20 Burst results for "Pakistan Army"

Death Sentence Overturned for Pervez Musharraf, Ex-Leader of Pakistan

BBC Newshour

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Death Sentence Overturned for Pervez Musharraf, Ex-Leader of Pakistan

"The coating punk is stone has thrown up the death sentence handed down last month to the former president Pervez Musharraf the former president's his company overseas for medical treatment so kinda Kamani is in Islamabad the death sentence handed down to general Musharraf was always unlikely to be carried out not least is he's been living outside of pockets on since twenty sixteen nevertheless it was still seen as unprecedented but both Pakistan's army and coming government strongly oppose the verdict today judges that hold high court ruled that a special court set up to try Mr Musharraf was unconstitutional he had been convicted of illegally declaring a period of emergency rule when faced by protests against him in two thousand and

Pervez Musharraf President Trump Islamabad Pakistan
Pakistani Military Says It Shot Down 2 Indian Aircrafts

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

04:13 min | 2 years ago

Pakistani Military Says It Shot Down 2 Indian Aircrafts

"Let's bring you up to date with events in south of Asia, this Wednesday, Pakistani and Indian stocks have taken a hit after Pakistani fighter jets shot down two Indian aircraft this morning. That's according to a Pakistani military spokesman, it's dramatic escalation just one day after the Indian air force bombed what it called a terror training camp inside Pakistan for let's get the latest now from New Delhi where Bloomberg's Ian Marlow is standing by. Ian, talk us through the details that we know of so far. Yeah. We're still sort of watching this situation unfold. But at the moment Pakistan's army has come out and said that they shot down two Indian aircraft. That would be a significant esscalation of tensions that we've seen again. It comes right after India bombed targets inside Pakistan yesterday and both of these events India crossing into Pakistani airspace and bombing targets and also Indian and Pakistani fighter jets engaging in what appears to be a dog fight the these are both relatively unprecedented in modern times. And you have to go back to the nineteen seventy one Indo Pakistani war that resulted in the creation of Bangladesh to find a similar scenario. In in terms of where this story could go from here, we understand that this kind of tit for tat on that kind of level. Especially in the air hasn't hasn't happened in a few decades. Clearly, the pressure was on Pakistan initially in terms of a foreign policy response, they delivered a response. What could we get from the Indian Indian government at this point? Yeah. At the moment, and this is it's it's kind of an interesting side to this mean on both days. Pakistan's army has come out and sort of set the narrative, I mean yesterday, they came out before India had even announced that they had that bombed these targets, and they said, look India didn't hit anything and today they've come out and said that that's downed aircraft. And so at the moment, we have Pakistan version of what happened, and we don't have anything from the India side at the moment, though, it appears that Pakistan is saying that they've arrested a pilot who ejected from a plane over Pakistani airspace, which which could could lead to a bit of a dramatic event here, and again, we're heading into a general election. So I've tensions have been running high. I think in India the public is is quite emotive on this issue. I give there was a terrorist attack that killed forty troops. Earlier this month so tensions are high. And and. I think both public now now in both India and Pakistan, are are sort of watching this very closely. What's likely to happen next than Ian? As you say the context in India is this election to what extent is prime minister Narendra Modi under pressure here to to to essentially strike back at Pakistan or seen to sort of be strong against the neighbor. Yeah. Even yesterday right after India had announced that it bombed a target inside Pakistan, the ruling party here in India was was stressing that responses, hey as a bold and decisive move by prime minister, Narendra Modi at the moment. It looks like Pakistan decided it needed to show us some kind of force to its own public. And right now, again, we we're not one hundred percent, sure. What exactly happened in in in in the air over Kashmir? But it would appear that I'm full. We'll find out. What really we'll find out India's version today later today. But at the moment, it's not clear exactly what what they're what they're going to respond to because India could come out, and again, say something completely contradictory to Pakistan is saying which which is again, kind of par for the course and South Asia. No one agrees on someone said yesterday, even the color of the sky. So we have to wait a

