35 Burst results for "Palestine"

Spinning and Winning: How Peloton is revolutionizing the fitness industry

Bloomberg Business of Sports

02:48 min | 4 d ago

Spinning and Winning: How Peloton is revolutionizing the fitness industry

"With neo You co founder and CEO Nate Forster. So, Nate, I gotta ask you about the £800 gorilla in this area of at home Fitness. Talk about pellet on it has been a juggernaut during the pandemic went public last year, too, You know a little bit of a tepid response, but clearly during the pandemic, as people have been sheltering in place, and Focusing on wellness in place as it were. They've seen demand. Serge What does Pelle Itan do for the broader business? In your estimation? So thanks for paving the way I think everyone has to think telethon for paving the way for this industry. You know what Holding was able to create and had the site. You know the vision to do. Actually amazing. They have a great bike and a great treadmill. They make really, really solid equipment and confident on that equipment, so huge what they've done for the industry had been anybody that never negatively about telethon that in this space is just been doing a injustice because they have Really paved the way and have done quickly and obviously, the pandemic and everything help on DH that that you know, done from a positive thing for a lot of companies and again, I said, it's about awareness. You know, the consumer needs to know that you're well and you could have a really good experience. But we have to give a lot of that credit to pallet town, so we would we would start there and, you know, I think they evolve and get better. They're going to do a lot of different things and They'll continue to look at the consumer and find creative ways to make it more affordable. I know they're doing some of that stuff will obviously be competitive that calm and try to be AH, cheaper version left expensive. I think the hardest part For a lot of these hardware companies is going to be content, right. We also know that the consumer doesn't want just one thing right? They don't want telethon, spinning pal time yoga palate on boot camp coltan because they don't want that. We've known that for years. That's what made class pass so great in the breaking mortar space and for all The way that we look at it. Look, you may want to do some spinning, which we also have on the platform. But maybe you want ah, meditation expert Or you want a boot camp expert or you want a boxing expert. So you want to jump around? We know our average user. Muses about 5 to 6 different brands among so they like lots of different things. They want to jump around expert so well. Palestine is doing their thing, and I think their biggest winner and everyone appreciates what they've done. I think the challenge they did, as they tried to evolve will be, you know, to be able to offer some different brands and concepts. To their consumer, not just pellets on this and tell him not very agnostic. I think they need to be able to be a bit more creative and give the consumer different things to do. And other brands and soul be inching to see how they get through that process that I'm sure they will. Hey, Nate,

Nate Forster Neo You Co Founder And Ceo Serge What Holding Pelle Itan Boxing Palestine
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | Last week

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
Oracle Deal With TikTok to Undergo U.S. Security Review

The World and Everything In It

00:57 sec | Last month

Oracle Deal With TikTok to Undergo U.S. Security Review

"The Chinese owner of the popular video APP Tiktok has chosen oracle over Microsoft to be trusted technology provider in the United States. The trump administration has flagged tick tock as a national security risk over worries about funneling user data to the Chinese government, and it is threatened to ban Tiktok by September twentieth unless it sells its US business treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin told CNBC. The next step is. For the Committee on foreign investment in the United States or Syfy for short to review the deal there's also a commitment to create tectonic global as a US, headquartered company with twenty thousand new jobs. I'm not going to go into the entire proposal. We will be reviewing that at the safest committee this week, and then we'll be making a recommendation to the president and reviewing it with them. TIKTOK denies that it's a national security risk and is suing to stop the administration from acting the threatened to ban.

United States Tiktok Chinese Government Cnbc Steve Mnuchin Microsoft Committee Syfy President Trump
Bahrain follows UAE to normalise ties with Israel

Fareed Zakaria GPS

03:32 min | Last month

Bahrain follows UAE to normalise ties with Israel

"Friday president trump announced that Bahrain would recognize Israel and the two nations would normalize relations. This comes just weeks after a similar move from the United, Arab Emirates what to make of it. All I'm joined again by Zanny Minton beddoes and we slaughter and Ian Bremmer in put this in context for us what does this mean? Why did it happen? What does it mean? Well two big things that people need to come to terms with the first. Is that Israel Palestine is considered close to the most important conflict in the region. It is for the Palestinians when you talk to the Maradas with the Saudis, the Bahrainis, the Kuwaitis you'll talk to you about their concerns about Iran they'll talk to you about diversification away from fossil fuels and the difficulties that they'll talk to you about domestic radicalism, all of these sorts of things. And so as a consequence, you no longer have a veto on if you don't get peace with Israel Palestine, you can't move on geopolitics. The second point is the united. States had long attempted to be seen as some kind of honest broker between Israel and Palestine when we're anything but Israel's our best ally in the region, the Palestinians particularly agree with we have problems with and so you know it's interesting trump's first trip as president outside the United States was to Saudi Arabia and then to Israel and those are the two places where he has the best personal relations and that's where they really drove. So yeah, you had the effort to. Talk about peace with Israel and Palestine where the Palestinians weren't even engage a big conference in. Bahrain. Now, you've got big announcements in relation. I think especially from you and I talking to jared through this that was kind of the game all along I I'm not in any way surprised by this. And we. A friend of mine WHO's from the Middle East very knowledgeable about the says what's really going on here this is this is the post American Middle East that is countries like. Israel UA Bahrain Saudi Arabia saying we're GONNA make our own alliances to defend ourselves against the the real threat that we feel as he was saying, which is Iran and we know the Americans aren't going going to help us. So we need we need to band together. Is that part of the dynamic. Afraid, I think that is right that again Obama wanted out of the Middle East. If you if you think about the direct line from his refusal to engage in Syria. And that's actually an area where he his policies and trump's have been closer than than other areas. But I also think you have to think about this in the context of us. Domestic Politics Donald Trump. Has Two modes he can be the fearmongering president or he can be the dealmaking president who delivers and if we're thinking about October surprises up for this election, what he would dearly love is to actually have a treaty or agreement between Israel and Saudi Arabia, which really would redraw the map of the Middle East and the conventional wisdom is the Saudis aren't ready but obviously, the UAE in Bahrain are stalking horses and and Bahrain would not have been able to do this without Saudi approval. So it's probably a low chance, but there is a real chance at least of a framework agreement in which Saudi Arabian Israel would would normalize relations in return for something more something bigger on the Palestinian sought.

Israel Israel Palestine Bahrain President Trump Saudi Arabian Israel Saudi Arabia Middle East Donald Trump Arab Emirates Iran Ian Bremmer Zanny Minton Syria United States Jared Stalking
COVID-19:infections areworseningeverywhere, warnsUN agency for Palestine refugees

UN News

06:07 min | Last month

COVID-19:infections areworseningeverywhere, warnsUN agency for Palestine refugees

"Covid nineteen infections at bay among Palestinian refugees has never been so crucial as the new school year gets underway the UN. Relief. and Works Agency unrehearsed said in an interview with you and uses Daniel. Johnson. Agency spokesperson tomorrow I'll refi explains how the agency's put changes in place to try and keep safety five point six million people at AIDS across Jordan, Lebanon Syria, and the West Bank including East Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip. Well, Anura has just launched an appeal to raise funds for it to be able. To continue responding to the consequences of covid nineteen, the immediate emergency of course is a health emergency and making sure that the Palestinian refugee community and the staff are all safe. The other immediate emergency is making sure that the Palestinian refugee community has access to all the critical services that's on your what gifts them even though the way we deliver these services has changed. So for instance, needs to have access to medical services, but they can no longer come to the Anura health centers instead on health staff, proceeds through telemedicine and home delivery of. Drugs, right. So people are getting their essential health needs but I think what was most alarming about what you said over the weekend was that the number of covid infections really are starting to spike alarmingly could you make a bit more detail about that owner is very concerned about the spike in numbers of covid nineteen across the countries we work, and so we've seen a spike in the West Bank over the last few weeks but also a spike in Lebanon recently, spy can Gaza with until not very long ago was relatively contained. We also saw a spike in Jordan and Syria would the conflict we hear about. But there is very little data and information coming from there. So everywhere we work seems to be becoming worse and the point is that you're able to keep it at bay if you like the infections of this new corona virus, because you were helping some of the five point, six million registered Palestine Refugees in the middle, East with what they needed to stay at home and keep away from others. So therefore preventing transmission of the virus, but that has now changed because people just literally have to. Get back to work only able to contain largely the outspread of Covid nineteen because we were able to convince people to stay home convinced them meaning delivering to their homes, what they needed whether it's food assistance or whether it's medicine or whether it's distance learning the problem is when the situation took much longer than we thought people needed to go back to work and to their livelihoods Palestine refugees say things like we rather catch covid nineteen than go hungry. Yeah, and you can understand that you of course. You can understand that given the scale of the social economic impact of Covid, nineteen around the world it's only worse on vulnerable communities like refugee communities and in particular Palestinian refugee communities. Another element of your work is obviously education and I know that you commissioner general is very proud of the educational support that you give to what five, hundred thousand Palestinian refugee children. Maybe you could tell me about how they're back to school challenges have panned out whether they're doing remote learning the actually backing class the. Early, signs are all very exciting and very positive students across the fields we work at. Enron are extremely excited to go back to school. We're talking about half a million girls and boys in over seven hundred schools. We're talking about a big cohort of people and a bit cohort of people who work committed in the last academic year to continuing their learning even though it was remote and often difficult. When you're a Palestine refugee, you don't necessarily have an individual tablet and constant internet coverage and yet the. Students that went on learning. Last year was really high and this is something we are very proud of this year. We have several scenarios in place either the children go fully back to school physically while respecting social distancing in hygiene rules and everything where they have a blended approach. So they go for three days to school and they study remotely for three days. We also have a scenario in case the situation gets worse and we have another lockdown where students fully lauren remotely. So we're looking at all scenarios where prepared to mix and match just to continue education and what Would you say in terms of covid exposing the weaknesses of the system of you like we've seen all over the world it's exposed the frailties of already mentioned of people with chronic illness those who don't have a job with some welfare support. What would you say in the five the five areas under works East Jerusalem Gaza Strip Lebanon Syria the West Bank and Jordan let in every crisis. The most vulnerable are the ones who are most put to the test and in the case of Covid nineteen as you said, a lot of the weaknesses of difference systems whether it's health education. Welfare were tested however, some of the strengths of some institutions were also tested in the case of Anura because we have a very long and solid experience and education in emergencies for example, were able to shift very quickly to distance learning and to supporting students and families, and the teachers and the education staff to continue education the same for health services we do have that experience, which unfortunately we took from various wars and conflicts and emergencies, but it's an experience that's helped us well in this lockdown and closure face because of covid nineteen.

