35 Burst results for "Palo Alto"

Ransomware Gang Still Wants Millions

Cyber Security Today

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Ransomware Gang Still Wants Millions

"Conti ransomware gang trying to mandates dented reputation for scrambling. The data of ireland's healthcare system yesterday had published a link to a free decrypt. Her which will allow the system to unscramble the files. This will be a relief to people worried about the loss of important medical or employee. Information makes the gang. Sound like the good guys. Right nope he see before. The files were encrypted. A lot were copied by the gang and the gang is still demanding the equivalent of about twenty million dollars or they will sell that data to other crooks or release it publicly. Congratulations to two teams from. Toronto's william line mackenzie collegiate. They finished first and second in the annual cyber titan national cybersecurity competition this week for canadian high schools and middle schools. Third place went to a team from toronto's earl haig secondary school cyber security experts regularly warn. It leaders of the importance of patching applications as soon as possible one security updates are released. And that's because threat actors move fast. Once they learn of a vulnerability how fast well according to a report. This week from palo alto networks. It could be minutes. A research team looked at the activities of hackers during the first three months of the year and found hackers scan for vulnerable applications open to the internet in as little as fifteen minutes after a patch was announced when microsoft announced vulnerabilities in the on premise version of exchange server in march hackers were scanning within five minutes.

Conti Ransomware William Line Mackenzie Collegi Earl Haig Ireland Toronto Palo Alto Networks Microsoft
The Future of Cloud Native Collaborative Communication

Future of Tech

01:52 min | 3 weeks ago

The Future of Cloud Native Collaborative Communication

"So welcome in europe. Future of I guess these greg walker under ceo. Dial pen and we're going to speak about many topics but before doing that. Let's start from the beginning Greg how did you find yourself Voice you know so. I've been in voice over. Ip the last twenty years but really didn't have any plans to become a voice over ip person. i was a securities attorney in palo. Alto california working at a big firm representing startups and venture capitalists and investment banks and big public companies and things like that and One of my clients was starting a venture fund. Tell us off partners in nineteen ninety nine. There was going to make a bunch of investments out of the the nineteen ninety-six telecom deregulation act is a really. He asked me to join him so i did. And we started making investments in in a lot of things We invested in surono related in Like optical switching and things like that an underlying architecture and there were acquired by cisco yes yes it was bought at the time was as seven billion dollar. Acquisition was massive. It was it was huge but One of our one of investments remade. And i went to a different venture fund and then we continue to make those types of investments. One was a voice over. Ip company from nine hundred ninety nine called dial pad and same name totally different company but Really fell in love with voice over. Ip matt deal and then when two thousand one came around and and the internet all in all these unprofitable businesses had had to lay off. A lot of people

Greg Walker Alto California Palo Greg Europe Cisco Matt
Meet the Brain Behind Facebook's Oversight Board

Sudhir Breaks the Internet

02:39 min | Last month

Meet the Brain Behind Facebook's Oversight Board

"I want to tell you a story about a friend and a colleague of mine. His name is noah feldman one afternoon. Back in twenty. Eighteen noah was taking a bike ride in the hills around palo alto california. He was visiting from the east coast. The bike ride was a little break from seeing friends. And doing is meetings. But no is not your average mountain biker. He's a constitutional law professor at harvard and one of the country's best he even helped to draft iraq's interim constitution so as no was cranking around the hills of old honda road he was thinking about a company with its headquarters nearby. Maybe you can guess. He was thinking about facebook. I happen to be staying with my friend. Sheryl sandberg who. I went to college with her. And she's the co or facebook but not for anything to do with facebook. I was just out there and it was nice to see her. No was thinking a lot about the relationship between his field constitutional law and the struggle that platforms have keeping people safe online. Think about the social media companies the more they grow the more content their users post not all the content is going to be so nice and friendly and when you get more content. You're bound to get more hateful speech as well. It's just really hard to keep all the bad stuff off the platforms. It's always an uphill battle for these social media companies and not unlike the uphill battle that noah found himself on during his bike that it was much too hard for me. And i had that you know oxygen deprivation field that you get when you're trying to climb hills too hard for you and i was sort of in my mind and one part of that was trying to figure out how the social media companies were themselves dealing with the challenges. A free speech. It's not the question of how governments were dealing with them and free speech but how they were thinking about it internally no hyperventilating about to give and sure enough it worked and i had an idea and the idea that came into my mind was that facebook content moderation supreme court all day. Oh yea whoa. I wrote it up in a you know twelve or thirteen hundred word document. I thought maybe i can publish. It isn't bad and showed it to charlotte because she was my host and she said to me. Actually you know what before you go and publish this. Let me send it to mark and see what he thinks about it as it turned out facebook. Ceo mark sanford love. Noah's idea others were not so sure could affor- profit company bill. They court many people in an outside facebook dot. The whole idea was more than a little crazy. One of those people was knee.

Noah Feldman Facebook Sheryl Sandberg Palo Alto East Coast Harvard Iraq California Noah Supreme Court Ceo Mark Sanford Charlotte
Sea Level Rise a Major Threat to San Francisco

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:41 min | Last month

Sea Level Rise a Major Threat to San Francisco

"All over the bay Area by 2050 In less than 30 years. Projections show floodwaters swamping bridges, infrastructure and entire neighborhoods. KQED science reporter Kevin Starke has been following this story as part of the Pulitzer Centers nationwide. Connected Coastlines Reporting Initiative and Kevin East Palo Alto specifically, is one community really susceptible to sea level rise in the Bay Area. How much of a threat is this? Well, already Half of the city lies in a federal flood zone. It's bound by water on three sides, the Bay and the San Francis Skeeto Creek. And it's located in the South Bay, where tides of the highest during bad storms the city already regularly experience is flooding. The average high tide in the bay is going in one direction. It's up. Scientific projections show up to a couple feet of sea level rise by mid century, and then the rate of rise could dramatically increase beyond that, so this is truly an existential threat for the community and his power out there. Great and this isn't just about sea level rise right? There are larger social forces at play here, too. Absolutely. The community is roughly two thirds Latino, has a sizable population from the Pacific Islands. In fact, we interviewed people who emigrated to East Palo Alto from places like Samoa and Tonga, in part to get away from flooding and climate change on the islands on me to find that it is an issue here along the bay, so the effects of climate change disproportionately impact communities like East Palo Alto. Many people in the community that we spoke with talk about the cost of housing. There's been a lot of pressure. There is Facebook and Google and other big companies have built campuses nearby. Yet East Palo Alto is this

Kevin Starke Pulitzer Centers Nationwide Kevin East Palo Alto San Francis Skeeto Creek Kqed Bay Area South Bay East Palo Alto Pacific Islands Tonga Samoa Facebook Google
A.I. And the Future of Work

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

01:38 min | Last month

A.I. And the Future of Work

"Pratique joshi. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks dan to be here. Thank you for having me. Well it's great to have you here my friend. Hey before we get started. I was wondering if you could tell our audience about pluto. Shift what is it. And what is your parole in the company. I'm that the joshi on the ceo. Ludo shift and We are headquartered in palo alto california and pluto shift is an operational data platform. But it means is. It's a tool to monitor physical infrastructure. And it's built for companies that make the guts like food and beverage and chemicals manufacturing so on and so forth so we held them. Keep an eye on it by using the data that already collecting so a lot of what you do revolves around artificial intelligence. Is that correct. That is correct. yes. I'm wondering if you could share with us for those that don't know what artificial intelligence or a is how you would define that and beyond that. How do you contrast it with machine. Learning to me is the ability of a machine to perform tasks that require human intelligence is a state of existence and the system and make decisions on itself now. How those decisions are made that many different frame with to do that. But at the core of its an ability that we can instill into a machine by providing a framework on how a decision gets made.

Pratique Joshi Joshi Palo Alto DAN California
Google's Kent Walker on Ethical AI

Eye On A.I.

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Google's Kent Walker on Ethical AI

"Kill walker. I oversee a global affairs group and cool that includes policy legal. Our trust and safety work are philanthropy and are responsible innovation teams. I've been working in the technology sector for quite some time actually grew up palo alto at a time when silicon valley was just coming into being as a as a phrase and it's been fascinating to see the growth and development of technology and how intersecting all across our societies ever since and part of your work then at google is overseeing the ai principles document. I presume and then the implementation of those principles within google. That's right we've been working on the yeah principles for some time. It may actually be helpful to go a little bit of a a history starting in maybe twenty sixteen. It was clear that hey i was going to be bigger. And bigger part of our product portfolio. Google translate just to take one example went from having a translation of say a six year old which was helpful in that grade to having the translation ability of a teenager. Not perfect but pretty. Good through the application of ai. Over the course of a summer and that kind of remarkable improvement in performance really started down the path of saying not only yet what are other applications. We could be exploring but at the same time. What are the implications of doing that. How do we make sure we drive the technology for it but we drive the thinking around ethics and how and when these new tools should be used so that was a big part of our effort. I think starting in two thousand sixteen twenty seventeen. We were plenty other people. From across the company anti-people historians ethicists etcetera to start to creamer framework. As to how we think about this

Google Palo Alto Silicon Valley Walker
Zero Trust: Fast Forward from 2010 to 2021

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

02:15 min | 2 months ago

Zero Trust: Fast Forward from 2010 to 2021

"Our guest today and greece pay attention. This is important is junkin the rug at onto it formerly at forrester fame and palo alto networks who was the first to define the concept of zero trust in two thousand ten. Think about it. Two thousand ten eleven years ago paper so we have a few questions mostly focuses their trust. And of course it's past and the future so let's start from a somewhat painful but necessary question. Let's defines zero. Trust perhaps contrast how you define it then and how you think about it today. So zero hasn't changed right. It was still a fight against the old trust model. Where we had trusted parts of the network and untrusted parts of the network as we would see implemented in say an old cisco pix and so you had to define policy based upon a trust level so the internal interface of a picks was trust level. One hundred the highest level and the external interface was trust level zero the lowest trust levels. So you could go from a high too low trust level without any policy and i thought having that variable is painful and it means that. There's no album rules and it's highly insecure and we allow people to have access because of this trust model and so trust is just a human emotion that we've injected into digital systems for no reason at all and people confuse all the time human trust digital trust. I mean going back to nineteen eighty-four can thompson who we all know is the co creator of unix in his turing award speech. That year talked about the problem trusting. Trust so trust is something that shouldn't be in digital systems and that was the main thesis of the report and then it led to. How do you build systems like that. But mostly it was about thinking that this concept of trust actually incentivized bad behavior because all data breaches and almost all negative security events. That have ever happened. The root cause is the trust model. You'd think it was a spam email but it exploited the trust me think it was ransomware it exploited the trust model snowden and manning were insider attacks who exploited the trust model. So that was my fight. And then it's led to a lot more stuff.

