35 Burst results for "Pakistan"

Lisa Boothe: People Like Sean Parnell Are American Heroes

The Dan Bongino Show

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Lisa Boothe: People Like Sean Parnell Are American Heroes

"The more profound conversations I've had was with Sean Parnell And if you know Sean Parnell I mean the guy is just like you want to talk about an American freaking hero in American bad ASS I think I can spell it out I don't think I can say it Hopefully I didn't get us in trouble Sorry I mean talk out a freaking American hero I mean the dude is a former U.S. Army airborne ranger He served in the tenth mountain division for 6 years he is a veteran of 485 days of fierce fighting along the Afghan Pakistan border The outlaw platoon which is one of the platoon is called that he led is known to be one of the most fierce and effective American fighting units And all of modern American history I mean get this 85% of his platoon received purple hearts for wounds incurred in battle His platoon killed over 350 enemy fighters and some of the biggest firefights of the Afghan war Sean Parnell ended up retiring as a captain received two bronze stars one for valor and a Purple Heart I mean the guy is just a freaking rockstar And I interviewed him for my podcast and I just learned so much from him because I think part of celebrating veterans and taking stock on Veterans Day and is trying to understand what veterans go through when they come home Because if you haven't been a veteran I'm not a veteran So I don't truly know how that feels to have been to war and then come home and have the world sort of pass you by and have change so significantly when you've been out fighting Sean Parnell out fighting in Afghanistan one of the most effective American fighting units in modern history facing potential death every single day of his life Willing to risk it all bravely and show bravely as I mentioned 85% of his platoon received purple hearts including shot I mean that's crazy So he's out there doing that when we're all just living our lives here

Sean Parnell U.S. Army Pakistan Afghanistan
Loss and damage: Fight over human harm, huge climate costs

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Loss and damage: Fight over human harm, huge climate costs

"More than 100 world leaders will gather in Egypt this month for climate talks and much of the discussions are expected to be making some of the world's biggest polluters pay for destruction caused by climate change This summer's floods in Pakistan put one third of the country underwater causing $40 billion in damage a study calculated that climate change increased Pakistan's flood causing rain by up to 50% Dartmouth climate researcher just in mankind says it's a group of highly developed high income countries that have brought this problem to the world The cost of it are disproportionately being endured by low income countries in the global south And that is a massive injustice and massive inequity Europe's leaders and president Joe Biden are calling for fossil fuel companies to pay a windfall profits tax that along with aid from rich nations would go to countries victimized by past pollution I'm Donna water

Pakistan Egypt Dartmouth Joe Biden Europe Donna
Ex-PM Khan says march on Pakistani capital to resume Tuesday

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ex-PM Khan says march on Pakistani capital to resume Tuesday

"Former Pakistani prime minister Imran Khan says his march on the capitol will resume on Tuesday Speaking from his wheelchair and shall cut khanum hospital the ex leader who was wounded by gunshot in an apparent attempt on his life called out to his supporters He demanded an investigation into the shooting and the resignation of three powerful members of the government and the military whom he alleges were involved in staging the attack on him Khan was ousted from office in April in a no confidence vote in parliament He organized a march to pressure prime minister shabazz Sharif's government to hold early elections is protest march was peaceful until the attack which killed one of his supporters and wounded him and 13 others and has raised concerns about growing political instability in Pakistan He has since been discharged from hospital and moved to his home in Lahore I'm Naomi Shannon

Khanum Hospital Imran Khan Shabazz Sharif Khan Parliament Pakistan Lahore Naomi Shannon
UN weather report: Climate woes bad and getting worse faster

AP News Radio

01:17 min | 3 weeks ago

UN weather report: Climate woes bad and getting worse faster

"The United Nations warns of worsening global warming as world leaders gather for key climate talks Envoys gather in the Egyptian seaside resort of Sharm el Sheik for a UN convention on climate change amid the war in Ukraine high inflation food shortages and an energy crunch This comes as the UN's weather agencies annual report shows shocking new data The sea level rise in the past ten years is double what it was in the 1990s rising by .2 inches per year and is opening speech outgoing conference president alok Sharma said that countries had made considerable progress at their last meeting in Glasgow but more has to be done How many more wake-up calls Does the world do world leaders actually need A third of Pakistan underwater The worst flooding in Nigeria in a decade this year the worst drought in 500 years in Europe in a thousand years in the U.S. and the worst on record in China Over 120 world leaders will attend the talks but the absence of Chinese presidents Xi Jinping and Indian prime minister Narendra Modi two of the world's biggest polluters means many are doubtful on whether the talks could result in any major deals to cut emissions long term I'm Naomi Shannon