Covid West Bank Syria Palestine East Jerusalem Gaza Strip Leba Jordan UN Gaza Strip Anura Gaza East Jerusalem Works Agency Johnson Lebanon Enron
John Foley on Peloton's Growth in the Pandemic

WSJ Tech News Briefing

07:04 min | Last month

John Foley on Peloton's Growth in the Pandemic

"John. Thanks for joining me today. I'm excited to be here. Thanks John. Appreciate it last time I saw was in the offices this was right before. was declared and we all went home, and so that's been several months but think it's fair to say that we could tell things were getting serious about cove nineteen at that point but couldn't have imagined what was going to happen over the course of the next month and full blown pandemic. In the way, it would hit your business in our business in every business in between. That's right. Twenty, twenty twenty what a what a wild year so far so far. One of the consequences for Peleton was having Jaeger critical new product launch and I really WanNa get into that and talk in depth about what's coming. But let's look backward a little bit not inconsequential at all is telling me you know what's gone on in these nearly last six months what they've been like running a business people lobby spent hunkering down in their homes and gyms have been closed and you offer these livestream workouts right in the home with the device, and early in the pandemic in fact, you guys were reported in the ninety four percent jump in your over your subs. I know there's been hiccups and it'll you've had a hard time immediately filling orders for instance, but it has has the pandemic Ben. Good. For Peleton. Well, it's hard to say good in the same sense with pandemic. At all but to your point, John It's definitely been wind in our sails as far as our bike sales and tread sales, and we've just been frankly happy to be there for our members are existing numbers in our new members who are buying bikes and threads and still getting them delivered, and we were also pretty excited to be able to innovate and bring the the live studio content from not from our studios anymore of for the for a couple of months but from the homes of our instructors. we continue our live format and connection with our with community through the crisis. So it was to your point a lot lots to do was a wild time for us like like everybody, but your business has been has been strong for sure also a little bit. You've got extensive background in ECOMMERCE and you know a number of different technology platforms and then legacy business like Barnes and noble once upon a time where the head of ECOMMERCE. Obviously everybody going into the pandemic lot of uncertainty in a lot of unknowns. And probably a moment of what's this going to do to our fledgling business? But when did it go from that to we have this enormous opportunity. That we're going to have to walk through and we're going to have to do it quickly and as you know as as as as successfully as we can. It happened very quickly John. I mean I I think it was Friday the thirteenth ironically in March when. Found of everyone stopped going to work and working from home and it became obvious and evident that this pandemic was upon us and it was going to be meaningful. Within a week or two of that, we saw a massive surge in our sales and we knew that this was a moment that people are going to Peleton in their home, and we we did see it as an opportunity to be totally opportunistic. We right away started giving away our digital content for ninety day, free trial which wasn't the best business because we still had to pay our music partners but we didn't care. We wanted to do our part for our communities and to help people stay saying in the pandemic so We were at one point I mean we're obviously in parallel scaling our supply chain or manufacturing and trying to make more bikes and tries as fast as possible. But we also have the pure software and digital content platforms across any one of your devices whether it's your phone, your IOS or android phone, or any of your television screens through Apple, TV android, TV fire, TV Roku, all these other platforms that you can engage with our content and do strengthen yoga and all the different stuff. So in that world, it wasn't dependent on our honor scaling supply chain. So we decided to give that ninety days away for free to new members, and we saw a massive explosion in that as well. So You know you alluded to this already and and it's it's a big topic of conversation and focus for investors is this growth curve in these growth big growth that you're planning? Because the addressable market for exercise gear is so large and the shifting dynamics of not being able to go you know at your whim to the local gym and use theirs is fueling even more enthusiasm but also pressure, and then you've got on top of this, you'll start about this virtual community where people can used gear but they can also use the community with people that they're getting to know or or somebody recognizable in the instructor. So you're about to test whether there's an appetite for a wider range. Of Palestine products, I'd like you to talk about what's coming out and how it's different than what the company already offers. You have a twenty two hundred dollar bike right now in a forty, three, hundred dollar treadmill, which are the main staples from what we know if we're going to A. Showroom on the website. So so what's coming in what's different about what you already offer? Yes. So we have two main lines of business as you know John and it's a stationary bike platform and then ate a treadmill platform. And the current bike is who have been called the best cardio machine on the planet the original Peleton bike, and what we're announcing is our Peleton plus and it's a new platform with a bigger screen that swivels now and allows from that bike platform our members to engage in all of our content whether it's the yoga or the strength or the boot camp or all of the different styles of content that we offer. They can now engage in that in a much more convenient easy to consume experience on the Peleton bike plus platform. In parallel, we've been working on a new treadmill platform, our original peleton tread, plus is the forty, five, hundred dollar but product that is kind of the Rolls Royce of the category because it has the Slat belt technology and it's one of the best running surfaces in the world if not the best running surface. And what we're bringing to market this month is a lower price tread that in a really open up the market and make it much more affordable for people to get a Peleton tread and take our boot camp classes and are running classes from home and really do full body workouts. Now whether it's on the less expensive treadmill that has a belt technology or with our Peleton bike plus which now allows you to consume. All of our content and not just the great cardio, but also the strength and the full body content on that. So the summary John is that we now have a portfolio on the bike side and on the trade side, a bike and a bike plus and a tread and tread plus. So depending on how much you're looking to spend and what you're looking to do we have now four options for you to engage pelivan platforms.

John It Peleton John. Barnes Apple Palestine A. Showroom Instructor Jaeger
Israel and the UAE: why now and whats next?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:05 min | 2 months ago

Israel and the UAE: why now and whats next?

"Is the greatest advancements toward peace between Israel and the Arab world in the last twenty, six years and it marks the third formal peace between Israel and an Arab nation. The diplomatic, Reproche Mon to nounce between Israel and the United Arab, Emirates last week is not in and of itself quite as big a deal as its orchestrators wished to claim the two countries have never been to war with each other the official hostility to Israel such as it was usually sounded pretty phoned in done for foresake when other Arab governments let fly with the fire-breathing choruses of condemnation in Israel's direction. The were generally very much in the back row of the quoi royal mumbling vaguely along hoping to be noticed. Israel and the US you have. Long. Dealt pretty, easily with each other Israeli ministers have made official visits to the Emirates. There are plentiful commercial ties between the countries Israel had already been invited to exhibit at Expo Twenty Twenty in by the intelligence services of Israel, and the have also long cooperated. The first official Israeli visited to the after the deal was announced was Yossi Cohen, director, of Masa Truly historic moment not since the Israel Jordan peace treaty was signed more than twenty years ago has so much. Progress has been made towards peace in the. Middle, East? By United Jew of America's closest and most capable partners in the region something which said could not be done. This deal is a significant step towards building a more peaceful secure and prosperous middle. East US President Donald Trump is claiming credit for brokering this agreement but suggestions by his proxies and flunkies that this is somehow worthy of the Nobel peace prize he frantically desires. somewhat optimistic granted that President Trump's predescessor barrack Obama was just given. One is a sort of housewarming present but an exchange of ambassadors between Israel and the U. A is just not a seismic recalibration comparable with the peace reached between Egypt and Israel in Nineteen, seventy, eight or Israel and Jordan in nineteen, ninety, four, I say to the people of Israel and Jordan. Now. You must make this peace real. To, turn no man's land into every man's home. To take down the barbed wire to remove the deadly minds. To help the. wounds. Of War to heal. However via the normalization of Israeli, Emirati relations may not be big deal. It may portend things which are indeed it's the fact that it isn't a big deal which may be the really big deal here. Israel's only two previous such agreements with countries as referenced above were with Egypt and Jordan neighbors against whom they fought wars. They were extraordinary responses to extraordinary circumstances. The agreement with the UI founds a diplomatic relationship which seems more or less remarkable than say, a diplomatic relationship between Denmark and Malaysia Will Senegal and Peru. It could have a domino effect. There are already suggestions that some other Arab, states including. Bahrain and Morocco a coming around to the U. I-IT's way of thinking where Israel is concerned and from there, what else might be possible Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has already spoken of hope that the direct flights which will shortly link Israel and the could be allowed to cross the skies above. Saudi Arabia. The prospect of an Israeli embassy in Riyadh might not seem exactly likely just yes. But nor does it seem any longer like a completely demented fantasy? I've Alanine Adam first of all. In our opinion this action is incorrect wrong one hundred percents. And it is a betrayal of the Palestinian. People and the will of Muslims and the will of quotes. Villas in autumn on Amazon one. Zero. Two significant shifts underpinning this realignment one is that in recent years Israel and the Arab states have discovered something they agree on Iran which regard as some combination of nuisance menace and existential threat. The other is that Israel and the Arab states have discovered something that they no longer disagree on at least old that much Palestine, which the rest of the Arab world seems less and less keen on pretending to care about a much ballyhooed component of the Israel you deal was Israel's promised to suspend its plans to annex the West. Bank. But it is difficult to believe Israel was ever entirely serious about that. Indeed it sounds in the light of the agreement exactly like the kind of mad idea you float. So you can make a big thing of agreeing not to do it as part of a subsequent diplomatic negotiation. News of the Israel. You a deal was very much not greeted by widespread dancing and celebrate tree hooting of car hoons in Gaza and Ramallah. There have been from Palestinian sources grim mutterings about betrayal by their fellow Arabs. Unfortunately, nowadays, most of the Arab is looking after their own interests at the expense of the Palestinian course. The wretched reality is that it's nothing. So sinister, it is simply that Palestine is increasingly regarded in Arab capitals as yesterday's cause and as a baffling boring headache one of the hardiest diplomatic truisms is Lord Pompton Quip that nations have no permanent friends no permanent enemies just permanent interests right now to the UAE and other Arab states which may follow. Israel seems a much more interesting ally than

Israel Israel Jordan United Arab Expo Twenty Twenty United States Jordan Official Egypt Reproche Mon President Trump Saudi Arabia Palestine Riyadh America Adam Barrack Obama Yossi Cohen Gaza
The Interior World

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:06 min | 2 months ago

The Interior World

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe. McCormick, and today we're going to be taking a look at interior space. Get Era Two thousand twenty brings to mind the old curse. May You live in interesting times and one of the factors here has, of course, been the corona virus cove in nineteen pandemic and in an effort to fight the spread of the illness, save lives and prevent overwhelming are hospitals. We've made a lot of changes to our lives and these range from the simple such as just wearing a mask when you're out in public and you can't so full. Distance from people to the harder choices about employment, and in life choices, we've all been social distancing and stay at home orders teleworking in quarantine have meant that we've all been spending a lot more time at home. Now depending on your home, this could mean a lot of things, but we want to explore what this means from a biological standpoint for the most part here. Now, make no mistake spending more time at home has absolutely been the right move. But just as it's forced you to focus more on, say that weird stain on your ceiling we wanted to focus on the other often unseen aspects of life in home right much the same way that being say on a Spanish galleon out in the middle of the ocean might have made you pay much more attention to the biology and behavior of of ship rats than you ever would have otherwise I. Think being at home more and more is forcing all of us to Turner is and maybe our microscopes and magnifying glasses to the corners and the cornices and the showerheads and the drain traps and all of the wonderful places in our house where life dwells. we're going to really get into the difference really between the natural world outside of our homes in the unnatural world inside and getting into some ideas about how how we could perhaps enable our interior world to be a little more on the natural side of things. But. Before we get into all that, I wanted to take a moment here to discuss the history of houses in general, you know just to get into the concept of what a house is. Our first and most important interior artificial environment. So you can certainly look at a home as an artificial cave to a certain extent indeed, we have lots of early evidence that early hominids sought out shelter in caves in the same way that many other animals do these can shelter one against the elements and against predators and as recently as one hundred, thirty thousand years ago cave-dwellers were already augmenting these natural interior environments with things like rough stone walls using timbers so So you know, even one, hundred, thirty, thousand years ago we were taking naturally occurring interior spaces and. A little less natural. And of course, on top of just the shelter caves can provide. It also seems that caves had a strong sacred meaning too many of these prehistoric peoples those might be important, but ultimately, proximity to water is far more important thus as Kate Spin Brian fagin point out in. In the section of the seventy grade inventions of the ancient world about homes, most early hominids lived out in the open near streams and lakes built temporary structures, and most of this has been lost a time. But some of the earliest evidence of potential structures for homes goes back a one point seven, two point seven, million years ago with Homo Erectus sites in southern Africa, and these were potentially contemporary with the domestication of fire. The have been temporary tents, but they still would have been artificial interior environments. Now, more secure evidence comes from the Ukraine roughly forty four thousand years ago the the mammoth bone structures from mullet ova with recently see us on the show actually yeah we did talknet these that would have been structures in one of the northernmost habitable regions of the earth the time because this was during a time of glacial. Advance where the polar ice caps from the north were coming deep down into Europe and Asia, and and so this would have been far far north way up among the ice and for some reason, humans were building these structures out of the bones of mammoth and we don't know that there are still things. We don't know about those structures like how how consistently they were inhabited and for how long and so forth. Right? Now beyond this, the history of human homes is is largely dictated by local resources and local climate. Long process of trial and error ends up leading to the development of regional and cultural building forums construction methods. Before nine thousand B C e we see evidence of clay houses and Palestine what is today Palestine and before seven thousand BC we see rectangular dwellings in Anatolia. But but a home is far more than just a shelter. As the authors here point out houses became key to social structure as well.