Junkin Forrester Fame Palo Alto Networks Greece Cisco Thompson Snowden Manning
"palo alto" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

02:05 min | 2 months ago

"palo alto" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

"We're going to be getting into the palo alto networks ransomware threat report. Twenty twenty one and you'll devos president regional chief security opposite the i pay giants head that role. Sometimes i have. I was thinking alia So yeah thanks for joining again having this talk history. Some of the k. Phonics was when i was running up the nights it's Pretty impressive Intensive some of the payments. I will deal with what the bank paying and what they're making. I think we're in the wrong business but Maybe they will talk about how companies should be dealing with this because it sounds like companies have been dipping their hands in their pockets tying ransomware. Yeah in ranson. Look think i think from the beginning of this survey you'd really hang around if there is no money to be might actually bandies. Brass was actually quite lucrative has been quite literally footing for a number of us and people have been pike. I think that's the the last year specifically ran sort of cut not injuring himself. What we saw was the average mass pike by organization has dramatically increase. Two thousand nine saint louis sitting somewhere in the order of about fifty thousand. Us dollars was typically so the ransom in twenty twenty s nelson going out to three hundred thousand dollars Hundred and seventy one percent year on year growth just simply from the ransomware itself the rest payments obviously with within organizations insensitive. The rats in this thing paid for generations vessels the double from five minutes. And you're making some instances where the mice rats were example. We looked amazing. Twenty twenty actually averaging somewhere around the four point eight million dollars just to the rest where threat. The questionable of the survey making people the hesitant. Pike i don't see why for a second. The people are not paying. Because there's no reason why the ransomware would be going over and things would be going out out. Why was seeing normal ransom with resurrection. So puppy up.

yesterday sean sean palo alto networks sanni japan Two Twenty twenty one twenty twenty one
Palo Alto Networks' 2021 Ransomware Threat Report Indicates a Ransomware Demands Surge

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Palo Alto Networks' 2021 Ransomware Threat Report Indicates a Ransomware Demands Surge

"We're going to be getting into the palo alto networks ransomware threat report. Twenty twenty one and you'll devos president regional chief security opposite the i pay giants head that role. Sometimes i have. I was thinking alia So yeah thanks for joining again having this talk history. Some of the k. Phonics was when i was running up the nights it's Pretty impressive Intensive some of the payments. I will deal with what the bank paying and what they're making. I think we're in the wrong business but Maybe they will talk about how companies should be dealing with this because it sounds like companies have been dipping their hands in their pockets tying ransomware. Yeah in ranson. Look think i think from the beginning of this survey you'd really hang around if there is no money to be might actually bandies. Brass was actually quite lucrative has been quite literally footing for a number of us and people have been pike. I think that's the the last year specifically ran sort of cut not injuring himself. What we saw was the average mass pike by organization has dramatically increase. Two thousand nine saint louis sitting somewhere in the order of about fifty thousand. Us dollars was typically so the ransom in twenty twenty s nelson going out to three hundred thousand dollars Hundred and seventy one percent year on year growth just simply from the ransomware itself the rest payments obviously with within organizations insensitive. The rats in this thing paid for generations vessels the double from five minutes. And you're making some instances where the mice rats were example. We looked amazing. Twenty twenty actually averaging somewhere around the four point eight million dollars just to the rest where threat. The questionable of the survey making people the hesitant. Pike i don't see why for a second. The people are not paying. Because there's no reason why the ransomware would be going over and things would be going out out. Why was seeing normal ransom with resurrection. So puppy up.

Palo Alto Networks Devos Ranson Giants Saint Louis Nelson United States Pike
Exchange email hack: Hundreds of UK firms compromised

Cyber Security Today

01:21 min | 3 months ago

Exchange email hack: Hundreds of UK firms compromised

"It administrators continue patching there microsoft exchange servers. It's over a week since urgent. Updates were issued to cover four series vulnerabilities called proxy logon. However there's evidence exchange server administrators. Aren't working quickly on tuesday a week. After the first alert palo alto networks said web scans suggest one hundred and twenty five thousand internet connected exchange servers around the world. Were still vulnerable including four thousand five hundred in canada and thirty three thousand in the us. One incident response firm here told me on wednesday that it knows of four canadian organizations had had been hacked shortly before microsoft issued its patches among the victim. Organizations is norway's parliamentary email system security researchers from e set think as many as tan threat groups are taking advantage of vulnerable exchange servers tehran. I will talk about this crisis in a few minutes. Verkada is a cloud based provider of video security for organizations that says it's systems are secure by default.

Palo Alto Networks Microsoft Canada Norway Verkada United States Tehran
Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:02 min | 4 months ago

Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

"We talked last week about how the stories of lack inventors were literally left out of the history books. Documenting the early internet now. A story about preserving that history in late twenty nineteen archivists from stanford university met in fremont california with over a dozen black engineers and entrepreneurs who had been working in the tech industry for decades. One of them was. Danny allan also been first engineering. Professors say some people in this class. That don't belong five of us thirty so actually wound up hating engineering. While to become an engineer. Alan worked as an engineer for bank of america and the electric power research institute in palo alto. He's now the vice president of global diversity and inclusion at sap labs stanford was interviewing allan and others for a new archive dedicated to the history of black people. Working in silicon valley henry low would helped build stanford silicon valley archive as a curator at the university. And he had realize that the stories of allen and others at that meeting were missing from the university's records to realize that there are substantial communities successful people who've not been fully represented. The archive is a. You know a bit of a shock. It's kind of sad disappointing. That that were at this position. But you very grateful to be be in a situation where i can try to respond to it though it had been inspired by kathy cotton. A longtime silicon valley recruiter turned archivist. She saw that. No one was telling the stories of the many black engineers and software developers. She knew were important to. The tech. industry's success. So

Danny Allan Sap Labs Stanford Silicon Valley Henry Stanford Silicon Valley Archiv Stanford University Fremont Electric Power Research Instit Bank Of America Palo Alto California Alan Allan Allen Kathy Cotton Silicon Valley
Algorithms for vaccine distribution have a weakness: the people behind them

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:38 min | 5 months ago

Algorithms for vaccine distribution have a weakness: the people behind them

"To deal with the massive logistical problem of distributing covid nineteen vaccines the federal government and some states are turning to private companies to create algorithms for prioritizing shipments. Some hospital systems like george washington in dc and stanford in palo alto also created their own software systems to prioritize which healthcare workers. Get vaccines i. In stanford's case we now know that process went wrong prioritizing doctors and administrators mostly working remotely residents working directly with patients every day. And we wondered is vaccine problem algorithms are meant to solve or are officials leading algorithms. Take the blame for built. In inequality karen how has reported on this for the mit technology. Review i would say that the stanford them not in fact that complex and there's actually been an argument within the hour them's research community about whether or not if we could even call it an algorithm because essentially it was just a set of rules that were codified into numbers and for many of the hospitals that i got in touch with after this story broke at stanford they used just a more simple rule set they usually just consider one factor which is the actual department of the staff what stanford was trying to do. Not just factor in one thing. They were trying to factor in. I guess. Three things age department and prevalence of exposure but the issue is. They didn't do it in a way that was craft. And so they're really kind of two lessons that we can learn from the stanford case the first is that the way that the distribution allocation was decided There were no residents at the decision making table. And then the second thing we can learn is once. The algorithm was rolled out. There was no mechanism for people to provide feedback so on top of lake. Having this thing that was somewhat flawed audit. They didn't really test it. They disorder like here. You go now shots. Exactly the issue is that they didn't have people who are impacted by this algorithm at the decision making table and they didn't have ways to then quickly itera an update the over them once they realized it was flawed is vaccine allocation of problem that algorithms are meant to solve or will it becomes something that you know leaders might get to hide behind when inequities inevitably happen. A lot of times. People believe that when an algorithm is involved it somehow is this other entity that is completely detached from human decision. Making and the algorithm is suddenly unbiased even though it was programmed by people and what i sort of try to hammer home to people when i talk about this is algorithm. The decision making is human decision making and so some of the language that stanford's leadership started using after this happened was the algorithm was really complicated. It was the algorithms fall is a misnomer. it's just. It doesn't really acknowledge the fact that they were the ones literally. Codifying these priorities into code. Karen how is a reporter for the mit technology review and now for some related links. Venturebeat has a nice piece about the federal vaccine distribution process. And how it's been contracted out to one of the trump administration's favorite private companies. The data mining company here which has other federal contracts under its belt of course pollen tear and the us department of health and human services have created a software platform that prioritizes shipments of the vaccines various states and then tracks the rollout and the vaccination process. Now look this is like obviously how you would do something this big in the computer age but since it's ultimately taxpayer money funding this process. It seems like it should be easy enough to tell us all what exact data goes into making these decisions. You know these big public health decision. It's but we don't know it sounds pretty cool on defense. Dot gov how they describe this tiberius platform using a big database of non personally identifiable information tiberius. Run some numbers every week. Determine which states should get vaccines ship it out. Lickety-split defense dot com even notes that quote tiberius can provide zip code by zip code view of priority populations including frontline workers nursing home residents which is always how computers are supposed to work like magic with pristine data. That's regularly updated in fully comprehensive except that not every zip code gets counted or track very well especially in four or black and brown neighborhoods or on reservations or places where lots of frontline workers might live and where covid nineteen is killing. More people also possibly health departments all over. The country are totally underfunded and reporting data with fax machines. If at all and again we actually don't know much about what. Data is being used to make these determinations at the federal level. But what we do know is it's not going great and lots of states are saying they're getting less vaccine and they expected to get an inequality is already showing up and people are frustrated and skeptical and it just seems like the best thing everyone can do is again be as transparent as possible about how it all works and i'm trying to start off. Twenty twenty one hopeful. So hey maybe if we keep talking about it. It'll happen

Stanford Itera Palo Alto George Washington Federal Government Us Department Of Health And Hu DC Karen Venturebeat
Mastering the Go-Around with Rob Mark

Aviation News Talk podcast

07:46 min | 6 months ago

Mastering the Go-Around with Rob Mark

"Tell people just kind of from the high level view what is go around and one. The some of the reasons that pilots might have to go arounds. Go around is a situation in which sure the aircraft is on final somewhere planning to land. You may be stabilized. You may not be when we talk about stabilized. We mean someone. That's not a thousand feet in the air half mile off the end of the runway diving to make the numbers. That's not stabilized. But that somehow the pilot realizes that this landing is not gonna turn out the way i wanted it to. I may the way it's going. I may land way further down the runway that i planned and you got to go back and do this again. And you push the power in a adjust the flaps to with a climb flaps. And you go around and you do it again. But that transition from getting the airplane setup for landing often you have full flaps landing flaps in to getting it to pitch up and climb and add the power and not bring the nose up so steeply that the plane stalls. That's quite an awful lot of work. As is the part up here with us. Transitioning your mind from. I'm gonna land to god. I'm not going to land. I've got to go around so again. Usually pilots see it early on but sometimes they don't and you know go around really needs to happen early enough so that there's not chaos in the cockpit and go around of course don't have to be initiated by the pilot. Atc might tell you to go around and for example. Sometimes when i'm landing at my home airport here in palo alto with people that i'm working with. Clients who are in the left seat will be spaced out nicely and then suddenly. Atc will put an aircraft on the runway at almost always. I clients at that point. Be prepared we might have to do a go around because often the spacing is so tight that that aircraft may not get off in time. So i think a lot of go round situations can be anticipated and certainly as you talked about stable approaches. That's really the core to a good landing. We had a see. If i'm meeting it at my flying club where they had analysed all the past incidents and they said that fully eighty percent of all those incidents could have been avoided by timely. Go around well. I think you just mentioned another really interesting point about you. Telling the person in the other seat heard that. Atc call you know that means we might be ready for go around here what you want what we as instructors want is we want the the student or the person the left seat to say You know what that sounds like. We better be prepared for a go route. You don't want them to depend on you to tell them that we want to see them. Recognize it and be prepared with a possible action somewhere along the line. We'll we'll talk a minute about some of the mechanics of doing go arounds. But i i that we might talk about stabilized approaches. And i've got something here which i've just brought up. Let's talk through this. These are the criteria that cirrus has in their flight operations manual for what constitutes a stabilized approach. And i think a lot of pilots have some vague general idea of what stabilized approaches. But they're actually a lot of different criteria to it so let. Let's talk through some of these. I think it's it's very interesting that we look and you see Six criteria for this stabilized approach and the one being airspeed. I flew with a student last year. Who was absolutely certain before he would start it. He knew how to fly because even playing with the flight sim for years. And we got on the down wind. And i said okay. Don't you start the turn to base now when you think it is it is necessary and we got opposite the numbers and he just crank this airplane around into about up forty degree bank and kind of the knows that what okay. This is going to be interesting. When of course we ended up really high and really fast and i had to tell him to go around and later on. We'll be debriefed. I said what was that about. He said. I don't know that always worked in flights him. I could always make it work and flights out and is too young but let's get in the right mindset. This is not flight sim. And and of course the reason the proper airspeed is so important is because you're landing criteria. Well i'll have this thing down and stopped in about twelve hundred feet. Or whatever is based on crossing the end of the runway at the proper airspeed. If you're ten knots high depending on the airplane you can extend that landing distance quite a bit in pilots might say sorry. Our port has a five thousand foot runway but you may not always operate from five thousand foot runway. And what happens when you're not on a five thousand foot runway on a day when it's starting to drizzle and the runways a little wet and you touchdown long past way past where you think you should and you try to get on the brakes to stop and the airplane might give you a little surprise on the ground so proper speed is absolutely a good place to begin and i usually tell fox. Try and keep it within a few knots. I mean i'd like to see them at the target reference speed. You know plus or minus a couple of knots and that's really important because our airfield is very short. And if you're in nuts fast you better be going around especially if your landing in the high-performance aircraft like the cirrus. Let's see a couple others here so correct flightpath. So essentially we've got gotta be a lined up on the center of the the runway and we've got to be essentially on the glide slope or the glide path so if it's an instrument approach where on the glide slope if were flying visually then were on the vase e or the pappy or whatever visual guidance we have but what. Tell us about some of the others here. Well i think being on the glide path is is a good one because so many airports the as have an old vase ozzy or a pappy or light or something which is a series of red and white lights to give you a visual. Clo- that you're on target to touchdown in the touchdown zone and if if you find that you're turning final close in and you're seeing nothing but white lights you're in trouble and then because your way high and if you happen to also be fast trust me you are not going to get down in the touchdown zone and as we talked about earlier you may land way past the touchdown point. You think so. The goal of all this is to get you to look and see a consistent place we want to see. The pilot have a consistent view of the runway so that every landing looks pretty much the same when they have the same airspeed and the same flap setting. And we know that they're confident that they're gonna touchdown in the first. Say the first third of the runway. Because if they're not and they're looking at that going anytime something in your brain says. I think this is gonna work. We'll probably be okay when your brain starts spitting out words like that even if it's not verbally it's time to go around and do it again. You don't get points off for reform messing it up the first couple of times. The real secret is to realize it's not right and we'll go back and fix it.

