of these women would end up to present Rwanda used to have one of the most restrictive abortion laws in Africa. But in two thousand twelve the government revised the law to allow abortion in cases of rape, incest and danger to a woman's life. But even then a woman seeking an abortion had to get a court approval that changed last year says Asia Russell with the group health global access project, and that's important because as you can imagine women were experiencing life threatening consequences as a result of a pregnancy and having to wait for a Judah -cation to agree with what she already knew. And in some cases, there were devastating health consequences result advocates say they. They hope could pardons signal that the government may be moving towards making safe abortions more accessible to more women. No human should ever be criminalised for the health services that they require and abortion is ultimately healthcare. But Rwanda is still a conservative country says Chantal Muhoza she points out that even though more than fifty percent of the lawmakers are women. It doesn't mean that they support abortion rights for the world. I'm Alison had at a. Earlier this week. We told you about Haitian immigrants living in the US under temporary protected status. A quick update on that. Now. A judge New York has said no to the Trump administration's plan to cancel TPS for Haitians that could impact about fifty thousand undocumented Haitians who currently live and work legally in the US many of them receive TPS after the two thousand ten earthquake in Haiti which killed hundreds of thousands and created severe hardship for many people there. The Trump administration argues that conditions have improved enough to cancel TPS lawyers. Who sued the administration argued that the severe hardship continues in Haiti? They also cited derogatory comments President Trump has made about Haitians in yesterday's ruling judge William Kuhn suggested that the White House policy was racially based and he wrote a TPS termination should not be a political decision. Made to carry out political motivations the near case is one of six lawsuits challenging the administration's termination. TPS programs for people from multiple countries. All big news stories have their own lexicon. The Trump presidency has maga- fake news cuff FA Bill Clinton did a deep dive. And what the meaning of the word is is next Watergate produce, expletive deleted. And of course, scandals after that became this gay that gate another big story with a rich lexicon. Is Brexit the world's Patrick Cox is here. Hey, patrick..

Chantal Muhoza Trump administration Rwanda Haiti president Alison Atta Porgy Barack Obama US Patrick Cox Ohio Bill Clinton director Paul Kagami Africa rape Asia Russell Trump Bess
"panton" Discussed on The Deep Dive Podcast

The Deep Dive Podcast

14:46 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on The Deep Dive Podcast

