36 Burst results for "Palo"

Fresh "Palo" from KCBS Radio Morning News

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:04 min | 42 min ago

Fresh "Palo" from KCBS Radio Morning News

"One door to multiple sites. Because if your securities not the best, you're not secure. Now, more than ever, they alarm your next update is at 8 58 on the traffic leader. KCBS Insidiously World six Day forecast Aaron Peck it K p x five today is going to be the coolest, the grassed and the windiest day of this entire week. We're going to see daytime highs only making into the midnight sun. Vinnie's for inland spots and in the Bay San Jose barely makes it to 70 Today Open goes to 66 San Francisco's going 62 Santa Rosa. You goto a warm 81 I say that jokingly and he want's gonna feel nice. So tomorrow we're going to start to increase the numbers. It's a gradual warm up. We're going to go back up another 10 degrees. Ifyou're inland, which means mid to upper eighties for most inland spots, and the bay will hold steady in the low to mid seventies, and we'll see less in the way of the marine layer. However, in the bay, it probably doesn't go away entirely for much of the rest of the week. I'm meteorologist Darren Pack with your k p x five KCBS forecast traffic and weather together on the eight So on all news, one of 69 and AM 7 40 KCBS. The Great American Outdoors Act is what it's called. For Many who love the national parks, it's likely to be some help. Hundreds of millions of dollars worth of deferred maintenance may now be caught up. One hears KCBS Betsy Gebhardt Upon hearing news of the parks bill becoming law at the Sierra Club in Palo Alto Loma Prieta chapter spokesman Gladwin D'Souza was cheering I I think it's fantastic car.

Vinnie Aaron Peck Bay San Jose Betsy Gebhardt Gladwin D'souza Darren Pack Sierra Club Palo Alto San Francisco Santa Rosa
You Dont Exist. But You Actually Do

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:58 min | 2 d ago

You Dont Exist. But You Actually Do

"In this episode, we're going to take a simple useful down to earth stroll through one of the most confounding liberating concepts in Buddhism. On. The one hand. Buddhists. Tell us the self is an illusion. You don't exist. On the other hand they tell us well, actually on some level you do, of course exist. So which is it? The answer this frustrating the answer is both. But this concept which is called not self selflessness Igla snus or emptiness. This concept does not have to be some hopelessly esoteric riddle. It is actually a game changer that we can all apply in our own lives. Here to tell us how to do that. Guy, Armstrong, who has been a meditation teacher in insight tradition for decades, he's written a book called emptiness. He is the husband of Sally Armstrong who appeared on the show just a few weeks ago. I. Actually conducted the interviews back to back last fall. But. Even though this was recorded before the record events twenty, twenty, the concepts here in our I, assure you. Perennially us. So here we go with Armstrong. Well, nice to see you again, thanks for coming on Nice to see you Dan. So the latest die back into your. biography, just a little bit. What was it about back in the seventies about meditation? No. What was it about your life that the practice of meditation and the? Teachings of the Buddha, such a big deal for you that you actually. You. Had Gone to a fancy college if I recall rice in Houston and you've worked in Silicon Valley and you were teaching at a alternative school in Palo. Alto. You basically put all that to the side and became, as you said, a Dermot Bum. Why? Well, it was two things I'd had a long standing interest in Buddhism. Really from my college days, it just spoke to me philosophically in a way that no other system ever had. There was a depth of precision and accuracy the really resonated with me, and the second thing was I was not very happy in my life at that time, I came out of the sixties and my life was really unsettled and I I did a little too much of all the things that people did too much of the sixties. Victor. and. So I was still trying to put my life back together and I never felt invested in the worldly things that I was engaged in. So this Dharma practice came along and I remember sitting on my first retreat. And I reached into a level of stillness of mind that I had never felt before. and. I think what struck me at that time? Was the basic. You could call it in this. You could call it space that meditation. In my mind I felt anything is possible in this place. So looking back now on that experience, what I tapped into was the basic emptiness or you know more congenial word is openness. Of Our mind, our basic situation I saw anything was possible. And I. I must admit I was really drawn by the concept of enlightenment. But there could be transformative moments of insight that would change your life forever you know in a positive way. said two things in there. I WANNA follow up on. We say anything is possible. Do you mean you could play for the NBA? You could learn how to fly. What do you mean when you say I, don't suspect you do to what do you mean exactly when you say anything is possible in that space by meant that the mind could be. Shaped or formed in any direction one wanted I just saw this vast potential of the space in the mind that was revealed through that stillness. And I knew that any degree of suffering that had come into my life didn't need to be there.

Sally Armstrong Dermot Bum Victor. NBA DAN Silicon Valley Houston Palo
Palo Alto Unified Middle, High Schoolers to Get Later School Start Times

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:04 min | 6 d ago

Palo Alto Unified Middle, High Schoolers to Get Later School Start Times

"Schools and high schools in California on a path to later start times. You may remember that Bill passed last year before all this stuff started. KCBS Keith Man Cockney reports for one school district on the peninsula. The pandemic is pushing up the timeline for the time change when the false school term starts, middle and high school students in the Palo Alto Unified School District will be starting their school days. No. Earlier. 9 a.m. It's a school board decision that reflects widespread concern that the early start for schools is cutting into students much needed sleep time. Still in any other year, this change probably would have been a harder sell. But with virtual learning said to return. There's a little more flexibility in the schedule, says District Superintendent John Austin was so many things thrown at us that we can't control start times are completely within our control. So we thought if there's ever a time to test assumptions and give something to try, this is this is the year so with a lot of unknowns and a lot to be learned, he says administrators We'll be taking notes in the Silicon Valley Bureau Keith Man, Cockney KCBS coming up

Palo Alto Unified School Distr Keith Man Cockney John Austin Keith Man Bill Superintendent California
Food for Medicine with Afsaneh Naimollah

Outcomes Rocket

05:25 min | Last week

Food for Medicine with Afsaneh Naimollah

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket Sal Marquez is here and today I have the privilege of hosting of San ant- name Mola she's an accomplished healthcare executive and investment banker shows currently an executive in residence at plug and play the world's largest early stage, VC Fund and corporate accelerator. She's also the managing partner of Zen partners an investment banking firm based in Palo, Alto and New York covering the next generation of health TECH COMPANIES OF WE'RE GONNA be diving into innovation and healthcare. Venture. Capital and I'm so privileged to have of Santa here with us of sonnet. Thanks so much for joining pleasure so Asana. You know you do some fascinating work in in healthcare and will dive into that the venture front, but before we do, would love to hear more about what inspires your work and healthcare, you know I've been on investment banker on a strategy advisor for over thirty years on I started my career in technology, so I come to healthcare with A. Fairly deep knowledge of what I call Horizontal Technology on about twenty years ago. Honestly I fell into healthcare. Just doing couple of deals, I'm then longside got you know the dynamics of the industry? was you know no looking back and I got heavily involved. On really started focusing on on the industry, and really for three three main reasons one is. You know, it is the largest industry in our economy. It's eighteen percent of our economy. It's the only industry that directly impacts every human being in our country. I'm probably most him personally an industry that despite his side. Is Social Impact. Is! Probably still to this day way behind. For example Fintech on some other technology, so it's an industry that. Really need. In my opinion innovation and it was really true technology bad. We can bend the cost curve so I said well. I have some good tech background. I love the industry. And it was almost like a calling I said that's how I'm going to get involved with this How Technology and make sure that I focused on. Sectors of the. Industry that could bend the cost curve. I love it. I love it, you you sort of just accidentally through a couple deals guide involved. Then strategically said. This is a good fit and the impacts big. So, let's let's roll up our sleeves. Yeah. I love it, and and so and so now you know your your role as managing partner of Zen Partners and executive in residence at logging play, you're seeing a lot of main stage work happening and so companies coming up with new ideas and businesses succeeding businesses failing you know. What would you say you? Guys are up to and really I. Guess, where should we focus you know? Should we focus on fly, play or Zen partners or more? I can't. We can touch base on both really there come with interchangeable so you know as an Investment Bank banker I've done about fifteen mergers and acquisitions transactions I was raised over twelve billion dollars or capital two. I feel private placement. Offering equity offering. You know when you do so many deals on you. You know I've met fell thousands of CEO's on thousands of companies over my thirty some year career. You've developed what I call an experiential intuition You know a pattern recognition, so what the reason when I moved to Silicon Valley three years ago from New York. Play. Invited me to become an E. R. and I was like okay. I don't have a lot of early stage experience, but I know a lot about healthcare and I know a lot about. Next Generation Technologies, and the opportunity afforded me listening to pitches like twenty thirty pitchers month. Of different companies, addressing different parts of healthcare, and then you know, it's been three and a half years now and when I wouldn't yards do the plug and play. We do really two things one is we help the five different venture funds that we have pick investment. And more importantly we take some of those mid stage for me. It's most of the early to mid stage company. We take it under our wing Ers. We work with founding teams on. From product strategy go to market strategy channel strategy and help them. We articulate their value proposition because especially the first time founders. They are sitting on a great technology, but I would say a good eighty percent of them. Do Not Know How to articulate the value.

Zen Partners Managing Partner Investment Banker Executive In Residence E. R. New York Horizontal Technology Sal Marquez Santa SAN Executive Fintech Palo Silicon Valley Advisor CEO Generation Technologies
"palo" Discussed on Poisonous Minds

Poisonous Minds

03:01 min | Last month

"palo" Discussed on Poisonous Minds

"But when he couldn't Wyman suggested that they just use machete and metal baseball bats. That's fucked up. Salah agreed he would only be the driver. And ymer continued to keep in contact with sleepy John By texting since. He was still grounded all. Cuisine testified in court on September tenth two thousand eleven a day prior to the gruesome murders, he was at y Mas residents with my Mo- Salat and some friends. Sleepy John arrived in the group met up in wine must driveway. Qassim sad that John? Junior was frustrated and. Talking very fast. Pacey. Almost like he was in a panic. He was telling the group that he wanted his parents dead that day. And then left Cassim and slot left for a while, but when they returned. Why confronted them? Sleep John wanted the murder done that day. Casino slot left again, but returned later on that evening after receiving a text from Lima. Now why must a little like? He's got people at his house like they're kind of having a party. There were actually people who saw them meeting up. anyways. Why am I explained to them that sleepy John was going to call him on skype later that night about a quote. Unquote concert. Was a code word. He set up to give them the green light to let them know that his parents were asleep and they were good to go and housing kill them now. Wimal later in his testimony says that the code word was actually used, or it was supposed to be used for sleepy John to say that he had killed his parents, and they need to come over regardless concert. Was the code word but I think that they. Obviously. They were going to kill his parents. So cuisine arrived around one forty. Five am on September Eleventh Sleepy John called Y on skype and use the code word. Lima reached for the metal. Bats and Salat drove cuisine and wine to sleepy. Johns home. Slash drop them off and cuisine told him to drive around until gave him the signal to pick him back up. So slow left sleepy John was waiting outside supposedly with a miner's helmet to signal CASSIM and Weimer from behind Bush. With the Light He then lead them towards the garage. He opened the rear service store and told them that his parents were sleeping upstairs. Cuisine testifies that he saw multiple stacks of money on a counter in the garage all in hundred dollar bills..

John Lima skype Salat Wyman ymer Salah Cassim y Mas Bush murder Weimer Wimal
"palo" Discussed on Poisonous Minds

Poisonous Minds

02:36 min | Last month

"palo" Discussed on Poisonous Minds

"He interviewed him on an offer a few hours. And Sleepy John was noted to not have even asked what had happened. It was parents didn't even care. Seems kind of odd for ACP. Seventeen year old boy on his way to church with five thousand dollars in his pocket rate. Red Flags everywhere. So in the core document, it was brought up that with further investigation of the House. It was inconsistent with anyone having had slept in the basement, but was more consistent with someone who had been involved in an incident that was taking place down there. I don't know if this means they may have some blood splatter down there or things like that. That's kind of what it sounds like. As we get into the case, you'll hear a little bit more in how that connects so so when detective movie and John Junior were talking. John began to change his version of events of the evening I. His Dad was a we dealer and a rival game member by the name of Momo was the one to be looking at. That one didn't pan out very well for sleepy John. One confronted about the changing stories sleepy. John said that he was actually out his friend's house Chris Ymer. The morning of the murders and the. He was with two other friends. Mohammed Salat and hub Qassim. John suggested that e have Qassim was responsible for the murders of his parents so. recapping, we have sleepy John I'm just calling him that for now on because he's just such heavy sleep so tired. He's seventeen years old. His friend Christopher Weimer also seventeen years old from bridgeview Ehab Qassim. Nineteen years old and he lived in Hickory hills. And Mohamed Salat seventeen years old. Now detected moody interviews all the People John Mansion and takes their statements. Searchers our cell phones and hold on to your chairs. Ladies and Gentlemen Shits about to get fucked up. Detective Moody Recovers Cellphone Records of Sleepy John MMA Salat cuisine that were sent to.