Palo Alto Cirrus FOX
"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

06:50 min | 7 months ago

"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Month for most tech stocks. But you know it keeps roaring palo alto networks w that's a cybersecurity kingpin with a stock. That's roughly twenty six percent just for november putting nearly twenty dollar game today. Wake up a fantastic quarter last week. We learned powell. Those acquiring a company called expanse giving them exposure to attack surface management. More locked it up more importantly though this morning a copy shot the lights out big top and bottom. I beat with maj raising their full year forecasts substantially. It was a terrific quarter but also the stock simply wasn't as over as many tech names. This one sometimes in raleigh gets lost. Among the sexier cloud plays. I fell. Prey that myself. Now though it's sitting new all time high and if we need to know how much worse can run. We're going to go to the man. Let's check into cash aurora. He's the chairman seal. How never saw moore reporter in the country's politics mr roy. Congratulations and welcome back to make money. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me again. We discovered that you don't want chest cloud as a matter of fact if you don't have both it seems like that you're going to be left out. Given the fact that there is so much fire will business and so much opposition. Need actually the powell to model gibb between fears telling you that. The market is going to do fundamental transformation. They're going from data centers to the cloud and do they're going from sensors as we identified this two years ago. I told you it's a way to get excited about cybersecurity. Donald platform that integrates. Billy dink people. Current doctor take them to the cloud in a safe capable fashion. Save time focused on the future. Which is collection of data analysis data and security so just delighted and excited that is beginning to come to or being see green shoots ability to convince the market that we're on the right. Now you spend two point seven billion. That's to get fifteen percent of your billings. Why see you have one hundred billion ten that you think in cloud an ai so that we need more acquisitions because it would seem worthwhile. They're all working. We'll look to more important things to worry about. Ten years ago. When i was google was convincing the world that the future as the internet and mobility is going to be where it's all going to be at and today i find myself in a similar position trying to convince people that cloud is where everything's going to be ad and i around giving practice security so i think anything that can further cloud security capability deliver security is important. The acquisition conversation is look at the market. I'm getting twenty basis points. Four dollars cash as a shareholder should one you take the money and genetic higher wife. As long as i can make sure there's product parkinson. As long as i can make sure that it integrates portfolio as long as i can make sure that can leverage with that are so so car remaining nine and acquisitions and working so far touch wood. We have to just integrating. We hope they're gonna work as well. As the other eight award sleep as my shit over to entrust me with the capital to make sure that i can create long term value and sustainable growth business and as long as i can opportunistic defined opportunities which allow us to bring that to life and allows us to generate higher customers. I think it's just continued to approach. Okay so how is it that there can be a company like expanse which shows you the same thing the bad guy see. How was that available. I mean to me that it's like i gotta have that. How did you get that. Why jim watson born as you've got to go see what the puck is going not where the butlers and the buck is going. Where fibers scan the internet on a regular basis the dave fires you can aggregate that data and storage cheaply to be able to look at it. Fires going to attribute that data to individual customers ever out there today. Technology is made it possible now these guys and then a phenomenal job at work with various laws govern on the world's largest companies actually have visibility from the outside most security inside chuck. Right chuck the window. Let anything bad happen to these guys. So great let's a look from the outside and off you've done everything done. What do i get to see the bad guys receipt. That's what the hackers who seek spend five years building capability training that gabler from the outside nine hundred companies made up of technical people who try to make sure this data's understood we can take that it can incorporate that into street we can deploy against our thousand. Two thousand accounts are fortune. One hundred and shoreline the benefits right off the gate. So we're launching use a conference tomorrow morning we're gonna make all of our cio. Who sign up. We give them the ability to get a free report actually see from the outside. What the bad guys are. it's incredible. That's incredible used to have these red team blue team. That's not good enough. That's those are people who are too good guys trying to hack. You need the bad guy mentality this cancer to them. Yes very excited about the acquisition. Really excited about the possibility of incorporating that identified and we're going to combine the do we have remaining inside out capability they bring outside her body in the future. You'll find out that people will need. both perspectives. Actually have a comprehensive secure solution for them. And that's what responding to be. There was an amazing moment. Where you basically said look people are getting a billion threat a week. They're getting and they're exhausted. They're not even bothering to catch him anymore. And then you bring yours and you reduce playing ninety nine percent i mean how can someone be a situation where they're just saying. Hey look i've got. So many i give bob and then have a bring paolo alto and suddenly. They're gone legitimate. As you might remember the very first acquisitions. I made was an automation company. Because i don't believe you can find these security battle with nice and swore you've gotta bring computing to the fight the only way bring computing. The fight is normalized. Data is automation because the bad guys can now they can rent the same cloud providers that we ran and they can fire off hundreds of thousands of emails that are tax at missouri. You you'll even your only way you're gonna find out signal to noise if you're gonna be able to block those attacks using using automation and so is the team of automating. The t mobile. I think that's a critical component. That's why we were able to take a customer. Two billion tracks. Take them down my nine nine percent so now out of all the fog and all the noise it can actually focus on the signal. Wow well congratulations. The acquisitions have made it so that your copies thrown off cash and growing faster than almost everybody else the cash aurora chairman. Ceo a palo alto networks job and always great..

powell chairman palo alto maj raleigh google Billy dink missouri Donald moore jim watson Ceo gabler mr roy cio paolo alto reporter gibb bob
Is Suicide Contagious?

Last Day

06:27 min | 8 months ago

Is Suicide Contagious?

"A beloved celebrity dies unexpectedly before their time. And the headline start to quickly pile up and take over social media. But there's no real story yet. No details no explanation just click -able headline with a bunch of photos. Celebrity. Dead at forty, eight, thirty to twenty, four whatever and in the absence of any real information, a question inevitably arises. Was it an overdose or suicide? Unfortunately, I am acutely aware of what it's like when the answer is overdose. Please refer to season one for that story. But when the answer is suicide, how the story is told matters. For so long there has been cautioned around public discussion of suicide. Asking the news media think a little harder by reporting it, they could be perpetuating the story. We touched on this episode one but if media gets the message wrong and that wrong message reaches a struggling person at the wrong time, the consequences can be devastating even fatal. For example. In Two thousand fourteen after beloved comedian actor Robin Williams died by apparent suicide. And that shocking news flooded the headlines. Suicide rates went up by ten percent. This detail got repeated after another prominent suicide death we'll designer kate spade was found dead in her apartment today her death and apparent suicide. We saw after Robin Williams suicide rates went up ten percent. We Know Kate spade reportedly was infatuated with his suicide. which became part of another subsequent suicide. Relearn today we lost a friend and colleague Anthony Bourdain. Anthony is the second public figure to die this way this week. Was the first some experts point to a phenomenon? They call suicide contagion, which often happens moments such as this. And it turns out there is a long historical precedent for this. There's this phenomenon called the weather effect. Stick with me. This won't take long. It is a fancy literary version of the outdated term copycat suicide. And it comes from this seventeen seventy four to novel called the sorrows of Young werther the book spoiler alert and with the sympathetic hero or they're dressed in a blue code and yellow trousers shooting himself after being rejected by someone he loved. In the years that followed so many young men were found dead having shot themselves while dressed as werther that people freaked out and banned the book in several countries. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two, when Marilyn Monroe died. The following months were filled with extensive coverage about her apparent suicide. which led to widespread sorrow and an apparent twelve percent uptick in suicides. These are obviously massive national reactions to the loss of our beloved heroes and icons. But you see the same thing happening in communities or someone dies by suicide. All of sudden, you have to worry about the other people in town. Or the kids in the schools. And it brings us to this very complicated question is suicide contagious. This question of course has been plaguing us this whole project not just because we're talking about suicide. But also if I didn't know, we are doing it in the midst of a global pandemic where community spread is all we're talking about. So is it as simple as that? Is suicide something you can catch and if so. How do we protect ourselves. Like. What's the equivalent of a mask for suicide? I'm Stephanie Woodall's Wax and this is last day. We knew early on that, we wanted to talk about contagion but truth be told we didn't totally get what it meant for suicidal thoughts to transfer. Is it like. Flipping a switch not suicidal one moment suicidal the next. And that's how we were thinking about it. Until we heard this. Every morning I wake up and I make agenda for the day. I love plans I love knowing my options. In sixth grade when the first suicide cluster happened in my community when we lost more than three people in one year. It was the first time that suicide became on my list of options when I was going through a problem. I feeling, Sad, one day I think through what the options were. NAPPING, think about hanging my friends I thought about taking my own life I thought about going out. On my list of what I could potentially do to help. Figure it out in solve it. This is Lisa. How speaking at a jet event a few years ago. And when we watch this video something clicked. We knew we had to talk to her. Can you tell me a little bit about yourself like who are you? WHO IS LISA? Yeah. So that's such a hard question sometimes answer. It makes sense that this is a tricky question for Lisa because a lot has changed in a short period of time. Today Lisa is twenty two and she just graduated from college. She's about to start a theory impressive job as an engineer at a little known company called Apple. But. In sixth grade, she was in a very different place at the center of what is probably the most commonly referenced example of suicide. Contagion. Lisa was a student at gun, high school. In Palo Alto California a school that comes up again and again when you start to dig into the concept of suicide. Contagion

Lisa Anthony Bourdain Kate Spade Stephanie Woodall Robin Williams Marilyn Monroe Werther Palo Alto California Engineer Apple Anthony
Crazy things people connect to company Wi-Fi networks