"Man who went to heaven before his time. I'm not supposed to be here for you guys made a mistake and came back to life in the bud. Body of another man, would you have used to Panton? That's what you see. Jio funds. That's what if we went else will see Warren Beatty, Julie Christie heaven can wait rated PG. The boss can be mad at that angel boss, is very mad at that angel the obvious choice is well, you got to got to put him back in his body. Right. Right. Except that Joe was cremated. Yeah, that's not good, even the salt pepper shaker. Well, it's not gonna work. I mean because Joe's like excuse me you screwed up. This is your fault you have to fix this. What are you gonna do for me? You know, I wanna see your manager. We'll talk to your manager buddy. All right. I wanna free body out of this. Swap it give me new body. Oh man. If they only knew so this guardian angel just trying to do the right thing goes on a hunt for a new body for Joe. And after a few not so successful attempts, which is very funny sequence. Trying to find a new body for him. They settle on a millionaire playboy. Okay. Who's about the same age same? You know, he looks the same. Of course, not everybody else. But not to not to other people. Right. But the and the reason they're able to put Joe into this guy's body that he's just been murdered. Oh, is just been murdered poisoned. So just as the millionaire dies the guardian angel puts Joe soul into his body. So he's wakes up, and it's like okay, this is not me, but maybe I can work with this. Right. So he retains his memories. Then he retains his memories. Okay. Yes. Because that's not fair, if he didn't. Right. Right. So now you've got Joe inside millionaires body and it's like okay, well, maybe we can do something with this. But of course he. He acts completely differently. So people pick up on people pick kind of pick up on a little bit because he had a near death experience so to speak that he's changing his life around. I see any makes them weird decision. He decides to he wants to get back into football but with this body, how's it going to do that? So he goes off on this diet regimen, exercise training. He uses his wealth to buy or rent a football professional football team to play in his massive yard, right? He's a state and everybody thinks he's gone. Absolutely bonkers. Meanwhile, the two people that conspire to murder him are like what happened. He was supposed to die, and they keep trying to kill him over and over again with no success, and is that due to intervention from the angels, you'd never find out for sure. Okay. But since all of the rule all bets are off now because, you know this is whole screw up. You never know. Right. You never know what's going to happen. But this is such a. Funny. Funny movie it, it's got a lot of slapstick stuff on it with the constant attempts to kill him that fail miserably but for a film that was made in the seventies, it is so optimistic and it's not cynical or bleak or anything like that. It is so charming. And there's even a love story involved. So it it's, it's such a sweet kind of comedy that. You don't really expect from the people involved this, like Warren Beatty is not known for his romantic side. Yeah. Well, romantic side. Yes. But not for his comedic side. But he pulls this off really, really well. And there's some great great actors in this movie villains are played by Charles Grodin. Diane cannon, both really, really good in this phone. There's some Hollywood veterans James Mason, Jack warden RG Armstrong, who was also in dick Tracy for Morin bady as well. There's a lot of suspense in this, too, because you never know really what's going to happen with is he gonna get to keep this body as you're gonna get murdered again. And what happens after that? Yeah. Will ever make his dream come true playing professional football again. How is that going to work, even does he have to? So winds up trying to have to buy the football team with his money and then put himself as quarterback and everybody thinks he's absolutely crazy for doing that. But that's his dream and it was taken away from him. So he tries to get that dream back and what happens in that process. And then, you know it it's so crazy and is a lot of twists and turns around, you gotta figure out how is this going to is going to play out as it's going to end? How can this possibly end? Well, right for anybody. But I have to say this has one of the best most satisfying endings of any movie I've ever seen. You see the year like in tears, like, oh, this is cool is so sweet. This is a great love story. And you really just sit back. Wow. This is amazing. It's so well done. It's I felt the same way after watching this. The first time as I did after. Watching back to the future. The first time as it all worked, so perfectly the plot everything dovetails together at the end. Everything's wrapped up in a nice neat little bow, you feel good about it. And it's just that kind of, it's kind of it feel good. It really is a feel-good movie. Yeah. I highly recommend it. And then you ring a bell angel gets his wings years different thing altogether. But if this, if this sounds like it's kind of a throwback to kind of an earlier type of movie it actually, is because heaven can wait is a remake of nineteen forty one film called here comes Mr. Jordan, which is a black and white kind of a very simple plot movie to same. It's the same general idea except in the nineteen forty one version, he's a boxer, not a football player. So it's the saints can it be a remake? If it's technically be a remake of has a different name. Yes. Okay. I think so, so not just like borrowing a concept then though, because it borrows. Almost exactly okay, it is. It is like to the tea with just a few minor. Pity the fool. It's not it. There's some things changed around for the times, but for the most part, it's the same plot. Yeah. Yeah. And I don't know. I honestly I don't know which one, I like more. They're both really, really good. Yeah. But high, I highly recommend checking either or both out when you get a chance because it's such a nice movie to watch and just let wash oria. Yeah, I really enjoy it a lot. There's so many movies too, with, like angels and sports, we have that movie than we have angels in the outfield when I was thinking, kidding king Arthur's, court does field of dreams count. Yeah. Kevin costner. I mean he did Waterworld. I haven't really trusted him since then. Yeah, but yeah. So the there's like there's a whole genre of like angels. Interfering in sports for people's lives like movies. What is it with that angels in sports? I mean, there's the California Angels now. The Anaheim angels say, wait a minute. Hold on. First of all, and second of all, the we don't use talk about them, what you said to me once. No sports podcasting on this podcast. So I'm gonna hold you to it to. Well, here's the thing. Mine had a significant part in the movie. So I have to kind of have to reference it because it in the movie. Okay. Yep. So I think that kind of special dispensation. Producer and they're saying note, and you have to wrap it up. So I don't think it does. You know what he's fired. You're fire Jemaine. Yeah. Get out norm. Not talking about the movie on German, actually, now that's not your mind, the situation, who. Going off. Actually, you're taking the nor'easter that think it's faint. That that's fast. I know I don't go on. Oh my gosh. Speaking of trains, as a really great movie called MRs Winterbourne and seen that I've heard of it. Lake. I love that movie. It involves a train crash, and then she has to presume the identity of somebody else. So it's kind of like a body swapping thing, but really nobody's were inter inter displaced. But Ricky Martin not Ricky Martin leaky. Martin really Vida loca Ricky leak has to pretend to be some, some buddy, who she's not and then fell in love. With Brendan Fraser who he's actually playing his twin. He's only not a twin. So it's this weird weird dynamic, but it's, it's so good. You should watch MRs Winterbourne rookie leagues not enough movies. You know crybaby. I've only seen her in to cry baby was one of them. Nope. Haven't seen that. And then MRs Winterbourne yeah, but quite baby cry baby. Kind of Christ. I love crab. Yeah. It was a good movie though. It was. Yeah. So now get to the stats stats. Yes, I'm sorry. I want to change it. You know, I'm sorry, doing sports again this. Let's hear this disticts heaven can wait. Gets a six point nine out of ten on the internet movie database, an eighty nine percent on rotten tomatoes. So hey, you know, the proof is there? You can rent it on fandango. Now, I tunes Amazon prime video Google play PlayStation store, voodoo and YouTube for a mere three dollars and ninety nine cents isn't the PlayStation store. Cool. I don't know. I don't know what that is. Okay, never mind. No, I can I get that. Can I get that with my Atari twenty six hundred? Oh, lord. Member dream casts. Oh, sega's. That's yeah. Pretty much stopped with the Nintendo entertainment system. Nice. So, yeah, that was my last real console. That's not true. I switch, tell anybody I do too. Oh, that's nice. Speaking of bodies while switch. Oh, switch. Hashtag sponsor us Nintendo. Now, here comes Mr. Jordan, the other film. I mentioned is as of this recording streaming Turner classic movies for free and is available to rent on most of the streaming services, which, I mentioned previously that TCI I'm channel has a lot of older movies, so good. I've seen gone with the wind on that channel. I've seen a bunch of movies like that. They have some really great ones, and they rotate them quite often do. And they have like months where like October to do a lot of horror movies do scifi movies. It's like TBS minus all the cop dramas is not all they have in the heat of the night to be as the badge station. Yeah. Okay. All right. So you feel good. I feel good. All right. I feel like I'm in my own body. Yeah. Those experience were working on didn't work out. Thank goodness, you know, next time, we'll cross the wires a little bit cross. The streams? Yeah. It'll be good. Never cross the streams. No. That would be bad. So that's it for this edition of the deep dive podcast. Thank you for listening. Yeah. Join us next time when we switch gears a little bit and rate the top ten bargain pasta strangers on the market today..