John Sleepy John MMA Salat People John Mansion John Junior Mohamed Salat John I Detective Moody Qassim Chris Ymer Ehab Qassim ACP Christopher Weimer Hickory hills
"palo" Discussed on Poisonous Minds

Poisonous Minds

04:10 min | Last month

"palo" Discussed on Poisonous Minds

"Stories of true crime, unsolved mysteries and the unknown, then you came to the right place, luckily for you, I will be re telling you stories of all of these things with my comedic. Take on it, so grab yourself a seat, and let's hit this shit show. Today's specifically I'm going to talk about a fucked up. Murder committed by a kid who went to school. The crime takes place in Illinois. First ask on the docket is John Greenwich Junior? He was at the time seventeen years old. He was a senior at stack high school. And he planned and executed the murder of his parents John Senior.

Murder stack high school John Senior John Greenwich Illinois
Philadelphia’s landlord organization taking city to court over 5 new laws meant to protect tenants during COVID-19 crisis

KYW 24 Hour News

01:10 min | Last month

Philadelphia’s landlord organization taking city to court over 5 new laws meant to protect tenants during COVID-19 crisis

"Organization is taking the city to court over five new laws meant to protect tenants from being evicted during the cove in 19 crisis. Here's K Y. W. City Hall bureau chief Palo City City Council Council passed passed a a package package of of bills bills that that extends extends the the eviction eviction moratorium moratorium to to August August 31st 31st gives gives tenants tenants nine nine months months to to pay pay back back rent rent forest forest landlords landlords from from charging charging late late fees fees during during that that Period Period and and creates creates an an eviction eviction diversion diversion program program for for residents residents and and small small businesses businesses struggling struggling because because of of the the pandemic. pandemic. The The landlord landlord group group APCO APCO filed filed suit suit in in federal federal court court yesterday, yesterday, charging charging the law's unilaterally rewrite every residential and small business lease in Philadelphia and place all of the financial burden on the city's landlords. It says the laws violate the contract clauses of the state and US constitutions, and it seeks an injunction to halt their enforcement. Helen Gim, who sponsored two of the bill, says she's confident they will hold up in court. The act is the result of a very long process, which included Half co I think have toe is going against the interests of its own industry and hitting landlords against tenants. In an unnecessary way, Gim says. The city is trying to manage the crisis, not exacerbate it. Pat

Palo City City Council Council Helen Gim Apco Apco K Y. W. City Hall Bureau PAT United States Philadelphia Pandemic.
"palo" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

03:27 min | Last month

"palo" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Are Say I'm super. Happy the weather this year is much better than last year. Yeah, it is a great day in Sunny San Francisco. we are somewhere above RSA. at the with Virgin Hotel. What's it called the Virgin? Virgin Hotels San Francisco which is a fun location, and and it's GonNa be fun couple of days, so we wanted to sit down with you and talk about unit forty two at Palo. Alto networks. We had John Davis on. He was incredible sharing all sorts of fun stuff. Africa's military crews had him on twice actually, and he mentioned uniform to, and we kinda wanted to to to the proverbial double. Click into this, so we're GONNA. Get into all that. And your career so I how did you get started in technology? So I had a strange path in technology I originally had a full scholarship for genetic engineering to a private college, and I got there and I realized the I really hated spending thirteen hours in the lab, doing the same thing over and over and over again, but I really enjoyed the knowledge, so I started with a foreign languages in elementary school, and I was aware that the military particularly the air force had A. A strong program of linguists, so not knowing what else I wanted to do I joined the Air Force or Mandarin Chinese and I kind of figured out you know figure out what I wanted to do later, but I was lucky enough that I was working still with the government when the government started getting more into the computer space, and as someone who's also computer. Geek I've again volunteered thinking. Hey, the sounds fun and here I am twenty years later in its a career now. So it all worked out well, linguistics is really funny feeling. We're kind of talking about this before. Because seems like everybody who goes into air force. Linguistics has some sort of interesting career path. Is it something about like? Is it all people who like puzzles? Is it lake? cryptography like what what's the kind of common thread? What makes what makes linguists? So interesting, because it seems like you all are I think a lot of it honestly is our enjoyment of puzzles whether you're learning a language that you're speaking or whether you're learning a language, the programming language, or whether you doing threat analysis. You're always putting kind of picture together. They're certain places. Certain pieces can go, and some are interchangeable, but you have to be able to take that step back. Actually figure it out and a lot of us, especially a Lotta sustain. Sustain their career field that tends to be one of our favorite things to do like as a team one of the things we do a lot offsite. Are The puzzle rooms 'cause? We're basically professional puzzle breakers, and we have a ton of fun with those EC tend to find that a lot in community. It is one of those things like as a kid. You don't necessarily think all of those things are going to add up to a career. Right where you're. Just kind of like the new games there like you know, whatever was but you so many times when we interview folks on nights, visionaries exactly what you get right like has interested in games when I was a kid got me interested in computers in an anonymous or southern. Well, there's so many career fields that exists now, and that continued to be made to be created that you. You know they didn't do the ten years ago. They didn't exp five years ago. You know they might not even have existed two or three years ago. It's there's so much variety in the space at this point, so told me a little bit about your cur role with Palo Alto networks in and specifically uniform to assure so I am the deputy with unit forty two I..

Air Force John Davis Virgin Hotel Palo Alto Sunny San Francisco. Virgin Palo Africa San Francisco
Can black journalists cover the Black Lives Matter movement objectively?

The Frame

05:01 min | 2 months ago

Can black journalists cover the Black Lives Matter movement objectively?

"Is a partisan for the press to say black lives matter news rooms across the country are debating the role that journalists should be playing and particularly when it comes to talking about race in America the twenty sixteen conversation with NPR's code switch then Washington post reporter Wesley Lowery had this to say about the idea of objectivity I don't like the word when we talk about how to be objective we begin the conversation with a lot like we did begin the conversation with the lie that we don't have biases and that we don't receive the welterweights right I strive to be fair and that means I have to interrogate my own biases that fairness means I have to go out of my way to make sure I'm giving a fair critique hearing the people who I know I disagree with journalists at The New York Times revolted over an op ed which many said threatened black lives that same week the Pittsburgh post Gazette barred some of its black reporters from covering the protests over fears that they'd be quote too biased and on the other hand just yesterday the news organization Axios announced that its reporters can participate in protests and that the company fund would cover bail for any employee who is arrested some news rooms across the country appear to be changing fast what could that mean for journalism as a possible to be fair and transparent without being objective I'll tell you this is a conversation that the one eighteen is having a lot and we should note that we reached out to NPR whose standards and guidelines we have bye bye but they declined to take part in the program joining us is Ricardo Sandoval Palos public editor for PBS Ricardo welcome to when I thank you thank you for having me also here is Nicole Hannah Jones reporter for The New York Times magazine covering racial injustice the call welcome back thank you the call start with you in the past couple of weeks past two weeks we've seen several incidents involving newsrooms scrutinizing journalists of color over their inability to be objective here's that word again talk to us about some of those incidents well we saying really three major incidents and and who knows how many others where journalists haven't spoken out about them but we have the case in Pittsburgh and that was where of course to black journalists wonderful one photo journalists want to print journalists were taken off of the beat to be able to cover the protests of the black journalist had posted on social media images of trash everywhere of garbage everywhere and said oh look at you know these looters and then said actually it's it's a Kenny Chesney the end of a Kenny Chesney tail gate and I guess her bosses thought that that was inappropriate to pull her off of the coverage we still have no explanation about why the photo journalist who is also a a black journalists was pulled off of the coverage and then go ahead of well tell me about what happened at your paper the senator Tom cotton's op ed sure so we ran online and op ed written by Tom cotton that was basically calling out for the U. S. military to be imposed on cities and states where the governors did not want that help in order to put down a protest that they felt were violent there was a huge pushback amongst journalists at The New York Times a book of more than a thousand journalists signed a letter put forth by our our our union I'm saying we oppose that in a lot of journalists went and spoke online about it and it was for it was for two reasons one this this editorial did not go through the proper normal fact checking process that any thing that appears in the time should go through but we also felt you we were getting kind of free space to a sitting U. S. senator to suppress their free speech rights of Americans and that that platform should not be given over in that way yeah that this would have been a news story and as a new story it would have been fine but not to allow to be a newspaper and allow someone to talk about using the military to repress free speech I was too far for many of us a lot of journalists were upset about that I remember waking up that morning looking at Twitter and just seeing the operate also the opinion editor James Bennet he resigned on Sunday how significant is that part local I'm you know it's complicated I I've worked with James Bennett and I certainly don't want to speak on kind of internal personnel matters but do you think that was necessary in resigning I I think he made the decision that he felt he needed to make we certainly we as journalists at The New York Times wanted this to be taken seriously yeah and it appears that it

The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

06:25 min | 2 months ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason gleason and and CREPE CREPE and and climb climb and and snap snap end. end. They They feed feed off off flesh. flesh. Flies Flies Matz Matz any any culinary culinary delight delight by intrepid? by intrepid? Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitchell back back in the in world's the world's hotspot hotspot for for carnivorous carnivorous plants plants or Western or Western Australia Australia last last week. Show week. Show sit sit sane. sane. Well Well today. today. It's a It's tile a tile full full of twists of twists and and tendrils. tendrils. Yes Yes Trust Trust Sarah. Sarah. I can I all can over all the over world. the world. I just bought I just another bought another one. Sorry one. Sorry wearies wearies Navan. Navan. I I have devoted have devoted much much time time to a to class a class of plants of plants that seemed that seemed to have to reversed have reversed regular regular order order of nature of nature and and like avengers like avengers of of Kingdom Kingdom have turned have turned upon upon animals animals incarcerating incarcerating and finally and finally killing killing them them whether whether the plants the plants are really are really hungry hungry and entrapped and entrapped the animals the animals for food for food or whether or whether it is only it is only an example an example of the of wanton the wanton destructiveness destructiveness of nature. of nature. I leave I leave the Rita the Rita to judge. to judge. Mary Mary treat treat eighteen eighteen eighty eighty five five throughout throughout history. history. The great The great botanical botanical artists artists have have often often been been women women but but many many of them of them infect infect scientists scientists to to just just without without the endorsement the endorsement of of the botanical the botanical establishment establishment which which often often shunned shunned or or ignored ignored them. them. The pint The pint brush brush deemed deemed more more appropriate appropriate tool tool for for lady lady than a than microscope. a microscope. I guess I botany guess botany has always has always being being an interesting an interesting one one because because I suppose I suppose that that the study the study of of flowers flowers and plants and plants historically historically was was maybe maybe seen seen in a bit in more a bit more of a of a suitable suitable for for for women for women feminine feminine because because of flowers of flowers and that and sort that of sort thing of thing but still but still it it it was it still was still also also quite quite male dominated. male dominated. I guess I in guess terms in terms of the of the scholars scholars in that in field that field throughout throughout history. history. Well Well one one determined determined woman woman on a farm on a farm in in way way belt Western. belt Western. Australia Australia defied defied the the odds odds and changed and changed the world the world sore. sore. Australia's Australia's incredible incredible carnivorous carnivorous plants plants and and listened listened to artists to artists so so with Laura with Laura Skates Skates botanical botanical scientists scientists doing doing her PhD her PhD on canvas on canvas plants. plants. Right Right now now I am I taking am taking you down. you down. Bush Bush trial trial in in pursuit pursuit of her of story. her story. Oh Oh is that is that it. it. Yup Yup Oh Oh cute cute so this so is this actually is actually one of one the climbing of the climbing ones ones that I was that just I was talking just talking about about so so new new sixty sixty centimeters centimeters long long and it's and just it's just spreading spreading out of out embankment. of embankment. He He and a and lot more a lot of more them of them seem seem to have to caught have caught prey prey on this on one. this I one. think I think it might it be might dresser. be dresser. A Men's A Men's Eli Eli address address or or Krant Krant though. though. Draw Draw ceramic ceramic cram cram throw throw or or the bridal the bridal rainbow rainbow with its with little its little sunlight sunlight sticky sticky leaves leaves hence hence the name. the Sanju name. Sanju it it was a man was a man English English naturalist naturalist and Biologist and Biologist Charles Charles Darwin Darwin nonetheless nonetheless who is who a first is a first credited credited with helping with helping us understand us understand that that coniferous coniferous plants plants lived lived off off flesh. flesh. His His particularly particularly interested interested in in is a is a European European species. species. Coatdress Coatdress ERA ERA TON. Two TON. folio Two folio which which he did he a lot did of a lot his of experiments his experiments on on so he so would he put would different put different things things on the on leaves the leaves like like for example for example he would he put would put a a piece of piece sand of sand orbit orbit of gloss of gloss and not and really not really see see any any reaction reaction but if but you put if you something put something like like little little piece piece of EG of EG or or some some meat meat juices juices suddenly suddenly the plant the plant would have would reaction have reaction to that to that and and the tentacles the tentacles would start would start to wrap to around wrap around so so what he what basically he basically showed. showed. Is that Is these that plants these plants are reacting are reacting to to is that is that have have not not gene or gene protein or protein in in them them so so the plants. the plants. I I almost almost instantaneously. instantaneously. They know They know not. not. That's a That's be the a sand be the sand economy economy that that cheese. cheese. I I eight that eight that yeah yeah exactly exactly so so you know. you They know. don't They don't waste waste any energy any energy wrapping wrapping around around something. something. That's not That's going not to be going nutritious to be nutritious day instead. day instead. Wraparound Wraparound when when it's going it's to be going something to be something that will give that will give them them a good a good boost boost of nitrogen. of nitrogen. I mean I even mean in even my in my PhD PhD thesis. thesis. I I go go back back to to Dahlan's Dahlan's original original studies studies and and some of some his of original his original thoughts thoughts and ideas and ideas things things that that with with testing testing to this to day this day and and so he so really he really liked the liked groundwork the groundwork for for set the set foundation the foundation full full of Verse of Plant Verse Plant Research Research But one But American one American woman woman was on was the on case the case of carnivorous of carnivorous plants. plants. Around Around the same the time same time as Darwin. as Darwin. I will I give will you give my you observations my observations on draw. on draw. Sarah Sarah would would have escaped have escaped the notice the notice of botanists of botanists and she and she struck struck up a up correspondence a correspondence with Darwin with Darwin in a in series a series of letters of letters from from eighteen. eighteen. Seventy Seventy one one four four years years before before he got he to got publishing to publishing his his influential influential on on insect insect diverse diverse plants. plants. I had I two had two or three or three species species of of plants plants growing growing window window ornaments ornaments and soon and soon saw saw the deal the deal on the on folio the folio was a was flytrap a flytrap of considerable. of considerable. Palo Palo when it comes when it to comes to reverse reverse plants plants one of the one best of the women best women that I that I kind kind of came of came across across in my in my studies studies was was Mary Mary trait trait and I and came I across came across her her because because he he in Child in Child Allen's Allen's book book insectivores insectivores plants. plants. There was There a little was a foot little foot art art that talked that talked about about what what Mary Mary Trait Trait had done had done to to contribute contribute to to that particular that particular chapter chapter and I and thought I thought wow. wow. Who's Who's Mrs Mrs Trait? Trait? I WANNA I find WANNA find out more out about more about her her de Madame. de Madame. Your observations Your observations and experiments and experiments on the on sexes the sexes of butterflies. of butterflies. Far Far the best the best as far as far as known as known to me to me which which have have ever ever been been made made said. There's said. a great There's a great letter. letter. Where Where don don thanks? thanks? Mary Mary trait trait for some for some observations observations on dresser. on dresser. I am I glad am glad to hear to hear your observations. your observations. On Dresser On Dresser will will be be published. The unlucky fly a common housefly. Would no sooner be caught by the sticky? Glands of it would've once commenced to fold about its victims. It folded from the apex to the stem of the lake. After the manner of its nation closer and closer it held the poor flying embrace until it ceased its struggles when it soon became partly absorbed by the plant. Professor Gray will give my observations on this planned in his new edition of how plants grow was most respectfully Mrs Mary. Treat New Jersey December. Twenty eight hundred seventy one. I have attended to this subject during several years and have almost manuscript enough to make a volume but have never yet found time to publish. I am very much obliged. You'RE COURTEOUS LEGEND AND REMAIN DIM Adam yours faithfully. Charles Darwin January five eighteen seventy two.