Talking Tech

03:41 min | 9 months ago

Crazy things people connect to company Wi-Fi networks

"Talking Tech is brought to you by Amazon Alexa turn your home into a smart home in just minutes with an Amazon Smart Lighting Bundle and right now they've got a special offer just for our listeners find out more after the show. So at the office, we connect our laptops and smartphones the company Wi fi network, and that's about it right? Well, not exactly Ryan. Olson. A top security researcher at Palo Alto networks found some pretty strange things in there as well. Ryan you tell everybody what you found. Yeah. Thanks Jeff Percents last week released a report based off of the survey where we reached out to over. A thousand people who are it decision makers all around the world. We were really interested in getting understanding of sort of how they view this Internet of things all these things that are being connected our network, the potential security ramifications of those things that you connected and we did find one of the questions we asked was what strange things are you finding? They're being connected to your. Networks and a couple of them were pretty strange. One was a smart trash can That's a really weird one that we learned about and another one was a smart hand wash to censor, which is also an interesting item to be connected to your network and sort of make sense in the world of Covid nineteen where you want to keep track of people often they're. Washing their hands and you're gathering all that data. But those are just examples of the billions of devices that are being connected, the Internet, which of having advantages for companies and for individuals but also eventually opened up new exposures for their data. Will you also found Tesla's and teddy bears and things like that. Now, what advantage to accompany is it to have a tesla on their network? For a company in particular that Tesla was probably connected by one of their employees they probably drove up, they wanted to connect their car so that somebody could get updates or something else for the car and they just connected to the company's wireless network without really thinking about what the impact of that would be, and that's true for lots and lots of IOT devices. It's very unlikely that a company is going to ask for that Internet connected. Teddy bear to be connected on someone brings it to work. They say, Hey, I wanNA use this here. I want to connect and they don't necessarily get permission or check with it or definitely check what security say is a good idea for me to add this device to our company's network will what's your feeling? Ryan is a good idea to connect tests, teddy bears or should companies be pretty strict and have just a computer and smartphone only policy? I think the the best way forward is to do this with your eyes open I check right before I jumped on the call I got forty seven devices connected to my home network and I'll tell you some of those computers, some of those phones but there's lots of IOT devices my house as well but I know what they are I know why they're here I know what purpose they serve. If you're a company whose allowing people to bring things into their office attached into the network, you should know what they are and why they're there because one of the things we're really refined commonly is. Not Devices. Simply are not well secured. They don't have patches being applied to them to close off security vulnerabilities. They have insecure configurations with these easy to guess passwords on them, and that means that they act sort of like a window into the company's data and window that someone might be able to peer through. But someone might also be able to smash it walk in and start excellent training lots of eight out of the network, and that's really where the danger comes in. You GotTa know what those windows are in know how you're keeping them secure. Ryan thanks so much. So I think the moral of the story is Hey, folks if you're bringing stuff to work in your plugging into the company Wifi Network, you might WanNa. Ask I write. Absolutely

Ryan Tesla Amazon Olson Jeff Percents Palo Alto Researcher Wanna Covid
"palo alto" Discussed on Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"palo alto" Discussed on Travel WITH Stephanie Abrams!

"Like scrambled eggs and Bacon. Absolutely that's right. Tell us. I and my hero for you you are my hero see I make sure this crazy wherever I go and I have I haven't mentioned it in a long time. So I'm glad we're bringing it up now but I have tried to instruct my audiences on radio on television online at public appearances in my writing. A menu is a suggestion if you if you look on the menu and you've just come off I, give you example we had just come off a week on a very fancy art ship. And had pretty much eaten ourselves under the table and the ship docked at eight o'clock at night, and we walked across the street in Puerto Rico in San Juan. We walks across the street from the port and checked into the hotel right there, and there was an Italian restaurant that was part of the hotel and the only restaurant and I could not a ten o'clock at night after eight days on this show nine days on this ship. SIT DOWN TO PASTA and veal Parmesan Spaghetti or something. So I looked at the waiter and I said. Could you go in the kitchen i. see you have Spaghetti Carbonara he said, yes. I said that means you have eggs and it means you have bacon he said, yes those are part of the ingredients I said would you go in the kitchen tell the chef there's a lunatic woman in the dining room. And all she wants scrambled eggs and Bacon. So. You blame it on me so he doesn't Yell at you. But. He said, I wouldn't know how charge you I said what's the most expensive thing on your menu? And I think he said steak pc solo or something like that. I said fine. You charge me for that but I want scrambled eggs and Bacon. And some and some Italian bread and butter and I'll be fine and I have to tell you I told this story to chef named Andrew Campbell who's now in back in in the in the UK But I met him, he was the executive chef at the West End. Zone Westerner the W I think it was the western Tokyo and when I told him the story artist God got tears in his eyes and said to me, Stephanie, that's what hospitality is. That's what it is. So you know it's wonderful that you know the that the hotel, the restaurant or the people that work in the kitchen or not imposing. What what they want you to eat on you. It's phenomenal. Barely a minute can you tell us what the other? Thing, you found in your travels that you incorporated into. Either you're Clement in Palo Alto or any of your other properties. Sure. Sure. a couple, a number of years ago my my wife and daughter were down in La for a dance performance and they were huddled at the bel-air hotel was January with the other dancers and the Belair had heated toilets and so all of the MOMS were rotating through the bathroom to sit on the heated toilet. That you're. My watching back at you believe this. So we toto heeded toilets in all of our bathrooms at the clements hotel. I. WanNa. Thank you for joining us this hour flying i..

Andrew Campbell clements hotel Puerto Rico Tokyo San Juan La UK Palo Alto Clement West End Stephanie
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | 9 months ago

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 9 months ago

Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

"Yana. Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. But when her job search a dead end, she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. She's been doing since she was fourteen. At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. Jeddah. Where are you right now? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. Treat, you like you're still in high school, right? Right and every time I go home. It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. I think she's our only period and. I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie of she loves house being cleaned. So I help out with all those things whenever I can. To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, Oregon, you grew up in eastern Washington state. Told me about where you grew up. So Eastern. Washington is very different from Seattle. I think that's why. Like columnists conception that I. Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. E mountain range. So we get like very little rain, it's very conservative. There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? Yeah. Absolutely. How old were you when you started working in the fields? I was fourteen years old. What was your first day of work like? I. Think I was super excited for my first year. We're ten years ago. And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. Tie Household I, think the causes for me was like, okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. So he went to buy school supplies in. We were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. I have three younger siblings. So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. Getting. The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. I think one story though remembering like me, my mom and my sister was. Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, yeah, you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. Or. Competitive data. Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. She was always telling me and my siblings like, Oh, you go to school a you do all in school. It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah Saigo Peron California Palo Alto Seattle Bonnie
Palantir Plans to Go Public

Squawk Pod

02:10 min | 10 months ago

Palantir Plans to Go Public

"Details on one of the most anticipated public debuts of the last few years, data analytics company. Pailin. Tear. Technologies has released its prospectus to debut on the public markets in the filing pound here reveals that plans to list on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker he l. t. are and will pursue a direct listing rather than a traditional IPO, the same unconventional route taken by slack and twenty nineteen and spotify two, thousand, eighteen the company said it lost about five hundred eighty million dollars last year despite a twenty, five percent increase in revenue from the prior year. Tear was founded in two thousand three by a group of Silicon, valley entrepreneurs, including CEO, Alex, Carp, and Peter Thiel became wealthy as a founder of pay PAL and an early investor in facebook, and just in case you didn't know I did not until today Pailin tear the company was named after a magical or in the Lord of the rings that lets you travel. Vast distances. Here's Andrew Ross Sorkin with more in the filing co Alex Carp said quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley and by the way now, it goes to take on a shot at Silicon Valley but we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technological technology sectors, values and commitments from the start. We've repeatedly turned down opportunities to sell, collect or mind data of technology companies including some of the largest in the world have built their entire businesses on doing just that. Carp recently announced plans to move its headquarters from Palo Alto to Denver in part because of. This value issues talked up how also clear on its stance on China. Says we not work with the Chinese Communist Party and had chosen not to host our platforms in. China. which may limit our growth prospects. Company proposed three classes of stock, a Class B and Class F which will be held voting trust established by its founders including Peter Thiel with just below fifty percent of the total voting power for that stock that's similar to voting structure of other tech giants, clean facebook, and Google. So if you're concerned about the power structure. That is that is something they do share in common with with the rest of the

Alex Carp Peter Thiel Silicon Valley Facebook Andrew Ross Sorkin Founder Silicon Chinese Communist Party China Palo Alto Spotify New York CEO Google L. T. China. Denver
"palo alto" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

Wall Street Breakfast

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"palo alto" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

"IPO's earnings reports, conference presentations, investors, days, FDA decisions, Barron's mansions, and other key events that could impact stocks and said you of the week ahead in the markets subscribe to this podcast and apple podcasts Google podcasts spotify stitcher. Today's Sunday August twenty third and I'm your host Yeoman cough they begin with a breakdown of the week add from seeking Alpha's news team. Economic reports to watch next week include updates on consumer confidence durable goods orders on the latest cracking key to GDP. Meanwhile the Federal Reserve's annual retreat. The Jackson hole goes online this year with the symposium entitled Navigating the Decade Ahead Implications for monetary policy set for August twenty seven to twenty eighth. International Central Bankers. Fed officials academics in a small number of private sector economists will participate in the online format. CDC officials meanwhile expect Covid nineteen cases, hospitalization and death numbers to trim better next week while the Gulf of Mexico may trend words to potential hurricanes brewing. On the Corporate Ghandour will have an IPO from Chinese EADIE maker Shopping Motors, and more earnings reports from retailers. In earnings, News Palo Alto Networks reports on August twenty fourth while best buy James Smucker Hanes Celeste deal he would packard enterprises and autodesk report on August twenty fifth. Next up we'll be raw. Bank. Of Canada Dick, sporting goods spunk and pva on August twenty. Six. At the of the week we will get results from dollar general dollar tree gap vm Ware Bill Dot. com. Dealt Technologies, Burlington stores, and Campbell. Soup. On. The earnings front strong results are expected at best buy. The resort seen as beneficiary at work from home and squad on trends but Bank of America's cautious into the brand. We are more positive on best buy's earnings..

IPO James Smucker Hanes Celeste Yeoman Federal Reserve Bank of America News Palo Alto Networks Google Barron International Central Bankers FDA Covid Alpha Mexico Dealt Technologies Corporate Ghandour CDC Shopping Motors packard enterprises autodesk Burlington
Ken Nguyen: Republic  Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

Epicenter

05:14 min | 10 months ago

Ken Nguyen: Republic Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

"We can grander founder and CEO of the public and really excited to speak with you. Today can about republic and so moved to super innovative things. You guys are doing with crowdfunding in republic note in particular. So thanks much for joining us. Brian thank you so much for having me. Wonderful being year. For some people probably haven't heard about Republic Right but republic east of connected with Angel Lists and lists of course had the big impact on crowdfunding I mean there's also growing list right that has come out that we've had on the podcast before as well. Speak a little bit about your background time angels and sort of how that evolves into starting republic. I started out my career securities attorney in New York, and then over time went into asset management in back into academia. So back in twenty, three, thirteen, I got a chance to get introduced to novel and injuries team and became their general counsel Wendy roll out his new investment product costs indication right did everyone knows about but injuries syndication is only available to millionaires or accredited investors then under president, Obama is a change. In US law and very relevant for blockchain laid on as well that did change in the law allow non accredited meaning. Anyone doesn't matter what income and net worth to invest in private securities, and that became fully legal in two thousand sixteen and that's when I left. Angeles to Launch Republic with a-list ended up invested in us. So there a significant backer among many of the VC's suggested to heritage between to companies. Role and yeah, I think many people have heard of the jobs act in in that regulation. So tells a little bit of what was that changed at happened in two thousand sixteen and you know what was the opportunity that opened up back then? If I may take a walk down memory lane or history lane and go little bit far back through the Great Depression in the United States back in the nineteen thirties easily eighty years ago after that will regulate is in DC decided, hey to avoid investigating defrauded no-one can invest in private securities in private company unless they really Ridge if they rich, we assume that this fisted and can you know tolerate the loss of capital that went on for eighty years in even though in the US people spend like eighty billion dollars a year and lottery ticket. And the same amount addict casino, and yet you have to be a millionaire to invest in start it obviously stop making sense a while back, but it took the Obama administration and a change in the law of for that to really now opened a gateway so that anyone if they go through a platform like republic can invest in early stage, Google early stay facebook or a restaurant even and will little bit behind compared to European counterparts particularly the UK and other countries in the EU that had allow up for democratized private investing years before the US. So what inspired you to start Republican? was there anything that you saw during your time angel which convinced you that there was a problem worth solving here? The problem with stuffing I think goes a little bit back before my time at is so my family immigrated to the US from Vietnam in we stuttered out in Palo Alto in the bay area. Just because you're right in the thick of innovation in at Tam Amazon and Google new startups and everyone wanted to invest but like we weren't accredited so we weren't able to invest and even neighbors who were credited meaning millionaires, doctors, lawyers this still couldn't invest either. So Cadillac the teenage me was like men I wish I get to put a little bit of money into Amazon Google early on but couldn't and I think catalyzed stay with me and I went on and became a lawyer Working Wall Street and still couldn't invest privately us so that desire. To make venture capital private investing more accessible I. think There's a little bit of a personal background behind that an angel is each is Amado that when I knew about I was like, wow, these guys are making it possible for my oldest siblings who are physicians and engineers to invest. That's really cool and so that's why I joined injuries back in two thousand thirteen does only a glimmer of the possibility. What we do at Republic is Cadillac to hope that a single mom Vietnam Ecuador when they can invest like five dollars in Assad of in Silicon Valley. blockchain and ICO