Robert Lamb Palestine Kate Spin Brian Fagin Mccormick Africa Turner Ukraine Anatolia Europe Asia
A Song For Peace

The Promised Podcast

05:17 min | 2 months ago

A Song For Peace

"This is the story of a song that is in a way the story of this country in the spring of Nineteen, sixty-nine at a sidewalk cafe on Richmond Street tucked in from the corner of Dizengoff. Street in Tel Aviv a twenty four year old poet named Yakov or Janka wrote Blit met a twenty five year old musician and arranger named yet year Rosenbloom and the two men became friends the cafe was called California and the. Place, itself said something about the people who made a habit of spending their days especially, their long nights there. The first thing to know about Cafe California is what it wasn't just one hundred and twenty five meters up Dizengoff was a legendary Bohemian cafe called carseat. It had been in operation since nineteen, thirty five, and since then it was the place where you can find some of Jewish palestines and then Israel's greatest poets and writers. On Alterman and Lebron's Sean Ski. Lay. Goldberg. Alexander Penn great writers who had been young and who grew old drinking coffee in the afternoon and vodka in Iraq at night at the simple spare tables of cassette alongside these luminaries in the nineteen sixties. New Generation staked claims at the table, the actor or. The singer Oregon Stein the architect Yaakov wreck there and many others cafe California was not seat from its vantage half of long block away even the young people at seat where old carseat was yesterday's Bohemia California was today's Cafe California was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine by a man named Ab Netanyahu who was only thirty two. Then that had lived a good deal of life. Netanyahu was born in nineteen twenty seven in the southwest corner of what is now Iran in a place called Abedin on the Persian Gulf just. Across the border from Bosra not far from Kuwait at six he was sent to board at Saint. Mary's a Jesuit School in Mumbai where you had an aunt, his parents abandoned. Persia. For India when he was twelve at sixteen and Nineteen, forty three, he lied about his age and joined the Royal Indo British Air Force in time after he trained to watch the Second World War wind down at twenty one he came to fight in Israel's war of independence and never left taking a job as an El Al pilot when he was decommissioned. It was with a few restless L. Buddies that Netanyahu opened cafe. California soon, it was filled with the city's young wannabe writers, directors and poets the people most eager to knock from their sinecures the city's old writers, directors, and poets who argued and held forth at carseat. Ab Thanh was a magnet for Bohemians and he came alive when he was with Bohemians, their company produced in him at once a sense of satisfaction. He had found his people but also a sense of restlessness eighty, nine ton was in constant search of his next Gig in nineteen sixty five he ran for Knesset advice of a friend who worked in PR he pledged that if he was elected, he would fly to Egypt to meet with General Nasser to seek peace after he failed to win a seat in parliament, he anyway bought a nineteen twenty seven steer. Men by playing that, he named piece one on February twenty, eighth nineteen, sixty six, he took off and flying low to avoid Israeli radars he landed in Port Saieed the Egyptians sent him back the next day Nassar had refused to see him back home a retired David Ben Gurion told reporters that not tons trip was an event of moral and political importance and quote pope. Pious gave him a medal of peace and Robert Kennedy and Bertrand Russell sought out his company not much later the notion took hold of Natanz, that music held the key to altering. Israeli. In the summer of Nineteen Sixty Nine AB NATANZ bought a Dutch cargo ship named MVP SEATO MVP stands for motor vessel and he rechristened it the MVP piece from Holland he sailed to New York to raise money and set up a shipboard radio station. His plan was to anchor in the Mediterranean outside territorial waters of Egypt and Israel and broadcast songs of peace that might open the minds of Israelis any. Alike his sojourn to New York stretched biblically three years would pass before he returned with ship in good repair with mixers, turntables, ABC cartridge machines, reel to reel tape machines, and fifty kilowatt transmitter to help not on- by what he needed John. Lennon. And Yoko Ono signed hundreds of posters of the two of them in bed in Amsterdam their famous bet in which not on sold to raise money for audio equipment. John Lennon also offered not time yet. Rolls. Royce grads to sell at auction, but the practical impediments of shipping the grand car stymied the business, the carpenters, Johnny Mathis and other musicians recorded for non promotional clips in praise of peace. Not an idea was that new music might open minds in Israel Egypt. The station eventually began to broadcast in nineteen seventy-three as the voice of peace

Ab Netanyahu Cafe California California Egypt Israel Dizengoff John Lennon Persia Bertrand Russell Tel Aviv MVP Johnny Mathis Alexander Penn Rosenbloom Bosra Iraq Yoko Ono Nassar New York Persian Gulf
Clean Beauty for the New Mom and Beyond with Gabriela Babila

SuperMamas

05:15 min | 2 months ago

Clean Beauty for the New Mom and Beyond with Gabriela Babila

"Are you. Are you. Thank you. Connect it with you For excited and actually ladies. I think we have I'm I'm La Native in I. Know You guys are too I? Think we have a connection. Might know I'm not sure if she's your sister I believe she's your sister, your younger sister to Kelly. Yes I. I graduated in two thousand ten in her out. I think you might know rec- on I'm like how and she's like. Well, you have to know her sister. I'm was like unannounced. Show me pictures she showed me pictures. She looks so familiar and I was like, oh my gosh, she went to college with us in. She's like, yeah, you you have to know that and I was like Oh my God this is a small world. So it's not even GonNa tell you what year I graduated but I graduated before. We are all we are all GOFFIN's here is it's a cool I. Know Love Palestine such. Great. I am an recently went to the beach down the street to the will rogers, and I just made me realize that Kim believe that that was high school I went to I'm like Oh my God how did I just take this betray granted I never even? I never went to the beach either so crazy and it was so close but I just always wanted to get out of Kelly because it was. It was like, yeah, which degree. You're older one. There's a lot of insulin lot village was so small then it wasn't really much to do so it was like. Always trying to. Rely on welcome to the show. So great to have you here. Thank you so much for sending over some of skincare routine some of the oil they add stretch mark oil that I received and the postpartum bath IDs phys called. Back fits bath there it is I can't wait to. Lying the bathtub after baby and just enjoy myself. But let's talk about your skincare line. What is what is Montana skincare? How'd you come up with the name? What products do offer tells about like this whole journey yeah, Abou- in how your mom inspired it. Yeah. So modern organics is basically a simple plan face care line devoted to mothers and just kind of help navigate distress that pregnancy in early maternity kind of brings with say if in fun ways to pamper yourself in your growing belly but just also that self care aspect of creating that moment for yourself, it really comes through in our products and I wanted to really create something that I felt was safe in fun for MOMS to enjoy. During pregnancy and after and when creating the brand in finding the name was actually a really unique coffee for me because I had to really look to motherhood my own mom and my daughter and my daughter's name is Netanyahu, which in Hebrew means God's gift and that really resonated with me really love them meaning so much because I gonNA lose women that at a young age I knew I wanted to be a mom it was just one of those. Things like I always wanted to be a mom you know I I saw myself being this working mother never a soccer mom but I just always Selena most likely Napoli herself with a Mile Yeah. Yeah. So when I became a mom at twenty six seeing age, my mom became a mother not planned at all. It was like just such a miracle for me and so the name really resonated with me and when I was looking to my daughter and my mom. Montana just came in mind because in Hebrew that means gift. So I really loved that it had that cultural background but that me that you know that I really wanted to share the knowledge support in a widely wanted to give mothers that nurturing safe fun way to pamper themselves. So just as the NAIPAUL's that kind of gift remains part of the mothers that we nourish. but yeah, that's that's kind of like a little bit of the background. How I came up with the name in stuff We're you know we're kind of early on you know I, have a stretch mark oil instance bath, and both of them kind of again always keeping in mind how I want to like. Create a skincare. That's really mother's. Centered I couldn't find anything when I was pregnant in terms of oils that was fast absorbing save accessible just easy to put on in a lot of my friends as well. Overall consensus was like, Oh, I am do not use oils I. Typically use creams and lotions because oils are just sticky there messy. They get all over my clothes so I really wanted to create something that was easy to put on, but that would hydrate your skin at all day in. You could just put it on, put your blouse on and get going

Goffin Kelly Montana Rogers LA Napoli Soccer Netanyahu Selena KIM
Hannah Senesh

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:54 min | 5 months ago

Hannah Senesh

"Today's fearless. Woman is both a maverick and a legend a national heroine in Israel. She parachuted into enemy territory to liberate Jews during the Holocaust looking death in the eye. Let's talk about Hannah said Nash Hanis. Ns was born in nineteen twenty one budapest Hungary the daughter of an author and a journalist. Honecker up in a literary household she routinely kept journals of her own from H. Thirteen right up to her death in the nineteen thirties as antisemitic sentiments were burgeoning and Budapest. Hana was drawn design scientist activities and in nineteen thirty nine. She left Hungary for what was then. Palestine there she. I attended an agricultural school and eventually settled at kibbutz. Yom where she wrote poetry and a play about life on the kibbutz in nineteen forty three at the height of World War Two. Hana enlisted with the British army in volunteered to be a paratrooper. The mission was to help the allied forces establish contact with resistance fighters in Europe. Were also working to help the Jews. Hana trained in Egypt and was one of only thirty three people chosen to parachute behind enemy lines in March of nineteen forty four. Hana parachuted into Yugoslavia and began working with the Yugoslav partisans. A Communist led resistance the access powers. The partisans were considered among Europe's most effective anti Nazi resistance groups Hana's Fervor and passion for the movement or captured in her poem. Last is the match. But she wrote during her time in Yugoslavia. After three months with the partisans on across into hungry in June of nineteen forty four at the height of deportation for Hungary's Jews with the goal of reaching her native Budapest. She didn't make it Hana was quickly picked up by the Hungarian police who were faithful to the Nazi party. Despite being repeatedly torture Hana declined to give up information pertaining to her mission. Even when the police threatened to harm Hana's own mother she held steadfast and her resistance and refused to cooperate during Hana's trial October of nineteen forty four. She didn't appeal for mercy and instead defended her actions at every turn on November seventh nineteen forty four. Hana was ordered to be executed by firing squad in the moments leading up to her that she refused a blindfold that was offered to her. Instead choosing to stare squarely into the eyes of per excecutioner. She was only twenty three years old. After her execution a poem was found in Hana's sell it read one two three eight feet long to strides apart. The rest is dark. Life is fleeting question. Mark one-two-three maybe another week or the next month may still find me here but death I feel is very near. I could have been twenty three next July i Campbell on what mattered. Most the dice were cast. I lost Hana's life was brief but her impact. On the world lasted long pastor untimely death her diary and poems were published posthumously and several of her poems have been set to music in one thousand nine hundred fifty Hamas remains were brought to Jerusalem and reinterred at the military cemetery on Mount Herzl to this day. Hana remains a symbol of self sacrifice idealism in the face of dire circumstance.

Hana Hungary Budapest Europe Yugoslavia Israel Palestine Nash Hanis Nazi Party Hannah British Army NS Hamas Mount Herzl Scientist Campbell YOM Mark One-Two-Three Egypt
Making of a CRISPR Film: Behind the Scenes with Producers of Human Nature