Pakistan India Indian Indian Government Ian Marlow Narendra Modi Asia New Delhi Bangladesh Bloomberg South Asia Prime Minister Kashmir One Hundred Percent One Day
"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is James Menendez with NewsHour live from the BBC. Now, the relationship between Pakistan, and the US has often been a rocky one, but things are being particularly shaky this year in January the American government announced it was freezing almost all security assistance to Pakistan because it said it had failed to take action against Islamist militants operating on its soil, including members of the Afghan Taliban last week three hundred million dollars of US military aid was cancelled well today, the secretary of state. Mike Pompeo's be meeting Pakistan's new prime minister Imran Khan in Islamabad. The BBC's seconda commodities on the line from there. Now under any information as to how the talks have been going. Well, we know that they've finished and micro PO paired is on his way now to to India, and he met as you say with the new prime minister in Ron Conway with the new foreign minister and with the head of the Pakistan army, so far the initial comments that have been coming out from the meeting seem to be fairly positive. We've got a comment from Mike Pompeo saying that he's hopeful that the foundation that was laid today we'll set the conditions for continued success fairly conciliatory remarks from him which while the go against the the kind of other tents build up. There was to the talks with for example, as you say the the announcement of those of that three hundred million dollars in security assistance being canceled. What does Pakistan's response being to those US accusations that it's not doing enough to combat militancy? Well, this has been a bit of a US mantra really constantly calling on Pakistan to do more to crack down, for example, on these safe havens that it alleges there are for the Afghan Taliban inside Pakistan, and to do more to bring the Afghan Taliban to the negotiating table. Now Pakistan denies that these safe havens exist at all, and it says when it comes to the Taliban that they have a very limited influence over them. And Pakistan is a very keen on pointing out the tens of thousands of lives that the country has lost in its own war on terror against militants and the military here has been very successful in driving out militants who have been launching attacks against Pakistani targets, the accusation from the west from the American particular has always been that they've been hand-in-hand secretly with Afghan focus focused militants like the Afghan Taliban. Hi, Connie network. And what about the new prime minister Imran Khan is this a difficult balancing act for him appeasing, the Americans on the one hand, but also appeasing a domestic constituents as well. Yes. Absolutely. I mean, traditionally actually foreign policy in Pakistan has really been the Demane of the of the Pakistani military for a number of years focused on in the last government didn't actually have a foreign minister almost as a kind of sign of a protest because foreign policy was being seen as being dominated by the Pakistani military, which has a very large influence in the country and the way the country's run. And it's the Pakistani military and elements of the Pakistan intelligence services that American the west have long accused of of working hand in hand with the Taliban to use them as a kind of proxy force to influence events in Afghanistan and rival potential Indian influence there. It's early days in Iran Khan's new administration and win yet to see how what kind of dynamic he'll develop with the Pakistani military and how much of a free hand he'll have to determine his foreign policy. He seems more in tune with the Cassini military, and there's some feeling that that could actually be beneficial with top the talks because it means that the Americans are talking to a United civilian and military front so good many, thanks gonna commodity commodity. Joining us live from Islamabad..

Afghan Taliban Pakistan Imran Khan prime minister Pakistan army Mike Pompeo US Islamabad BBC Ron Conway James Menendez American government India Afghanistan three hundred million dollars
Palestinian FA calls on Argentina's Messi to not play in Jerusalem

BBC Minute

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Palestinian FA calls on Argentina's Messi to not play in Jerusalem

"Chami fat. BBC minute brought Somalia's. Government says a million people have been affected by the eruption of volcano. It caused lava to flow into a village called l. rodeo killing seven people and injuring almost three hundred is an cloud of ash. Ten kilometers into the sky two-headed Palestine's football associations as Arab funds should burn posters of Lena, messy. If he plays in Argentina's friendly against Israel in Jerusalem on Saturday, a Palestinian member of Israel's parliament has appealed to Argentina to pull out of the game after more than one hundred protesters were killed by Rayleigh troops at the border with Gaza Pakistan's. Army says its troops have killed six militants who had launched attacks against border posts. It's building from inside Afghan territory. Pakistan is currently constructing wall along the two thousand six hundred kilometer, long border issues with Afghanistan and finally, tennis Novak Jackovich's into the French Open quarter-final. He's beating Spain's Pernando ver- Dusko in straight-sets oh three. Fifty nine. Minutes.