Mary Mary Australia Sarah Sarah Charles Charles Darwin Darwin Dresser On Dresser Mrs Mrs Trait Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitch Charles Darwin Matz Matz Western Australia Australia Sanju Eli Eli Bush Bush Kingdom Kingdom Dahlan Krant Krant Palo Palo
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

05:35 min | 2 months ago

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason and CREPE and climb and snap end. They feed off flesh. Flies Matz any culinary delight by intrepid? Natasha Mitchell back in the world's hotspot for carnivorous plants or Western Australia last week. Show sit sane. Well today. It's a tile full of twists and tendrils. Yes Trust Sarah. I can all over the world. I just bought another one. Sorry wearies Navan. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seemed to have reversed regular order of nature and like avengers of Kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the Rita to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The great botanical artists have often been women but many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The pint brush deemed more appropriate tool for lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always being an interesting one because I suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen in a bit more of a suitable for for women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it it was still also quite male dominated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in way belt Western. Australia defied the odds and changed the world sore. Australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listened to artists so with Laura Skates botanical scientists doing her PhD on canvas plants. Right now I am taking you down. Bush trial in pursuit of her story. Oh is that it. Yup Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones that I was just talking about so new sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. A Men's Eli address or Krant though. Draw ceramic cram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name. Sanju it was a man English naturalist and Biologist Charles Darwin nonetheless who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. His particularly interested in is a European species. Coatdress ERA TON. Two folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example he would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction but if you put something like little piece of EG or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around so what he basically showed. Is that these plants are reacting to is that have not gene or protein in them so the plants. I almost instantaneously. They know not. That's a be the sand economy that cheese. I eight that yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious day instead. Wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost of nitrogen. I mean even in my PhD thesis. I go back to Dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for set the foundation full of Verse Plant Research But one American woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as Darwin. I will give you my observations on draw. Sarah would have escaped the notice of botanists and she struck up a correspondence with Darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of plants growing window ornaments and soon saw the deal on the folio was a flytrap of considerable. Palo when it comes to reverse plants one of the best women that I kind of came across in my studies was Mary trait and I came across her because he in Child Allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little foot art that talked about what Mary Trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and I thought wow. Who's Mrs Trait? I WANNA find out more about her de Madame. Your observations and experiments on the sexes of butterflies. Far the best as far as known to me which have ever been made said. There's a great letter. Where don thanks? Mary trait for some observations on dresser. I am glad to hear your observations. On Dresser will be

Mary Trait Charles Darwin Australia Sarah Western Australia Natasha Mitchell Gleason Matz Rita Bush ELI DON Dahlan Verse Plant Research Krant Palo Child Allen
Los Angeles - Newsom Orders End To ‘Carotid Hold’ Training In State Police Program

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - Newsom Orders End To ‘Carotid Hold’ Training In State Police Program

"Well governor Gavin Newsom has ordered the immediate end of state police training for the Kerala cold KCBS is Margie Shafer explained governor Newsom called for the end of the carotid hold claiming the move is designed to keep people's blood from flowing to their brain and it has no place in policing any longer I am immediately directing post which is our police officers training to end the training of that practice and I could not be more pleased no sooner did we make a commitment on this proposal that a member of the legislature Mike Gibson to his credit just introduced a piece of legislation that I will support and sign Gibson as an assembly member representing south Los Angeles Newsome said he noticed the disparities in the waste police departments dealt with crown it's in peaceful protests municipalities have different approaches and it's clear to me that we need to standardize those approaches activist and president of the bart board of directors Latina Simon and former Oakland police officer Anh east Palo alto chief who also served as director of the cops office in the Obama administration Ron Davis will advise on police engagement

Gavin Newsom Margie Shafer Mike Gibson Newsome President Trump Simon Director Ron Davis Kerala Governor Newsom Los Angeles Oakland Officer Palo Alto Barack Obama
Creativity in lockdown with Dan Thawley

Fashion No Filter

07:03 min | 2 months ago

Creativity in lockdown with Dan Thawley

"Name's done thoroughly and I am. The editor in chief of a magazine curated by fashion and odds journalists based in Paris mistrial like I was born in Sydney and moved over to Europe in two thousand nine. And I've been working on this magazine since two thousand nine is its digital editor in two thousand and ten. I became the editor in chief. It's a magazine that was started in Antwerp in two thousand one with the mission of creating Belgium's first name fashioned title and it quickly became something quite different as the concept is to invite one fashion designer to curate each each issue of the magazine at say cut blonde to them to express their interests their that loves their obsessions and all about the universe in around two hundred pages and it is something that has really done a a world to a in nearly twenty years with designers from France and Italy from Japan from England and from the United States and really a covering a very very broad aesthetic scope as well so it started with designers like Martin Majella and had Iraq common and alleviate tastes skins people that were really based in that late nineties Belgian aesthetic And then moving forward. We've we've worked with the many many different types of designers like Alexandra mckelway at Gucci. We've worked with Palo Pitcher Lee at Gallon Tina and almost issue which is just about to hit newsstands. In the coming days and was announced last week is with. Luke and Lucy mayor who are the Co curated directors of Joe Sanders Milan. I'm such a fan of theirs. I'm really excited to read this. But I'm I'm wondering Dan. How how. How do you put together a print magazine while in confinement? How did you make that work? We're very impressed so we have. I mean it's always a long process in this initiative. We've been working on for many months. So certain parts of it were very luckily finished. Just before legal confinement and other parts of it was still in the process as we as we were shutdown lockdown here in France so I was very lucky to have program this issue more or less to come out around this Around this time but it was slightly delayed. But I'm what we don was actually done most of the physical productions in the months of January to March already. So what was the biggest challenge for US was That we usually design the magazine together without team in Cologne as we work with a wonderful office codes Marais and Mirae in a column and so usually we would have gone there with looking Lucia and whichever designer we were with the time for a couple of days and we sit in the office with them and we design all the pages and we go through all of the process of of the structure and putting everything together in person. And this time we were unable to do that. As actually there was a case of covid nineteen in the in the office in Cologne in the earlier. Part of of quarantine. It was really off the table before travel was actually Was actually restricted. So we were forced to do everything. And and work from home as as were everybody else. What we were lucky was that we'd had most of Al Photo shoots finished so I'm one of the challenges was that we had photographers rushing to their lab. Zola the All over the place to get prints developed in time and we did shoot Many different cities New York Bacelona Paris. I slammed we. We really were all over the place. Summer talk of traveled others were in their in their hometown during their own country where they could drive and and do something locally which was nice. It wasn't all baked productions Anyway but it was many small things happening at once and and so we did have the risk of getting some of our images in time and then everything was luckily through except for one or two things that we really had too late by the wayside and we set to work designing the magazine from fall which was very challenging. Because we had people in time zones on my colleagues Blake was in Vancouver with his family so he was able to come over for the design periods so we had people working from Vancouver to France to Cologne and Milan only lockdown so it was quite a juggling act but al lost real stroke of luck in the middle. That was that in fact we would for the first time printing with an Italian printout because they work with a special technique where the side of the magazine is actually invisibly bound. So it's bound with stitches. Which then all these small booklets stitch together and then glued on the side so you have this invisible spine with the stitches showing through and they were actually considered an essential service in Italy. Even though they were northern Italy area that was very very heavily affected by the virus and Due to their Status as an essential services provider we were able to print in April saw so that was really interesting and as I said a very serendipitous experience. The putting the print magazine together nut time of course like putting any media together in that period. It was something that had to be done very sensitively. It had to be done with a lot of thought to the well that we were living in at a particular time as well as The That we're going into and We were also very prescient with that because Lucy and Luke's same for the issue that was decided last. July was the idea of human nature and Mother Nature and the interactions between those things that have been decided way before because I feel it so APP. Yes so we've found ourselves with the same that we'd already been working on for months. It was already very much connected to current events. In a way you know we're looking at indicted environments. We were looking at different kinds of architecture that was linked to people's domestic lives the process of them creating work. We were looking at also different elements of of race. We were looking into also things that sort of pivoted around the way we deal with nature and environment. It was something that I of course have to think about when riding my editor's letter which is one of the loss things that goes into the magazine and A very timeless publication. We're not the kind of magazine like You were discussing earlier. The whether it's vogue or New York Times it has to be on the on the point of of the actually of the news and really making strong statements Thereabouts but what we did have in wanted to do. He was still a really acknowledged the fact that we were coming out in this time and in this year Wanted that we will never forget in our in our

France Print Magazine Editor In Chief Editor United States Italy Lucy Luke Cologne Alexandra Mckelway Paris Europe Belgium Palo Pitcher Lee Antwerp Vancouver Martin Majella Gallon Tina New York Times New York Bacelona Paris
Elon Musk Says Tesla Suing California County, Moving Headquarters Out Of State