CRISPR Cuts

09:19 min | 6 months ago

Making of a CRISPR Film: Behind the Scenes with Producers of Human Nature

"Highly one. Welcome to crisper cuts. I'm super excited about today's episode because today via celebrities on our show yesterday said I goodwin Elliott Kirschner their producers of the human nature. Movie for those of you. Who Don't know what this movie is about. It basically covers jody of crispell onto joining us today on. This show is given Holden head of science at San Diego. So this is GonNa be a great episode all adjoining Menu Today on the Chris Cast so as me as well food we get started. Can you just introduce yourself and give your background before you became producers of this movie? My name is Sara Goodwin producer at Pfizer. My background action is in Science. I teach the UCS and the I turned into a science communicator. Joining and leading an organization about project called I biology which has an initiative area cocoa butter collaborates at produced. This felt and so that's how I got. Involved Elliott leaks elected project to it which is great blog. Si- thank you. I'm Elliot Kirschner. So I came to this project after many years working in news and documentary film back shake round side poverty the scientists but I really sort of more general reporting but it was always interested in telling the stories of science while find ways those little bobble and interesting ways that could challenge conventional wisdom's sites. Could be and so. We were looking for a topic to really make a big film to just tell an important story in ways that we would be different end. Hopefully engage audiences in new ways. And so I've secret spurs such huge story touches almost every aspect of the biomedical sciences but also exchanging meaning Dmitri society all that so when we decided on this topic we really washed and built a team of filmmakers and scientists together to make a documentary. That sounds great. So basically you kind of briefly mentioned how the idea of doing a film on crisper about but still there seems to be a lot that needs to be figured out. Even you know what basic topic you're going far. So can you tell us a little bit about behind the scenes of how you decided you know right right makes off researchers and patients and how the story would flow and not just make it like a scientific presentation but more like a movie by itself that we knew going in we want it to be so and we know it to be a story that would appeal to a general audience so that was the directive from the very beginning. We didn't WANNA make quote unquote educational video. We also wanted to make something that felt cinematic. I mean there's a wonderful rich history. A science explainer television that kind of stuff that people any think tank stock entries the short length of one hour television affair with a heavy raider voice. That kind of thing as well. That wanted to do something that would play on a big screen. That would make the decision. We didn't want it narrator. We wanted to let the scientists speak for themselves. Who wanted to film this with a cinematic spoke? Mind musical score all that we WANNA make a film so that was sort of the original directive that we give to ourselves once we got there. The question was okay. What is a science film there if you go to sundance or we premiered at South by southwest or the major some festivals. It's not like there's a lot of science programming a lot of science documentary and so we sort of had a lot of leeway. What is modern science stone-built look like but that's when the decision making came in about what the style would be. But as for the substance we also knew we wanted to work with the very beginning to sort of develop a story line or story lines that were true to the Science. Not only the facts of the science but the ethos of science idea. What is scientific discovery? How how did serendipity and the search for knowledge or basic research play into the story and then what are. These are more broader societal issues so those are all pieces together but I think one of the key things early on we had a meeting at woods hole. Report the film team. And we brought in George Church George Staley Jennifer Dowd Or All your own rights leaders in this field and we just had the two days of brainstorming about what they thought the story was and where they thought the scientists building and that really sort of helped direct the editorial in obviously Sarah being trained scientists being on this very beginning really helped shape bet as iterative throughout the process and this this film many many different forms over the course of its production as we try to tease out what science metric would be. And I'd say one thing that was really. It's worked to us from the beginning to make sure we told the story of the discovery of crisper and turning crisper to technology which is a story. That's off the told when crisper is talked about because it's actually a fascinating basic science research story of we really wanted to show. Elliot said you know how the process of sites works. How knowledge is created. And so as a scientist you know is able to really go back to the literature. I read you know as much primary literature as I could around the crisper discovery. And he's together as best they could also used reviews that were out there. This summit really helped a lot but it really helped us kind of have a deep understanding of the steps that it took to really understand what crisper was and decide who we wanted to interview might actually ended up interviewing or people than even made it into the cell because they were hardest story. But you know at the end of the day we wanted to have a film that was around ninety minutes of you. Just can't include everything that you want to. And so that was interesting viewpoint. Make us a kind of behind the scenes. Look when we were editing as to what should be in on should be out especially for me coming more from the science side of things which dirt's look really vital to have Sarah's voice project I think that was one of the real unique elements that we we built into the production framework in that throughout the discussion of who'd interview with talk about what's the balanced bill. There was constant discussion between still making team and science group that were just challenging our own assumptions pushing in different ways and I think that dynamic process really led to its own that is it relates that scientists in a way that it's not just about what we say on exerts absolutely right. We tried to all the Discovery Story. But just the way the scientists are allowed to speak the decisions made about what to include what not to include. I mean this was really dictated throughout by I think very nuanced understanding of how science works and I think that that hopefully shines through that when scientists watch at the dotted understand world and. I think that that is is really important to try to convey in film the impression of Palestine Science work as well as the actual facts over trying to convey right. Yeah absolutely does shine through. I love the myself so they can thank you. I just wanted to ask you guys. So I'm sorry. You mentioned some of the people that you interviewed for the film curious. Do you have any particular anecdotes funny or like most surprising moments came out through so making process in the interviews. People talk about a great question. I mean I'd say the first thing that comes to mind is actually what a treat it was to be Cisco he goes. Who's early crisper researcher at the University Valid? Kante got to go to Spain and meet him and be in his lab and he showed us a lot of Israeli shells. Found THE REPEATS. A very special time to be serving. Someone who usually isn't spoken about when Christopher is talked about but in general like say what was a real treat for me as a scientist is a lot of the people he's interviewed. I L about their science at baby. Give a research talk. But I've never really got to hear them talk about kind of the more ethical. Societal implications of the crisper work and Atta did most interviewing I think did a wonderful job really probing people trying to get you know. They're on his thoughts on something as science discovery. That is really going to have an impact in so many different ways throughout the world to end the scientists were really wonderful in be sharing their thoughts with us. I think you know included a lot of that on. I think makes a lot richer because it shows how scientists are people to beat other families. They have a lot of thoughts about how science works and technology is used and it was really nice to be able to hear a lot of that and then of course you know getting these really wonderful. I mean so make it of course offered was a key researcher for comment DNA. Which is the topic we cut off. But you were going to go much forgotten. Just cut it Due to time and really trying to make the story as clear as possible but he's just just a wonderful person and getting to meet him was just a really special

Scientist Goodwin Elliott Kirschner Elliot Kirschner Palestine Science Researcher San Diego Sarah Sara Goodwin Pfizer Chris Cast Holden Producer Woods Hole George Staley Jennifer Dowd Dmitri Atta Spain Kante Cisco Christopher
Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

05:34 min | 6 months ago

Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain

"Once there was a big famine in Palestine it was during the time of the Prophet Prophet. Sulaiman King Solomon. He came out with his people and proceeded to an open place in the desert to pray for the rains to come. Suddenly he saw an and standing on. Its two legs raising. Its hands up towards the sky and saying oh Allah we are but very small among all the creatures we cannot survive without die. Grace please bestow upon US sustenance and do not punish us because of the sins of human beings please send down the reins so that trees can grow farms become green in grains become available and we have our food to eat prophet. Sulaiman knew the language of all animals. He told his people let us go home. The prayer of this end is enough. It then rain too heavily in all the land became green and productive. The end is an intelligent creature. Warm days it collects and stores grain inside the hulls. It knows that during wet and cold months it would not be able to go out to search for food for fear that grain may start growing because of wetness it splits it into two or more pieces at times during Moonlit nights it brings the split grains out of the stores for drying and preservation against decay. The holes under the ground are made very carefully and covered with shelter to prevent the rain water from getting inside the holes the end unlike the other animals can lift a burden twice. Its own weight. It is not a selfish creature. When aunt finds some store of food grains it runs up to its group takes its fellow ants to that place. It shows everyone of them. Its own find of this door. The always behave in this manner. They work in live in cooperation with each other. This shows how the aunt works for the group and how each of them fulfills the needs in livelihood of its fellow beings how shameful it is for a man who has no regard for another man who has no concern for his fellow human beings who could be starving because of want of food. Once while Prophet Sulaiman was traveling together with hosts of men. Gin and birds. They reached valley events. When the chief of these ants witnessed the pomp and the glory with which Prophet Sulaiman and his companions were approaching toward it. He warned all the answers to get into their holes lest they got trampled and crushed unknowingly by the approaching men and Jinn Prophet. Sulaiman smiled at. This warning sounded by the ants chief and ordered his companions to wait till the aunts went inside their holes. None of us should hurt any aunt while passing over their land. He said it said that Prophet Sulaiman addressed the chief of the aunts. And Said How could my people hurt you or your fellow ants when they are floating through air? Don't you know that I am a messenger of God and would never act unfairly? The chief of the ants replied o Messenger of God my cautioning. The ants was not for any hurt that they would suffer but to prevent them getting stray and forgetting the glory of God after seeing year pomp. And show there is a deep meaning. In this event it shows that even the most humble and smallest of creatures has been endowed with the necessary wisdom to live safely and avoid being hurt as far as possible. It also shows how even a small end does have the natural understanding of the true position of Allah. It imparts a lesson. That one should not forget the true might and glory of Allah when one experiences a great power and dignity of any creature in this world thus an aunt is one of the most wonderful small creatures in this World Surinam L. The end in the holy current is a chapter named after this creature over one thousand three hundred years ago. Imam Ali was giving a sermon in Kufa. In which he was describing the beauties of creation in various forms of life he was referring to small creatures in asking men to study. How God made them so small yet so sturdy strong he described the end in these words. Look at an end. How tiny is its body? And how delicate features it is such a small creature that it often escapes the eye and few people care to attach any importance to it. Among the living beings found on this earth. Look at it and study its ways of life how it crawls how it attacks its food how it lifts a grain so many times heavier than its body carries it to its whole how it stores grains and how in summer it gathers in stocks food for

Prophet Sulaiman Sulaiman King Solomon Imam Ali Palestine United States Surinam Grace Kufa
"palestine" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"palestine" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Jerusalem and what was Palestine in nineteen forty six and is a squamous car Slome was vocal cord is obstruction in a tracheotomy which is a whole this track yes we could breeze through a little hole in his neck road through his mouth or nose he was never treated he's married he has six children as high blood pressure and cholesterol and heart disease well eight years ago it was seen by a doctor and at that time at a small tumor in his religious leadership told him to forget about it so you have a cancer liver records and his religious leader said to not bother it at least that's what the patient understood and so for eight years the patient to do anything and for eight years is getting worse and worse and worse and worse from late last year lost his voice was hoarse which means he was talking like this if you talk like that if your horse it means your vocal cords can't touch each other to have a clear voice you need for records of touch each other and there is a mass than the error slips through and speak like or horse well he didn't like it and they had pain near the suffering and you have bleeding it was losing weight and they went to another doctor to a hospital and world the stock a big hospital made him feel frightened like he was going to die and you have a pet scan recalled for the record she's lost forty five pounds he went from two hundred and thirty pounds two hundred eighty five pounds he's six foot to examine the meanness of trachea is a large masses voice box.

Jerusalem Palestine
Census Bureau: No Middle Eastern Or North African Check Box

Morning Edition

03:09 min | 8 months ago

Census Bureau: No Middle Eastern Or North African Check Box

"Here in this country the twenty twenty census is rolling out nationwide this week now for decades the U. S. government has categorized people with roots in the Middle East or in North Africa as white despite an ongoing push from some advocates that is not changing for this year's census we're bringing you an updated report about the controversial decision first may two years ago here's NPR's Hansi lo one this scene kabbadi left Yemen as a young girl with her family seventeen years ago and after they settled in New York City she noticed that when you fill out an official form here in the U. S. they're always seem to be a question about race and ethnicity everywhere you can see when you go to a doctor will schools you always get this option and but he said she wasn't sure which check boxes for her honestly it was hard for me to pick I was like oh my god what should I push I put Asian or the other about he says because Yemen is on the continent of Asia she settled on Asian and when she can on form she writes in Arab but she says on the twenty twenty senses she would have like to mark a box for middle eastern or north African it should be there because they had many nationalities so why is not there is unbelievable in twenty eighteen the U. S. census bureau decided against adding a middle eastern or north African category now because officials said they need to do more research that disappointed Mohammed Barakat he works at the Arab American family support center based in Brooklyn every member is grappling with the race question as a first grader my parents came from Palestine I didn't really know English and so whenever there is paperwork I had to do it and on one of those forms I remember seeing white and then in parentheses anyone from the Middle East or North Africa which are the regions along with Europe that the U. S. government defines as white the better catch was perplexed he went to school in acid teacher if you could answer Asian is like well if you want to put a single had reading you should polite and so I went around asking other teachers and they all set your white your what I like but look at me that I can't says he doesn't look white and he's culturally not white but sometimes he marks white if he sees the Middle East and North Africa listed next to it or he looks for a box for others so we can write in Arab this makeshift way of answering surveys means that information about people with roots in the Middle East or North Africa is often hidden within data about other groups the fight right now is to say the category should be there because it will arrive at a better account Maya berry is the executive director of the Arab American institute which is trying to get a category added to the twenty thirty census form it's an issue that touches on a sensitive topic especially after president trump's travel bans against countries such as Iran Libya Syria and Yemen federal law prohibits the census bureau from releasing census responses identifying individuals for seventy two years but many in the middle eastern or north African communities in the U. S. worry about giving the federal government more personal information that's the burden that our communities had to they're trying to make a determination about do you advocate for the inclusion of a category or not Terry says getting a middle eastern or north African check box on the

EU rejects Trump Mideast plan amid annexation concerns

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

EU rejects Trump Mideast plan amid annexation concerns

"In a statement E. U. foreign policy chief chose appareil underline the books commitment to a two state solution for the region bass along nineteen sixty seven lines with the possibility of mutually agreed land swaps made up of the state of Israel and he says an independent democratic contiguous sovereign and viable state of Palestine the president's plan unveiled last week with full see the eventual creation of a Palestine state but it falls far short of minimal Palestinian the moms and it would leave sizeable chunks of the occupied west bank in Israeli hands I'm Charles de Ledesma