Pakistan Novak Jackovich Pernando Ver- Dusko Argentina Israel Somalia BBC Palestine Rayleigh Lena Army Jerusalem Spain Afghanistan Two Thousand Six Hundred Kilom Ten Kilometers
"pakistan army" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Um you know probably it allows the two capitals to say that there isn't a great diplomatic achievement but what difference it makes on the ground is hard to say because again this week what we've had is news from afghanistan that suggests that even less territory is actually controlled by kabul than currently appeared so the the tana bone are making inroads and that while the previous problems seemed to be that the seemed to be that the central government lacked control lucked control of a lot of the country we've now got absolute proof that there are parts of the country an increasing pose of the country where it doesn't have control sean kiss this basically just an agreement to have an agreement you know e it's too early to say if you go to afghantistan you will find that you know you may think indians don't like pakistanis don't trust them we'll believe me stormed the attitudes are even worse i can't even begin to tell you the level of distrust which is born if you know blurred border years of pakistani support the taliban and so on but what's interesting is is this is a multifaceted agreement part of it is you know motherhood and apple pie and let's say nice things about each other we just break from cena bam things about each other but the other side of you something more concrete one of the clauses is specifically a promise that pakistan will support an afghan led peace process that's really important because of course the main taliban leadership is based in pakistan is subject to influence by pakistan's intelligence service so if with the blessing in the support of countries like china and the united states we can see pakistan doing more to facilitate the taliban the people sitting on their soil and cities like question and shower and the border areas being pushed in the direction of kabul and of course the taliban see the kabul government is neil legitimate puppet regime but if paxton can push them in that direction and that it comes out of this if we see concrete movement i think that would be fantastic because that's what we need that's not a step one in a very long and arduous process but of course given the weakness of the afghan government given the fact the americans will.

tana bone central government taliban apple pakistan china united states kabul kabul government paxton afghan government afghanistan cena
"pakistan army" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Beneficiary of such insanity i'm a i'm a pakistan my father who is an obstacle irish fan is obsessed with the jackson and just insistent on say the wrong thing again i think they do everything wrong right what do i tell him because i think i think he was best case scenario that david to me if i'm a jet fan and thanks for the call emmett that was absolutely best case scenario for me donald was the best quarterback of the bunch i'm the quarterback group but i can tell you what i liked about them if you so inclined to listen i think he has a strong enough on it wasn't the best arm in the draft but he has a strong enough arm clearly allen had the best arm in the draft but he's got a strong enough to make every throw in the nfl route tree i believe he has a very allusive feel inside the pocket which i think is important i think it's what rothlisberger has i think it's what aaron rodgers has it's the ability to just wiggle inside the pocket i'm not talking about scrambling wiggle inside the pocket figure out a way to avoid the sack get your foot work just right and make a throw on the move i think that's what he's great at and i think it's a a skill that really sets a lot of quarterback quarterbacks when i got me saying like elleman quarterbacks it's got he's got the skill sets quarterbacks apart i just think that's i think that's an important skill and i think he has in spades i think he's somebody who can just figure it out get his foot he doesn't even have to get his foot were perfect but you'll figure out a way to make an accurate throw and i think he's mentally tough and i saw i saw his performance firsthand in the rose bowl against penn state and i thought it was brilliant i thought it was brilliant i just think he's a winner i really do i think he's the guy i think his attitudes just right i think he's humble i think he's strong he's confident i think he can make all the throws i think he's got elusiveness you can you know move inside the pocket that's what i love about his ability to move inside the pocket and make throws on the move without the perfect footwork and something you can't teach everything else can be taught learning.

jackson emmett aaron rodgers pakistan david donald allen nfl
"pakistan army" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Her home in the northwestern town of mingora in the swat valley for the first time since two thousand twelve the pakistan army provided use a calico after which took her to men gora from islamabad where she arrived before dawn yesterday on thursday flanked by heavy securities you plans to return to britain on monday you saw fossa won international renown after she was shot by the taliban for advocating for girls education she received initial treatment in pakistan and later was taken to england where she continued her education us diplomats are packing their bags in russia after orders to leave following the us's expulsion of russian officials abc's james longman reports diplomats from other countries have also been ordered to leave is continuing to expel diplomats following the coordinated expulsion of russian officials from some twenty three countries sixty us diplomats were ordered to leave russia friday and the us consulate in saint petersburg shot and other fifty british officials have today been given instructions to return home the breakdown in relations follows the nerve agent attack on a former russian spy and his daughter in the british town of salisbury for which the uk government blames russia we have breaking news this morning to you want to know information now coming in here wanna learn turn on the knowledge wbz news on news turn on wbz newsradio ten thirty wbz news time six fifty three the subaru retailers are doing linda all wheel drive traffic on.

