6 Burst results for "Pamela Toler"

"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

Open Stacks

12:05 min | 2 years ago

"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

"And fury. Also for more recipes and revolutions we turn to Carol Adams in conversation with journalist Marla rose at the call last fall. Of course, that devoted November twenty sixteen was devastating and one morning in December two thousand sixteen. I thought I know what we need to right. We need to write the anti-trump diet. We were very lucky. There was an editor who loved it, but he, he suggested protests kitchen because we weren't just criticizing Trump. We shouldn't situate the book that only the problem was only Trump. The problem is not Trump. The problem is eleven on the Republican members on the judiciary. The problem is Brexit in England. The problem is the right wing gaining surgeons and seeing a phobia in Europe. So we needed to wide in this, this is the book, you can give people to say this is why I'm vegan social Justice thing, but it was also written for vegans to help articulation isn't isn't like what? Foodie weeding. Thing we wanted to show that you can play with your food. And this was my sister's idea. She said Carol, you've gotta have some sort of Trump to dinner and so we had Briana Clark rope in this very talented Canadian chef she has provided. So we call them resistance meals, end of bonus. Trumped Trump say, Tom a lot more on. Drain the swamp, kitchen cabinet compote. Stop the wall. Fire and wall taco salad with Aaron.

Trump Carol Adams Marla rose Briana Clark editor Aaron Europe England Tom
"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

Open Stacks

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

"Here's another the word of the day is galley or advanced reader copies, also known as arcs whatever you call them books that publisher sent out before they're even close to being reminded that is before, they hit our shelves help booksellers, especially know what it is. We're selling and fill our lives and cars with an unparalleled excitement. And oftentimes embarrassment for taking longer to read them than frankly, seems possible. Let alone practical, for instance, I've had a copy of animal wise, five Virginia Morell on my shelves since two thousand twelve that I still haven't so much as cracked or passed on. Why because there's a fascinating looking chapter on dolphins. For more incredulous reading material, we asked our staff, what? They couldn't wait to read it managed somehow to put off until now. What's that? What's strike that? They've still gone read, what they sure do sound good. So what's the problem? I begged for copy of novel. Sounds southern.

Virginia Morell publisher
"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

Open Stacks

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

"And being astonished at how expensive it is. A lot of people, that's a lot of money including me. So I think a common misconception insight really a misconception. I don't know if it's misconception, but a common thought when you enter place, any books are really, but especially perhaps a place like the seminary, call that specializes in titles from university presses which we won't get into now. But are often for reasons known and unknown very expensive. A lot of labor time a lot of research time, and a lot of editing time that goes into the production of university press book Leinna as, as a book editor as well. Precise insight into that. Is that right? So you really know why we're ascribing this value to books, or is a reason thera. You can always tell when there's a paid copy editor on board with a project, and it usually makes the book better. But there's also you know, if you're talking about works that are either in translation or that have passages that have been translated as part of the research. There's translation fees. There's foreign rights fees and stuff. So there, there really are a lot of things tied up in the cost of university press book, which is not always apparent the casual browser. We're here today not to talk about it's the front tip where we're standing now. But also at the front of house front of store, some books, that are marked down, and you're going to tell us why and what those books are called. Yes. Exactly. Yes. It's the remainder carts. This is just an abandoned cart, but I've put some remainders on but yeah here at the front of the star. We have various sales sections. Some better signed than others. And I just wanted to point, you around the different things that we have in reasons why they may have ended up here on sale, despite us. You know, fully valuing the book, this is not trying to undercut anyone this is not trying to light out some form of labor that's gone onto the book. There are other reasons why these books are lower price, so to these I pulled brand Luther Andrew pedigree from penguin, press, and EastWest street from Naf by Philippe sands got a couple of these in this category. Alexei of secondhand time, of course, Nobel prize literature, and then another Luther book Martin Luther renegade in profit. Throwing a boat here. What's wrong with Luther? He's all he's just remaindered all over the place. He's a controversial guy. But both these Luther books were massive when they came out in hardcover, and now here we have renegade improv Lindahl Roper from Random House that one is marked down from forty two nine ninety eight and despite having are fantastic sales here in hard cover. I think what happened to this is probably they pushed out the paperback for both of these Luther books sales have been going so strongly in hardcover paperback comes out that immediately, people want the paperback rather than the hard cover and despite the really high and quick sales. The publisher has a lot of hardcover stock that needs to get turned over to somewhere else wants the paperback comes out, and our customers are allowed to kind of take advantage of that, by getting this heart markdown hardcover stock that the publishers trying to they're trying to make room in their warehouses for, for the paperback or new brand new releases Luther. Not having that hard time of it led to the reformation hardcover book sales looking good. So good. In fact, that the publisher had faith in Luther enough to print more copies than than upping necessary. Right. Okay. Yes. And then there's the. This new stock of books that we are just in the process of cycling out onto our into our sale sections. These are stock from the Indianapolis Christian theological seminary, which had a fantastic bookstore attached to it for many, many years and believe the bookstore. Portion of it was closed down late last year early last year. Sorry, late last fiscal year in our books. And they were looking for a place that the stock could go and still be, you know, shared among people who really value it. So we brought their inventory up here to sell and a lot of it is, you know, older additions of things things I have some, you know, yellow pages some shelf ware, but as you can see lane Pagel's for aid, totem taboo, William James varieties of religious experience. These are prime books that still have a big audience. So we were able to bring them in and sell them at sale price, much to the benefit of our customers. Two and it's speaking in misconceptions this afternoon. But another understandable misconception. Is that the seminary Cobb is, in fact, attached to a seminary, which one point our history, we were, but no longer we still have. However. Notable theology section and then world religion section. So these books do have a home here that books like this with the continuing closing most Christian bookstores no longer do one more that I wanted to point out here is a book called an history of the corruptions of Christianity into volumes by Joseph Priestley would definitely sounds like a made up off their her religious book. But this is from a so-called publisher called forgotten books, and they do a lot of basically FEC simile reprinting books that are in the public domain. So as you can see this is more or less a digital scan of a manuscript from many decades ago, not sure when but you know that the S's look like Fs it's old enough that, that that's happening. And you got that thing it's not even a key on a keyboard anymore. Coffee stain or fake blood or anything like that. It's probably -mongst blood. Yeah. So these will be a digitally scanned and then printed up with this horrendous cover any any book that you get from forgotten books is going to have this torn kind of manuscript and half leather bound cover with a seal. Really, just pay a graphic designer like ten more bucks to make it better. But as which is this is unsurprising, but they are non-returnable because they're just printed as one off someone replaced, the book, they print it. And I mean it's fantastic, that these things are out in a veil -able in the world. So it's fantastic that these books are made available out into the world. But when we when we do bring them into the store because they're these one off printings of these books in the public domain. We once we buy them, we have them pass them onto a customer. So sometimes they. Until there. Yeah. When you put it in their back when. Exactly. Yeah. So sometimes as with any book, that's on our shelf for a long time. It just needs to find a new home mclearn shelves forgotten until it's forgotten again. Which I did. And we had to turn the recorder back for exactly. Yeah. Well, this, this isn't wonderful spot end all these would be forgotten books, if not for booksellers like you, Elaine. Thank you. Well with all the new.