Israel Palestine President Trump Charles De Ledesma E. U.
Another Peace Plan for Israel and Palestine

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:26 min | 9 months ago

Another Peace Plan for Israel and Palestine

"This White House is certainly not the first to offer a proposal for resolving the nearly eight decade conflict between Israel and the Palestinians and judging by their response so far trump's proposal will likely not be the one to resolve this issue. That has been vexing. American officials and much of the world since the nineteen sixties. The understand understand why solution has been so elusive. It's less essential to understand the specifics of the current plan on the table. Then it is to understand those things that the Israelis and Palestinians Estonians have long considered to be at stake first. Israel's chief concern is its own security not only from conventional military attacks at the hands of its many hostile neighbors verse but also from terrorist attacks at the hands of non-state actors like Hamas a second but just as central concern for both players in this conflict is the borders. There's and the nature of a Palestinian state third concern is the status of Jerusalem specifically whether it would be an undivided capital of Israel or divided lighted between both parties. And finally there's the question of what's known as the right to return namely whether the estimated four million descendants of the Palestinian Arabs CBS who fled. What is now Israel and the aftermath of the nine hundred forty seven partition and subsequent? Wars should have a right to return not only to the West Bank but also also to pre nineteen sixty seven Israel. Obviously the questions of where to place borders and who ought to be considered security threats are interrelated concerns and making this already Herculean task. Only more difficult are the Israeli settlements on the West Bank. The Palestinian harboring of bad actors and a history of to put it mildly hatreds and distrust. The trump administration's plan is formerly known peace to Prosperity A.. Vision to improve the lies of the Palestinian and Israeli people. People it runs fifty pages offers very specific proposals. I it rejects the right of return a concern that's essential to Israel because of the potential influx flocks of millions of Arabs that threaten its identity as a Jewish state and homeland. This on the other hand makes the proposal a non starter for the Palestinians. Second the plan would award virtually all of Jerusalem to Israel while designating Abu d say village bordering Jerusalem to be the capital of the Palestinian state. Third the map in the plan details the contours of the Palestinian state. Granting to the Palestinians about seventy percent of the West Bank plus Gaza in parts of the Negev desert however the current Israeli settlements would remain also according to the plan. The Palestinians would not be permitted their own military. They'd be forced to renounce violence and disband moss in exchange for this step toward Israeli security. They would receive fifty billion dollars in economic assistance. It's over ten years. How has the peace to prosperity planned? Been received well Dr Jerry. McDermott Anglican Chair of divinity. School told Christianity today this. This was a realistic opportunity for peace. He also noted the significant Arab support for the proposal including UAE. Amman Bahrain and Egypt Gitte Joel Rosenberg. Co founder of the Alliance for the peace of Jerusalem told Christianity today that the plan was generous to the Palestinians while giving the Israelis almost everything they wanted wanted on the other hand others including Arab Christians disagreed Dr Salim Mounier of muscle ministries which promotes reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians based on biblical principles told C.. T. that no Palestinian leader can accept this deal because it doesn't meet our basic needs another Palestinian Indian evangelical. Daoud Kutab said that the plan sounded more like a surrender dictate than a peace plan and more importantly the Palestinian Authority's President Mahmoud Mood. A boss called the plan a conspiracy and added we say a thousand times over No-no and if this plan is conditioned on the Palestinians bringing Hamas online. Well it's just difficult to imagine that happening to paraphrase a former Canadian prime minister if there was ever a place with too much history and too little geography. It's this part of the Middle East. That's why it's difficult to imagine that this plan will succeed where others have failed still. It is possible that it could be a step. Even if a very small one in in a better direction so we continue to follow the dictate of Psalm. One twenty two and pray for the peace of Jerusalem

Israel Jerusalem West Bank Palestinian Authority Hamas White House Middle East UAE Prime Minister Dr Jerry Joel Rosenberg Dr Salim Mounier Amman Bahrain Mcdermott Egypt Daoud Kutab Abu D Mahmoud Mood Co Founder Gaza
"palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"palestine" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Had a masters and I was trying to figure grab nextstep semi professional path in a friend of mine convinced me that scholarship matters if you're doing contemporary stop. Now I'm not getting into the validity of that but I do think for me. I can only do scholarship. That's related to what's going on right now that's just how design the teller oriented towards these things and the Israeli Palestinian conflict is not some yes it is taking place on the other side of the world and yes. The most people don't spend years living living over there. Endorse studying the conflict as I have in as mere has by there real people who are in this conflict end. This conflict is one of the most polarizing conflicts on American campuses. And why that is is a whole other probably podcast but it matters not just in Israel zero Palestine for the people who are living. This conflict matters for people who exist on college campuses because it's tied into their identities. It's tied into their their feelings of their safety on their campus. It's tied into so many pieces and part of the intersection out of this whole entity of Israel and Palestine. It is really like a spiderweb in it's connected to so many different things going on so given that and given that the Israeli president concert what is being taught on campuses are book is an attempt to add. Voices two classrooms that perhaps word present prior not particularly that because we want students necessarily think. ABC Or D.. But because we want them to think about ABC indeed and how does that relate to their understanding of Israel Palestine in there now does that relate to their understanding of the United States or Canada or wherever else. Because that's the world we live even today where these things are connected to another even if they're literally or metaphorically on the other side of the plan I feel like the through line throughout this whole conversation has been about helping to engender thoughtful discussion on the university campus by creating a text that students can read. The professors can use when when teaching when thinking about these issues because social justice in Israel Palestine are thing that is already taking place on the college campus. I think we can have kind of sanity. Check here and say say to what extent do discussions on college campuses matter. I know from personal experience in going back for for years and years and years people are always talking talking about what people are saying on college. Campuses like this is the end of the world or they're always talking about what people are talking about college campuses like this is the most important thing in the entire universe and it's easy I think for us as does professors who have sequestered ourselves to the college campus for years and decades to say okay. Yes what is happening. Here is the most important. This is our lives right but in the grand scheme of things competitions which are taking place all over the place and not just at the university campus level. So we're talking about all of this and the discussion about Israel and Palestine nine. Why do you think that the debates that take place at the university level here talking just about the professors and discussions but the overarching discussions and debates? You know when the Student Union is pushing forward on proposing to have obedience resolution or anything else. Why do we think that the university campuses debates about Israel and Palestine and social justice matter particularly as opposed to other places where this debate taking place debates on university? Campuses are really only one element of where these debates h show up in. Our book is equally applicable to trade union debate or Canada's recent about face in voting in the UN or mark trump's decision to move the US embassy to Jerusalem so there are debates taking place in a quarter of power there debates taking place triples. Workplaces added their debates taking place plays on campuses and there are debates taking place on the streets of Israel in the streets of Palestine so this book is a way of capturing the debates that are taking place in real about real people's lives back say that United States in Canada have disproportionate influence on the rest of the planet especially in terms of monetary unitary influenced the United States has a ridiculously disproportionate influence. So I think for pound if one wants to changed the world for the better vis-a-vis education I think one can have more influence on the world if they're working on a campus in a country that has disproportionate power great. Thank you guys so much for this really interesting conversation. Thank you Jason. Thank you for -tunities. Thanks for listening to this episode. If you like it. I hope you'll subscribe to the podcast which you can find on apple podcasts. Google play spotify. I or wherever else you listen until next time I'm Jason. Let's dig and thanks for listening to Jewish history matters..

Israel Israel Palestine Palestine United States Canada Jason ABC Student Union apple president Google UN spotify mark trump Jerusalem
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 min | 9 months ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
What sets Trump's Mideast peace plan apart from previous proposals?

Ben Shapiro

10:10 min | 9 months ago

What sets Trump's Mideast peace plan apart from previous proposals?

"The trump brings out this peace plan yesterday is this plan is effectively very simple basically get knowledges realities on the ground that's what this from Middle East peace plan is that what you're hearing from the media today is that trump has changed the game in the Middle East that from his abandon prospects for peace when what to wear is about this is the prospects for peace have stopped all wounds the reason they have stock always in the Middle East is because you have one side that would like to white the other side off of the map now a lot of prospects for peace over there in order to understand the Middle East conflict what you have to understand is one very simple truth Israel has accepted every piece offer that has ever been put in front of it and every single piece offer has been rejected by the Palestinians and the Arab world generally back in nineteen seventeen when the ball for declaration was first promulgated that said there would be Jewish national home in Palestine meeting now will be Jordan as well as Israel when that was first put out there the Jews immediately accepted the herbs turned it down and when people talk about this vast territory for the Jews get let let's be real about this there's some fifty eight Arab and Muslim countries on planet earth Arab or Muslim countries on planet earth all the Arab countries are all Muslim country there is one Jewish state I'm plant earth it is tiny Israel is something like fifteen thousand square miles is extraordinarily small Israel is half the size of New Jersey in a region that is extraordinarily large so the idea of a Jewish national home there not only is not any sort of giant cram down on the on the Arab population it is eight eight eight tiny percentage of the total land mass in the area and of course Jews have never stop living there there is a historic Jewish tie to the land of Israel but the reason I'm going back in history is you need to understand why it is the pieces never happen there and then because of the Jews okay so the Jews were originally told by the British Mandate by the British they're going to get Jordan as well as Israel okay then sliced off Jordan then they slice off half of Israel are they sliced away most of today and Samaria they sliced away half of Jerusalem it's like the way the Gaza Strip and then did you accepted that you like okay the U. N. says that Israel can be a state jurors will be an open international city right under the tutelage of the west right will not be in fact owned by the Jews are owned by the Arabs will be under the tutelage of the United Nations whatever is real touch that deal except it right granted an indefensible rum state in the borders in nineteen forty seven Israel accepted and the Arabs rejected has been termed by people living in Israel be out of its borders because they're completely indefensible completely understand how small Israel is you have to understand the borders before nineteen sixty seven included an area of Israel that is nine miles wide okay the distance from our office to the Santa Monica beach and that is the distance and and without traffic okay for without traffic you can travel the with of Israel with a bit of the state of Israel you can travel that without traffic in four in forty seven forty at worst you can travel that in under fifteen minutes and that is the worst in the entire country in that particular area if you've never been is really don't understand the geography you don't actually understand what's going on and understand how closely everything is packed together okay so Israel accepts that and the Arabs rejected and they declare war the Saudis the Jordanians the Egyptians the Syrians they all declare war on this new state the British were very much afraid of taking off the air is because they didn't want to drive the Arabs in the arms of the chair of the Soviet Union they refuse to allow Jews to emigrate to British Mandate Palestine so during the world during World War two as the Holocaust is happening the British mandated preventing Jews from moving in specifically because they don't want to take off the Arabs in the area the Jews largely go along with that Ben Gurion largely goes along with that in the interest of venture we getting state the state is finally granted by the United Nations and once that happens the user like okay fine I guess we'll just accept it okay if I like okay good at least we have a place to go at least now there is a Jewish national home and everything now okay this is when all of Japan's Maria Andrews wasn't international control and the Gaza Strip all of that is delegated to the Arabs who had pre sixty seven borders and say no and they want you in an isolation attack on the state of Israel and Israel fights back in the early stages of that of that war Arabs are urged by the Arab leadership to flee the area specifically because they're supposed to get out of the way of the onrushing Arab armies are gonna come in and crush the Jews and so they they're so hundred thousand Palestinian Arabs for living in the in the British Mandate Palestine in the Jewish area of what will be the the Israeli state of Palestine the the Israeli area Palestine hundred thousand arms fully he then as the war progresses it turns out that a lot of the Arab villages are actually if columns operating on behalf of the Arab armies which is exactly what you would expect because this is an ethnic conflict Hey the the Arabs are using these as bases of attack against the Jews they're cutting off supply lines supply rolled and the and the Israelis put in place some called operation dollar which says we are not going to lock down our tiny army in guarding these villages that are effectively in many cases a fifth column instead we're going to tell people that they need to leave these villages and move over to the Arab side okay now remember when the state of Israel was declared the state of Israel declaration of independence urges the Arab citizens to stay to stay here be part of the part of the work that we are doing be part of the state Ben Gurion didn't understand why the Arabs are fleeing using you can live here what's the problem she's lived as minority in Arab countries for thousands of years why exactly should there not be one Jewish state where Arabs are a minority and the assumption on the part of the Israeli leadership is that as all the Jews flowed into Israel from the other Arab countries and from Europe that that would become minority population more minority population their population okay sell people flee and then the Israeli army in the second wave is fighting these battles in in the middle of war there's always population term well people always leave to get out of the way I'm on rushing battles and the Israeli army can't afford to be locked down pin down transitive van insurgent campaigns in certain villages into the clear the population out okay so after the war ends there now something like for it anywhere from four hundred to seven hundred thousand Palestinian refugees at the same exact time nearly the same number of Jews are expelled from Arab countries around the region of ever talk about this right like the reason that there's so many Moroccan Jews who live in Israel the reason there's so many Iranian Jews living in Israel the reason there's so many Syrian Jews living in Israel is because at the time of the Israeli sounding seven hundred thousand Jews were expelled from the surrounding Arab countries and Israel took all of them in all of them it'll take all of them and with no international help he normally the U. N. helped fund the placement of refugees in new places no help at all Israel takes all of them in the Arab states instead of absorbing these populations into the general population decides that they're going to keep these populations refugees so the first movie is we are not going to actually allow them to return to the state of Israel when I can allow them to move back to division because that would be acknowledging that we lost the war and that they would have to then be Israeli citizens then very quickly within about a year the Arab leadership says you know great if we could infiltrate the state of Israel with a bunch of people who are on our side one of his state of Israel destroyed at that point the Israelis like well guess what we are not letting people in back into the state when they fled their homes were not letting them back in just to stand in favor of the destruction of the state is not never in human history has been the obligation of a of a state that was declared war on by its surrounding population to take in large numbers of members of people who are trying to destroy the state from within that has never been anything okay in in the aftermath of everywhere they're refugees the idea of resettlement of the refugees back in their original homes has never really been a thing either in fact is in the aftermath of World War two there were huge population transfers all over Europe they're in the aftermath of the of the declaration of the division of Pakistan and India there were tens of millions of people who are refugees and they were taken in by their countries and they did is that Indians live in India and Muslims live in Pakistan and the specific area where there is no separation cashmere has been a hot spot ever since but there's never been any call for less sixty years for all of the Indians were expelled from Pakistan and left Pakistan to have their original homes back in Pakistan right is never been negotiation point the Palestinians then are used as a tool by the Arab world to club Israel into submission and their use as an excuse to claim that Israel ought to be is right this is the so called right of return it's a great book on this at recommended yesterday called the war for turn by a couple of the leftist Israelis one was a former labor MK member of Knesset and one of them is journalist hearts okay so I'm just explaining history because it you're not going to stand from fees plan until you understand okay so there's never been anything internationally that says the Jews cannot live in Judean Samaria it's a ridiculous suggestion the notion that it is somehow a violation of international law for the Jews who won a defensive war in nineteen forty to settle in the areas they want is upset it's absurd okay in nineteen sixty four the Arabs still have yes merry on Gaza Egypt is in the Gaza Strip but has not an exit specifically because it does not actually want the Palestinian population absorbed into the Egyptian population density area have not been annexed by Jordan right they've not been technically annexed by Jordan for the exact same reason but Jordan is ruling intraday and Samaria Hey this is a so the notion that Israel was always ruling all of these errors all is just not historically true the Palestine Liberation Organization which is Yasser Arafat's organization now the Palestinian authority which rules the Palestinian areas in the west bank an area act the Palestinian authority effectively is founded in nineteen sixty four now you might notice something on the time line here nineteen sixty four is before nineteen sixty seven in nineteen sixty four the Arabs are talking about the liberation of Palestine at that point Jerusalem is split the Jordanians are in control of the old city of Jerusalem they've banned all Jews mentoring the old city of Jerusalem they discriminate against Christians in the old city of Jerusalem they build barbed wire fences around Jerusalem Hey they already control Judea and Samaria Egypt controls the Gaza Strip and yet there's something called the Palestine Liberation Organization weird what exactly are they seeking to liberate make very clear in their charter what exactly they're seeking to liberate every square inch of territory between the Jordan River in the Mediterranean Sea in other words the murder of every Jew in that region and the ethnic cleansing of Jews from that region a second Holocaust get a made this clear since nineteen sixty four in the nineteen sixty seven war happens and all the Arab countries under the leadership of NASA in Egypt decide to mobilize against the Israelis they decide they're going to want to second war every time shin against the Israelis and the Israelis get wind of this and the Israelis