Sharm El Sheik UN Alok Sharma United Nations Ukraine Glasgow Nigeria Pakistan Xi Jinping Europe Narendra Modi U.S. China Naomi Shannon
 Pakistan's ex-PM Khan pauses protest march after shooting

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

Pakistan's ex-PM Khan pauses protest march after shooting

"Pakistan's former prime minister Imran Khan is in a stable condition after being shot and wounded during a protest march Khan's protest march and rallies were peaceful until the Thursday afternoon attack raising concerns about growing political instability in Pakistan a country with a history of political violence and assassinations Video footage showed him and his team ducking for cover on top of a vehicle as gunfire rings out One

Imran Khan Pakistan Khan
Pakistan's Imran Khan shot in "clear assassination attempt"

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Pakistan's Imran Khan shot in "clear assassination attempt"

"A gunman has opened fire at a campaign truck carrying a former Pakistani prime minister wounding him slightly party officials said former Pakistani prime minister Imran Khan was winded in the leg and that his injuries were not serious The attack happened in Pakistan's eastern Punjab province where Khan was traveling in a large convoy towards the capital Islamabad Khan has been pursuing his campaign aimed at forcing the government to hold early elections He was taken to a hospital in Lahore the identity of the gunmen is still unknown I'm Karen Chammas

Imran Khan Khan Punjab Pakistan Islamabad Lahore Karen Chammas
Oldest Guantanamo Bay prisoner transferred to Pakistan after 17 years

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Oldest Guantanamo Bay prisoner transferred to Pakistan after 17 years

"The oldest prisoner to be held at Guantanamo Bay is released and returned to his home country The foreign ministry in Islamabad and the U.S. Defense Department are confirming that 75 year old saifa paracha a Pakistani national was released and reunited with his family after spending more than 17 years in U.S. custody in Cuba After being captured in 2003 paracha was held at Guantanamo on suspicion of ties to Al-Qaeda but was never charged with a crime The notification of his release does not give a detailed reasoning for the decision but it concludes that paracha is not a continuing threat to the United States

Foreign Ministry U.S. Defense Department Saifa Paracha Paracha Guantanamo Bay Islamabad Cuba Guantanamo Qaeda United States AL
Karlsson scores in OT, Sharks beat Rangers 3-2 for 1st win

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Karlsson scores in OT, Sharks beat Rangers 3-2 for 1st win

"Air Carlson scored 49 seconds into overtime to give the sharks their first one of the season Three to two over the rangers San Jose scored first for the 6th straight game with Logan couture doing the honors on a power play 6 minutes into the game But the sharks had dropped their first 5 games with four Carlson cabbed as 2.9 beating Igor shish durkin I think we did a good job in trying to keep pushing if they even though we had to dump a lot of Pakistan but we worked hard Radam scheme also scored and James reimer made 21 saves for the sharks Filipino and Artemis Panera had the rangers goals I'm Jane ferry

Air Carlson Sharks Logan Couture Igor Shish Durkin Rangers San Jose Carlson Radam James Reimer Pakistan Artemis Panera Jane Ferry
Phil Kerpen: The Harm Created by COVID Vaccine Mandates