Luther Andrew publisher Indianapolis Christian theolog Martin Luther editor copy editor Philippe sands Nobel prize Joseph Priestley lane Pagel Elaine Random House William James Lindahl Roper Alexei Cobb
"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

Open Stacks

14:57 min | 2 years ago

"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

"Another book on your list that we have. Here's the Amazon's lives and legends of warrior, women across the ancient world by mayor, which you point out sort of combines mythology with history. In order to tell a true account of women warriors. So there's two that are kind of using metaphor or story differently, and I'm curious as a historian, how does story, help either shape and or complicate our sense of history. In so many ways that part of it is a lot of what most of us, hold.

Amazon
"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

Open Stacks

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"pamela toler" Discussed on Open Stacks

"I wanted to start though by asking it seems to me that your, your project, your career is in writing, maybe alternative or unexpected histories. But also in a more. We're, we're sometimes needlessly afraid to say accessible way sensible pros that seems like such a cool mission. What about history mix you excited to bring it or present it to more general audience at some level? It's the best stories are. I apologies to all my friends who write novels, but. They're.

"pamela toler" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"pamela toler" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Not that unknown for the period. I mean, we often get letters or even more portly speeches that no one could have heard. One of the most famous speeches from this period is, is the warrior Buddha Kaz famous speech to rally her people fight the Romans. That was one. Yeah. They're writing. Yeah. Frantically scribbling down the words that not a Roman historian audience, listening, and noting. But this is why accepted as a historical document to this. You gotta work with what you've got right? Yeah. You can always accept sources like that, too, because you imagine that as that writer was doing their research. They had sources in front of them. They were drawing from other texts that don't exist anymore. So you kind of have to put your faith in them. But you can't understand that if it did even a little research they had something that they were drawing on. And but you must have gotten this somewhere. The more sober. And reliable source is from a Greek historian name soci-, moose, that's written in the sixth century. I don't I don't have anything interesting to tell you about it. Then we also have a handful of Arabic sources that give alternate version and really interesting version of Nobis life. So Pamela Toler polls from all of those and has the job of trying to figure out, what seems most likely and what to make of these conflicting stories. Historical detective work. Yeah. This is choose your own adventure essentially. Wills Nobis die. What will happen to her story. Cool we all get to choose our own version. I think so. Yeah. Here's what we do. Now. She was born around two forty see she married an atheist sometime between two fifty eight I'm shortly before the, the Bulgarian disaster. And at the time that she married him he was much older. He was widowed and he happened. Adults at least one adult son probably was older than Nokia. So in two sixty after he's pushed the Persians back across the frady's Odin. This is the most powerful man eastern half of the. And we tend to forget the eastern part of the pyre. In fact, was larger and more wealthy than the west half is a snore, maybe two-thirds. And he certainly was as powerful as any of the user purrs, who had used their position the Roman legions to get themselves main emperor, instead, he seems to have remained loyal to Valeria ins some. So for about three years after Davis is death. Keeps things going, she remains loyal to the emperor. She maintains the border, she keeps everything suitable and in two sixty nine or seventy. Something happens to know be a suddenly assembles and army and begins an imperial expansion in the name of Myra. Not in the name of Rome to conquer Arabia. Do we know why? Nope. We don't know what happens if this was just waiting. Her time until she could do this. If there was something that triggered it, we don't have any records that explain what might have happened. There is this constant conflict with both the Persian empire. And the tennis, trimbe something may have happened there or she may have just gone might here we go. Either way, she is wildly successful. She conquers Arabia goes from there into Egypt. An Egypt is. It's the source of the third of Rome's grain. And so it's not just an attack on the economy, but is also a possibility for a lot of instability bread and circuses, isn't just a clever line, Romans eight a lot of Romans soldiers daily rations to three. If you're if you cut off at third of that, you've got a real possibility of trouble at home. This is crazy bold move, but this is Rome. I mean Egypt is Rome, and she is in room, but she's not taking it on behalf.

Rome Egypt Valeria Arabia Buddha Kaz Nobis Pamela Toler Nokia writer Davis tennis three years