United States Google Founder And Ceo Angel Lists Cadillac Brian Amazon Barack Obama New York Obama Administration Palo Alto DC Attorney Amado Tam Amazon General Counsel Wendy Roll Vietnam EU
"palo alto" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"They all you spearfishing you leave starts to say say a lot of people use Mimi cavs, or some of these other tools versus custom. It can give you a way of prioritizing especially when budgets can be tight. Across the groups that are likely to target us so that we know target us here them primary ways they do things so those are the ones that you would prioritize detecting because they do them almost all of the time, instead of putting a ton of money and effort into the one off. You saw once that that never do again, so it's it's both field answer. Those questions would be protected, and then to be able to make those security decisions you know. Where should I focus my money in time? Where would it be best used? Who are the types of people that are looking like, is it? Is it a mix of a? A junior associate level folks all the way up to like C. level executives like who are the people that that kind of find and lovers play books that a team the playbook send to be people have threat, intelligence teams, or that have some more developed of postures. There are especially when the CIO's. Our system were technical. They tend to find them useful because it helps them form where they might have gaps or things to look at their is consumable unusable that we've been able to figure out how to make them. If we ever get suggestions for way to make the more consumable or easier to use, we'll definitely take that. Under advisement, but this is the simplest way we've been able to to organize it so far. Okay, let's get into our lightning round questions before that. If anyone wants those playbook, so we were talking about or any of the resources just go to Yuna forty two dot Palo Alto networks are That's where you can find it up shots. great resources. Let's get into our lightning round. These questions fasten easy. Just like.

Palo Alto CIO
"palo alto" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Are Say I'm super. Happy the weather this year is much better than last year. Yeah, it is a great day in Sunny San Francisco. we are somewhere above RSA. at the with Virgin Hotel. What's it called the Virgin? Virgin Hotels San Francisco which is a fun location, and and it's GonNa be fun couple of days, so we wanted to sit down with you and talk about unit forty two at Palo. Alto networks. We had John Davis on. He was incredible sharing all sorts of fun stuff. Africa's military crews had him on twice actually, and he mentioned uniform to, and we kinda wanted to to to the proverbial double. Click into this, so we're GONNA. Get into all that. And your career so I how did you get started in technology? So I had a strange path in technology I originally had a full scholarship for genetic engineering to a private college, and I got there and I realized the I really hated spending thirteen hours in the lab, doing the same thing over and over and over again, but I really enjoyed the knowledge, so I started with a foreign languages in elementary school, and I was aware that the military particularly the air force had A. A strong program of linguists, so not knowing what else I wanted to do I joined the Air Force or Mandarin Chinese and I kind of figured out you know figure out what I wanted to do later, but I was lucky enough that I was working still with the government when the government started getting more into the computer space, and as someone who's also computer. Geek I've again volunteered thinking. Hey, the sounds fun and here I am twenty years later in its a career now. So it all worked out well, linguistics is really funny feeling. We're kind of talking about this before. Because seems like everybody who goes into air force. Linguistics has some sort of interesting career path. Is it something about like? Is it all people who like puzzles? Is it lake? cryptography like what what's the kind of common thread? What makes what makes linguists? So interesting, because it seems like you all are I think a lot of it honestly is our enjoyment of puzzles whether you're learning a language that you're speaking or whether you're learning a language, the programming language, or whether you doing threat analysis. You're always putting kind of picture together. They're certain places. Certain pieces can go, and some are interchangeable, but you have to be able to take that step back. Actually figure it out and a lot of us, especially a Lotta sustain. Sustain their career field that tends to be one of our favorite things to do like as a team one of the things we do a lot offsite. Are The puzzle rooms 'cause? We're basically professional puzzle breakers, and we have a ton of fun with those EC tend to find that a lot in community. It is one of those things like as a kid. You don't necessarily think all of those things are going to add up to a career. Right where you're. Just kind of like the new games there like you know, whatever was but you so many times when we interview folks on nights, visionaries exactly what you get right like has interested in games when I was a kid got me interested in computers in an anonymous or southern. Well, there's so many career fields that exists now, and that continued to be made to be created that you. You know they didn't do the ten years ago. They didn't exp five years ago. You know they might not even have existed two or three years ago. It's there's so much variety in the space at this point, so told me a little bit about your cur role with Palo Alto networks in and specifically uniform to assure so I am the deputy with unit forty two I..

Air Force John Davis Virgin Hotel Palo Alto Sunny San Francisco. Virgin Palo Africa San Francisco
"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"The beginning. I think of a very very exciting plight. Ben For Palo Alto and Alto. Shareholders of which you are a big one because you bought on the open market substantially lower making it clear that you thought it was supply. Thank you so much sir. Thank you very much Absolutely that's the catch word chairman. Ceo OF PALO ALTO networks P. A. N. W. A. Very exciting situation might expect is time was over and then the White House are. Are you ready scheme? Data Governor Light Round with Allison Jersey. Alex Mitchell book coming out Bud. I'll hold man I got one on. Es Jebron torn home. Because MR pandemic. What's happening. I can't wait well. I wanted to get your opinion on Textron. Okay here's why you intentionally. It's always cheap. It's been cheap. Why recommended Nineteen eighty-four Goldman Sachs? So it's cheap and that's how about Joanne in California Joanne. I Jim for Dr Chill is a pleasure to speak with you. I am color. Shout out to my youngest son and his beautiful family in Chatham New Jersey. Yeah but but but rival go ahead my I'm a member of a club. Tgif twelve girls and finance and we're always looking for some small and mid cap stops to balance the big win anyway. My thought was with so many of us home. Snacking what do you think about medifast? You don't what it's interesting I've been thinking that after the pandemic people say you don't. We don't keep stay. Trim keep awake down. Whatever the next pandemic student I like your idea I would not have liked it pre pandemic though but I liked the women's women. Stock Grouping always look for your recommendations going forward but have Tom Com Alabama. Tom June put down all right Just on the actual work on a through concern civil your thank you so much. Thank you got a high quality product for the suspect last year. Pursuit at this double got money out it back down now about a fifty percent gain must stop is in pharmaceutical. Alfa Romeo Whisky. Romeo silencing I you know when you hear well mood dern is doing. There are many ways to skin the unfortunate cat and I like I like your stock but it is that gives you mentioned but remember. We don't ever leave gains on the table. We catch it. W we sell half and we played with that else's money now going to anti in. North Carolina Anti dispersive. Geog Anthony Damn Anthony. Hey my thought is Ford Motor Company. Are we gonNA see similar appreciation like we did? No answer is no it was a different Ford Dan. it was able to not take government money because it was stronger than the other guys. This Ford I just feel like this I don't know I mean it just kind of plotlines and I'm not in favor of the flat lining stocks. I like growth. I prefer this. This'll this'll crush. People member said Tesla that you could add born. Gm together and when the doubles those to you. That's where Tesla might be too expensive Now Tesla goes higher now. We're going to dual Massachusetts Abdul. What's up ten? This is goal symbol of opening like Sony's cheap and very good got good growth. I'm thinking you know whatever asked me about it. I liked it for a long time. I remember it was in the thirties. It's a good stock and that pleasure sewage. Lightning round is sponsored by D. Amirah DRI people..

Palo Alto Tesla Ford Motor Company Tom June Ceo Goldman Sachs Alfa Romeo Whisky Jim Textron chairman D. Amirah DRI Chatham New Jersey Allison Jersey Joanne Ben Alex Mitchell White House Geog Anthony Romeo North Carolina
"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Let alone great guides so can keep climbing. Let's dig deeper with the Kessler. He's the chairman. Ceo of Palo. Alto networks better meet on the quarter and his company's prospects in the strange world Mr Moore. Welcome back to money. Thank you again Jim. Okay because first of all congratulations your strategy. Which I regard as being one that you put together for two years to enable customers to consolidate this hyper security. Diplo deployments was perfect for this environment. It just was the one had to choose. How did you know that this can work? Well you know. I don't think we knew what was going to happen in the world but what became obvious when I started in this industry whereas customers had too much fragmentation things needed to come together so we started focusing and integration and early but became obvious. That people are going to go to the cloud always starting for the cloud security strategy together. We've got fifteen hundred customers. This quarter so far so it takes just fell into place. I think Kobe did what was accelerate the trends in the direction of integration consolidation and cloud. Transformation you help me understand this I had become quite an amber instill a these pure cloud players They're terrific if you're all at the Office. Maybe not so good if you're at home even working on your own device and maybe you shouldn't Powell out. This cut. Both bases covered. That was the right. Course that's what that's part of the reason could raise guys. Well Jim look. I know you're a fan of some of our peers in the industry which are pure plays and I think pure have a run. They come up with an amazing product. They run with it but the challenge. And we'll look at it from the customer's perspective. They need things to work together. Way Better over. Time because hacker friends are not sitting there waiting for us to do all the that we do they. They're they're on the money with all kinds of quantum computing and all kinds of cloud computing. They're gonNA use to hack against us so we've got matched them with consolidated into products. That's the standard you've been following. I think in this alarm it ask. People started working from home more and more the attack. Surface just exploited. Now you have to me in my house as well as in the office. It's no longer. I can go to one headquarters and be protect their so. The perimeter is gone traditional perimeter. You've got to protect people every year for that. We need a Marietta Products. That work together. So we're lucky in this wonderful place. I also underestimated CORTEX. It's really playing. You need a one-stop people don't want to have multiple vendors but they did want prevent and you're giving and prevent now. We've been very very fortunate. Our product teams have done a great job and taking products which we have great ideas on and putting them into industry leading categories where now the industry leader on endpoint protection annex. The are are the leader in cloud security always been the leader in firewalls are teams. Have done a phenomenal job and building. Automation Platform CORTEX EXOR. We have a very competitive product in the market against the golden access. We feel like our product strategy is working couple that in the last quarter unite talked. There was some concern that on execution. Our sales team really kicked the ball park. They said we're not digging lying. We'RE GONNA rise to the challenge. Our supply chain teams rose to the challenge. I couldn't be prouder of the people that power that works. In the way they've helped you navigate this crisis and the way they really strengthen the opportunity going forward. The execution here was flawless. A you also at a something. I wish a lot of Sito's would do you had a stockholder letter which talked about longer term trends. Not just about Powell longer term trends. It finishes with something quite eloquent but I need explanation to indirectly quote one of my friends and legendary business leader. The Path to stability will be like the waves caused by a tuning fork. How do I interpret that? Well you know everybody's been talking about a visha recovery a you shape recovery. W ship recovery. I think when you look at joining the first wave is a strongest and then over time it dampens so we are going to see ebbs flows as the economy recovers as things. Get Out of this stuff but I think the worst is behind us. I think that fear of everything's going to a very dark place. It's going to take us ears and a long time to get out of. It is out of the system. I think that's the first step towards the country and I think we're going to see companies are energized. It all coming out with ways to deal the normal. We announced a new policy today Gulf flexor. We're letting employees pick where they worked from is going from employer choice to employees choice. They will choose how they're comfortable weather in the social environment whether in the professional environment. And that's the new normal so I think the way we all adapt to the new normal is going to come forth the next six to nine months. I believe in the resilience of our country. I believe in the resilience of the global economy. We're GONNA come back out of this. There may be bumps on the way over definitely coming out in a reasonable time. That's the first time I've really heard like this. There are a lot of people have been telling me Jim Itching to go back and then other people say no. They all want to stay home. It's choice but because it's choice that means that companies will have to adapt to that choice. Meaning that they'll have to bring in Palo Alto. They can't just say we're on the class guys can't wait for you to get back if it's choice it's Palo Alto Well Jim you know. I've come into the office today to experience how it is and it's different. You know it used to be funny when you were working in. The office are sanctuary. Was I to get out of the office go home. I've been home for two months. I want to come to the office. So many of our employees are going to go to the same balance a wanting to come to work. Sometimes I wanted to be sometimes but we discovered to this pandemic that'd be can be productive from both places only very few people in the office based to face. Meetings are interesting are required but not necesary everywhere in every business so I think this is the new normal. We have an opportunity to adapt a new flexible environment. We've talked about. Jim's in the office started about free food in the office. Those things the things I think people want a different set of birds be just given an allowance. Everybody to God make working from home more comfortable. She's to be working for a very long time. I think that's the most important part in that environment as the world becomes more and more despite in the way we done companies. We're going to have to protect people. Whatever their and for that you cannot do that with single products that work you need to have comprehensive product strategy security and we're delighted excited that our teams have built that strategy lingle's product. I couldn't be happier about one this question because there there are systems for video. Some of them are ironclad insecure expensive and there others that you want to use sometimes secure sometimes not but you WANNA use them. Can Paolo Alto protect me with video? Yes Jim look the video. There's been a lot of controversy and discussion. I'm not sure how much it was warranted. I think most video systems have security capabilities. I think there were some missteps made by some players stay. Rectified BE USED THOSE VIDEO SYSTEM. Use all of them. They're all secure to passwords against them. So people can get into a conference ball. If you leave your door open to your house. You can't blame. The principal will block eight. So what passwords video calls. That's what you need. Make sure you're not giving anybody else. But they will stop giving. I think you're say well. We can't show congratulate you again. You made a series of acquisitions all came together at one time. This is obviously.