The Dan Bongino Show

01:21 min | Last month

Phil Kerpen: The Harm Created by COVID Vaccine Mandates

"I think that the original vaccines were pretty good for the virus at the time A lot of people want to attack Trump and say you know the vaccine is that he claims credit for it actually was a terrible thing I mean I think the vaccine when it came out worked really well for the virus that we had at that time The virus changed The vaccine protection didn't last as long as we thought it would And it took them forever to update the thing And by the time they updated they didn't have time to do any testing And so they've made a total mess of it in my opinion And I think that the other thing that's changed in is almost everyone's had the virus now So it's just not the same kind of urgent situation where you need to cut corners or rush things through and you could go through a full process now would be we're really not in an emergency even though they keep renewing the emergency and then the other thing that's a real national embarrassment global embarrassment is we're like one of the last countries in the world that still has a vaccine mandate for international travelers It's us China North Korea Pakistan Indonesia Philips and Libya Seriously that's like the entire list other than like a few random islands We're discharging people from the military if they don't want the vaccine and we've still got vaccine mandates for federal employees Almost crazy stuff vaccine mandates if you want to work in head star vaccine mandates if you want to work in any healthcare setting in the United States basically that gets Medicare and Medicaid dollars And everyone admits that the vaccines don't stop transmission So what are we doing What are we doing that these mandates are still in

North Korea Philips Libya Indonesia Pakistan China United States
Gates Foundation pledges $1.2B to eradicate polio globally

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Gates Foundation pledges $1.2B to eradicate polio globally

"The Gates Foundation wants to end polio worldwide In an announcement Sunday at the world health summit in Berlin the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation pledged $1.2 billion to help implement the global polio eradication initiative strategy through 2026 the goal is to end the polio virus in Pakistan and Afghanistan the last two endemic countries The group is also working to make national health systems stronger so countries are better prepared for future health threats I'm Shelley Adler

Gates Foundation Polio Berlin Pakistan Afghanistan Shelley Adler
UN chief: World is in `life-or-death struggle' for survival

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

UN chief: World is in `life-or-death struggle' for survival

"The head of the United Nations says the world's environment is in a life or death struggle for survival I Norman hall UN secretary general Antonio Guterres warned world leaders that immediate action is needed to prevent further environmental disasters such as historic flooding and Pakistan and powerful hurricanes that have struck recently including Ian The world can not wait Emissions are at an all time high and rising And meanwhile the war in Ukraine is putting climate action on the back burner while our planet itself is burning Guterres challenged leaders especially from developed nations to ten next month's climate summit in Egypt I Norman hall

Norman Hall Antonio Guterres United Nations Pakistan IAN Guterres Ukraine Egypt
 UN: 5.7 million Pakistani flood victims to face food crisis

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

UN: 5.7 million Pakistani flood victims to face food crisis

"Humanitarian agency is warning that nearly 6 million Pakistani flood survivors will face a serious food crisis in the next three months and is calling for a large uptick in funding On Saturday the UN office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs announced the current floods are expected to exacerbate food insecurity For around 5.7 million people in flood affected areas in Pakistan now Julianne honeys resident coordinator in Pakistan says more funds are needed to prevent a second wave of destruction from waterborne and other diseases a recent appeal for 160 million in emergency funding honey says has not proved to be enough agencies

Un Office For The Coordination Julianne Honeys Pakistan
Get to Know Hung Cao, U.S. House Candidate for VA-10

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Get to Know Hung Cao, U.S. House Candidate for VA-10

"You're running as the Republican in the tenth congressional district in Virginia which is right outside of Washington but it also stretches a bit Tell everybody a little bit about your background From Vietnam in 1975 and then we escaped there within days of the fall Saigon Came over here and my father couldn't find work over here So we had to move to Africa So I grew up I spent 7 years in Africa And while we're over there my parents we spent 7 years over there I was going to French schools and my parents realized at the age of 12 that this kid probably needs to learn English also So we moved back here My mom brought myself in my sport sisters back here while my dad remained over there for 15 years by himself working and seeing him every 6 months but I want to I grabbed on to that American Dream and I want to Thomas Jefferson high school for science and technology I was the first class to graduate from there I went to the United States naval academy I got my master's in physics from naval postgraduate school and I was a fellow at MIT and at Harvard But I paid everything back with services country I served 25 years in special operations I thought in Iraq Afghanistan Somalia I was in Pakistan during the earthquake relief I was in the Balkans I dove the ocean depth I recovered John F. Kennedy Jr. but then that's been required last October because just watching Kabul fall and seeing mothers hand babies to marines Just broke my heart I mean that's exactly what happened in Vietnam And so I decided to run for Congress Wow And how old are you I'm 51 sir 51 well you've led a full life at the age of 51 And a very patriotic