Joe football MRs Winterbourne Warren Beatty Ricky Martin Mr. Jordan California Angels Panton Nintendo Charles Grodin Diane cannon Julie Christie Kevin costner murder Anaheim Brendan Fraser fandango sega Producer king Arthur
"panton" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And I'm not where I was this job. Come from our in college. Yeah. I was like twenty one maybe I had been drawings and had my work in a few magazines and done some editorial. I was just putting my work out. All the time. I had a website probably had a couple of websites. And an aunt by contacted me. I was actually in New York was walking down spring, and I had a blackberry Paula. I was walking down spring. And I remember getting an Email, my blackberry, which is kind of like insane because it was so long ago, but I kind of wanted to be like that guy. And I just remember getting and reading and being like, wow, this could be cool. And I didn't know about the process that you go through together Joel with the big edgy at agency or anything. So I remember just sending some foes from iphone of drawings idea. The apple like it was social like, I don't know how I got the job. But in the end the buy from Fallon, he came to my apartment, mice cheat my student apartment. Was it a dorm? No, no. It wasn't a dome. But still it was like I had actually I had a studio in my in my house like attend one of my rooms into a study, and it was like fully operational, and yeah, he came he was like explained everything, and I I got the job and I learned how to use a straight appropriately. And learn about Panton, I, you know, I threw myself into very deep chocolate pool of money and contracts, and it was scary. But I really enjoyed it set me on my way, but one of the UK, and I read that the icing on the cake for you is when a massive billboard with your design was erected right outside the university. Again, I didn't have many friends, but you said it was a bit grotesque. But at least they started your professors started to take you more. Seriously. Why didn't your professors take you seriously because school told that commercial design.