Jim Powell Diplo Kessler Mr Moore chairman Palo Ceo Palo Alto Kobe Marietta Products Paolo Alto ball park Sito
"palo alto" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"Josh is the board operator. But he's also a professional dog walker which is part of his interest in our program. So I'm GonNa let him ask you some questions. If you don't mind that will keep me from calling you eleanor. Which is my wife's name which I have to look at your name three times every time to not say. Eleanor de Delgado. And I I apologize because I'll probably do that so Josh go ahead. You start out and I'll join in certain things so What does your organization do to help animals in the local communities? Yes well we have a special role in the local communities since we do not run a shelter. We do a lot of other stuff We actually serve as a hotline for people calling in. They think that we have a shelter. We point them to shelters rescue groups. We give them advice when we and and one of the our most important roles in the local community on the Mid Peninsula here is our our veterinary programs We help people who are low income when their pets are ill. We help rescuers with our animal rescue fund to take them to the vet. We also have a spay neuter fund that we use to help local animals who are Bandon who needs to be stayed and neutered before they can go out to adoption and speaking of that hotline. What is the top frequently asked question that is received on that it's about cat? We were very active Years ago and we still are in the cat rescue community and it's always about people. It's nearly always about people finding kittens outside. What can they do to help? We point them to shelters and rescue groups and with that in mind since you mentioned cats how are Cats doing in the low in the local shelters within your area like is there an abundance. Or what's going on there if you know? Open shelters all they. Most of the cats are out in Foster programs there's been a large response to Call outs for fosters. And they're they're doing they're doing well in foster program and What are Stoesz more about these foster programs? Are they temporary homes for these kittens? Or what is what happens until they can be returned to shelter or rescue group. Were they are adopted out In addition to Helping cats and dogs and other animals We're running a campaign called creating compassionate communities and this is the way in which we not only Give our attention to veterinary issues but also to educational issues and Tell us more about some of these educational issues or programs that you offer within the Palo Alto humane society. Okay We started out. We're actually pretty pretty old. We started out in nineteen eight as an advocacy group Addressing issues around the welfare of animals on the community at that on the peninsula at that time The Palo Alto. Police were actually shooting. Stray dogs. Horses were going thirsty and our group address these issues. We advocated for functioning. Animal shelter was built by US and run by US until nineteen seventy and that at that point it was taken over by the city of Palo Alto so What we do now is basically focused on advocacy and our Veterinary programs that I mentioned and education Do you want to speak a little bit? More about the educational programs are advocacy absolutely and feel free to also mention in addition to these Any of the other ways in which your organization addresses community outreach. Okay sure yeah In a few years ago in the nineties we created we help create the California Coalition for homeless cats which fought against all kinds of negative legislation that supported euthanasia we propose a trap neuter return popularly known as TNN and that's now taken root in the country and has become one of the main ways and the best way to deal with homeless cat populations We also advocated for the local shelter to keep it open when the city of Palo Alto threatened to close it and twenty twelve and we've always advocated for and supported good legislation and public policy such as prop to And other actions that we've taken. We introduced with local legislator Kevin Mullin a statewide proposition linking character education with humane education for all schools in the state in the state of California and our basic thrust. Now excuse me is education. We want young people to become ambassadors of compassion. So we look for different ways in which we can engage them in our programs. And if it's okay with you I'd like to mention a couple of these programs. Go ahead okay. Sure What we're doing right now is we're sponsoring a story writing contest for seventh and eighth graders in the local counties of Santa Clara and some fail and we had our first contests last year. We Awarded a wonderful writer. Vanden a Ravi The award for her Wonderful story about donkeys. We expanded her story into a book that includes information about donkeys and history Rescue of donkeys local donkey organizations. And that's one of the several books that we have in our collection that we're selling through Palo Alto Humane Society To get information about our books please of go to our website. Www Dot Palo alto humane dot org Our contest this year has been expanded. extended to the end of April. Because of the current Kovic Nineteenth Situation We've also reached out to different groups in the community at at the school level We developed a middle school program. That were worked with animal advocacy clubs on the peninsula We have we partner with Silicon Valley Animal Control Authority in a Special Program called Kitties K I D D I e s number two kitty cats and kittens. Yeah and this started out and it still is a reading program. It's a shelter based reading program where kids of all ages come and read to the cats and when they start reading to cats and kittens the they re quietly the cats and kittens come up to them and then they begin the process of socialization with these cats and kittens. These are all adoptable cats and kittens. Some are more shy than others. And we've had some wonderful wonderful successes Cats and kittens have overcome their. You know being frightened of people they've Been adopted Some of our volunteers in this program have become fosters We give Community service time for high school students involved in the program We also visit classrooms and after school programs with a tailoring our interaction with them to their needs so if they want to learn more about dogs we have A large contingency of what we call our dog teams and they go out to the schools to scouts to after school clubs community service clubs and interact with the participants at the same time. The participants are learning about good ways to take care of dogs. We do the same with with cats We also have an online program and we'd like to encourage teachers to look at the program. It's a bilingual online program for Grades K. Through five Teachers can choose whatever they want to work with in the program if batches state standards for curriculum and the program is called Mao animals. Not Bow Mao. 'cause we wanted to get that in there too so if anyone on the program is interested in looking at the program please go to. Www DOT now. Wow M. O. W. W. O. W. One word DOT ORG and they can take a look at the program and see all the different kinds of activities we've mapped out. Videos that are included readings And classroom of and worksheets. That can be done right here at home while parents are self home schooling children at this at this point in time and One other question You mentioned about a local shelter getting threatened to be shut down in two thousand twelve and I follow city issues. Often here locally. So would you be able to tell us more about that shelter shutdown threat of two thousand twelve We were part of a coalition of groups that Spoke out to keep this shelter open and as a result of our activities and our At one point we had people out there with their dogs and horns were honking. They went by City Council. We had students come up and see Animal Control officers and just members of the Community. Saying how important it was or Paolo. Alto and the local communities surrounding to have its own shelter. That's very important low AD. That's an amazing insight on that whole story like I'm glad it ended up. Actually having a happy ending was it. Do you happen to know why the City Council thought that was a logical move. At first. They wanted to save money by By finding another group to run the shelter so yeah drip ways to cut the budget essentially with the budgetary issue. Awesome well Thank you so much leaner. Can you tell us where to find your organization's website before we go? Yeah I mentioned that It's www dot palo alto humane dot org in addition to our website. Where very active on facebook Just look us up Palo Alto humane society and you can see our postings. We post nearly every day We are also active funded program and twitter and we do other things We have instituted this year. A pause therapy pause program where we go out to high schools universities local companies and we bring dogs who are kind and gentle or playful and gentle and just to get people's mind off their stress and to relax and be better prepared for the stresses that surround them. Think well thank you so much For joining US Today Leonardo. We appreciate all the work. Your organization does as well and Just thank you for especially in times like these lake. We really need that help to protect our little furry animals and because in and men and women's best friends yes we are and we are developing material that will soon be up online videos and other materials that parents and teachers and kids can use at home just to learn more about animals and to destroy during this time. Well thank you again for joining us and We look forward to having you some time down the line in the future. Thank you very much. We'd lose was great and it talks about the important role that schools and teachers and parents play in educating children. Young people to be more humane to animals in it starts very early..

Palo Alto humane society Palo Alto Josh City Council Eleanor de Delgado US Mid Peninsula Bandon Alto twitter Santa Clara facebook DOT California Kevin Mullin Vanden Silicon Valley Animal Control
"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"And where the country's headed miss rural back to money. Thank you for having me Jim. You gotTA start with the most important. Which is that. Everyone is very worried about what's going to happen to their employees. I am very worried about what's going to happen in the future in terms of layoffs but it also in terms of health. What can you commit to do for Palo Alto Well Jaime tank you browse question at Baldo? Networks we preempted this a little bit. We one of the first companies to send people home because we figured people need to get established at home to be able to work remotely so that we can continue to serve our customers. Put the health and safety our employees. I we have been in constant communication and last night we announced the code relief. Fund and Management. Has Your back. We have committed to know Kobe. Nineteen layoffs in our company because people are very insecure. People are concerned about whether they'll have job economic thing comes back around so we made a commitment that people are going to be protected to jobs and protected they'll be no covert related. Layoffs and digitally me are bored in the company has committed to contributing four million dollars to match employs. Donations are asking voice to donate up to a million dollars or more so hoping to have five plus million dollars raised very quickly and the intent is to help employees in need first and foremost to help all your wage workers and twee support the community that we're all in so we basically chosen to balance employees people or profit in the short term timeframe because people are very concerned about what's going around and it will that include the cloud gen-x people who were required of course and if anybody. Who's welcomes his welcome to the ball. Family wants to acquire them that you take four to six weeks. They're part of the family and never make a distinction. We're used to companies being bought and then people being fire. You're not doing that Jim. I think we will come out of this. I think we'll come out of this. Strong both has an economy and as a company I think what form the coming out takes can be up for debate. Whether it's slow protracted comeback which I think is more likely than not but at that time it is going to hunker down. Put our heads down and continue to build great products be position to continue to be the largest cybersecurity companies. Orland at a time like this. You're shakes out winners losers now this cloud genetics is important. You've got some great. You've really good blonde. And you have incredible. I have seen not.