WSJ Tech News Briefing

10:14 min | 3 months ago

Elon Musk Says Tesla Suing California County, Moving Headquarters Out Of State

"Week. California started phasing in the reopening of business including manufacturing so when that was announced Tesla CEO Elon. Musk sent out a memo to ten thousand employees at a factory in Alameda. County telling them to come into work the next day but just a few hours after that memo the local government in Alameda County said not so fast they were keeping tighter restrictions in place and Tesla's factory was not allowed to open yet in response. Tesla sued and Monday. Musk said they're opening their factory. Anyway here to tell us all about this lawsuit and what it could mean for businesses and governments across the US is our reporter. Tim Higgins Tim. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you all right. Let's start with Tesla. What is Tesla arguing in this suit? One of the things that you must angry about is that The California state government has to open up again including manufacturing and he's arguing that essentially that the local government has overstepped its authority by saying that. Tesla's factory cannot reopen that. The governor's office allowing for the state to reopen and that the US constitution allows for these sorts of things so really Arguments at the county. Government is overreaching and then he made a comparison to another facility. That is a nearby county. What's his argument? There Tesla has its has one assembly plant in the US but it has a number of facilities around California that help with the business. And there's a factory that is not that far from the assembly pant that has in a different county and the people there are not facing the same kind of shelter in place restrictions. Tassels reason the question of why are why isn't a uniform wise? They're pointing to figures. They say indicate that the rate of infection is very similar Why is one place stricter than the other so? Musk actually went a step further and reopened TUSLA yesterday. Right surprising a lot of people Monday. Tweeting out that He was opening the factory starting production that day in fact he said he's going to be on the assembly line and that if the police show up to arrest people he should be the one that's arrested so let's just back up a little bit. This sets tesla apart from many of its tag counterparts right. I mean facebook and others have announced that they're not bringing employees back to the office for months. Why is Elon? Musk and tesla wire. Wise Tusla's taking such a big stand here exactly facebook and Google and others. They can largely do their work at home on computers. Were Tesla makes cars. It needs an army of workers in the factory banging on metal to build these vehicles so they can sell them and without the Fremont Factory Online. It doesn't have anything to sell here in the US eventually. The cars that they made prior the shutdown. They're not gonNA have anything. So if Tesla is going to take advantage of any potential economic rebound that something might occur in the months to come as the country learns to live with the Corona virus. It needs cars. The shutdown came at a bad time for Tesla. It was just a ramping up. Production of its newest vehicle. The Model Y Compact Sport Utility vehicle is a vehicle that Elon. Musk has said could be. The company's top seller analysts expected to do very well. It's a good segment for this kind of vehicle and really there was a lot of enthusiasm among investors about the year ahead and so what the Krono virus has done is essentially. Put everything on ice and The problem for you on musk. Is that this. Factory has been sitting Essentially vacant for weeks. Now and he needs the lifeblood of the company to kick back on. I guess comparing to facebook isn't quite fair. I mean the better comparison might be to other. Automakers what are we seeing Michigan do for example and how our automakers they're responding. That's some of the frustration that musk has been. Venting is that Michigan announced last week and then that they were bringing manufacturing back online this week so Monday. As Yuan is sitting there unhappy that his factory is an open open. Places in Michigan could come back online and he knows his competitors have already announced. Gm for Chrysler others that they're kicking up production GM and Ford. They're a scheduled to start assembly vehicles again next Monday and here in California. That's that's not the case so elon. Musk has taken it another step further. He also has threatened to move production out of California altogether. He's saying maybe to Texas. What kind of impact could his departure have on? The state would smell something that can happen. Overnight it's not as simple as picking up his tools and going to Texas and starting to make cars and a new factory I. It's much more complicated. And it's something that probably would take years to do but the effect would be dramatic. Tessa wouldn't be the first car company to pull out of California Toyota. Its headquarters for the US. North America used to be based on your La and they pulled out over the course of several years starting in two thousand fourteen and they went to Texas because in emerged part it's cheaper to operate their California had just gotten to expensive the factory that Tesla owns and California used to be a factory that was jointly operated by General Motors and Toyota in when GM wind bankruptcy left to Toyota and Toyota. Didn't want to didn't want to be there anymore. I wanted to go to someplace. Cheaper the state of California has in recent generation or so struggled to keep a car manufacturing and the Fremont factory the fact that Tesla was able to buy in two thousand ten and resume making vehicles there in twenty twelve was seen by the the region him by Government officials is a huge win and is something very important for the economy states. Local leaders across the country prize car factories. These are things they want. It means jobs. It means economic investment. It means all the and things that go with with that so it's not just the car factory it's the suppliers and the ecosystem that creates and brings into the community so this kind of threat in some ways was almost going nuclear to say that he was going to pull out of of the state now a lot of people are saying or asking was was just because he lost his temper. And and that sort of thing. Well we'll see. He has said on twitter that he's not messing around and he's taking this very seriously. Some of this of course is also. He's in essentially negotiating in public. He's trying to push put pressure on on the local government to allow him to open up. Yeah I mean it's it's a very public lobbying effort if you can call it that I think the interesting thing is. We'VE SEE BUSINESSES. Do this all the time time right to get tax incentives or or other deals but in this case it's public health interests that are at stake. How HAVE OFFICIALS IN ALAMEDA? County responded to this very open threat And is the pressure that he's putting on them seeming to impact their decisions to reopen at all whether the mayor of Fremont put out a statement saying that she supports Tesla and the Mayor of Palo Alto or the company's headquarters is located. Put out a statement over the weekend about their support for the company. It's a tough position for some of these elected officials They want to see the company. Back Open. They want to see businesses back. Open him yet. Some are also weighing the health ramifications. Several people have died in the county from Kovic Nineteen and they have reported More than two thousand cases of Govan Nineteen and so the concern among county leaders is that they're not sure if there's going to be a spike as they start to re phase in business activity and they'd like to see it play out a little bit longer and be prepared and the idea of ten thousand people coming into a facility is concerning and so they have been working with the company to make sure that the safety protocols in place and the Tesla has Publicized some of these. Things are what they're working on. And that's where the standoff here is. It's not when we're unique to test so there are lots of places and companies around the country who are frustrated and want to get back to the way things were and we've seen state by state by state Different ways of handling this. But there's probably no higher profile company in the US The take this kind of stand to to sue the local authorities and to Defy a local shutdown order. Well we wouldn't expect anything else from Elon. Musk I guess. Our reporter Tim Higgins. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you

Tesla Musk California United States Fremont Factory Online Facebook Alameda County Elon Alameda Tim Higgins Tim Reporter Fremont GM Michigan Texas Toyota Tim Higgins CEO
Tough Airports with Pilot to Pilot

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

06:11 min | 3 months ago

Tough Airports with Pilot to Pilot

"I'm GonNa Bring Justin. See here he comes. Hey there's my man has then. Are you actually looking up at four flight up with my computer? And I was looking up bested when you're talking about it because I know seen it before in my mind is not like I don't even know if I WANNA fly. They're like Oh yeah. You know it's funny. Some sometimes that stuff's really intimidating but the rules you have to follow making for example. If you're coming down through Elgin and Valparaiso there I think it looks. I mean obviously be having to talk to their tower Roy. Once you're talking to their tower than your you know everything's Kinda worked out for you with the floor capabilities. File Easier that's funny. I was going to ask you about that because you're flying into so many different types of sorts. That's pretty much what you guys do. All the time right. It's just file a far. Yeah we will most are flights Are we can't take off the far far up in the air but we like to keep it many times. It's awesome just because it does help the have. Atc talking to you. We're GONNA get a busy airports. I never even expected to be really busy. There's one in Minnesota really crazy student training area. And there's like six or one seventy two pattern at a time mixing via far in just the Afar general. It can be a lot safer going I- Afar when you have the opportunity to do so. Yeah I totally see that Aspen. Airport there any over. It's like that that you guys going to where your company says we're GonNa have to do extra work with you guys or you have to fly in their inexperienced captain. I or something like that. We do similar trading on ask than we have a whole like Aspen lesson where we have to to land at Aspen. Show that we can do that. Another one's called Ocean research is a private airport down in Florida. And it's a really skinny and kind of severi interesting airport which we have to get checked out in the simulator. I I think we have to do it. Every every couple of years just to get retrained because our wings actually hangover the hedges when we go into land so it's very interesting but it's a very popular destination. While can you say just briefly? What's so challenging about aspirin? I that's SORTA aspirins just very interesting place. I mean if you even just look up the approach tar and you can see the glide. Slope like seven degrees. Maybe maybe it will literally feeling like you're going straight down at catch it. The site pictures just so messed up and then you have like a mountain right here. Airports a little bit farther forward. You can't get the glide slope warning fear when you come here I. It's hard for me to really explain it unless you're going. There are other chart in front of me. But it's there's a lot going on at Aston you gotTa be under your pointed down so far that you're speaking to come even if you have the Steve Breaks out so it's a very interesting airport for sure. Yeah that's wild. I mean we flew in there all the time in one. Eighty Two's mountain checkouts in Eagle Aspen than through loveland. Pass out toward lead though and all that now one eighty two. It's not a huge big deal. It's totally different. When you've got a jet can handle up pretty well so it's not too big of a deal but it definitely interesting. We don't take it down to the purchase so that we have the the airport site at a certain fixed remember. Stop ahead now. But we have special charts going in there and then. There's some other mountain airports where we don't need to be checked out in but we have a special area in our. Aol were read up about it before released before we go so we know the challenges that airport could cost. That's interesting I think. The last accident I remember at Aspen was a challenger from that mistake and landed with a tail rent. That's yeah that's very commonly. I WANNA say they landed on the taxiway almost other grass remember astronaut now or another airport. Another airport was. They didn't know that the runway was just pay. They thought the runway was covered in snow so they saw a freshly paved runway but their mind. They thought that it was supposed to be snow-covered sir. Lynden to the right or to the left of the runway landed on grass. Wow that's so fascinating that you just said that because somebody else I think it was. Brian Shift pigmy the other day he was doing lecture for Nasty. Just wanted to know if I thought about something. He was calling expectation bias in training right and I didn't really know any man I was like. What do you mean by expectation bias? And then he told me a little more it was basically what you just described. It's like how do you deal with when your mind is set on seeing one thing? That's what you're expecting. And then something different is happening and to be honest. I don't see it very much in training but what you just described was perfect. Exactly what the talk about do you guys talk about that at all in your training that specific conflict We'll make a big deal about going over all the threats that could be going on so as soon as we brief all the threats. We kinda talk about all the threats. This threat might be kind of one that comes up on the fly. But if there's ever a moment where you feel any kind of confusion or you feel any dow it's like immediately go around this. Go take off. We'll talk about last hour. The runways taped or not paved or regain rebrith. We WanNA do. We can go somewhere else. We can talk about some things especially to ask them because the weather changes so often. We have a very strict kaylynn limit were. Some operators may be part ninety one. Maybe they don't relate abide by that but we do not go in there with a win more than two not talented. So if we're coming down on finally tell us that the tailwinds do high will do out and go around and go somewhere else. So it's definitely safety. And you always going to err on the side of safety so one person was real comfortable. You go out now. That's awesome and there's two things that you just said that I always hammer on my students about so I just have to act on. One wasn't aboard point where you're talking about having a certain way point if you're not on glide path through or whatever then it's just an automatic and the other is that a superior if it's eleven knots. Tailwind you're out you don't think about it. It's not ten anymore. It's eleven soared on once really good. That's good stuff. I feel like so many of those things that we can cement those for GE pilots. You know there was a guy that flew into Palo. Alto in a mean. I don't know if you've ever flown a Moonie but it's like doesn't want to stop flying. I mean not only. Is the wing like six inches off the ground at slamming her flow. It won't quit and twice in my career I've seen people come in and Mooney's and just go around late in one case and hit the trees on in this last case Palo Alto literally just floated till he went right off the end of the runway and that was a fatal accident. You know people say like what would happen. How could he avoid it? I mean abort point in any airplane is a great idea right. No absolutely and it's something that like you said when you drill down and generally aviation to create that kind of mindset. You always think that it's not going to happen to you but it can happen to you. You're gonNA find yourself in this situation. You don't feel comfortable. Then you gotta go around just like no if saying like you can't succumb to that mindset

Aspen Afar Elgin Eagle Aspen Moonie Valparaiso Lynden Aspirin Palo Alto Minnesota Ocean Research Aston Mooney Brian Shift AOL Palo Florida Steve Loveland
"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:52 min | 3 months ago

"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Update the delays in Palo alto the Bayshore freeway this update brought to buy junk king is sadly the cons of this set back up was an accident that involved someone who what was killed in an overturn accident the highway patrol says there was an initial collision a minor injury accident but then another car came up and made an unsafe move and ended up flipping over so person was ejected from the car a coroner's investigation is on going so expect delays were well yet north bound wanna one just after Embarcadero road and across the bay we had another overturn accident and that one still not out of the waste down five eighty west of seminary just wrapping that one now that one got a little complicated because people took off running so I'm not quite sure if they were apprehended or not but I do see delays on eastbound five eighty and no delays on eight eighty three downtown that's the name it's a freeway northbound and southbound traffic is light moving well haven't had a single problem for your ride on twenty four between Oakland and Walnut Creek called cut tunnel and traffic is moving great at the limit and that you sure freeway also no delays or new accidents to report between Berkeley and Malayo anda earlier problems on the bay bridge upper deck and lower deck pad no longer there so traffic is at the limit stop the spread of unwanted clutter by distancing yourself from all the junk you've accumulated over the years let junk king hauled away with a free virtual estimates one hundred percent touchless pickup and no contact payments call triple a Tripoli junk that's eight eight eight eight eight eight five six eight five mention curbside for fifteen percent off your next service next update five forty eight on the traffic leader KCBS partly cloudy overnight with overnight lows in the upper forties we are going to see the start of some high pressure building in tomorrow's gonna bump up temperatures.