Fallon Joel Panton apple New York UK
"panton" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"That? I didn't put that in there. Somebody put it in. But you're gonna love this. Wait till I tell you what it is. Like he missed a line. He missed an opportunity. He should have followed up by saying, by the way, there's more women in congress because of me. Right. I mean, he got more of them elected. Well, that is true. Actually did. That's why they were so heavily while while they were clapping. He should've just said, you're welcome. That would have been nice. I wanted a little more that Trump than the one that I got last night. I know people love the speech, and they thought it was great. But state of the union is like just needs to be reworked. I we either gonna go rock them sock them robots or to get the thing off TV 'cause it's not working for me right now because there was a great speech fine. But it doesn't move anything. We're not coming together. We're not gonna put party aside. And we're not getting these things done, and the one thing they will do is this infrastructure thing, which I don't want any part of because that's just going to waste a lot of money. Well, I mean, look, I I traveled a lot of roads here in Massachusetts. I can tell you the infrastructure Bill kind of needed. You're going to be happy because you're going to get it. I have a feeling Panton and hang she's next on W R K. I what did you think about the speech last night? Pam. Hi ni. I thought it was a great speech. And I thought he. To say when he wanted to say happy for him. In the house. I thought that the women would Paul all in little white suits. They look like. Bag, and I thought that looking at Senator Warren and magi I'm really discussing on their faces. I just thought it was terrible. I wish they did. Massachusetts. And I wish you. And I'm hoping the next time around that you'll be there to take over the world one. Thanks, pam. I appreciate that. I would have liked to have been down there as well. But look watching it on TV getting a chance to analyze what was said. And then being here in studio with the I think it's kind of quivalent I feel like I I actually won in the logging you the same thing that I did you did. Which is we found out about this three by five yellowcard for Lisbeth Warren minutes before the thing happened. You're just waiting for the way to see the look on her face. She did not look like a happy woman. Now, she wasn't going to look happy. No matter what their but you did what I did. Which is that what is going on in her mind because she had to just be planning over and over again and my cooked him I cooked cooked at my cook. Yeah. I mean, I think when she when did you did, you know about that before you watch the state of the union? Oh, she's going. I'm sorry. I lost you. What did Trump know about it because we were talking about this earlier? Clearly, they people within the White House would have known about this before the speech. But do you tell Trump or do you not tell Trump about that? There is no way. His handlers said tell him he may have actually tweeted from the podium about it had you see that halfway through Pelosi's official site tweeted out he's wrong about this. But she wasn't tweeting. She couldn't she didn't have a phone that we could see an Oba Warren definitely because her office had to put a statement out before saying it was valid that card was valid. And so she had to be sitting there knowing because he had to ask her. Did you do this? And she probably said, yeah, I did can you imagine a state of the union where Trump says by the way before we go any further. I don't know if you guys have seen any held up the cars, you imagine. Again. I know you love what happened last night. But there could have been a whole different conversation going on if that had happened, which is why you don't tell them because he might just do that. Right. Hey, we had a friend of ours was actually you weren't there. Jeff. But somebody that we do know was there, and we're gonna check in with that. When we come back. Find out what what was the inside skinny what did they see? What did they know? Do they have any fast food did they fall asleep? Did they obviously? Love is in.