Middle East
"palestine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:30 min | 9 months ago

"palestine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Israel and Palestine and a Palestinian capital in parts of East Jerusalem my vision presents a win win opportunity for both sides a realistic two state solution that resolves the risk for Palestinian statehood to Israel's security he stood side by side of the White House with Israel's prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu this is an unprecedented and highly significant development Mr prime minister thank you for having the courage to take this bold step for Mr trump's is a committee will be formed to take make a more detailed map and put the plan in motion the Palestinians rejected the plan B. even before it was rolled out and as we just heard Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu was with the president as his plan was unveiled but back at home Netanyahu's legal troubles are mounting it's official prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu has become the first leader in his country's history to be criminally charged while in office Attorney General obvious high mandalit filing charges of bribery fraud and breach of trust against Netanyahu here in Jerusalem at the District Court that just hours after the Israeli leader with drew a doom for quest for parliamentary immunity it's bad news for to Tenniel's reelection bid voters may not want to put him in office again knowing he will be put on trial Giordana Miller ABC news Jerusalem is twelve forty nine police take down a man with a knife in Saugus last night W. B. C. T. V.'s Lisa Gresh she has more from the scene police arrived to industry just before nine thirty last night and spotted a man carrying a knife coming out of a building officers attempts to calm the situation down and ordered the man to drop the knife twenty one and they hit him with the beam background officers quickly moved in and took the suspect into custody now this is really just down the street from the Saugus public safety building the man was taken to the hospital this incident is still under investigation and it all happening on Woodbury Avenue police responded to the scene for a report of a disturbance the death toll from a boat dock fire in Scottsboro Alabama has now climbed eight ABC's Jim Ryan with the update a witness captured video of the flames as they jump from one boat slip to the next eventually taking three dozen vessels to the bottom of a lake east of Huntsville Alabama last night one of visual hastily arranged by pastor Brett Hartland everybody seems to know everybody and there's not anybody that you would talk to the doesn't know some of these families that have been impacted as his congregation looks for spiritual guidance state and federal investigators are looking for the cause of the blaze that killed eight Jim Ryan ABC news and now to New Hampshire where a Clermont man is facing charges of sharing revenge porn the union leader reporting Justin la montagne was indicted last week he's accused of sending a video to two other men that showed a woman partially exposed the woman allegedly wanted that video to remain private la montagne is currently free without bail last month in a different cases Sullivan county Superior Court judge ruled that the first amendment does not protect those who share revenge porn is twelve fifty one we check traffic and weather next for the world forever no some is.

Israel Palestine East Jerusalem
"palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"palestine" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Ever heard of lab grown diamonds if not. We've got you. After thousands of hours perfecting the science lightboxes here to shed some light. Here's how it works lab. Grown diamonds are chemically the same natural ones just made in a lab to make them they use a plasma reactor to heat tiny pieces of lab grown diamonds up to temperatures almost as hot as the Sun John in about two weeks. Those little seeds turned into full carat stones. Light box has perfected the process to consistently create are gorgeous gems. Now here's where it gets. It's really interesting light box lab. Grown diamonds aren't just made the same every time they're also priced the same. Each carrot is eight hundred dollars. Mind blown so there you have it. Get the facts. And see the science behind the sparkle at light box jewelry dot com slash intelligence use code intelligence for twenty five dollars off last night. Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson went head to head in a televised debate on. It with his main rival. Jeremy Corbett. There'll be an election in just over three weeks called by Mr Johnson in an effort to resolve an impasse after he failed to persuade parliament to approve his brexit deal. Mr Corbin's Labor Party pitching itself as an agent of change Labor. We'll put wealth and power in the hands of the many Boris Johnson's conservatives who think that born to rule will only ever look after the privileged few Mister Johnson as promised to to leave the European Union as quickly as possible appealing to British public puts keen to move past the divisive issue of Brexit. If I come back here where they working majority in parliament then I will get parliament working again for you on day. One of the new parliament in December we will start getting our deal through so we can get brexit done. In January analyst countries potential. Neither man is especially popular nick. Mister Johnson's Conservative Party is leading in the polls. That's despite questions over his personal life which were raised again this week when businesswoman Jennifer or curate spoke to I tv about her relationship with him and I don't understand why you've blocked me and ignored me. An investigation is ongoing related to Mister Johnson's relationship with Missouri. When he was mayor of London he's denied wrongdoing? This week is curie alleged. That Mister Johnson had a child who he's kept secret but the debate steered largely clear of Oh choppy waters. British people have had some great TV. Recently I'm not just the Cran Dan but Prince Andrew's extraordinary interview with the BBC. This was not drama in that class. Emma Duncan is on our Britain team and was somewhat less than transfixed. Last night's debates. The format wasn't great. The participants were given such short term. Basically they mostly strung together a few stoke phrases said. Nobody was was on the edge of their seats during this debate. We'll we'll how did it start. How did Each of these candidates sort of set set off their their stole opening statements. Corbin essentially was saying on the vote for change and Johnson essentially was saying Kuban is the vote for continued horrific long-drawn-out uncertainty about brexit. And I am the gate brexit done. Vote suit it was slightly. Where in the sense that Kuban did a very competently learned statement? Straight to camera. Johnson was reading from a piece of the paper and given that he's got a reputation for laziness disorganization. That probably wasn't a great move and the defining issue for this election is inevitably brexit. Do you do you think that either one of the candidates performed better than the other. Yea On that one Johnson clearly performed better He's gone. It's very very very clear. Line which is vote for me and you will get brexit done get brexit damage what he kept saying during the debate somewhat to the audiences irritation Kubin did very badly on that in the sense. That Labor's policy is to renegotiate the deal. It's already been negotiated twice. We will have a referendum will abide by that result and after that to put the resulting deal you back to the country to another referendum and that firstly sand a bit exhausting to a country that is already fit up with this process. Secondly he wouldn't say how he would campaign in that referendum and Corbin is trying to conceal the void in the heart of his brexit policy and refusing to answer the question of which side Johnson pointed head. He's leaving open the possibility that he negotiates deal with the European Union and then campaigns against it which does send faintly ridiculous and there's another referendum issue to which again Johnson successfully prodded him on. which is that? Nobody thinks that Labor's GonNa get an overall majority one way that cool been could get into downing. Street is by doing a deal with the Scottish Nationalist Party. But the price of that deal would be the promise of another referendum referendum on Scottish independence and Kuban refused to rule that I'd say he sounded a bit shifty on both cans. Well Mr Johnson has a very well well known controversial personal life and career and in fact this week there have been stories coming out about a relationship. He had with an American businesswoman When he was mayor of London were any of those details explore during a debate? Not Really I mean it could have been worse for Johnson in the sense that some people were expecting getting a bold question Mr Johnson. How many children do you have because nobody really knows but no specifics were brought up and and there was quite a good moment which did demonstrate what the audience and the nation at large fields about Mitt willingness to trust Mr the Johnson when he said something along the lines of of truth Nashes to me and the audience laughed? And on Mr Corbin's parts. Did he score any sort of direct hits. Yeah he did on the National Health Service but really he had to. I mean attis Labor's home turf. Labor create the National Health Service. The tours I've been in power long enough to have to take responsibility for the strains that it's under at the moment through underfunding. Mr Cogan brought with with him a documents which he waved around we had lots and lots of black lines on it because it's been so redacted which he said was an account British negotiations Sion's with the Americans and there's a particularly sensitive point as far as the NHS and the USA is concerned? The left is is convinced that Britain. If it's run by the Tories will basically Opened the NHS to private American health companies and thus destroy the system. The country say loves so all told. What's what's your view? Did anyone win this debate. Will this debate make a difference to the election action. Do you think well Johnson Johnson. Just one eight. As far as the snap opinion afterwards is concerned it was fifty one forty forty nine to him I would say as of you're yeah he he did he just about one in buying those and he will be pleased with the event because he's on top in the race and he really just had to hold his own Kuban. We'll be disappointed because it could be needed to do something to re regain a foothold really because the numbers are so solidly in the jury's favor commend. Thank you very much for joining us. You're very welcome.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Mr Corbin Johnson Johnson Britain Brexit Kuban Labor London European Union Jeremy Corbett Labor Party Conservative Party Kubin Scottish Nationalist Party BBC Mr Cogan Jennifer
"palestine" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"palestine" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Office information okay onto lighter things like israel and palestine. What do you think i'm trying to think. Do we have time for what's news yeah. There are a lot of really fucked up people out there. That's the thing that's the reason. I wanted to put this out there because it's not only the republicans who are are assholes now. I know i can be an asshole times. It's part of my charm. Don't you think <hes> but shit like that. That's ugly. That's sick. That's demented minted. There's something wrong with this man and that's why i'm asking seriously if anybody knows who this person is. I think we need to send the authorities to go. Check on him and make sure no guns in the house. Okay all right all right. Let's see i'll play what's news is at the end because frankly the interview we have coming up dealing with israel and the palestinians and all that on was was we're recorded earlier so i i know how long it goes and we'll have time at the end. I think before we get to that. Let me see if there's any you know what there's nothing. Nothing else here that i really need to share with you so let's do this. I play for you. A little bit of the press conference that rashida to leave and <hes> ilhan omar held and rashida to leave was asked. Why did she decide not to go visit her grandmother other in. I think the grandmother is i'm sure she's in gaza or the or the <hes> the west bank <hes> but why after they said she could go why she decided not to and here was her answer and ilhan omar in a in a very a a move the press conference here we go the letter of rings is rarely if your mother after the approved thus i spoke to my family and i think my grandmother said it beautifully when she said i'm her for an arabic means her bird and she said i'm her dream manifested. I referred so why would i come back and be caged. Bow down when my election rolls her head up high gave her dignity for the first time and so through tears three o'clock in the morning we all decided as is a family that i could not go until i was a free american united states congresswoman coming. They're not only to see my grandmother but talk to palestinian and israeli organizations that believed that my grandmother deserved human dignity as much as anyone else does so it is something that i struggled with and i i talked to sister sister-in-law omar a little bit about it is a piece of you that gets broken especially when i grew up here and i grew up in the most beautiful black city in the country where you you don't let anybody tell you you're less than or humiliate you solely based on your faith or your ethnicity as united states congresswoman. I could not do that to my grandmother. What i what i what i tell what she all. The time is that you don't ever allow people to enjoy your tears. She says is saying that there are so so many people invested in our pain in our struggle in seeing as broken down and the one thing that is important to me more than anything as we fight for the most marginalized people is that we have have our internal liberation curious external liberation and there is no way now. I told her she'd had for you. Sent that letter. You should've called the way there is no way that we are ever ever going to allow people to tear us down down to see us. Cry out of pain to ever make us feel like our certificate is less than there's so we are going to hold our head up high and we are going to fight this administration and the oppressive netanyahu in yahoo administration until we take our last breath. It sounds that sounds sounds good to me all right so there was a little bit from ilhan omar and rasheed had to leave talking talking about why receipt is not going but i had bigger questions look as you know..