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"pakistan army" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the pbs news hour the pbs newshour comes on after the world is afternoon at three o'clock here on cake i'm marco werman you're with the world we saw some poignant moments this week in pakistan nobel peace prize winner malala yousafzai is back in her home country for the first time since being shot by taliban militants on six years ago for security reasons information about her movements and whereabouts is being kept mostly under wraps but my bbc colleagues are kinda kirmani was able to meet with her for a few minutes and he asked her out feels to be home is emotional asian everything i see is valuable to me even just this warm air i value it and i'm enjoying it and i am just so happy to be home and to put my feet on on this land again and i think this was right time the government also provided support the pakistan army for supporting security are you scared all here waltz malala is hugely admired across the world and in pakistan she also has a lot of critics here i'm scrolling through people's comments on the bbc or do facebook page and there are a lot and lots of people abusing some like this one call her a cia or western agent others allege she faked the attack against her how does it feel when you when you read those kind of comments i say i just wanted to understand like who why do they oppose me and what is it easy behind it i want very future for this country that's why i started speaking out for education that's why i did not fear anything and i said even if the terrorist attack me it does not matter i will continue speaking out and it did happen and i continued my my campaign for girls' education so my focus is only working for the good it's two hundred million people and i know that ninety nine percent more than ninety nine percents stand with me support me they believe in education they believe in their daughters my focus right now is continuing my work to me fund in making sure we out to as many goals as we can and one hundred thirty million girls who could not go to school right now to ensure that they can get quality education malala yousafzai undeterred talking there about returning to visit pakistan this week she was with the bbc's sikander kirmani.

pakistan army bbc cia pakistan marco werman malala yousafzai taliban facebook ninety nine percent six years
"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Devil's bargain but later we wondered if we hadn't created a problem for ourselves and our on nine eleven the bush administration basically started to plan for a war against the taliban and alqaeda and they looked at the situation and day recognize that if they were going to go to war with the taliban they would in effect be going to war with eyes so they essentially said the pakistan army you can switch sides you know we've we've got a day or two or a week to decide but here the things that we would need for new basing writes air flight rights supply lines and president pervez mucharraf than the army chief and and essentially the military leader of pakistan he took a week and he said okay we're gonna we're gonna fight with you i even though we don't think this war is necessarily wise we if if it's a all or nothing decision we don't want to oppose nato we don't want to oppose the united states at this moment of crisis again i'm hurry can volume speaking with steve cole about his new book directorate asked the cia in america secret wars in afghanistan and pakistan stepping back just for a moment in i think for for a lot of people the story with alqaeda and taliban kind of and ten plus years ago right so you know the belief being weren't the taliban alqaeda i'll read he did after two thousand and one so what happened where are we right now right so this this narrative history that that we're talking about as kind of four parts and the first is about the war to overthrow the taliban in the fall of two thousand one and the second and is called losing the peace which was what we did after the taliban collapsed the taliban and alqaeda basically those who weren't killed in the fall of two thousand one migrated into pakistan the alqaeda types arabs chechens was backs tended to settle in the tribal areas along the border although some of them ended up in pakistani cities and and the taliban survivors ended up mostly in quite a also in karachi over the years and there was there was a uh an opportunity between two thousand and two and two thousand and five four of the united states europe asia the rest of the world that was all with uh the coalition at that time to.