Oakland Walnut Creek Berkeley KCBS Palo alto bay bridge Tripoli
Revisiting the Archive: Edythe Eyde

Making Gay History

02:42 min | 4 months ago

Revisiting the Archive: Edythe Eyde

"I had just moved down to Los Angeles in nineteen forty five after I spent two and a half miserable years being a secretary in Palo Alto. I moved down here. I knew no gay people in Palo Alto. As a matter of fact I didn't even know the Word Lesbian in Palo Alto and the way I did find out was I was sunning myself up on the top of the garage of the place where I had Rome and some other girls that lived in the building came up to and spread out their towels. I somehow noticed that all of their talk was The plenty of it. They never mentioned boys names and I thought well gee that's refreshing to hear some people talk that aren't always talking about their boyfriends and breakup and this that and the other one of the girls turned to me and said are you gay and I said well. I try to be as happy as I can. Under the circumstances but and they all laugh then they said. Oh no no and they told me what it meant and I said well yes. I guess I am because I don't. I don't really actively go out and search for BOYFRIENDS I. I don't care for that. And so they will. You must come with us to a girls softball game. The Game Wasn't exciting to me aboard the Tara. A May I mean. I just don't care for Sports. I know that's very funny for a lesbian to say but it is true. I never have cared for but I went along to be with the crowd. You see then the next thing next week or so. They took me down to a gay bar. I looked around man. I knew tears came to my is partly because of the cigarette. Smoke and I thought gee how wonderful that all these girls can be together so the girls could dance together there so I started dancing with one or the other of them. That would come over and ask me. I never asked them. They asked me because I was obviously feminine. I had my hair long and I wore jewelry and I just didn't look like a gay guy how you know. I didn't have the close cropped hair tailored attire. That was so prevalent in those days and I didn't do any of that jazz because I just didn't feel like it. You know and I was darned if I'm GONNA. I was going to do it just because everybody else did. I mean I am a girl. I've always been a girl. The only difference is I like girls.

Palo Alto Los Angeles Rome Secretary Softball Sports
Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

Unreserved

07:16 min | 4 months ago

Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

"Good afternoon I just wanted to show everybody what I had for sale tournament. Some quick cash. I have tons of these hoops through the loops. Dangles anything that's like Brick stitch dangles is thirty. Five dollars for me. Anyway come on my staff level. This is for those of you. That can't get out and smart yourselves. He's allow sacred smoke. Sage runway all negative feelings negative energy Tyler Nizhny late and I'm GONNA be dancing with today are affected by Kevin. May this stent from the protected by stay safe in the hope? That was a little bit from the Social Distance Powell. Facebook group page which was created to bring together people who would normally be hitting the PAO trail pretty soon but earlier this month. North America's largest power. The gathering of nations in Albuquerque made the difficult decision to cancel. The event powwow season is a community stable for first nation people. It's where different nations meet and also where indigenous vendors make a large chunk of their annual income. Dan Simon's the founder of womp somewhere usually heads out on the road to sell his jewelry and Art Ed powwows but because events are being canceled he decided to launch a digital Powell which he's calling the social distance Powell. He joins me from Montana. Hello Hello recently. Gathering of nations cancelled their annual general gathering. As I mentioned as a Vendor Palau's are where you sell your jewelry and art. So how did it make you feel to find out? The POWWOW was cancelled so for me. Personally have had different experiences with this. This is all felt like a dream. Hopefully I think I'm waking up from soon because Kind of amazing that this is all of our reality right now. Not just one person who is experiencing this. Everyone is around the world you know and a lot of vendors. I don't want to speak for myself. Many vendors rely on POW income for a living just like myself just in two months of the spring. A lot of vendors lost between TEN THOUSAND AND THIRTY TO FORTY THOUSAND DOLLARS. Tennis became general bracket there that income that we're losing and I was really depressed about this because I try to provide for my family. And this is a damper on me. You know myself and I know it's heard a lot of other vendors and there's not really a platform for all of us to sell their wares and not just vendors but no singers that are affected by this dancers that are affected by. This theory was not really a platform to share our voice. So I'm blown away and that's taking off. And it's pretty amazing supporting love all the support and love outweighs anything that's negative absolutely so vendors like you. How much can people make on the Palo trail? Typically I don't want to speak for myself but Most vendors bracket would be anywhere from twenty five thirty thousand up to one hundred two hundred fifty thousand. It just depends on what you're selling. And so how? Do people participate in the social distancing power? So we are on a group page on facebook right now again. This is just a week old so things are transforming as I'm talking. We're trying to focus on live feeds. There's a lot of people that are sending pictures in you know. We all are kind of used to Facebook and getting those likes and comments but for us in the group. This isn't what it's about it's not about the likes and comments it's about people having the platform in all being heard and One thing I've learned to withdrew pages on facebook. There's with people trapped in their houses. Right now is a lot of negativity and this is a lot of negativity. So it's coming out at us in. I know people don't mean to direct it at us. It's just what happens with humans. That's what we do a lot of time. We attacked ourselves now. This is the time to kind of sit back and reflect on. How did we end up in this space that we're in right now so Dan? How does the FACEBOOK group work exactly? Okay so anyone. That's on facebook Join the group There's about a reaching about seventy thousand people on there right now this past weekend. We had her first Powell online. It was kind of a test. No-one some you're on there I mean all the everything's up there on the group it's been really positive in. I hope it continues in a positive way. In on dangle that I have helped so many people there are so many people stuck in their homes and this has been an outlet for them to not feel like they're in that space to connect with others and all the people at is brought together has been kinda magical. I wanted this to have the platform where we area this week were featuring storytelling so there are some people sending in videos just upon their stories their traditions you know from their own tribes so you had said earlier that you've received a lot of love and support but also criticism. What kinds of love and support? Have you received from community? And how is the turnout been? Read you a one that I just sent in my other founders today on this motion to tribal enbrel human name but he says thank you Sam. My mom is able to get that medicine from your page. She's an eighty four year old elder and she loves what you've created so getting those messages. I like. I said it's definitely outweigh the negative things we've received on this. So is this something that you're planning to continue this is in its infancy so This is a platform. Want to keep in create. We're kind of still deciding what route to take. This is definitely the world right now. We don't know what's going to happen with this virus. This is definitely going to continue as long as it's virus continues and then from there We're GONNA see what happens. Know as one of my elders. I'm from the peak while Driving Connecticut myself so one of my elders tall oak. Just WanNa give him a shout-out He always told me. We can't plan for tomorrow. You never know what to expect for tomorrow so I can't plan just kind of do a creator guides me to do so. During the pandemic indigenous people are gathering together and getting creative of how they do it over the Internet. Is this something that you've been seeing a lot of in the United States well after this platform launched? I've been seeing people all over the world a lot of Canadians. Well in the states So it's been quite the outpour I mean just in an hour. We get a hundred posts people wanting to post you know if you look online anything you'll see a social distance. Pow is now a movement in. I didn't expect us to become a movement. I've had other groups online. This is the first one that went viral. It's just again all kinds of crazy. Well certainly speaks to a need right as indigenous people when we have to gather and be loving with each other Well thank you so much for your time today. Dan Welcome is pleasure to be here and I hope it continues in a positive way. That was the point of all this suggested. Kinda spread. Light love and positivity with everything. That's going on.

Facebook Powell Montana Tyler Nizhny Sage Albuquerque Palo Trail Vendor Palau Kevin Dan Simon Tennis Dan Welcome POW North America DAN Connecticut United States Founder Ed Powwows
Leadership During Difficult Times

The Strategerist

08:09 min | 4 months ago

Leadership During Difficult Times

"Guest on this episode of the strategic is Keith Hennessy. These days he teaches at the Stanford Graduate School of Business Stanford Law School and his leadership fellow at the Bush Institute where he's teaching our leadership program sessions during the Bush administration. Though Keith was the assistant to the president for economic policy was the director of the National Economic Council during the financial crisis in two thousand seven and two thousand eight so those days Keith was working around the clock to blunt the impact of that financial crisis on on our economy. So we thought it'd be interesting today to hear about that experience while we're reacting to the cove in nineteen pandemic. That's happening right now. Keith thank you so much for taking time while your social distancing to call in happy to help hello from Palo Alto California. Well first off. Can you paint a picture of what it's like to be a decision maker in government during a time like this because I know right now? I'm watching the news. And there's just a constant stream of information things are changing by the minute and some of it is is fact some of it is conjecture. Some of it is somewhere in between. What's that stream of information like inside the White House and in our government? Yeah well an advantage. You have when you're working in the White House is that you get you. Get the best information that's out there. I always joke that one of the wonderful privileges. You can pick up the phone call pretty much anyone in the world and say. I need to help the president understand about your area of expertise. Can you spend some time with me? The person will always say yes. And then you have. You have a tremendous Roster of experts working in the government and then also outside of government Who can help feed you information? So the information tends to find you and if it doesn't you've you've got a team of talented people who can go find out The best available answer to any question. That's out there but there definitely is sort of a fog of war we're You think you know what's going on and you probably have a better picture than almost anyone else But there are a lot of unknowns. There are a lot of things that You know that you're just making educated guesses at so that's tough in hindsight This is one of the big mistakes. In terms of historic analysis is in hindsight. It is very easy to forget the things that now seem obvious. But we're not obvious time You know the biggest mistake about hindsight announces at the time. You didn't know what was going to happen next. And while you thought you knew what your actions and decisions might Might produce you're not always certain And then the other thing is is stressful And so you learn how individuals react to stressful environments and then you learn how teams React to stressful environments and you know I think it also depends on how long the crisis Lassen how long the pressure is applied. It's one thing to be in a stressful situation for days and weeks. It's a whole another thing to be in it for weeks and months and wears on people and In overtime that takes a toll because the people who are making these decisions are after all humans right. That's actually kind of interesting. And and so how? How do you keep team functioning under these kind of in under this kind of situation? And where might we might be doing this for a long time? Yeah I'm not sure I have many tricks. We were in in one respect. We were fortunate in that the the financial crisis in two thousand eight hit in year eight. So of the Bush team We knew how to operate as a team. We knew how the mechanisms of governments worked on a lot of US had four or five or six or seven years under our belts working for this president working with each other So we had those advantages of experience and know each other and frankly had a really good team In that last year With with Hank Paulson sort of as the the field. General for the president with Ben Bernanke over at the Fed and Kevin Warsh And with a lot of amazing people internally and so that teen Kinda you know it means that you don't have to worry about those aspects of it. You can just focus on the crisis of hand. So we had a bunch of pros. We had a bunch of pros. Who knew how to work together. And then you know you just you kind of say look. There will be time to sleep and time to rest on the back end of this. We're just going to keep pushing basically because we have to. I think the other thing is the morale is really important and and Bush thing. We were really fortunate because the morale comes in large part from the president You know the morale and the tone I always say that the tone in the White House is eighty percent set by the president and twenty percent by the White House Chief of staff and we had a president and a chief of staff who were creating a tone and environment where the rest of us didn't have to worry about the politics We could basically just focus on. What was the? What was the best policy? And how do we try to make it happen? So then you mentioned the that you knew how the government works and the government with all of its departments and with experts who sometimes have competing priorities. So in general strokes. Can you talk about how to how these departments all work together and coordinate during a crisis like this? Well that's what the White House policy councils are for. At the time we had four of them there are now three In the White House of the National Security Council is the granddaddy of them all And the National Economic Council in the Domestic Policy Councils And I worked in a on the National Economic Council staff so these are people who work in the White House for the president and Their job is to coordinate policy making in their in their area for the All the information that comes in for the president goes through the Policy Council to sort of structure. It make sure the presence president knows what's going on and what that best information is and in particular because the president has got a lot of advisers each of whom is responsible for looking at a part of the problem and the Policy Council Stash. Job is to make sure that the president has the information that they need to look at the whole problem. And so when you run one of these Policy cancels you get very good at running meetings and conference calls to pull all the advisers together To to compare information to figure out what decisions the president to make and then to make sure that the president hears from all of you know his advisors that he needs to we. We would joke that. Our job was to set up clean fights cleaner where you'd have conflicting advice. The you know one team advisors would set a precedent you do X. And other advisers would say the president should do why you. WanNa make sure the president gets the information. He needs so that he can make that decision and then when he makes the decision that everybody throughout the executive branch actually executes. Does what the president wants to do right so you would actually present. Exxon wide both team ex ante y presented the president. Let him make that decision. Yeah and I shouldn't describe as really two teams that a mismatch speak mistaken. Are My these are. These are different advisors who were all part of the president skiing. But right right right just disagree on a particular question and You know these. These decisions are hard. None of the options are particularly good. Because you're always over constrained But there are just different. Trade offs different choices that the advisers would make. And what you WANNA do. Is You want to hear the president. Have the president here. Those arguments be able to push the advisers. And then say okay. Here's what we're going to do You know the privilege of working for the president. Is You get to be in the room to make the argument or the option that you think you should make. And then when he hasn't sides it you've got to go out there and execute even if he went with The other option one that you didn't recommend be interesting thing about the financial crisis is that there were a lot fewer disagreements about what to do among