Jim Family Fund and Management Palo Alto Orland
"palo alto" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In downtown Palo alto it gets my heart and he began comparing Facebook to to Google and the next kind of big platform on the internet and I remember thing myself great and how much with possible and but at the same time feeling like because those field goals because the goal and it had been shifting so often why not you know what I mean maybe and it will but even in even at that moment throughout that period it was hard for me to understand why I just didn't feel it as much as he or as much as many of the other employees because in theory you know it was it was an immense opportunity there was there were so many people are signing up there was it was so exciting for for him at least it was it was a mission you know the idea of connecting people to one another was good in and of itself right and I could understand that and at the time on I leaned in that direction and agreed with that but I also was a bit skeptical of of the idea that connection and alone was necessarily going to transform the world I did the the the the the missionary bent to it it sounded and some a little bit too much like a lot of the very religious people that I grew up with who could we're almost blinded by by a face so much she couldn't think about some of the problematic effects of religion or anything anything else so so I stayed as I talk about in the work for for three years and then went on to something I did feel a mission and which is was to work for then senator Obama I'm saying just in those early years at Facebook for another minute I would you know part of what your work now has been about is grappling with the ethics of what you helped create right and so it made me wonder I mean you know I try to think of myself at like nineteen and twenty and twenty one and what what my ethical quandaries where it's like did you guys have moments as a crew where you would sort of pause and be like all right we ARE creek is is this thing is as big as it feels like it's going to be are we pausing to ask ethical questions along the way or was it just you know hit the next mark no yeah and that that that that was a problem yeah and well I think that they're grappling with that more I do diverge on a whole host of places where he in the Facebook leadership team have landed as I've been public about but there were there there wasn't a lot of of talk about the the ethical implications I mean it's so easy to highlight the positive stories but you naturally you know gravitate away from the negative ones I'm their customer service features they were priced some privacy issues there some safety issues in those things began to be built and built and over time so there was awareness of the fact that the the platform could be used and I negative or destructive way but no there there was a there was a face that on balance this was going to be good for the world yeah we will return to that I wanna go to your your role in the bombing campaign and you were one of the people who sort of created the whole digital strategy and you write about the book which I thought was really interesting that people largely track that up to here's this Facebook guy he knows tack he figured out how to great technological solutions campaigning when in fact what you felt like was really different about what you did had little to do with tech and much more to do with something else can talk a little bit about what you're most proud of around that work yeah the tech in the two thousand eight campaign was not anything particular error when he slick let's say I mean the it was it was helpful to have some tools that have been built the remnants out of the dean campaign in two thousand four company called blue state digital it build some built some tools that the Obama campaign with able to contract and and by Sir the tech was helpful and we were able to do things the because of the tech but the real magic of that era was the fact that we had a candidate who asked people to believe again and to combat the cynicism that was pervasive then I think it's gotten even worse now and then when he asked people to believe again there was an opportunity to then say okay I can do something and to for people to raise their hand certainly give some money of course but also to go and say actually you know organized event on Saturday and our role as online organizer's was yes to build the tool to make it easy to like set a time and recruit people to come the authors say will we can do it the event to the agenda and how we gonna make sure that that work is actually gonna help elect Obama as president so you know instead of just talking about how great he is let's talk about who our friends who we can recruit the door so we can come knock on the of phone calls that we can make in a local field office that kind of infrastructure building and because that primary was so extended between between Obama and Hillary Clinton what it meant is that as the state's came became increasingly important in each state there was a there was a an infrastructure grassroots infrastructure that had been at work largely through digital connections for months if not for years and so Obama kept winning in the states like Idaho and Oklahoma and the and unexpected places for particular for a black American like a bomb to be winning with these big margins and I think a piece of that was the fact that we have the technology to head enable people to self organize for quite some time yeah and but the much bigger force obviously was the candidate who is asking them to believe again in the first place and did you have any mentorship in organizing like how did you make that leap from Facebook to as a campaign like that we had a great set of organizer's on that campaign Buffy wicks who's now in the an elected here in the bay area it was one of the field leaders they were leaders in each of the states who were focused on and and so there was that there was a big there's a big network I'm trying to learn as quickly as I could portion we along primary certain February of seven of two thousand seven and the first first caucus I think with a full year later so that that was helpful there sometimes but the plane together at least a little bit before it started on the runway do you remember your first time seeing Brack Obama speak and like being aware of him as a candidate the first time I think I met him in the Chicago office for the first time I had seen him give speeches on television and digitally and read his books but I met him for the first time in the office but but I think that's I don't know I had gone to rally it's a little like as I'm asking like I feel like there's a little bit of a forest Gump quality to your life because it's like you like in counter mark Zuckerberg at Harvard and then you're encountering Brock about in Chicago and it's like you're really one of the like major moments of our I don't know if you want to get there but this is a big part of what I talk about the book this is also a problem for me because I had because Facebook was such a breakout success and then obviously the Obama campaign not just one but we wanted a certain kind of way where technology was critical to it I I got very convinced that I could like you know what's next I can you know I felt like I had the midas touch yeah I was totally wrong about I had I had done some smart things but I have gotten very lucky in in multiple moments in my life and so some of that does experience though problematically turned in to hubris which you know let's all kinds of failures in the in the period well let's hear that so then you get a great exactly let's go to the good learning really important part of not just your story but every you know twenty something year old story of of you know coming up against your own limitations and your own world views so you you bought the new Republic famously and and so you know this hundred year old print magazine I'm sure many of her from familiar and you had this vision of journalists bringing into the twenty first century fixing this business model of journalism which of course I know all too well so broken and it didn't work it failed and it failed at a very high monetary costs but also to some extent reputational costs for you feeling like one for the mac and for the magazine and and you said that that was a real turning point for you which you just started to to him that they can you talk a little bit about the texture of that turning point what was the learning their yeah I mean it was so as as you were saying hi I'm Buffy Republic in twenty twelve you know I'm it was in a period right around when Facebook went public I had I had money and wanted to do something that was good for the world I had always been interested in journalism and really believe in its importance and in democracy I particularly loved the long from kind of journalism I was you know I'm particularly then you know a subscriber to New York review of books The New Yorker the new Republic occasionally often on the nation like I was in and in many ways I just couldn't get enough of this of this stuff and the fact that so many of these publications are particularly new Republic was what felt to me like at that point really struggling to to make it work felt like an opportunity and that's where the the hubris came and I mean I I really did believe that with some smarts elbow grease and capital and an investment we could find silver bullet we could we could find some way not necessarily to make it you know a super profitable endeavor but but when that would be break even and I was last person in the world to learn that a lot of these publications have never been very keep and they were effectively essentially public goods and I spend multiple years trying to apply a kind of market world logic that when these things have to be a business for them to work in the long term not missing what was right there directly visible to in retrospect it felt like everybody but me which is that these things are public institutions they were public goods they were never going to make money they were probably going to lose money they happen to be incorporated as for profits a hundred years ago but they they're effectively not for profits and just naming that and taking that owns a responsibility but I I had too much too much ambition too much too much optimism so I pushed in invested quite a bit of money and and pushed particularly in the digital direction because as much as I want to hold on to print I also want to bring in new audiences and then made some pretty fundamental management errors I brought in the CEO who wanted to let go the editor it it got very messy and the other at the time and doesn't senior editors left on mass and we had a you know a moment where we had to stop printing for a couple months we re staff we we grew back but there's no question that the institution was weakened because of that experience because of mine failure but but I also think that in the long term the new Republic I sold it to you a year later it's still going it it's and it's one of a very special small set of institutions in American public discourse which I hope will you know fixed on for a long time how did you get through that like how did you after all of the successes having that failure like did you.

Facebook Google Palo alto
"palo alto" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"palo alto" Discussed on Mission Daily

"I mean phase on chief content officer here at mission dot Org and we have on the other line John what's going on. Hey in grey day to do an interview like this. I'm looking forward to it yet. Metoo so we met about two years ago a little over two years ago when I put on in investing Ethic Summit knows hosted by Palo Alto networks we have a connection because we both went to West Point and and the former. CEO of Palo Alto networks also went to West Point. So we have a little bit of of shared history and you have a a passion for for leadership tip and everything I'm curious. You Know How's the world treating you sense great. I've been with Palo Alto networks almost four years. There's after thirty five years in the military and based on what I was doing when I left the Pentagon as the senior military cyber adviser Sir my role at Palo Alto networks is actually very similar to to what I was doing in that and the Pentagon role and that's a building and maintaining ending trusted advisory relationships with leaders of of different organizations in order to achieve common interests goals when it came into cybersecurity in the entire cyber buyer in Palo Alto networks has over sixty thousand enterprise customers. Immerse maintaining trust in in this digital age. I I'm curious before we dive in. What would you say like what is the security landscape ape you know in the digital world. Look like twenty nineteen. It's a it's. It's a pretty astonishing thing if you ask me so the digital title age the some people have called this the fourth industrial revolution and I think that it's because the digital environment brings us all US promise opportunity of all shapes and sizes and this movement is direction. There's no stopping. There's no going back. It's it's on a path with with no u-turns and as we are all increasingly connecting nearly everyone and everything in the digital environment we're increasingly dependent on it for everything that we do including our personal public safety our economic competitiveness even our national and international security but as a result of this path that we're on we're also increasingly commercial and as we connect everyone in everything that risk aren't just at the scale is going to increase I I think the risks is that the the impact of of the vulnerabilities will become more dangerous. I mean just think of it. We're connecting life. life-sustaining devices public transportation systems energy electric grids were connecting all of this stuff and so when there's a security incident in the near term and into the future. I think it's no longer just about a loss of you know personal org sensitive information or or maybe not being able to get to some. It system like a banking website because it's got a distributed denial of service. I mean that's as bad as that is bad. That's just an inconvenience..

Palo Alto West Point Pentagon chief content officer John CEO US two years thirty five years four years
"palo alto" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"palo alto" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And so Susan, as you know, the leader in many cases in the room as the woman, one of the only women that started one of the highest ranking women. It's all right. Probably I three right? She focused on what she was doing and not on all the stuff that was happening around on the other side. Yeah. All right. When we get back. We're and talk more. That's just want to talk about what's happening now this week with the college admissions thing because it's it's the exact opposite of what you're talking about. And when we get back. We'll talk about that. We're here with Esther would just gaze. She's the author of a new book called how to raise successful people. She's also very well known journal. Teacher in Silicon Valley, a very prominent high school and also works a lot on education issues going forward and want to talk about that too. When we get back. We're back here with Esther would just sees the author of how to raise successful people, and she certainly has raised some successful people her children and also students at Palo Alto high school. We were talking ahead. Your book gets out later. We're talking ahead of red happening. This week is this college admission scandal where all these this is exactly the kind of thing you're talking against in the book, can you talk a little bit. But like when this popped up, what did you because this is people facilitating their children to get into things by cheating, essentially and not trusting them and not giving them independence. And you know, he handling them in ways that are disturbing to say, the least can you? I love to get your thoughts on that. This college cheating scandal is just the ultimate helicopter parenting. So the people that are participating in this. Let's just ask yourself. Why are they doing they're doing this? Because they don't trust and believe and respect their kids. They think their kids by themselves on their own will not be able to make it. And so a lot of the kids weren't even aware that their parents were doing this. But their parents were paying to make sure that they got into the college of their choice. They're being the parents choice. Right. So how does how does that child happened? You say this. It's like the there's parental anxiety. It's it starts with parental anxiety over achievement and or lack thereof. It's because parents think there's a very narrow path to success. And if they don't follow that narrow path to success the kid will fail. And so there's been a lot of there's a book written about how to raise an adult and to talks a lot about one of the problems. They see happening at Stanford, which is parents whose kids actually even get into Stanford. They moved to Palo Alto to be next to their kids to help them in their classes in college. I'm goodbye in Kayla. They need some help. And some of the Stanford professors have even complained that when a kid does poorly in the class the parent calls up. What is this all about? This is helicopter parenting to the extreme. And the number one thing kids say the number one problem is they say. I feel like I am not in control. I don't have control of my life. And that's why so many kids are depressed, right? And taking all these, you know, bad things because they are emotionally upset there is no control. They have no control. So that's a really important part is this idea of of having control over this. Do you were you surprised by these scant scandal? Actually, I wasn't surprised because I've seen so much helicopter parenting. And unfortunately, there's even been part of this scandal is at Palo Alto high scoring right. They're talking about that. Because there's been a bunch of tech people. The the focus was on a lot of these celebrities, which is interesting to the public at large. But there's been quite a few tech people in and and the pressures are enormous..