taliban pakistan army pervez mucharraf pakistan united states steve cole cia karachi president army nato america afghanistan europe
"pakistan army" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"My guest today on pod say the world is steve call he's the author of directorate s the cia and america's secret wars in afghanistan and pakistan that book is really almost a sequel to a fantastic book called ghost wars which came out several years ago is also a staff writer at the new yorker and the dean of the columbia university graduate school of journalism steve thank you so much for being here but thanks for having me i'm gonna start you off the light question light easy pop quiz how many nuclear weapons do we think pakistan has more than one hundred in more than 100 i think one problem with that programme which has been around since the 1980s is that they have moved in recent years toward what are called tactical nuclear weapons meaning smaller yield more portable weapons that might be used on the battlefield or at least might be constructed to convince india that they might be used on the battlefield so there in the kind of weapons that are particularly dangerous if you're thinking about them from a counterterrorism perspective rights they're not in a gigantic silo somewhere in the middle nowhere their are smaller would guess or really bring the next question is has secured you think there's weapons army how worried are the national security officials you talk to you for this book and for your job generally about these nuclear weapons falling into the hands of terrorists or rogue elements in pakistan i guess when you talk to people who specialize in nuclear weapons security they they start with the question well how big is the attacking force because you're defences depend on whether somebody's turning up with like a brigade or five guys in black masks and so there's really no fence that could stop the kind of collapse for example of the pakistan army or civil war or something along those lines the pakistanis are wary of our help in this area because they suspect that we might be looking to neutralise war identify where their weapons are and so when we offer for example um sophisticated knowledge about how to.

cia america staff writer india pakistan army steve afghanistan pakistan columbia university graduate s
"pakistan army" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"The us led invasion of afghanistan in two thousand one which caused al qaeda to migrate across the border into pakistan collaborate with local radicals and eventually touch off the worst domestic terrorism pakistan has ever known out of the country was in turmoil in two thousand nine many in the west feared the pakistani state with its nuclear weapons was about to collapse so in the process of fighting their way back and tried to push this violence back into afghanistan i assigned the pakistan army tended to distinguish between what were sometimes sir donnelly referred to as good taliban and bad taliban good taliban being those that didn't seek revolutionary violence against the pakistani state um bad taliban being does the did so the good thai the good types attended to be those facing afghanistan and i think it was part of pakistan's effort to calm violence in its own country that led the army to tolerate and then gradually even support the afghan taliban uh as they attacked nato forces across the border bidding choosing to single out the actions of the isi as the greatest factor in in the failure to make progress and to achieve the aims in afghanistan you are in effect on you lessing the united states off the hook these were policy decisions strategy decisions from those in charge in the united states the cost was not only a trillion dollars in money but more than two thousand american soldiers lives are of the he wanted could read the book thanks on leading the united states off the hook i mean the whole chronicle of this is a kind of pentagon papers of american blindness and failure repeatedly uh and it's not only about isis i as i say i think it's the most important of a series of factors including hubris about the capacity of american counterinsurgency doctrine to turn the tide of the war again and again now the us went into afghanistan not to fight a war against the taliban per se but to retaliate against alqaeda after the september eleven attacks and even later in two thousand nine when president obama escalated the war his advisors sat down in the situation room and i.

pakistan pakistan army taliban isi united states obama afghanistan sir donnelly nato pentagon president trillion dollars
"pakistan army" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The nineties so that's one set of taliban but then pakistan has pakistani taliban who are focused on overthrowing the pakistani state now that has been the real concern of the pakistan army and its intelligence service they want to put those guys out of business they are not so concerned about the afghan taliban there's this long stink shen in pakistani policy between good taliban a bad taliban so what's happened where we are now is that there are twenty five thousand thirty thousand afghan taliban guerrilla soldiers fighting the war going in and out of pakistan but fighting a war on afghan ground those units include d suicide bomber truck bomber units that case leaked kill scores of innocent civilians in kabul as we've seen over the last couple of weeks couple of horrific attacks and then inside pakistan the effort by the pakistani taliban to overthrow their government has really faltered the pakistani state has restored security over the last couple of years to a significant degree not entirely i think five hundred civilians died in terrorist attacks in pakistan last year but that compared to many thousands of few few years ago when when the when a country looked like it might collapse so what you have now is a picture of pakistani stability relatively an afghan instability getting worse and one of the ways that's happening is that alqaeda little elements of alqaeda or international terrorist groups the islamic state have migrated back to afghanistan from pakistan so one of the effects of the pakistani approach to the war has been they've more or less finally managed to kicked out a lot of the people who who came into their country after two thousand one that they don't that it they don't want because you know they're revolutionaries um and so this is why the united states has backed at war uh in afghanistan's why president obama was not able to end the war as he had hoped to do at the end of two thousand fourteen is because along the eastern um frontier of afghanistan near the pakistan border there are groups of either affiliated with the international on editions of the islamic state or on other international terrorist groups including alqaeda my guest is steve call author of the new book director had ass the cia and america's secret wars in afghanistan and pakistan this is fresh air hi my name is tom and from fremont and i donated to kqed because my goodness we need real journalism alias.