ilhan omar rashida israel gaza netanyahu palestine united states rasheed yahoo
"palestine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"palestine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Clearly it was far more than I could have ever imagined how else to explain it when they label it a trip to Palestine not as rough because to them Israel shouldn't even exist how do I know this because they labeled it a trip to Palestine do you see how that works this is what we're gonna break down bit by bit piece by piece the importance of understanding mess then it is no do you who are the problem it is not the fact that they are Muslim that makes you somehow anti Muslim but noticed him noticing that they are anti Semites when the word came down that Israel was not going to allow them into the country newspaper after newspaper article after article column after column and yes cable news network get for cable news network Israel refuses to let Muslim Congress woman in to Israel they should let Jeremy Corbyn in either he's not a Muslim he's just a jerk Jeremy Corbett of course is the anti semite labor party leader from the U. K. propagandist the issue is not and that somehow they disagree with Israeli policy but rather that they support aggressively the BDS movement boycott divestment and sanction and it turns out that Israel has laws about such a thing me I'm turning capstone cats today the phone number eight three three got Tony eight three three four six eight eight six six nine so they're planning this trip to Israel they support boycott divestment sanctions that refers to that you should boycott Israeli products divest from from investments in Israel and you should sanction Israeli companies that's boycott divestment and sanctions is utilized in America specifically on college campuses as a way of attacking the Jewish students by really attacking the Christian and non Jewish students to create them as I've discussed many times a Pavlovian response so when someone says Israel they immediately get the the response of all bad problematic apartheid state all the other lies that are out there lies that are out there that's the purpose of BDS it is an insidious gross disgusting movement made up of disgusting people when I say you can quote me I need every last bit of it you are welcome to it just make sure you spell my name right K. A. T. Z. so here's a seat at the lead in Hana mark they want to go on this trip to Palestine well lets you know everything because yesterday I was discussing this and I said I think Israel should let a man of course the terrible people of course are anti Semites you show them how much you can handle it the nation can handle it and when they lie you refused to lie you know they're gonna lie you used to live my goodness if the U. N. didn't live they were need such a big building to house all those flyers but they've got a lot Benjamin Netanyahu the prime minister writing is a free and vibrant democracy Israel's open the critics and criticism with one exception Israeli law prohibits the entry to into Israel of those who call for work to employees book boycotts on Israel as do other democracies that prohibit the entry of people who seek to harm the country in fact in the past the US did this to an Israeli commit member of the Knesset as well as other public figures from around the world the prime minister continues trans women's leaving Omar are leading activists in promoting the legislation of boycotts against Israel and the American Congress only a few days ago we received their itinerary for their visit in Israel which revealed that they plan to visit whose sole objective is to strengthen the boycott against us and deny Israel's legitimacy for instance they listed the destination of their trip is Palestine not Israel and unlike all democratic Republican members of Congress who visited Israel they did not request to meet any Israeli officials either from the government or the opposition it's very clear what their motive is it's very clear what it is that they favor it was also then noted the organization funding their trip is a group called Mr M. I. F. T. H. I wasn't aware or was miglior with with Mr I'm not familiar with every group of anti Semites of that that are out there I mean I'm familiar with leaving Omar and I'm familiar with Jeremy Corbyn but this one slipped through my my anti semite radar you would think after my bar mitzvah I'd give you know yearly updates and upgrades but no no no I just got the one is an organization that long has supported boycott divestment sanctions they have expressed support for terrorism against Israel as a matter of fact as was reported Hey have actually pushed the concept that Jews use Christian blood for the Passover seder it is so there's listen I've enjoyed my whole life I have checked the top my head many times no horns when I first heard that ID I've not heard that from my parents and I heard that from anybody in in my world the Jews I'd heard that like basically like on the street somebody mentioned that I'm like I'm sorry people think white he didn't talk I never heard that a day in my life I was in my late teens I think on it when I heard that one I cannot pinpoint the moment Ryan for forever heard that there were these people these anti Semites these bigots who actually thought you know pass over right so it's it's the it's the pharaoh it's the it's the escape from from Egypt it's the accidents right the story is a story of the accident and and to to celebrate they they we wait a day we made us not make matzah so it's the unleavened bread right the Jews are escaping agent they don't have time for the bread to rise so basically they made crackers the best way I can describe the thing that is Tony's pocket have got available now at Amazon dot com the the the anti Semites way of describing this is that the monster was made from the blood of Christian babies not a joke these people are criminally insane yeah pushes that idea Mr supports terrorism against Israel and receive them to leave and Hana Maher said yes we'll take your money thank you and not a single Democrat has gotten up to say yeah these people are gross I'll give result in the credit where it's due out of New York there I'm not I'm not a democratic government we lease all them as a Democrat try that right I know exactly I'm talking about I know I'm talking right now Republicans sadly welcome to future second so here we are now you don't have receded leaving no Hamar going to Israel but here comes back we see that's leave I would like to go you see I have a I have a grandmother and my grandmother is ninety and she's not to be alive much longer as a matter of fact she wrote a letter to the ministry of the interior to the minister I would like to request admittance to Israel in order to visit my relatives and specifically my grandmother who is in her nineties and lives in in the area this could be my last opportunity to see her I will respect any restrictions and will not promote boycotts against Israel during my visit she writes this on rational letter had to Israel the minister of the interior since okay go visit your grandmother go visit your grandmother and then receded sleeve decide so now I can't go visit my grandmother now no no no no and starts tweeting when I won he gave the Palestinian people hope that someone will finally speak the truth about the inhumane conditions I can't allow the state of Israel to take away that light by humiliating me and use my love for my city I guess it's because our grandmother it's about down to their oppressive and racist policies silencing me she continues and treated me like a criminal is not what she wants from me it would kill a piece of me I decided that visiting my grandmother into these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in fighting against racism oppression and injustice she then of basically writes a massive a statement about this and what is the statement what is it the headline congresswoman to leave statement on travel to Palestine and Israel she did it again she is a propagandist first line in my attempt to visit Palestine I have experienced the same races treatment that many Palestinian Americans indoor when encountering the Israeli government's Palestine not Israel again pushing the idea that Israel doesn't exist in Israel's illegitimate I would make I was on the fence and I actually said Israel sweater in this is the exact propaganda that would have happened if they let her in and see exactly again the happening now that they said you go with your grandmother and she has decided that her grandmother is a political tool grandma eight nothing more than a tool visit my grandmother under these oppressive conditions meant to humiliate me would break my grandmother's heart silencing me with treatment to make me feel less than is not what she wants from me it would kill a piece of me that always stands up against racism and injustice she's standing up against racism and injustice issue well god bless the minister putting out a tweet I approved to request as a gesture of goodwill on humanitarian basis but it was just a provocative request aimed at bashing the state of Israel Lee her hate for Israel overcomes her love for her grandmother yeah told my air we will have peace with the Palestinians when they love their children more than they hate us and here we are once again I started off by saying and I wanna make sure I'm clear we should have to leave as an anti semite you know how Ammar as an anti semite quote me those are the facts as presented not by me but by them leave the inventor of fox news up next he's been quite a few years covering Jerusalem of for a fox news what do we think of the mood is and what do they think of this response from a Netanyahu and his administration and what we think a may.

Palestine Israel
"palestine" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"palestine" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Okay. Why not talk to us? And she just walked away and would not respond to her assertion that the president is an MR an effort. By the way in her office. She has a sticky note with the word Palestine. Placed over the state of Israel on a map. A BuzzFeed reporter. Noticed it and said, quote, someone has already made a slight alteration to the map that hangs in Rashida to lives. New congressional office into quote. The assignment visa doll centre said that there is currently no country called Palestine, quote, the territory upon which the word Palestine is a fixed on the map is called Palestinian. Territories Palestinian statehood will be achieved if and when the Palestinian leader to prepare to recognize the validity of the Jewish state as their neighbor close, quote, which they are not prepared to do. Here is MS Rashida to leave at a free Palestine rally in Detroit in twenty fourteen. Almost. You.

Palestine MS Rashida president Israel reporter BuzzFeed Detroit
"palestine" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"I'm sure you have a whole different knowledge of what's happening with Palestine Israel because you've been there. So can you speak on that? And which and what you think about what happened to Marc Lamont hill. Marc Lamont hill. I met him in Palestine, actually. To see Marc Lamont hill be going through this controversy based on his statements. The Palestine Israel is not at all surprising. You know what I'm saying? When I was flying back from Palestine. You gotta go through Tel Aviv. You know, I had a book called on Palestine and I had a series of like maybe three or four souvenir plates and ashtrays and stuff. When I'm in the airport. They call my name on com-. And I'm thinking, I left something that security something like that. The woman runs up on me. Like, yeah. We found this book in your bag. It says Palestine, how do you even know about Palestine, how do you even know about that? And that's that's when it really dawned upon me how much they were trying to erase Palestine from the memory of you know, of anyone. So why why issued at the Marc Lamont hill is in Vic midst care about so much. I'm not up on like that. So I just I mean, it wasn't until I went there that I really realized. How how severe was? But we appreciate you for joining us. Robyn approach. Yes. Charlemagne God here we can with the breakfast club. That was my man Vic Ludvig Mensa is one of the guys that is out here. You know, make any cool to be mentally healthy. He's not afraid to share experiences from from his battles with meant to help. So I salute him for that. Now, you got one to watch. What we're watching is major. We'll get into next weekends.