President Trump White House Assistant To The President Keith Hennessy National Economic Council Bush Bush Institute Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Palo Alto California Policy Council United States Exxon National Security Council Director Hank Paulson Ben Bernanke Kevin Warsh
The COVID-19 crisis is making the internet more available

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:31 min | 5 months ago

The COVID-19 crisis is making the internet more available

"Millions of people and more every day are working from home or learning from home during the corona virus outbreak. And that means we need the internet now more than ever Wi fi virtual private networks to connect securely to work broadband cellular connections so is our digital infrastructure up to the task and how can companies and even cities prepare for such a massive unplanned experiment. Jonathan Rankin tall is the former chief information officer. For the city of Palo Alto California. He says there's enough infrastructure but it isn't always evenly distributed there is available bandwidth in the US the big telcos of builds some significant infrastructure across the country. What we're going to have to see is communities. Get access to that broadband. They're still in the United States. Nineteen million people who don't have access to broadband in part of the problem is it can be a little expensive for for many homes and also just some communities. Don't have the prerequisite technology in place. So maybe having millions of Americans all of a sudden do remote work. It's going to act as a strong encouragement for government intervention more spending and for the Telco companies to also step up as well where they're still got right and we have seen even just in the last few days companies say that they're going to drop data caps that they're going to increase speeds for lower income users is going to be any going back after that. I think we're GONNA have a lot of questions I mean. I hope people to wash their hands after this event is over. These are good behaviors and we need to continue them. Some of our experience suggests that if we get over this we may go back to our old routine and all the wonderful things that the private sector's doing to step up right now. Dr. Mayo resort to the way we've been doing things. I don't know the answer to that. You know it'll depend how things really start to progress over the next few weeks I think if it's long term which I certainly hope not people will get used to it and there might be a greater inclination to to keep it in place or perhaps offer access to lower income communities providing them with reduced course and more access as we see more people effectively adopting remote work because it works right like. Do you think this is the moment when we will all say? Oh Hey turns out? The Internet really is a utility. Well I think we'd all agree now that the Internet is magical. It's absolutely magical me liquid. It's enabling us to not only have millions and millions of workers all over the world work from home but it's allowing scientists to collaborate in a speed that we've never seen before collaborating on vaccines sharing information between science organizations and governments and working on the medicine so the Internet you know we have to say is is quite a magical platform for humanity right. Let's talk about security for a bit. What do companies have to do? I mean some companies work with very sensitive information and require people to be offsite even to onsite to access it. What can they do? There's gotta be continual investment in Cybersecurity. This is not a you. Write a check once and you're good to go. You got to build a little department depending on the size of organization immature big airline company or a bank. You're going to have a huge security organization and you're going to be investing likely hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars a year in keeping the security good so on the enterprise side for sure absolutely for sure. The costs are high in their continuing. To increase on the home side. Does enough low cost tools. I mean there's actually a handful of VPN software that a home user can console that's free and then there's some premium services that are relatively low cost so if you got VPN some backup software. Antivirus and anti malware. You're you're in good shape you know in the twenty first century. Don't we can guarantee that you're going to have absolute security. This is something we're going to have to live with and fight for a longtime Jonathan. Rankin tall is the former chief information officer for the city of Palo Alto California. He also wrote the book smarter cities for Dummies when it comes to the digital divide and making sure everyone has access to the magic some. Isp's are stepping up. Spectrum is offering sixty days of free access to homes WHO HAVE KIDS IN K. Through twelve or college students if they don't already have it comcast says it's doing the same for low income households in its service areas

Jonathan Rankin Palo Alto California Chief Information Officer United States WI Comcast Dr. Mayo ISP
Pants on Fire: Cheerleading

Pants On Fire

09:29 min | 5 months ago

Pants on Fire: Cheerleading

"Welcome to pants on. Fire that game show where kids choose between the cheerful and spirited truth and the bad sportsmanship of lies. I'm your host Deborah Gold. Cnn in the studio today is our sound effects about Lisa which stands for live in-studio audience too but not too but that is the question. Pardon me I poured in the lady. Thank you but what is it that you are doing? I'm practicing my lines. I have an audition tomorrow for the robot. Regional Theater production of Hamlet. How that's exciting to thrilling. Indeed but to be honest I am nervous. Oh I really want to be in this play and I've been setting all the lines for weeks. I think you're going to be great and remember this above all to thine own self be true. What is that some sort of fortune cookies saying? No it's a line from no forget it. Why don't you take your mind off your audition and tell us how our game works Shaw Melody? Every ways we bring onto grownups. One is an expert the other ally and it's the job of a human to help us figure out who is too because no one gets about Aligarh better than a kid. I mean we hope right. Otherwise Radha business. What are we lying about today Deborah? We are lying about cheerleading. An activity of organized cheering chanting dancing and sometimes competing with stumps Lisa. Do you know anything about cheerleading. I'm sure had mentioned my great uncle. The electronic scoreboard was installed at a basketball court. I used to go to games and watch him keep score the cheerleaders. Were pretty good but nothing is as exciting as watching your uncle. Flip those numbers. That's real spirit. I I can appreciate that but I think you're going to really feel the spirit when we learn more about cheerleading. Now whatever okay. I say we should find out about our contestants shall we? Who might that be? I know tell us are human child contestant as an eight year old who loves everything about baseball. I'm Talkin every billy leave of it lily are you. I'm good welcome to pass on. We're so happy that you're here. You love everything about baseball. You like watching it or playing it. That's cool duva favorite baseball team. Yes the New York mets. The New York mets and dealer favorite player on the team Noah syndergaard. Mister met. Yeah I was stuffy of him only and I went to high school together. I don't know about that and tells. I hear that there is a forbidden word in your house and it starts with the letter Z. And it is perhaps a vegetable and getting close to something you don't care for Sabre Broccoli might be Zucchini. This is something you do not like correct blab not in any which way not even Zucchini ice cream. Ill Zucchini no. It's kind of fun. So can all right. We'll we want to know some more fun facts about you lilly. But we're GONNA do it the way we do it on pants on fire playing two truths and a lie. Okay so you're gonNA tell us three facts about yourself. Two of those facts will be true. One will be ally and we have to figure out which one is the lie. Are you ready? Yeah Excellent. What are your three facts on so first one is my dreams go to West Point West Point? I know absolutely everything about Harry Potter. Threes my grandparents live in Spain Spain. No not space stain. That'd be fun. Okay what do you think Lisa? Which one of those things is a lie? She said earlier that she knew everything about baseball. Now trying to come back and say she knows everything about Harry Potter. That's like a lot of that. One is the law. That's fair. I think there's one things she doesn't know about. Maybe so lily. Which one of those things is a lie Is My grandparents live Spain? So you're saying you know everything about Harry Potter. Yes okay. Let's see. Do you know what Harry Potter does? Yeah he's a wizard. She does everything she does. Okay Lisa can we get some welcome music? For OUR CHEER EXPERTS. Two four six eight khurda appreciate. I want to hear about it if it's me otherwise I don't talk about it. I just appreciate me. Our first expert is Allison Williams. Allison introduce yourself to Palo Lily. I am a CO owner of an All Star cheerleading program in Brooklyn New York. Pay Thank you very much and our second expert is Gerry mccrae Jerry. Please introduce yourself to lily. Lilly how are you? I'm Cheri and competitive cheer choreographer at Various High Schools in New York and Connecticut and they used to cheerleader twenty Peac University. Two thousand five to two thousand nine go Queenie plus enough. Let's see those are some cheerful sounds? Lisa well I always feel cheerful. It's I'd say time toads. We are going to put our experts on the hot seat while they answered lillies questions Lisa. Who should we put on the hot seat? I Jerry Maguire. Because he's going to show us the money. His name is not Jerry Maguire. But I like your thinking anyway I fine. Blue Okay Lily. What question do you have for Jerry to start? Tell me about what you do. What does a typical day in your job? Look like sure so. I've been hired to come up with competitive cheer routines at various high schools. So I go. I work with the students. I kind of envisioned the whole routine. I teach it to them and we go through all the motions and until we're ready to go. Put it into competitions clue. Yeah that's my job to. That's basically what I do. I see. Allison how did cheerleading become a sport? That's an excellent question. So initially cheerleading began in the UK in the mid eighteen hundreds and then traveled over to the US and at first there were college students who were in the audience watching a football game and the athletes weren't doing well during the football game and so the audience decided that they were going to get together and they were going to encourage their fellow athletes from there the sport grew throughout the US and then officially became competitive sport in the nineteen eighties. It's also spread throughout the entire world since then cool. This is for you. Jerry what would you say is the worst injury seen on the Mat So one time I did see a basket. Toss gone wrong person. Just didn't catch the flyer so she fell down. Hit the person who was on the base that they both kind of hit their head on the ground and Yeah so just to head. Injuries is the worst I saw. Because you know you need your you need your brain to be intact or two. That are they okay. They're they're still with us. That's good yes where I don't see bring them. He said they were with us. It's just an expression that means they're non dead. Humans are obsessed with. Who's alive who is dead going? What are you robots obsessed with? Good question we have you ever had something called Zucchini tuition. So mean Okay Lily. Quick change the subject away from that. Vegeta- this one's for both of you. Can you tell me about the jump? The herkie Chanda Hurricane Joe. Okay who wants to take that question? I'll start okay. So there was a fellow named Lauren Turkey and he founded the NCI the national cheerleading association. And he also invented the pom pom so they named jump after him because everyone loves him and he big in the world of cheerleading. And it's just this fantasy cheerleading jumping with some nice arches in aerials well to add onto that Lawrence her car. The reason why the jump was specific named after him because he attempted to do a split jump and instead bent his leg and as a result he came up with this jump. That did not exist. Which is why was named after him the hurricane.

Lisa Gerry Mccrae Jerry Harry Potter Baseball New York Mets Deborah Gold Allison Williams Jerry Maguire Spain Various High Schools CNN Regional Theater Palo Lily Basketball Shaw Melody United States Chanda Hurricane Joe Aligarh Mister West Point
Coronavirus Impact: Gap Closes New York Office

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:26 sec | 5 months ago

Coronavirus Impact: Gap Closes New York Office

"Gap has closed its lower Manhattan headquarters after a worker tested positive for the coronavirus a memo sent to gap employees says that person is recovering at home and all workers in the building are being told to work from home until further notice MasterCard's coronavirus cases a Brazil based employee who had visited a MasterCard office in purchase New York the offices in purchase and sell Palo are closed and are being

Mastercard Brazil New York Palo Manhattan
Poltergeist: A Playful Ghost?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:37 min | 5 months ago

Poltergeist: A Playful Ghost?