pakistan army kabul pakistan pakistani taliban united states obama director cia america fremont taliban afghanistan president steve kqed
"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The pakistani state now that has been the real concern of the pakistan army and its intelligence service they want to put those guys out of business they are not so concerned about the afghan taliban there's this long stinks shen in pakistani policy between good taliban had bad taliban so what's happened where we are now is that there are twenty five thousand thirty thousand afghan taliban guerrilla soldiers fighting the war going in and out of pakistan but fighting a war on afghan ground those units include d suicide bomber truck bomber units that casually kill scores of innocent civilians in kabul as we've seen over the last couple of weeks couple of horrific attacks and then inside pakistan the effort by the pakistani taliban to overthrow their government has really faltered the pakistani state has restored security over the last couple of years to a significant degree not entirely i think five hundred civilians died in terrorist attacks in pakistan last year but that compared to many thousands of few few years ago when when the when the country looked like it might collapse so what you have now is a picture of pakistani stability relatively and afghan instability getting worse and one of the ways that's happening is that alqaeda little elements of alqaeda or international terrorist groups the islamic state have migrated back to afghanistan from pakistan so one of the effects of the pakistani approach to the war has been they've more or less finally managed to kicked out a lot of that people who who came into their country after two thousand at one that they don't that it did they didn't want because you know they're revolutionaries um and so this is why the united states is back at war uh in afghanistan's why president obama was not able to end the war as he had hoped to do at the end of two thousand fourteen is because along the eastern um frontier of afghanistan near the pakistan border there are groups of either affiliated with the international ambitions of the islamic state or other international terrorist groups including alqaeda my guest is steve call author of the new book directorate s the cia and america's secret wars in afghanistan and pakistan we'll be right back this is fresh air wnyc is supported by jazz at lincoln center presenting grammy award winning vocalist diane reeves for valentine's day weekend february ninth and tenth at jazz at lincoln center columbus circle tickets at jazz dot org lorde one a new moon.

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"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"America's secret wars in afghanistan and pakistan we'll be right back this is fresh air after president trump announced the us would leave the paris climate deal dozens of cities vowed to go it alone but reducing total greenhouse gas emissions is hard the city will set very aggressive goals it won't meet them and then a few or five years later they just set new goals that are even more ambitious i'm ari shapiro why some cities are falling short this afternoon on all things considered from npr news weekday starting at four on wnyc this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is steve call his staff writer for the new yorker and author of the new book directorate s the cia and america's secret wars in afghanistan and pakistan it's a sequel to his book ghost wars the secret history of the cia afghanistan and bin laden from the soviet invasion to september test two thousand one so what were some of the methods that pakistan's secret intelligence agency had for supporting the taliban will they could afford to be passive in a lot of ways because pakistan was a sanctuary for the taliban guerrillas and they had used it in the war against the soviet forces in the 1980s in a way that was similar to what uh what they did when when the americans were the were the force in afghanistan so they had hospitals in pakistan they had families in pakistan they rotated in and out of the war on on fixed tours of you know seasonal tours or sixmonth tours they acquired weapons there they train their they formed units there they planned campaigns there they held political meetings there and i as i turned a blind eye to this from the very beginning and then became more actively involved the americans who started to study the war who went out to secretly view what was going on the other for the secretary of state or for the cia by two thousand and six they were seeing taliban units that looked as if they had been trained by the pakistan army they had sniper rifles they had uniforms they had rank uh they were.