Palestine Marc Lamont Vic Ludvig Mensa Israel Tel Aviv
"palestine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The planet that we we all know enjoy the we are anti war which I believe Jesus was to we are all four ways for Justice which Jesus was a Palestinian Jewish. Rabbi as a. Person of color that was killed by white supremacists and we're usually making every, effort to be on the front lines for racial So, what sets us apart from. Millionaire okay just two, things the idea of Jesus being. A person of color I guess because, we all have some color to us but what kind of person of color he says he was a Palestinian here's the problem the term Palestine didn't exist when Jesus was alive No really it didn't He was a. Judean, the? Roman province That. He was, born. Into was called Judea no one repeat. No one referred to it as Palestine Palestine. Was a term that the Romans adopted after they, destroyed the second temple and sent the, Judean Jews that's what the term Jews comes from into exile and they renamed Jerusalem alia capital Lena and they. Sowed salt with plows onto the Temple Mount so that they would never ever ever rebuild the temple and. And then. They. Also gave that province the name Palestine To insult the Jews. That they had just slaughtered and. Driven out by giving it the name of the ancient enemy. Of the Jewish people the Philistines that's where the Palestine comes from but no one believes by the way. I mean zero historians will tell you that there's, any connection between today's Palestinians are Arabs, and the ancient Philistines who were lost to history by the time the Jews Jesus was born in any event. Pastor van hall then says that the reason Jesus was killed Was. For the color of his skin. And he was a victim of white, supremacy really, listen hey why can't we do a brewery.

Palestine Temple Mount Lena
"palestine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Know I speak for all the Jews if you're Jewish. And you vote. For someone like Alexandra Cossio Cortez you're voting for. Your own destruction just so we're perfectly clear if. You're Jewish in the New York fourteenth and you vote. For Alexandra Cossio Cortez you're out of your mind you might as well glue your four skins back on it's over kids. It's, over, you just given up on Judaism altogether let me share this audio with you firing line she's with Margaret Hoover, and she's being asked about Israel the dynamic there in terms of geopolitics and the war is very different than people expressing their first. Amendment right to protest well yes, but I also think that what people are starting to see at least in in the occupation. Of Palestine is Just an. Increasing, crisis, of humanitarian condition and that's me is just where I tend, to come from on this issue occupation of Palestine Israel the occupation of. Palestine what talking point are we buying into here Margaret Hoover she wants a little more information The term the occupation of Palestine What, did you, mean by that oh I think what I meant is like the settlements that are increasing in some of these areas and places? Where Or Palestinians are experiencing difficulty in access to Housing and homes She has no idea what she's. Saying right there she thinks. What she said she thinks what. She, meant settlements no Israel build houses. Anywhere in Israel. It's their nation they can build homes anywhere. Hoover goes again you can. Expand. On that, yeah I mean I think I'd, also just I I am not the expert geopolitics on, this issue you you're the one who. Brought it up you said the occupation of Palestine that's very specific and direct wording that is certainly. Beyond an anti-semitic it certainly anti-israel. Without a doubt it goes down a whole line of thinking that you, see for students Justice. Of Palestine the. J. p. and Jewish voice for peace and. A lot of these groups. That. Are anti, Israel groups that's the wording you, used so obviously that's the wording of socialist I think, without question I can see that down. The line in a multiplicity of places and then when pressed upon your own words you go I. Don't know anything you giggle like. A child and then pretend that what you said isn't what you said I, wanna be clear she's not. Bright don't tell me she got an economics degree from Boston University Boston University right it. Was with the b wasn't Harvard was Boston wasn't Brandeis, I think was Boston University so why Paul Krugman has an economics degree I don't think he's very bright either Does it. Matter does it matter that you went to college and got, a degree, in. This replaced well in that, it is, meaningless drivel you brought up the occupation of Palestine. And when asked to explain what you meant. You basically said dad I don't know And you expect us to say oh, so bright so smart so with it all democratic socialists are liars. All democratic socialists? Are not democratic they are socialist socialism is evil socialism has done nothing for society? And, can't do anything for society. And obviously now we know as we've seen, in many places the talking point for socialists, is to push, this, anti Israel agenda So let me ask why anybody votes for. This fool and this foolish nonsense but they're going to be, using the fourteenth district of New York who vote for this loser I would go with the gorilla glue. To get the foreskin back on because honestly we don't watch back when you vote for her I'm Tony cats Justice will be. Retiring to story Changing changing by them Successor who, the president nominates shames the nominee At each other, you have a chance to take down Welby..

Palestine Israel Margaret Hoover Alexandra Cossio Cortez New York Boston University Boston Unive Paul Krugman Boston University president Tony Welby Brandeis Boston J. p. Harvard
"palestine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"To drive to, their beach houses and while we send, them five, hundred? Million? Dollars. A. Year, so they. Can tow the democrat, party line isn't it, great to be a democrat She was asked in this. Alleged interview it was a fluff job with PBS about Israel she jumped in well the occupiers she refers to. Israel as the occupiers and the lame brain milk toast fluffer suckling on the tax payer and employed by, PBS with a private chef sitting nearby Set what, you call them occupiers and that's where it gets good Alexandria Casio Cortes the future of the Democratic Party what people are starting to see at least in in the occupation Of Palestine is just an increasing. Crisis of humanitarian condition the occupation of Palestine where. I tend to come from on, this issue the occupation of Palestine She is an historical, illiterate she's a half wit but, she's been indoctrinated by the Democratic Party to call Israel Palestine and call it an occupation which means that it's illegal which means that she's with HAMAs which is a radical Islamic. Terrorist group dedicated to. The destruction of the state. Of Israel and the, extermination of the Jews contained their rim and, the democratic socialists are with her she is with them this is today's. Democratic Party as the poster says if you're a Jew and you're a, democrat you're a fool.

Democratic Party Palestine Israel Israel Palestine Alexandria Casio Cortes HAMAs milk
"palestine" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

"By the way they weren't called palestinians there they were philistines which was the greatest enemies of the jews at the time then in the late eighteen hundreds they started some of the jews in england and russia decided they wanted to come back home so what did they do they bought the land they paid for it the country had been destroyed by centuries of armies tearing down cutting down trees israel was a big swamp nobody knew what to do with it heck you can even go back to that late eighteen hundreds when mark twain went over to be called palestine at the time said you could go for days of that seeing anybody buildings were basically tents the country was a disaster so jews came over they paid for the land they fixed it up they paid to fix it up and then when hitler came around and started doing the holocaust he teamed up with the palestinians palestine when hey help us kill some jews over here when that didn't work jews from around the world came to their ancestry homeland israel started trying to build a country they fought wars and one them they have paid the price and yet it's never ever good enough.

england russia israel mark twain palestine hitler
"palestine" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on The Young Turks

"What happened i thought every nation could choose his capital oh what palestine is not a nation why because you want end to occupation so israel and the united states guests and do everything they want including death destruction shooting and hitting two thousand seven hundred people but the other side is not allowed to do anything they're not even allowed to walk to the border they must stay in their prison and i guess that people must know when they were defeated that is their rationale so palestine cannot shoot chooses capital palestine doesn't even exist and the us and israel cheer enthusiastically i think the palestinians should put away even the slingshots what are you going to do you're not going to do anything with that all it does give them an excuse i know that they'll kill you anyway so put aside the slingshots never ever do an act of violence do not pick up a stone burning tires what the hell is that going to do so the leadership of hamas please stop being so stupid and have putting rocks in those people's hands so because i know that if they just walk i know that new york times and others have reported for just walking they're killed so then why are you helping israeli right wing government with the optics with the stones on the tires put aside the any talk of molotov cocktails or stones are tires put that aside and just walk with no weapons at all i know that they are likely to mow you down and if they do.

palestine us hamas new york times israel
"palestine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"A bit about what actually happened in nineteen forty eight so in nineteen forty eight is what we call the neck bad catastrophe and as really the loss of palestine as we knew it before nineteen forty eight the loss of our homeland the loss of our identity to give you an example of very personal example my grandfather used to live in the village in what is now called israel called there's nate he was a very rich farmer and the landlord he lost his home and his land was kicked out deported and became a refugee ever since ever since and went into the gaza strip anez result my father and myself grew up as refugees in a refugee camp in the gaza strip but to put it more into context so we need to go back a little bit back to the british occupation of palestine is often referred to as the british mandate but it's actually unoccupied was a military occupation britain occupied palestine when with a hundred thousand soldiers there's more than the views team vade iraq and afghanistan combined and they've occupied palestine since nineteen seventeen to up to nine hundred forty eight during that period they gave a promise which is called the balfour declaration which cave a promise and a pledge to the jewish lobby in europe to build a homeland for them in palestine those taking the right of the people the indigenous people in their away from them and given it to somebody else colonial project really and from nineteen seventeen to nineteen forty eight the jewish population and jewish immigration from europe increase in palestine kebir tsa's and settlements were built on our land and we lost our home and identity in nineteen forty eight when britain suddenly declared that there with throwing from palestine on the fourteenth of may nineteen forty eight without putting together any political solution without putting any arrangement together and they just lifted they're giving one side the upper hand to really go into villages and towns on the rampage killing and shooting people.

palestine israel nate europe gaza britain iraq afghanistan
"palestine" Discussed on WREK

WREK

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on WREK

"And working class palestinians who indeed have shaved their own destiny and have resisted and made tremendous difference because without him there is no story to tell one time ago leila's grandparents had built a house in syria it resembled the earlier home as closely as possible perhaps this replica of their place in palestine was meant to heal old wounds there little haven sprinkled with happy memories and the orange trees during the war they had to abandon this new house to an escape to jordan were they became refugees once more where will they return the war's over to sell you john or will they stay in jordan but why not palestine why never palestine the lady had never been there the rusty key in the family home was clearly marked the key to our home in palestine we will die here here in the last passage here and here our blood we plant it's olive tree think.

leila syria palestine jordan
"palestine" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"She had completed her studies at the evergreen state college she actually graduated posthumously after she was killed we accepted her diploma she completed her work she had been really introduced to the to the issue of palestine israel and palestine after nine eleven when she went trying to find explanations that was such a nine eleven was such a significant event for her and for all americans of course but she was in college at the time the community really launched into activism after that while the country was was moving towards war people in our community and in in groups some do groups that formed but also existing groups really trying to find other other responses and so there was the olympia movement for justice in peace olympia for peace in the middle east formed and the fellowship of reconciliation was here and rachel connected with all those groups also through her studies to this issue and trying to figure out why did it happen and and that led her to israel and palestine not as a sole reason but at least as one factor one explanation and there were people on the campus who had direct ties to the middle east and one was an israeli citizen who had become a co founder of women in black after events in lebanon earlier and so these people were were were sharing their stories their experiences with rachel and then this the second intifada was underway in in israel and palestine and there was a call for international to come that was after a resolution in the united nations to take a human rights monitoring force to the region was vetoed by the united states and as a result the international solidarity movement was formed it was organized by palestinians and by his railly's who wanted or decided that they could call internationals to come to be observers to respond nonviolently to this situation there and rachel had friends who went in two thousand and two to something called freedom summer and they came back she followed what they were doing very closely and they came back and said that more people were needed she was studying arabic she was looking for something meaningful to do in her life and she decided to go with the international solidarity movement.

evergreen state college israel palestine co founder lebanon rachel united nations united states
"palestine" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"palestine" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

"Palestine lansing your chance to dance yes it's that outage grow terrorist cells saint valentine's dinner and saturday february tenth from sixty nine pm epa cottage growth high school cafeteria m bring your sweetheart enjoy an excellent dinner and silent auction two along with fantastic swing and pig band music public parchment parkson grand all proceeds built for restoration of that cottage grove barracks for tickets information physics cg garrod cell dot com cg carousel dot com in africa five year old seru has no choice she and million slicker walk miles a day for dirty water together we can end their walk because when you just add water exchange alive learn more world vision on how to use garlic it's at gcc an wellness dot com now the station manager told me that i needed to say the url at least twice even though it feels kind of weird but if you're interested in backyard self reliance you're one of us go to w w w g cnn wellness dot com and let connect up hi this is teddy under so i'm here to tell you about g cnn telecasts dot com a team of boardcertified doctors assisting you 24 hours a day seven days a week 365 days a year within fifteen minutes the registration care your family can afford revolutionizing the healthcare industry virtual consulting providing diagnosis of nonemergency medical issues by fold or secure video on computer or smart mobile devices to cnn telecasts doc com virtual care anywhere.

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