"So far in my investigation of the paranormal metaphysical. I've covered a lot of territory today. I'm GONNA look poltergeists. Generally these are spirits that are thought to be playful ghosts. An example of a playful ghosts occurred here in. Ashland Oregon. When a psychologist from Palo Alto California purchased a home here and ask once belong to one of the founders of the

Palo Alto California Ashland Oregon
"palo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:55 min | 7 months ago

"palo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In downtown Palo alto it gets my heart and he began comparing Facebook to to Google and the next kind of big platform on the internet and I remember thing myself great and how much with possible and but at the same time feeling like because those field goals because the goal and it had been shifting so often why not you know what I mean maybe and it will but even in even at that moment throughout that period it was hard for me to understand why I just didn't feel it as much as he or as much as many of the other employees because in theory you know it was it was an immense opportunity there was there were so many people are signing up there was it was so exciting for for him at least it was it was a mission you know the idea of connecting people to one another was good in and of itself right and I could understand that and at the time on I leaned in that direction and agreed with that but I also was a bit skeptical of of the idea that connection and alone was necessarily going to transform the world I did the the the the the missionary bent to it it sounded and some a little bit too much like a lot of the very religious people that I grew up with who could we're almost blinded by by a face so much she couldn't think about some of the problematic effects of religion or anything anything else so so I stayed as I talk about in the work for for three years and then went on to something I did feel a mission and which is was to work for then senator Obama I'm saying just in those early years at Facebook for another minute I would you know part of what your work now has been about is grappling with the ethics of what you helped create right and so it made me wonder I mean you know I try to think of myself at like nineteen and twenty and twenty one and what what my ethical quandaries where it's like did you guys have moments as a crew where you would sort of pause and be like all right we ARE creek is is this thing is as big as it feels like it's going to be are we pausing to ask ethical questions along the way or was it just you know hit the next mark no yeah and that that that that was a problem yeah and well I think that they're grappling with that more I do diverge on a whole host of places where he in the Facebook leadership team have landed as I've been public about but there were there there wasn't a lot of of talk about the the ethical implications I mean it's so easy to highlight the positive stories but you naturally you know gravitate away from the negative ones I'm their customer service features they were priced some privacy issues there some safety issues in those things began to be built and built and over time so there was awareness of the fact that the the platform could be used and I negative or destructive way but no there there was a there was a face that on balance this was going to be good for the world yeah we will return to that I wanna go to your your role in the bombing campaign and you were one of the people who sort of created the whole digital strategy and you write about the book which I thought was really interesting that people largely track that up to here's this Facebook guy he knows tack he figured out how to great technological solutions campaigning when in fact what you felt like was really different about what you did had little to do with tech and much more to do with something else can talk a little bit about what you're most proud of around that work yeah the tech in the two thousand eight campaign was not anything particular error when he slick let's say I mean the it was it was helpful to have some tools that have been built the remnants out of the dean campaign in two thousand four company called blue state digital it build some built some tools that the Obama campaign with able to contract and and by Sir the tech was helpful and we were able to do things the because of the tech but the real magic of that era was the fact that we had a candidate who asked people to believe again and to combat the cynicism that was pervasive then I think it's gotten even worse now and then when he asked people to believe again there was an opportunity to then say okay I can do something and to for people to raise their hand certainly give some money of course but also to go and say actually you know organized event on Saturday and our role as online organizer's was yes to build the tool to make it easy to like set a time and recruit people to come the authors say will we can do it the event to the agenda and how we gonna make sure that that work is actually gonna help elect Obama as president so you know instead of just talking about how great he is let's talk about who our friends who we can recruit the door so we can come knock on the of phone calls that we can make in a local field office that kind of infrastructure building and because that primary was so extended between between Obama and Hillary Clinton what it meant is that as the state's came became increasingly important in each state there was a there was a an infrastructure grassroots infrastructure that had been at work largely through digital connections for months if not for years and so Obama kept winning in the states like Idaho and Oklahoma and the and unexpected places for particular for a black American like a bomb to be winning with these big margins and I think a piece of that was the fact that we have the technology to head enable people to self organize for quite some time yeah and but the much bigger force obviously was the candidate who is asking them to believe again in the first place and did you have any mentorship in organizing like how did you make that leap from Facebook to as a campaign like that we had a great set of organizer's on that campaign Buffy wicks who's now in the an elected here in the bay area it was one of the field leaders they were leaders in each of the states who were focused on and and so there was that there was a big there's a big network I'm trying to learn as quickly as I could portion we along primary certain February of seven of two thousand seven and the first first caucus I think with a full year later so that that was helpful there sometimes but the plane together at least a little bit before it started on the runway do you remember your first time seeing Brack Obama speak and like being aware of him as a candidate the first time I think I met him in the Chicago office for the first time I had seen him give speeches on television and digitally and read his books but I met him for the first time in the office but but I think that's I don't know I had gone to rally it's a little like as I'm asking like I feel like there's a little bit of a forest Gump quality to your life because it's like you like in counter mark Zuckerberg at Harvard and then you're encountering Brock about in Chicago and it's like you're really one of the like major moments of our I don't know if you want to get there but this is a big part of what I talk about the book this is also a problem for me because I had because Facebook was such a breakout success and then obviously the Obama campaign not just one but we wanted a certain kind of way where technology was critical to it I I got very convinced that I could like you know what's next I can you know I felt like I had the midas touch yeah I was totally wrong about I had I had done some smart things but I have gotten very lucky in in multiple moments in my life and so some of that does experience though problematically turned in to hubris which you know let's all kinds of failures in the in the period well let's hear that so then you get a great exactly let's go to the good learning really important part of not just your story but every you know twenty something year old story of of you know coming up against your own limitations and your own world views so you you bought the new Republic famously and and so you know this hundred year old print magazine I'm sure many of her from familiar and you had this vision of journalists bringing into the twenty first century fixing this business model of journalism which of course I know all too well so broken and it didn't work it failed and it failed at a very high monetary costs but also to some extent reputational costs for you feeling like one for the mac and for the magazine and and you said that that was a real turning point for you which you just started to to him that they can you talk a little bit about the texture of that turning point what was the learning their yeah I mean it was so as as you were saying hi I'm Buffy Republic in twenty twelve you know I'm it was in a period right around when Facebook went public I had I had money and wanted to do something that was good for the world I had always been interested in journalism and really believe in its importance and in democracy I particularly loved the long from kind of journalism I was you know I'm particularly then you know a subscriber to New York review of books The New Yorker the new Republic occasionally often on the nation like I was in and in many ways I just couldn't get enough of this of this stuff and the fact that so many of these publications are particularly new Republic was what felt to me like at that point really struggling to to make it work felt like an opportunity and that's where the the hubris came and I mean I I really did believe that with some smarts elbow grease and capital and an investment we could find silver bullet we could we could find some way not necessarily to make it you know a super profitable endeavor but but when that would be break even and I was last person in the world to learn that a lot of these publications have never been very keep and they were effectively essentially public goods and I spend multiple years trying to apply a kind of market world logic that when these things have to be a business for them to work in the long term not missing what was right there directly visible to in retrospect it felt like everybody but me which is that these things are public institutions they were public goods they were never going to make money they were probably going to lose money they happen to be incorporated as for profits a hundred years ago but they they're effectively not for profits and just naming that and taking that owns a responsibility but I I had too much too much ambition too much too much optimism so I pushed in invested quite a bit of money and and pushed particularly in the digital direction because as much as I want to hold on to print I also want to bring in new audiences and then made some pretty fundamental management errors I brought in the CEO who wanted to let go the editor it it got very messy and the other at the time and doesn't senior editors left on mass and we had a you know a moment where we had to stop printing for a couple months we re staff we we grew back but there's no question that the institution was weakened because of that experience because of mine failure but but I also think that in the long term the new Republic I sold it to you a year later it's still going it it's and it's one of a very special small set of institutions in American public discourse which I hope will you know fixed on for a long time how did you get through that like how did you after all of the successes having that failure like did you.

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"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:57 min | 7 months ago

"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

"In Palo alto are breathing a little easier now that police are stepping up patrols around churches and other places of worship as KCBS is Matt Bigler reports the extra security comes in the wake of two incidents of Randall is them in the past week the graffiti described as anti Christian first showed up at a grocery store in Palo alto and then here at the university a enemies I in church the city's oldest African American congregation I was profoundly distressed I was angry I was fearful what next pastor collamer Smith praise police for increasing patrols around not just their church but all places of worship here the reference as they are also adding lighting surveillance and starting to use the buddy system this has steal this to be more active in our community but we're going to be cautious and on there meanwhile police spokesperson Jeanine de la Vega says they are asking the faithful to remain vigilant and report any suspicious activity we take crimes against the worship very seriously like we did in this case we're gonna fully investigated work best to locate whoever's responsible in Palo alto Matt Bigler KCBS the Methodists are splitting over the controversy real issues of gay marriage and gay ministers KCBS is Jim Taylor with the details church leaders say they are agreed to spin off a traditionalist Methodist denomination that would continue to oppose same sex marriage and gay clergy Julie south Washington post reporter covers religion faith and spirituality this is a new proposal that has support from a wide variety of leaders in the church and is expected to pass all right the United Methodist Church splitting up which one is going to be bigger and and which one is going to have more of a voice now in the United States the United Methodist Church that will remain as the traditionalists are the ones who are going to break away so the more liberal church is expected to be larger in the United States in the rest of the world there's a real question and I'm hearing today from conservatives and liberals who have very different opinions they both think that the global church is going to go with them a global vote does come this may Jim Taylor case CBS a group born out of the San Francisco counterculture celebrates its fiftieth anniversary this weekend the **** cats were a self described group of hippie acid phreak drag queens who actually came together in the Haight Ashbury in nineteen sixty nine they're celebrating their fiftieth anniversary though at the beginning of twenty twenty **** cats are golden taking place tonight at the Victoria theatre in the mission district the event is sold out case CBS news time one forty four sports is next when you're stuck in traffic during to us we're the only bay area radio station with the live and local traffic reports around the clock we are the traffic leader all news when it was six nine and A. M. seven forty KCBS upon KCBS line Kerry hit a sac why light or technology could be useful in Bosch vehicles see the world in a super human way before that though we do wanna check sports with Bruce me down the river wild card weekend open Saturday afternoon the ball game to watch buffalo at Houston even though the Texans are favored even on the bills in the bright young quarterback Josh out when he's only twenty three years old out of the university of Wyoming actually grew up on a farm just outside of Fresno the afternoon game with the patriots hosting the Tennessee Titans just might turn of the last stand for Tom Brady the forty two year old future hall of Famer has been given any indication that he's gonna retire but you have to wonder how much longer he can play still the patriots to one of the elite teams in the league even though they were stunned by Miami at home last weekend Brady well knows that in any football game the margin of error is very thin one play could lead to another good place could lead to another good players Lisa good series which leads to the quarter which he's got half which leads to the game comes down to a couple plays at the end of the game you know there's been a lot of post season games that have been like that where when I blown teams out forty five nothing I mean these are type games and that's one great catcher one great tackler one great interception one great ship sack not be able to make the make the play well here's a rather unusual story for you you might remember that met south into the former a start your one SS but is missed all of last year because of a fractured ankle turns out that he was dropping a wild boar is ranch barely had the board caged or so we thought the Borgata loose charged him and says but it's either fell down or got smacked pretty hard by the enraged animal the bottom line is that says but as had half of his twenty nine million dollar contract cut by the Mets process but it didn't play a game in two thousand and nineteen I don't think he has any beef coming at the sports that's Bruce McGowan KCBS we.

Palo alto
"palo" Discussed on Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

01:42 min | 9 months ago

"palo" Discussed on Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

"Is your barrier restaurant. Foreing all jacked up. Your Foundation needs to be protected from heat chemicals and other contaminants at the same time. You want to make sure it's slip resistant. Even clean up your messes with soap and water. You know who to call us. We've been manufacturing poured in place for instance two thousand two and we've got solutions just to fit any facilities needs going. visit our website at res- dot net that's R. E. S. T. K.. Dot Net. Drop US line and we'll come to you for free free evaluation. Have you ever thought about owning your own brewery. But don't know what it takes to get one bill. We're storytime construction. And we build breweries the most experienced and hands on contractors when it comes to building new breweries and tapper four expanding existing breweries. We offer full buildouts remodeling and additions as low as consulting and construction management. Give us a call at seven seven zero seven three three four three four three storytime construction. We we build breweries. Follow the beer guys on facebook twitter and Instagram and enjoy it at all now. Back to the beer guy's radio show welcome back to show want to give a quick shout out to one of our great radio affiliates W. R. M. N. or teen ten. Am in Elgin Illinois Espn Radio and W. R. M. and every Saturday at noon local time..

"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Palo Alto. Between essentially embarcadero road and Marsh road. You have the two left lanes blocked for demolition your next traffic. Data. One twenty eight on the traffic leader, KCBS KCBS bay area weather forecast, clear and warm this morning lows from the upper fifties to the low seventies sunny and warm to hot again today, seabreeze though, and some fog by afternoon. We'll, we'll start to cool things down a little bit high from the sixties and seventies at the coast, eighties around the bay, you go inland, and you'll find one hundred degrees again, we should have further cooling, on Wednesday, traffic and weather together, on the, it's on all news one zero six nine and AM seven forty KCBS. Yeah. Earthquake in the north bay this morning. A four point one magnitude quake struck at twelve Forty-six this morning near the geysers according to the US GS about six miles north of the geysers geothermic project. Sneer Cobb mountain felt as far as ways Healdsburg no damage or injuries reported. He admitted to the HP was high on meth when he led officers on a high speed chase in the predawn hours of San Jose ended when that suspect crashed into a mini. Van killing the driver Cape. CBS's Mike cope visas driver of the BMW was going one hundred plus and southbound one it took the year. But Ueno offramp ran a red light brought citing the minivan that just happened to be going through the intersection feel nothing but sympathy for the victim. We are sorry this happened, but I, I can't help but say that had MRs Amini stops this tragedy would have been avoided saddle CHP, captain, Jason Reardon identified the suspect as twenty eight year old Alexander Meany of San Jose. Mrs Vini will be charged with gross vehicular manslaughter DUI causing serious injury, felony hit and run felony evading a peace officer causing injury possession of vitamin for sale..