taliban laden steve npr paris president afghanistan pakistan army America pakistan cia staff writer ari shapiro us trump five years sixmonth
"pakistan army" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Very longstanding part of pakistan's that'd be it's been a very long ending component of of this strategic culture of the pakistan army well but let's assume for example that the huge investment that we've made in america's longest war will end up being futile that the situation just gets worse and worse that they this divided government and and uh all the corruption accenture uh anyway and it's obvious that a few uh terrorist can destabilise a you know we've seen terrorist attacks in europe it the have they paralyzed entire countries so uh it's pretty obvious that this could go so much worse and eventually uh you could end up with this roiling terrorist haven like they had before nine eleven of it's even worse uh what good does that do to anybody lentil and the pakistanis that part that i don't get i understand their strategy but this it's like having in a pit bull that you keep taunting and one of the day's at one of these days it turns on you you do now i have i'm the momma a three pitfall that's not how it works all right i'm sal you mention that okay we we we can talk about other dogs but we had talked about pit bulls of this way they they suffer enough uh brutality and misperceptions let let's not foster that further now i know it sounds really difficult to understand but from pakistan's point of view it is capable of writing this tiger and it is writing a tiger from pakistan's plenty of you the the parts of pakistan that that have experienced insecurity is a part of pakistan that pakistan is really don't care that much about since about two thousand nine or ten i think largely thanks to the us theron program the pakistani taleban have really been unable to execute the kind of attacks that they had done in two thousand nine when do were ravaging lahore islamabad they were taking on jiri significant targets in the pakistan military and intelligence d than pretty much degraded to largely killing civilians mostly they've been conducting sectarian attacks against she uh for example the shia his are in baluchistan energy and some minority attacked so from pakistan's point of view this is very well worth the price and.

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"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The victims from that haven't yet been identified still and that's just a week off the more than twenty people were killed in another attack claimed by the taleban on the intercontinental hotel an upmarket hotel in kabul to why have there been so many attacks on kabul in the past week what's going on here whether it's hard to say one reason seems to be that both the taliban and the islamic state group a focusing their efforts on the capital kabul rather than trying to capture rural territories from government forces because they know that attacks here generate more international attention and they do more to undermine based in the government the head of the afghan security services and the press conference yesterday the he believed this out taken attacks was author to jute either the increase pressure from the united states on on pakistan for its alleged support for full militants allied to to the thought of on pakistan denies that though so the and one other explanation is often given by our country shows is that the visa these attacks in in kabul which generally target soft targets are a response to the fact that they are making progress in their fight against the taliban elsewhere in the country that that claimed that some an analyst sheikh rob sceptically them to thank you very much to conduct money there in kabul bruno mars has defied all the critics to beach kendrick lamar and jay.

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"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The word filing than zia about what measures you might see come from the government in kabul a both about what you've just eluded to with reference to pakistan and what influence there may have been from there but also about basic daytoday security in the city what might change now do you think the government the just announced the national melania today and afghanistan's flag will be flown halfmast the dead also tomorrow as hot national holiday uh the they they've been trying to uh being a to improve the security in the green soon there are more checkpoints more police officers checking the cars and people as well uh and uh you know is happening at the time that the pressures and pakistan are increasing by the us and also afghan government blaming pakistan constantly being behind these attacks so there is an active diplomat internationally diplomatic uh uh a diplomatic movement that the afghan government claims the credit saying for the people that look we are we have a increased pressure in pakistan you as a supporting manila's security council is supporting but on the other hand that are also talking about reforms in the security sector which has not resulted the ads i mean we haven't seen proper results yet but the afghan security forces are also busy infighting different uh groups including the taleban i s in the rural areas and the the casualties are so high among the afghan security forces as well that it would be really something care to to think about if they are able to do anything different thank you very much zia sharia in kabul you're listening to weekend from the bbc world service.

zia pakistan afghan government manila kabul afghanistan bbc
"pakistan army" Discussed on The Assassination