Esther Palo Alto high school Stanford Palo Alto Susan
"palo alto" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"palo alto" Discussed on Bay Curious

"You. Next up. We're going down to the peninsula where Wiley Greg has lived since the nineteen eighties. I was trained as a city planner. And I've always been puzzled since I've been living and working in Palo Alto. Why there were two downtowns? That's right Palo Alto, effectively has two downtowns. The main drag is University Avenue which connects to one one and it runs directly into the main entrance into Stanford. And then just a couple miles south is California avenue, another bustling street with shops cafes and restaurants. But why does this small city need to downtown's reporter Ryan Levy went back in time to find out the story behind Paolo Alto? Hs dueling downtown's dates back to before Powell to even existed. So the town of Mayfield was established here sometime following the gold rush. That's Laura Jones. President of the Stanford historical society. She says Mayfield was one of many small towns dotted among the farms of the nineteenth, century peninsula. And so there was a small downtown of general stores and blacksmiths and saloons and lumber yards that served the farming community that surrounded that small downtown was California avenue or Lincoln street as it was called back then and when Leland and Jane Stanford came looking in eighteen eighty six for a town to support the new university they were building nearby. They turned to Mayfield then just one condition. They went to see the leaders of the town of Mayfield and asked them if they would close the saloons because they were concerned about the students having access to liquor now this was during the heart of the temperance movement and Stanford knew that having a dry town associated with his university was a good political move. But Mayfield had thirteen saloons. It was known as a place where farmers could come and take a load off. The end of a hard week. So when the stanfords made their offer and the leaders of the town of Mayfield refused to close their saloons. Luckily, for the stanfords they had a friend who was able to just buy up seven hundred acres of land nearby and start selling lots affectively building a new town. If you bought one of the lots you were not allowed to sell liquor on it, and if you did the property reverted, and so they established a dry town, which is now what we think of as Palo Alto. The two towns coexisted for about twenty years, but as Palo Alto continued to grow and thrive Mayfield began to struggle. Finally may feel gave it up and incorporated it self into Palo Alto in nineteen twenty five. The town of Mayfield was no more now Palo Alto already had a Lincoln street. So they renamed Mayfield old downtown California avenue and nearly a century later. It's one of the last reminders of the place that refused to close its bars. When Stanford came. To town. In case you were wondering you couldn't legally buy a drink on University Avenue Palo Alto original downtown until nineteen seventy-one and even back when the stanfords were demanding dry college town, they were the owners of the world's largest winery, just north of Chico, and they had a winery on campus hypocrites. Our next question. Takes us to the palace of fine arts in San Francisco. It's like a little slice of ancient Greece plopped right in the middle of the marina district. If you haven't seen it picture, a large pink and sand colored returned to flanked by colonnades all sitting next to a dreamy reflective pool. Reporter Jessica plot. Check went to check it out with a listener who had a question about some statues that seemed to face the wrong way. Let's drop in on the conversation. Cuban reduce yourself. My name is Emily staffer. And I have lived in San Francisco for nearly twenty years and palace. The fine arts is one of my favorite places in the city. I love to come down here and knit terrific people watching 'cause like you get tons of tourists like tons of different kinds of people and the Kingston yeras the comedown, weddings. Come to do photo shoots. It just is a real like everyone in San Francisco comes through. And we are here to talk about the sad. Looking ladies that top a lot of the columns here. And it looks like there's usually four of them surrounding these big concrete boxes and all the ladies are leaning towards the boxes with their heads resting on top of the boxes. They're known as the weeping women. Another funny thing is when you're walking into them their butts are just so mad. It's true. I mean, that's the other thing I kind of thought about well, I maybe they just didn't want to take the time to detail out seventy two faces. Did you get here before me? And you started counting all of them. Yeah. I tried to count. I think they're seventy two weeping ladies. Yeah. So there's a lot of them. So my question is why do all of these women have their backs turned? What's the story that you love tilling? So the story that I've heard that I really like is the designer sort of had the Greek columns and the style dictated to him and what designer likes to have creative work dictated to them. So he turned the ladies backs to signify his own we and that's the part that really got me excited. I was like anytime, you're so bored. It has to be in French signing up, and I'm kind of cynical. So it's like the spiteful nature of it that I enjoy I'm gonna tell you what I know. So the palace of fine arts was built for the nineteen fifteen Panama Pacific, international exposition. It was like a world's fair and they built tons of stunning structures, including the tower of jewels which scintillating with thousands of cut glass. Gems and most all these structures were supposed to be temporary. But Preservationists liked this one the Palestinian arts and kept it around till it needed to be rebuilt in the nineteen sixties anyway back to the beginning. So the palace of fine arts was designed by Bernard may back the inside hall held tons of impressive art and may back wanted the structures outside to remind visitors of romantic European ruins now, that's the key word. So he wanted to evoke a melancholy and reflective feel a sculptor was hired. Because may back was not a sculptor over Eller Husson, or I hope I'm saying that right? We'll Rick aller housing. How would you say that? Yeah. We'll Rick Eller who's in Hewson something like that. Hello, the German pronunciation as Ella was when he moved to America. It was.

Mayfield Palo Alto Stanford San Francisco University Avenue Palo Alto California Jane Stanford reporter Paolo Alto Wiley Greg Eller Husson Stanford historical society Greece Rick aller Laura Jones Powell Rick Eller
"palo alto" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:34 min | 3 years ago

"palo alto" Discussed on KQED Radio

"E. d. it's morning edition on I'm Brian watt California voters consider a, measure this November that would allow local governments to adopt or expand rent control it's not clear if the city, of Palo, Alto is ready to go that. Far but the. City council passed emergency ordinance last week to create the strongest, renter protections in the city's history owners of buildings with fifty or, more units must now pay some, tenants, up to seventeen thousand dollars. If. They're addicted through no fault of their own Palo Alto mayor Liz NIST joins. Me to talk about this good morning good morning how are you all right so. What made this so urgent in Palo Alto was the dozens of families in one downtown apartment building faced. Eviction mainly because the new owners wanted to turn it back into a hotel we've seen stories like this in the bay area a lot what was different this time What was different this time is that we know a great many of the people who. Were at that location however that wasn't the only reason we pass this, the rent and the living situation in. The, bay area has become so extreme so, we looked, not only. At that particular situation but we looked at any building where they have fifty or more units and we don't know when there might be another. Building, that comes up with no cause of action but. We will. Have not only? This first. Urgency or is in place but also a long-term one in places well there's no rent control in Palo Alto not yet not yet so do I hear you saying that you're really thinking. About it because it's not been an easy thing to sell. In a lot of communities Or something similar to it we. Have about forty five percent of. Our population Palo Alto I- renters and I, know that there are some on council really feel strongly they should have more protection others are really hesitant to. Get, even close to the topic it's about half and half, on our council so this is probably the closest we have come. In a while to having any control over landlords, and that was quite a step forward for the seven who voted for, it the other night maybe assign that the tide is changing maybe there could be more tenant protections. Coming and maybe we should look at the fact that there's an election, this fall are you saying that a. Lot, of the people on the council we're, looking towards, this election. And realizing that they needed to be sensitive to rising housing costs I think that is said perfectly so when we voted on this last year And I believe the term then used was rent stabilization at that point we were a five, to four vote this time we actually. Had seven of the eight members who are, present the night for Saturday town and so I think when one is running. For office when looks at all sides of the issue and I? Think that that would indicate that maybe this more interest now in renter protection I don't believe. Long-term that's going to be interested. In rent control that's Palo Alto mayor listeners When the federal government was making. No progress on treatment for HIV AIDS people around the country protested visibly and angrily that's, a sharp contrast to what's happening with Alzheimer's a devastating disease it has no. Treatment and little public outcry it's a, contrast Sharon Begley pointed out in her reporting and writing. For stat a health and biomedical science website she joins us? From Boston good morning Sharon that morning Brian to start. Can you tell, us how widespread is Alzheimer's in America. In this. Country five point seven million people currently have it the vast majority of them are over. Age sixty five projections are that by twenty fifty they'll be fourteen million cases and it's already the. Sixth leading cause of death so in terms of suffering and mortality it is a very, serious disease with just. Untold consequences and is it a bigger problem. In America than aids now Yeah it definitely is. The amount of attention drug development etcetera for HIV aids has been a hugely impressive and that's. Why I contrasted with Alzheimer's wondered where is. The outrage and where do you think the outrage, is just to. Give you context here Brian the last drug. That was approved. For Alzheimer's was approved in two thousand and three so fifteen, years and we have had nothing. So one expert I spoke. To use, a, term that made me just, gas practically he called it therapeutic nihilism and by that he meant that? The disease, has proved so challenging to scientists. But people have almost given up but that doesn't answer the question why are people not, outraged and there you have things like the age of the patients unfortunately for. People sixty five and older there's at, least some sentiment that you know what they've had a. Good life that's the way it goes there's also a? Science Traffic I'm not sure I would say rationale but sort of an explanation and that. Is drug after drug after. Drug experimental one has failed the drug companies have spent and lost billions of, dollars trying to find something that, works for Alzheimer's patients and they're. Giving up I'm not sure? That answers the question why is there not more outrage but. At, least that's part of it I, think you report to the drug companies have basically moved on trying to stop. Alzheimer's at earlier stages what's. Wrong with doing that That is great and we all hope it works if you could. Look at that person and say wow you don't actually have a diagnosis. Yet you're on the cusp of getting. It but here's. A drug that will keep you from actually developing, Alzheimer's absolutely that would be great but you know as we said. At the top there are five and a half million people and growing who already have the disease so what we are essentially. Saying to them and we have nothing. That will help you but not, only the u because it takes so. Long to develop a drug that means that anybody who was diagnosed probably for the next ten years there'll. Be nothing for them either Reporter Sharon Begley with the health and biomedical science website stat thanks so. Much for talking to us thank you Brian you're listening. To morning edition on funding for science is provided by the SD Bechtel junior. Foundation the Templeton religion trust in the Durkin Charlene caps and l. foundation. And we're going, to get a look at traffic. Real quick with Mel Baker looking eastbound on the, Dumbarton, bridge eighty four there at mid span we have a stall that's blocking the, middle lane again in the eastbound direction danville six eighty northbound just. Before. The Oslo road an. Unknown object there, in the middle lanes on the, bay bridge no metering lights traffic moving at the speed limit I'm Mel Baker for..

Alzheimer Palo Alto Brian watt Sharon Begley Palo America Alto Mel Baker City council Liz NIST biomedical science AIDS bay bridge Bechtel junior Boston Reporter federal government Charlene caps Oslo
"palo alto" Discussed on The MacCast

The MacCast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"palo alto" Discussed on The MacCast

"Point if when or how apple would actually use the technology they're developing there was a recent rumor that apple was planning on an inhouse atonomy employee shuttle service codenamed pale for palo alto to infinite loop but we haven't seen anything come from that i would imagine that would be some sort of expansion of their atonomy systems testing so kinda using it internally as he using themselves basically as guinea pigs for these things and they would be shuttling employees back and forth with an autonomous shuttle which would he still pretty cool to see a who knows if battle actually happen listeners listeners to the back cast know that my own personal theory is that apple hopes to develop a car as a service program and that would be of course far off in the future but basically the idea being that you know we don't only to own vehicles we would be able to buy service from apple or similar companies and they would just have a car available that we could order up with our smartphone or apple watch a have available compare us up take us where we need to go drop us off and then when we need to leave later we just call up another vehicle and you just pay a monthly fee to have access to this fleet of thomas vehicle so that's my own harebrained theory i think that is where we're going in the future but who knows we'll see what apple comes up with but this week they were meeting with california dmv likely to talk about expansion plans for getting more thomas vehicles testing vehicles on the roads.

apple palo alto california
"palo alto" Discussed on MacCast - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

MacCast - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"palo alto" Discussed on MacCast - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

"Point if when or how apple would actually use the technology they're developing there was a recent rumor that apple was planning on an inhouse atonomy employee shuttle service codenamed pale for palo alto to infinite loop but we haven't seen anything come from that i would imagine that would be some sort of expansion of their atonomy systems testing so kinda using it internally as he using themselves basically as guinea pigs for these things and they would be shuttling employees back and forth with an autonomous shuttle which would he still pretty cool to see a who knows if battle actually happen listeners listeners to the back cast know that my own personal theory is that apple hopes to develop a car as a service program and that would be of course far off in the future but basically the idea being that you know we don't only to own vehicles we would be able to buy service from apple or similar companies and they would just have a car available that we could order up with our smartphone or apple watch a have available compare us up take us where we need to go drop us off and then when we need to leave later we just call up another vehicle and you just pay a monthly fee to have access to this fleet of thomas vehicle so that's my own harebrained theory i think that is where we're going in the future but who knows we'll see what apple comes up with but this week they were meeting with california dmv likely to talk about expansion plans for getting more thomas vehicles testing vehicles on the roads.

apple palo alto california