San Jose Ueno offramp Palo Alto Mrs Vini MRs Amini north bay Earthquake Sneer Cobb US Alexander Meany Jason Reardon Healdsburg BMW officer HP Van CBS one hundred degrees twenty eight year
"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"palo" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The Palo Alto humane society is launching its therapy. Pause program. KCBS is Margie Schaefer reports from Palo Alto that the special dogs have visited colleges senior centers and several tech companies to try and help people distress. The therapy ponds program is the brainchild of Arlene. Eski VS, what began as a final project in college has been brought to the Palo Alto humane society six dogs, and their owners, including ski has poodle many, visit schools senior homes, and tech companies many actually trained to be therapy dog could most of these dogs are trained by their own owners. They just have to have that personality. That's great eater that they're friendly. And then. Of course, needs to be owners education manager for the Palo Alto. Humane society Lenore Delgado says the team recently paid a visit to hiring service. Eightfold a I actually sat with them when they were working. I mean there were so pressure for what the actor they had work in the dogs were sitting there. And they were petting the dog at the same time, and I think it was really good distress research has shown interaction with animals can decrease levels of cortisol and lower blood pressure in Palo Alto, Margie, Schaefer, KCBI kind of seems like magic you use your credit card of one of those square payment terminals, and almost before you're done, drink, and the coffee, the receipts arrived in the Email, except sometimes somebody else gets the Email, the Wall Street Journal reports today that scene numerous cases where square receipts wound up in the wrong persons in everything from that Cup of coffee. Two in one case visit to the obsta Trish in exactly how this happens seems a bit unclear squared. Did tell the Wall Street Journal that in one case it reviewed the misdirected Email. Address had been used to get a receipt during an earlier square transaction at a different vendor. Those emailed receipts may seem like a plus for consumers..

Palo Alto humane society Palo Alto Margie Schaefer Wall Street Journal Lenore Delgado KCBS Arlene cortisol Eski Trish
"palo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"palo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Where is the standard off the cook? And you found out because all of our family there. So we starting to call to our family. She was in her office at work a few hours from the epicenter in Palo. She saw a su- NAMI warning on social media and managed to phone. Her sister to tell her to get to high ground after dead. Are we saw Feo us up the feed your of salami in Palo? But in the televisions is still. So if there is no salami in Palo, but three now is actually this is must be salami. And how did you feel is like? Putney golf course. Now is quick. Now. There's an earthquake now so. Now. While we was speaking the ground was shaking once again. Okay. Well, look take cover. Yes. Okay. Leanna UK's it a big one. No, it's not a comparatively far. Now. Okay. And that really within cut off moments later, we reconnect by phone. She moves outside to safety highly N, A you or I. Yes. This this. If you so we usually like experience this time liangel golly continues his story. After.

Palo Leanna UK NAMI Putney
"palo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"palo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"E. d. it's morning edition on I'm Brian watt California voters consider a, measure this November that would allow local governments to adopt or expand rent control it's not clear if the city, of Palo, Alto is ready to go that. Far but the. City council passed emergency ordinance last week to create the strongest, renter protections in the city's history owners of buildings with fifty or, more units must now pay some, tenants, up to seventeen thousand dollars. If. They're addicted through no fault of their own Palo Alto mayor Liz NIST joins. Me to talk about this good morning good morning how are you all right so. What made this so urgent in Palo Alto was the dozens of families in one downtown apartment building faced. Eviction mainly because the new owners wanted to turn it back into a hotel we've seen stories like this in the bay area a lot what was different this time What was different this time is that we know a great many of the people who. Were at that location however that wasn't the only reason we pass this, the rent and the living situation in. The, bay area has become so extreme so, we looked, not only. At that particular situation but we looked at any building where they have fifty or more units and we don't know when there might be another. Building, that comes up with no cause of action but. We will. Have not only? This first. Urgency or is in place but also a long-term one in places well there's no rent control in Palo Alto not yet not yet so do I hear you saying that you're really thinking. About it because it's not been an easy thing to sell. In a lot of communities Or something similar to it we. Have about forty five percent of. Our population Palo Alto I- renters and I, know that there are some on council really feel strongly they should have more protection others are really hesitant to. Get, even close to the topic it's about half and half, on our council so this is probably the closest we have come. In a while to having any control over landlords, and that was quite a step forward for the seven who voted for, it the other night maybe assign that the tide is changing maybe there could be more tenant protections. Coming and maybe we should look at the fact that there's an election, this fall are you saying that a. Lot, of the people on the council we're, looking towards, this election. And realizing that they needed to be sensitive to rising housing costs I think that is said perfectly so when we voted on this last year And I believe the term then used was rent stabilization at that point we were a five, to four vote this time we actually. Had seven of the eight members who are, present the night for Saturday town and so I think when one is running. For office when looks at all sides of the issue and I? Think that that would indicate that maybe this more interest now in renter protection I don't believe. Long-term that's going to be interested. In rent control that's Palo Alto mayor listeners When the federal government was making. No progress on treatment for HIV AIDS people around the country protested visibly and angrily that's, a sharp contrast to what's happening with Alzheimer's a devastating disease it has no. Treatment and little public outcry it's a, contrast Sharon Begley pointed out in her reporting and writing. For stat a health and biomedical science website she joins us? From Boston good morning Sharon that morning Brian to start. Can you tell, us how widespread is Alzheimer's in America. In this. Country five point seven million people currently have it the vast majority of them are over. Age sixty five projections are that by twenty fifty they'll be fourteen million cases and it's already the. Sixth leading cause of death so in terms of suffering and mortality it is a very, serious disease with just. Untold consequences and is it a bigger problem. In America than aids now Yeah it definitely is. The amount of attention drug development etcetera for HIV aids has been a hugely impressive and that's. Why I contrasted with Alzheimer's wondered where is. The outrage and where do you think the outrage, is just to. Give you context here Brian the last drug. That was approved. For Alzheimer's was approved in two thousand and three so fifteen, years and we have had nothing. So one expert I spoke. To use, a, term that made me just, gas practically he called it therapeutic nihilism and by that he meant that? The disease, has proved so challenging to scientists. But people have almost given up but that doesn't answer the question why are people not, outraged and there you have things like the age of the patients unfortunately for. People sixty five and older there's at, least some sentiment that you know what they've had a. Good life that's the way it goes there's also a? Science Traffic I'm not sure I would say rationale but sort of an explanation and that. Is drug after drug after. Drug experimental one has failed the drug companies have spent and lost billions of, dollars trying to find something that, works for Alzheimer's patients and they're. Giving up I'm not sure? That answers the question why is there not more outrage but. At, least that's part of it I, think you report to the drug companies have basically moved on trying to stop. Alzheimer's at earlier stages what's. Wrong with doing that That is great and we all hope it works if you could. Look at that person and say wow you don't actually have a diagnosis. Yet you're on the cusp of getting. It but here's. A drug that will keep you from actually developing, Alzheimer's absolutely that would be great but you know as we said. At the top there are five and a half million people and growing who already have the disease so what we are essentially. Saying to them and we have nothing. That will help you but not, only the u because it takes so. Long to develop a drug that means that anybody who was diagnosed probably for the next ten years there'll. Be nothing for them either Reporter Sharon Begley with the health and biomedical science website stat thanks so. Much for talking to us thank you Brian you're listening. To morning edition on funding for science is provided by the SD Bechtel junior. Foundation the Templeton religion trust in the Durkin Charlene caps and l. foundation. And we're going, to get a look at traffic. Real quick with Mel Baker looking eastbound on the, Dumbarton, bridge eighty four there at mid span we have a stall that's blocking the, middle lane again in the eastbound direction danville six eighty northbound just. Before. The Oslo road an. Unknown object there, in the middle lanes on the, bay bridge no metering lights traffic moving at the speed limit I'm Mel Baker for..

Alzheimer Palo Alto Brian watt Sharon Begley Palo America Alto Mel Baker City council Liz NIST biomedical science AIDS bay bridge Bechtel junior Boston Reporter federal government Charlene caps Oslo
"palo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"palo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Reach. Her and leaving increasingly frantic? Messages that day and? So immediately Erica was on her? Guards and so she? Asked the colleague who had? Tapped on the shoulder to accompany her to her car. As she left the office which the Cali did and when they walked out, of the building, a young man came out of a. Black SUV and. Made a beeline. Toward them, and handed to Erica a novel Nope The envelope contained a, letter very aggressive letter signed by David boies threatening to sue her for disclosing trade secrets and giving her an ultimatum which is that she had to meet with him and his voice Schiller associates a by a certain day on a certain time or she would be. Sued but before she even got the, letter what freaked her. Out the most was that the envelope had her name and an address typed on it and the address was a house in East Palo? Alto Colleagues at her new company that she had been. Staying at for less than two weeks because Erica, had, planned, on, moving to China and so she had given up the lease on her place in Oakland just a couple. Of weeks prior and started staying with, a colleague basically shacking collies house. In East Palo Alto and no one knew she was saying there except for the. Colleague her mother didn't even know she. Was staying there so there, was absolutely no way to have known this were this was for new address without having followed her and so so she goes home that that evening Friday evening petrified and stays inside this house in East Palo Alto with the blind closed all weekend doesn't dare go. Out and then first thing on Monday, morning she calls me. And she's terrified and she tells me what has happened and I'm in my car, at that point double parked on a street in Brooklyn.

Erica East Palo Alto East Palo David boies Cali Brooklyn Oakland China two weeks
"palo" Discussed on MacCast - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

MacCast - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"palo" Discussed on MacCast - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

"Point if when or how apple would actually use the technology they're developing there was a recent rumor that apple was planning on an inhouse atonomy employee shuttle service codenamed pale for palo alto to infinite loop but we haven't seen anything come from that i would imagine that would be some sort of expansion of their atonomy systems testing so kinda using it internally as he using themselves basically as guinea pigs for these things and they would be shuttling employees back and forth with an autonomous shuttle which would he still pretty cool to see a who knows if battle actually happen listeners listeners to the back cast know that my own personal theory is that apple hopes to develop a car as a service program and that would be of course far off in the future but basically the idea being that you know we don't only to own vehicles we would be able to buy service from apple or similar companies and they would just have a car available that we could order up with our smartphone or apple watch a have available compare us up take us where we need to go drop us off and then when we need to leave later we just call up another vehicle and you just pay a monthly fee to have access to this fleet of thomas vehicle so that's my own harebrained theory i think that is where we're going in the future but who knows we'll see what apple comes up with but this week they were meeting with california dmv likely to talk about expansion plans for getting more thomas vehicles testing vehicles on the roads.

apple palo alto california
"palo" Discussed on The MacCast

The MacCast

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"palo" Discussed on The MacCast

"Point if when or how apple would actually use the technology they're developing there was a recent rumor that apple was planning on an inhouse atonomy employee shuttle service codenamed pale for palo alto to infinite loop but we haven't seen anything come from that i would imagine that would be some sort of expansion of their atonomy systems testing so kinda using it internally as he using themselves basically as guinea pigs for these things and they would be shuttling employees back and forth with an autonomous shuttle which would he still pretty cool to see a who knows if battle actually happen listeners listeners to the back cast know that my own personal theory is that apple hopes to develop a car as a service program and that would be of course far off in the future but basically the idea being that you know we don't only to own vehicles we would be able to buy service from apple or similar companies and they would just have a car available that we could order up with our smartphone or apple watch a have available compare us up take us where we need to go drop us off and then when we need to leave later we just call up another vehicle and you just pay a monthly fee to have access to this fleet of thomas vehicle so that's my own harebrained theory i think that is where we're going in the future but who knows we'll see what apple comes up with but this week they were meeting with california dmv likely to talk about expansion plans for getting more thomas vehicles testing vehicles on the roads.

apple palo alto california
"palo" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"palo" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"Mom jio kboi hey oh one burns fredericks humans adagio allegro play by zoe lynn 70yearold cellist from palo alto california.

zoe lynn palo alto california
"palo" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"palo" Discussed on WGTK

"In jesus name palo's father we heliger your name as jehovah shallow the gun peace thank you lord that there's peace in christ jesus thank you lord in all the children should be taught of the lord in great surely the grease of children you said no weapon formed against us would prosper in every tung that would rise against them in just we we condemn for this the heritage of the servants and the righteousness is of maine alan ordinances lesson of the peacemakers for they should recall the children of god god show bruce satan under your feet shortly and the grace of our lord jesus christ be with you follow thank you for your piece your name is wholly shomar you the job that's always pressed thank you lord that your present with us today your hand is with us today you're in on his upon us in everything we do father he said cast on tears upon him for he terrorist for you you said the spirit of truth to the world cannot receive because it see it not neither him but you know him for he well with you and shelby in you more your spirits known with us zinas in jesus name helen father your jehovah's witness you are miracle you are cover you are are great conquer thank you lord that all our enemies are defeat louisville weapon formed against us will cross you said you would cover us with you as you said the lord will cheer the away with us a great captivity he said in all these things we are more than conquers i declare the victory of god and jewelers in jesus name following your name was overruling u are shepherd laura's shepherd guys who she and more you are guiding us we on your she the other sheep of your past you said trust in the lord with all.

palo shelby maine bruce louisville