Africa Thomas Jefferson High School F Vietnam Virginia Washington United States Naval Academy Naval Postgraduate School John F. Kennedy Jr. MIT Harvard Somalia Balkans Afghanistan Iraq Pakistan Kabul Congress
Bilawal Bhutto Zardari

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Bilawal Bhutto Zardari

"Secretary of State Anthony blinken and his counterpart from Pakistan have discussed relations and recent devastating flooding I Norman hall Secretary of State Antony Blinken met at the State Department with his Pakistani counterpart billa wall Bhutto zadari besides 75 years of relations the two leaders also discussed cataclysmic flooding a third of Pakistan remains submerged from being inundated most of the summer We have experienced a climate catastrophe Of biblical apocalyptic proportions It rained and rained and rained and rained and rained from mid June Till the end of August secretary blinken says the U.S. immediate response so far tops $50 million and 17 plain loads of emergency supplies including food and tarps Norman hall Washington

Secretary Of State Anthony Bli Norman Hall Secretary Of State Billa Wall Bhutto Zadari Pakistan State Department Blinken U.S. Washington
"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:16 min | 2 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Of the United States. It was a country that was expected to help the United States stabilize Afghanistan. Keep the Taliban at bay, make sure that there was some kind of an outcome in Afghanistan in which the U.S. could readily withdraw its troops. What has changed since then is that Pakistan is now seen in the United States as a country that did not help America in Afghanistan. There is a feeling that Pakistan supported the Taliban towards victory as a result there is a sense of negativity towards Pakistan among policymakers and in policy circles. Also, there is no readily appropriated large packet of money that can be relocated towards flood relief in Pakistan. Both of those

America Afghanistan Taliban Pakistan
"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:54 min | 2 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It's today explained I'm Noelle king. Now is catastrophic as things are in Pakistan right now. The country is not shy about making demands, specifically for climate reparations. And it has the clout to ask very powerful members of the international community for help. Because for years, informed region watchers have told us that Pakistan is like the ball in a great game being played by world powers. The U.S. wants badly to influence it, China, which is much closer geographically also wants influence in Pakistan. Ambassador Hussein Haqqani is the director of south and Central Asia at the Hudson institute, and he was Pakistan's ambassador to the U.S. during the 2010 floods. When the U.S. was very keen to help Pakistan. American NGOs, American foundations, the private sector, American churches. They were all very generous towards Pakistan because they saw Pakistan as an ally and they saw millions of people in Pakistan who were allied to the United States as being in trouble. The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps are rushing ten Osprey aircraft like these to Pakistan as part of U.S. aid efforts to the flood ravaged country. That sentiment is no longer existent, if anything, Pakistan and the U.S. have drifted apart. And because they have drifted apart, even the will to provide humanitarian assistance has diminished somewhat. Okay, so U.S. support is not what it once was. The other player in this great game is China. What has China done for Pakistan recently? Pakistan is very close to China. That aid from China and also to appreciate the government of China is excellency president Xi Jinping and the people of China for their abiding love and affiliation for the people of Pakistan. 30% of Pakistan's debt is owed to China. Pakistan and the United States have a functional relationship. It's not as warm as it used to be. And that is reflected in the fact that at the time of the 2010 floods, the United States contributed more than a $1 billion towards a rehabilitation and reconstruction for flood victims. This time that contribution is only $53 million so far, China, on the other hand, has never been a huge humanitarian and other aid giver, but it has been a big lender, and they have neither given Pakistan any debt relief, nor have they given a large amount of support in rehabilitation and reconstruction aid. Their aid is around 57 million at this moment. Do you think that the United States or China or any other country that is a major emitter of carbon is likely to pay Pakistan reparations? I think that reparations are not a practical thing in the modern world anyway. All reparations are paid only when somebody can enforce them. And when there is no enforcement mechanism, people generally do not reparations. So it is a great shall we say a great one liner to say that the big emitters of the past, those who have polluted the world have a responsibility towards paying the poorer countries that are suffering from their past excesses. And maybe it's even a fair point to make at an academic level, but in the real world, I do not see any major country paying Pakistan reparations. On the other hand, what is more likely to happen is that the international community can be persuaded to provide Pakistan relief assistance because there is a human tragedy unfolding and the world has a track record of rising to helping nations that are afflicted with humanitarian tragedies. Beijing, as you said, has promised $57 million in assistance. It's Pakistan's main ally here. What do you think of that amount? In this particular instance, China has just not been generous enough. Pakistan will need something between ten to $12 billion to deal with flood relief, flood reliability, and post flood reconstruction. People have lost homes, farmers have lost crops. They have lost their livestock, and a lot of infrastructure has been permanently damaged. All of that will require a lot of resources. The one thing China could do for Pakistan very easily is to give it debt relief. One third of Pakistan's debt is owed to China. China has a track record of not giving debt relief to most countries, unlike the Western countries and Japan who have a long history of providing aid and providing loans, a development loan which then they either forgive or reschedule China does not have the experience of providing their relief, but that's a very flimsy argument. I think that they need to actually provide debt relief as a way of helping the Pakistan government in finding the additional resources that will be needed for dealing with the post flood rehabilitation and