The Assassination

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on The Assassination

"Frank pakistan wouldbe to fight militants i sometimes they are that will be when the militants are attacking the pakistan army but when them innocence go for civilians including politicians like benazir bhutto than is a different story some militant so given considerable leeway because the pakistan army thinks that even if they overstep the mark by killing civilians they do remain useful in relation to pakistan's neighbours india and afghanistan after all the isi helped create the taliban in afghanistan and it uses other medicine groups to attack indian forces along the disputed border with kashmir the murder of benazir bhutto's sheds light on these tangled deep state calculations for example the official report into the karachi attack puts a passage from a book called reconciliation which benazir was working on in the months before her death her words spoken by an actor i was informed of a meeting that had taken place in lahore with a bomb blasts were planned a bomb maker was needed for the bombs enter gardez saif ullah there a wanted terrorist who tried to overthrow my second government carry saiful acta was a wellknown militant unimportant one the story when the when the americans bombed the afghan city of kandahar after nine eleven curry saiful acta an afghan taliban leader mullah omar fled together on the same motorbike but as is new york adviser mark siegel co roach reconciliation we would discuss the chapter than i will draft the chapter then i would send it to her and she would heavily edit the chapter this is one case where heart edits added this man's name i wasn't aware of with this man was and is the book within her name i accept that every other chee made so that's how it came to be she put it in herself a did you give you any indication where she got that lame fro no we heard earlier that benazir held back from naming the three men she said had organized terror attack they were all senior figures in the deep state but when it came to naming an ice tonight militant she felt so i'm sure a grand she knew she could never do a deal with the violence jihadists not least because they would never do a deal with her so she might as well name him nothing.

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"pakistan army" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Wherever dense avivi have actually that i do not custody but you have said of wind because if a few months ago you were defence minister and you said we will destroy india or if it dads to impose a war on us pakistan army fully prepared to answer any misadventure of india we have not made a tonic devices to display in a showcase is such a situation arises we will use it and eliminate india two rainy stand by that let me here trade led meteor chaired that there if india a commits aggression against fox on and if there is an extras exist and shoot threat to boxed thon we will or daddy it with two full might i'll again now repeat the same thing i'd if lashkar etaiba provokes india into a response you want then in a situation where you will use nuclear weapons you know it it is is again a hypothetical thing you know that that's a if the date that excuse and commit aggression against boxed on then obviously there's a water and water are there there there is no restraint waters water you know it's a let's applied restrain and let's talk i'm salt are sato god disputes through negotiations but it how can you imagine in utah which is when you are making such aggressive language we have a we have a the former head of and like we we we do not have songs from their side the speak the same language the former head to they're seat that british secret intelligence service john so as has said pakistan has developed a battlefield nuclear weapons we're talking about tactical weapons not strategic ones as a means to defend itself and if we have india declaring it respond militarily metairie militarily if there was another attack that like the one in mumbai knowing they were well by indian forces these weapons of pakistan's way to halt indian forces shortly after they crossed the border it makes it sound like war could be very quickly very quickly reached even by accident should dave your i agree with that they're they're they're they're they're there is any likelihood of war should be prevented.

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"pakistan army" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"pakistan army" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Is the best sam saved my life call sam at 800 we help u with the letter u that's tollfree 800 we help u with the letter u 800 we help u presidential advisor and soninlaw makes his first public remarks since taking the job at the white house here's usa's chris barnes we are here to improve the daytoday lives of the average citizen kushner speaking of the nation's top tech industry leaders in administration officials about his work on updating how the federal government operates especially when it comes to the va and the secretary's plan to unify the conduct medical records systems of the va and the department of defense hasn't systems in confidence essentially seems set of users this merger with somalia however this has been a major issue for veterans and despite sixteen years of failed efforts the trump administration guy don in less than five i'm chris barnes pakistan is launching a new effort to root out terrorism correspondent bill semper has the tail intelligence agencies in pakistan have released name of nearly one hundred people wanted on terrorismrelated charges more than half of whom are thought to be members of isis until now the government and the pakistan army had been relatively quiet about the scale of isis presence and influence in pakistan the move also comes at a time when president trump is reportedly ready to take a firmer stance with pakistan over their alleged harboring of terrorists bills emperor at five am and arizona was ninety degrees mid afternoon won twenty two this is usa radio news and i'm rod william stole if you're suffering from.

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