Trump Pam Oba Warren Massachusetts congress Lisbeth Warren Pelosi Senator Warren White House Panton Jeff Bag Paul official
"panton" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

"So many times that I forget who's been in there and who's not been bed when you do things out of love. There's a chance that your wife is just not going to remember you went there. Now, I really can't recall this I feel like we talked about it. And I showed you where it was. But I know you've been in there. It's okay. I believe you. We went in the back section where there's no longer. It's not all fancy and nicer little linoleum pads or whatever just how rack okay? Yeah. Now, remember, certainly. Been they're awesome. Memorable. Remember, also listening. Don't do things for extra validation. You know, if you gotta do it for yourself, which I the people will let you down at least fifty percent of the time. Well, you did it for me. 'cause you know, I like to do that stuff. But I'm in there so often that I didn't remember do that for me. Thank you, Honey. Super impactful. Yeah. I appreciate it. I think any of these tips if you can apply them to your dating life your relationship. Life will help you lead more fulfilled existence with your partner. Like, it just we make things so complicated. And what loses most people, especially as I work with them. As I can't be this easy. It just can't be this easy. Like, what do you mean? This all you all I have to do just trust the process is dead serious doing it. Is that easy though? Yeah. It's like show up be present plan. Stay countable. Do the right thing. Panton.

Panton partner fifty percent
"panton" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"panton" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"I have an outstanding guest for you today. His name is Mick Atkins. He's on the advisory board for cloud break health, where their focus is to humanize healthcare where we also had the c o Jamie. But the other thing that Nick does. And I think we'll be focusing on today is he is the founder of the pink socks movement. It's a tribe of makers doers that are looking to digitize healthcare. And so what I wanted to do is welcome him to the show and maybe expand on on that introduction. Nick, welcome Saul. It's great to be here, man. I'm really glad that you asked me to join you today. Thank you. Now, really, really. Appreciate it, Nick. And you know, what your name keeps popping up in the? As I've gotten started with this podcast. You name just keeps popping up. So you're you're definitely creating some waves out there. But it says you gotta talk to Nick, you gotta talk to Nick, I think all roads lead to Nick somehow. Well, I'll tell you saw I've been really fortunate to meet some awesome people all around the world see some really cool technology, and you know, this whole pink socks thing. We'll talk about this. It's a global tribe and have been able to meet some of the most outstanding amazing people who are doing really good things in the world. And a very very grateful to the universe for that. Hey, so Sydney, why why did you decide to get into the medical sector? Well, long time ago when I was graduated from grad the first job, I had was selling medical surgical supplies in Nashville, Tennessee, and it is, you know, did that for a few years in the individual decided to go back to school and fresh out of business school of my MBA. I went to work for the Vanderbilt health plans back in the day. And that's when HMO's were starting they were popular at that point that hidden unpopular. And so I had all this experience around the healthcare world in couple of jobs. I got in the payroll business in the next came back to the HR business in medical billing practice management software CEO of a couple of companies back in Nashville. So I knew I knew healthcare knew that world noodling go on new steel in space. So once you gravitate to something that you're you're in the groove with you to stick with it. That's what I did. That's awesome, man. And you definitely have done a lot in year. Experience speaks for it. What? Do you think today, you're at cloud break? But you've also done a lot of other things. What do you think today should be a topic on every medical leaders agenda? Well, obviously, telemedicine Telehealth, that's that's a given. And really, no telemedicine is nothing new. That's quite fantastic thing about it is it's almost it's hard to believe that we're still having to sell the concept that you can stay home. Inter Jamie, Panton sear doctor over video instead of having a fight traffic and go in and do that. I mean, the so many cases where a virtual visit just makes a lot of sense for everybody. But the doctor patient artificial intelligence, a huge right now VR AR MR so first rally augmented reality mixed rowdy. I think we're gonna see ton of that. I think the first piece that we're already seeing it play out pretty big as in med is in education and training. And I think we're going to say his son mash up of that with telemedicine in is so all of these things really fit together. They're not silo pieces. They've may seem that way right now. But the endgame of all of this is that is. All of those things are mashed together to four provide a really truly virtual on visit. Yeah. And so how does this fit into the perspective of the tribe is pink socks tribe? I really wanna spend some time here with you and give the listeners and appreciation for for what you guys are doing. And what the vision of the tribe is while you know, there's all walks of life all different companies are represented me patients. Doctors different tech specialties is really nonspecific, right?.

founder Nashville Jamie Mick Atkins HMO Vanderbilt advisory board Tennessee Saul Sydney CEO Panton