Pakistan China United States Noelle king Hussein Haqqani American NGOs American foundations U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Hudson institute Xi Jinping Central Asia Beijing Japan Pakistan government
"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:13 min | 2 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Hi, I'm Kara Swisher. For decades, I've covered Silicon Valley, Washington and Hollywood, making sense of those worlds by talking directly to the people who shape them. Elon Musk, Barack Obama, Tony Fauci, Kim Kardashian, I've had the pleasure of grilling them all. Now I'm launching a new show called the Joe Rogan experience with Kara Swisher. Just kidding. It's actually called on with Kara Swisher and let me tell you it is on. No holds barred on the tough questions or on my opinions. On with Kara Swisher, launches September 26th from New York magazine and the vox media podcast network. Just look for on with Kara Swisher in your podcast app and hit follow or subscribe. Rings of power, The Little Mermaid reboot, Game of Thrones, something always happens with fantasy whenever characters of color are introduced. It's the black person sitting up being a knight or a mermaid that causes the hesitation. It's as much as the flutter of a dragon's wing or fairy dust. It's that profound. I'm Sam Sanders, join me on into it from vulture to hear about fantasies, race problem. Good girls and girls are listening to today's point. My name is zoha siddiqui. I am a journalist based on Pakistan and I cover the environment, technology and human rights. The karakoram is a mountain range that stretches from Pakistan to India to China and the highest point of the karakoram is the K two, which is located in Pakistan and it is the second highest mountain in the world. To the corporate glacier, which is in Pakistan's north, it's in a place called Pakistan. And it was an incredible sight because it's pinned up silence, right? Because you're so far away from civilization. And you can hear the sound of your own breath because it has such a high altitude. And then you can also hear this faint echo. And that seemed to echo is the glacier slowly melting. It's not a drip drip drip, but it's an echo as if there's some sort of movement taking place. And what that means is that the volume of the glaciers decreasing. And if you go see it right now, it's basically a gray mass of rock. Ice and sludge, because there have been landslides there recently. And it's located right at the foothills of the karakoram mountain range. And so the backdrop of the glaciers, this majestic, beautiful white mountain, and at the bottom there's this massive mass of gray ice rock and sludge that slowly making its way south. So in the north, you've got an abundance of glaciers over 7000. And in the south you've got a desert. You've got a river that runs from the north of the country right down to the south where it sinks into the Arabian sea. And so they've got deserts, mountains, but glaciers, you've got hills and valleys, and so there's a lot to see, but that also makes Pakistan extremely vulnerable to climate change, because when glaciers melt in the north, they increase the volume of water in the river, which then travels south inland villages and towns, which also form the country's breadbasket.

Kara Swisher Pakistan Tony Fauci Sam Sanders zoha siddiqui Elon Musk Joe Rogan Kim Kardashian New York magazine Silicon Valley Barack Obama Hollywood Washington karakoram mountain range India China Arabian sea
2 decades later, 9/11 self-professed mastermind awaits trial

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 2 months ago

2 decades later, 9/11 self-professed mastermind awaits trial

"Nearly two decades after his capture and Pakistan the self described mastermind of the September 11th terror attacks is still in legal limbo As of the 21st anniversary of the terror attacks Khalid Sheik Muhammad and four other men accused of 9 11 related crimes sit in detention in Guantanamo Bay Their military tribunals constantly postponed the latest a pretrial hearing scheduled for early fall canceled Another disappointment for relatives of the nearly 3000 killed like Eddie Bracken whose sister Lucy fishman died in the twin towers The whole world is looking at us and saying what are they doing after all this time Gordon haberman lost his daughter Andrea and says he hopes to live to see the outcome I have to know I promised her I would follow this through to the end One attorney involved in the case says their attempting to reach an agreement avoiding a trial Julie Walker New York

Khalid Sheik Muhammad Eddie Bracken Lucy Fishman Guantanamo Bay Pakistan Gordon Haberman Andrea Julie Walker New York
Where Do Things Stand With Brexit? Mike Graham Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 3 months ago

Where Do Things Stand With Brexit? Mike Graham Explains

"Is the status? Are you finally free men and women in the UK is Brexit finally done? Well, they still one or two nicer seats. I would say they have to be capped off the first, of course, the European court of human rights, which actually was something that was set up outside of the European Union. It was part of the Second World War settlement, if you like. But we need to get out of that as well, because as much as that was part of the idea of never having Nazi Germany, again, as much as it was all about making sure that countries didn't go to war. It hasn't become that. Well, it's become is yet another kind of strand of the European Union become like the dead hand of communism. It's become the thing that lefty lawyers use to protect the rights of scumbags. They want to protect the rights of Albanian rapists. Drug dealers, they want to stop it, stop us from deporting people through the likes of India and Pakistan and Morocco and all points east of there for both of us Somalia because we should respect the human rights. Well, you know what? We don't respect that human rights because they don't respect ours if you want to come to this country to commit crime. If you want to come to this country to commit terrorism, we don't want you and we don't want some ridiculous Strasbourg court to be able to stop it from happening. We want to kick you out. We want to kick you out. I'm hoping that this trust will do that. She will do away with the European court for human rights. And the reason Northern Ireland hasn't quite been fixed is entirely due to the intransigence of the French and the people in Strasbourg and Brussels. We need to take a very firm line with them and say, look, forget about it. We are going to do this and whether you like it or not. We're not trying to be nice. We're not trying to reach a settlement. We are simply leaving the European Union and that means every single part of Britain needs to do that.

European Court Of Human Rights European Union Lefty UK Germany Morocco Somalia Pakistan India Northern Ireland United States Strasbourg Brussels Britain
Waterborne diseases spread among flood victims in Pakistan

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Waterborne diseases spread among flood victims in Pakistan

"Pakistan health officials say an outbreak of waterborne diseases has hit flooded areas as authorities step up efforts to ensure the provision of clean water to hundreds of thousands of people Diarrhea skin diseases and eye infections are spreading at relief camps set up by the government across the country with over 90,000 diary cases reported from one of the worst hit provinces Sindh in the past 24 hours the latest development comes a day after Pakistan and the World Health Organization various concerns over the spread of water borne diseases among flood victims floodwaters continue to recede in most of the country but many districts in Sindh remain underwater I'm Charles De Ledesma

Diarrhea Skin Diseases Pakistan Eye Infections Sindh World Health Organization Charles De Ledesma
International aid reaches flood-ravaged Pakistan

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

International aid reaches flood-ravaged Pakistan

"International aids reaching Pakistan as the military and volunteers desperately try to evacuate many thousands stranded by widespread flooding driven by what's been called monster monsoons Cargo planes from turkey and the United Arab Emirates have landed in Islamabad carrying tents food and other daily necessities for onward transport to the hardest hit regions also trucks carrying tents food and water arranged by the home country's national disaster management authority are getting aid to tens of thousands of flood victims So far exceptionally heavy monsoon rains that triggered flash floods across the country have affected 33 million Pakistanis damaging over 1 million homes and killing over 1000 people I'm Charles De Ledesma

National Disaster Management A Aids Pakistan United Arab Emirates Islamabad Turkey Charles De Ledesma
"pakistan" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

08:14 min | 6 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"To understand here. Sure. And great. And thanks so much for having us on too. I think that one of the important things that we can think about here is that the background of this story of these tensions really begins all the way back in partition when England gave up its crown jewel of India. You know, as we all know, the subcontinent was divided across religious lines, where the Hindu majority provinces became India and the Muslim majority provinces became Pakistan. But the problem, of course, was that the two different sections of Pakistan were separated by nearly a thousand miles, you had to the west, the Punjabi urdu speaking west Pakistan to the east, you have the Bengali speaking East Pakistan. Now even though East Pakistan had more people, it was much poorer and the west tended to use it just as a place where they could extract valuable resources. So over 2025 years, it perpetuated this notion that west Pakistan was where the money and where the power was in East Pakistan was effectively the colonial territory of the west. So over an entire generation, this, of course, built up a lot of resentment and a lot of tensions between west and east. And it was all exacerbated by the fact that there's foreign enemy, India, lay in between them. That helps a lot. Thank you. And these tensions, although it could perhaps be held together by a strong government, the problems are laid bare with natural disaster, which will come to. Let's tell me about the cyclone itself. How big was it and what was it like for survivors to live through it? Sure. So this was a sort of warm water fed cyclone that came up through the bay of Bengal in an area that had traditionally been hit by many, many cyclones before, including ones that had killed hundreds of thousands of people. And imagine it's about the size of Texas and the first thing that happens that sinks in Indian freighter, which gives notice to the Indian government that they know a big storm is coming, but we are just on the cusp of satellite imagery where it starts starting to get good. We have the very first television quality broadcast coming down to earth. And the systems are not yet developed to really send warnings out correctly to these populations. And although it is not the strongest storm of the season. It's not a category 5. It's a category four. It happens to hit during a full moon at high tide. And when you think about the country of East Pakistan, what is now Bangladesh, it's a place that, you know, a lot of the landmass along the coast is barely a meter above sea level. And when that storm hits, at about 11 at night, when it starts coming in, you know, people are getting ready for bed. They hear these sort of confusing storm warnings. And the surge goes up to about 20 feet. And we have this person named Muhammad hi, who we found who survived the store. And he's, you know, at first they just, they hear the warnings and they hear their cows and their livestock, getting upset outside. And the water starts creeping into their house and they're like, oh my God, this is really bad. We should have sought higher ground if we could. But by then it's too late. The water fills the first floor of his house. It fills the second floor of his house. And he has to jump to the roof of the building with his I think about 20 family members with him, and they're all screaming. They don't know what's going on. They don't know when it's going to abate, and they're praying to God that it will be all right. And Muhammad Hai realizes that his only chance is to jump to a palm tree about 5 feet away from his house. And he does it. And climbs to the top and holds on in a 140 mile an hour winds, and he calls to his family, so you guys need to jump too. You guys need to jump too. And he just calls out into the night and no one else jumps. And he hates on for about 8 hours in this sort of swaying palm tree. And the next morning he finds his entire family dead. He buries a hundred people in his yard the next day, and his island of 50,000 people has a 90% fatality rate, where everyone is dead and the storm actually kills a half a million people in East Pakistan at that time. It's a tragedy for multiple reasons because as you mentioned, people are right at sea level. Also, Bangladesh today has one of the highest population densities in the world, a bit of trivia is that there are more people living in Bangladesh than Russia, even though Russia is the largest nation on earth. Bangladesh, I don't know if there are any oblasts in Russia that are as small as Bangladesh. It has more people. So not to use a cliche perfect storm, but really everything terrible that would have made for a disaster. It seems like it's present here in Bangladesh that would have made it horrific if I understand correctly. Oh yeah, I mean, it was, you know, the perfect storm was the title we probably should have chosen from the book, but I think Sebastian young are already got it. Is that this, it really hit at a moment where a moment in time where the most the highest number of people were vulnerable. There were no warnings, but I think even more importantly it also hit a moment time, which was incredibly politically fragile. And this is what you were getting at at the top of this show is that when that storm smashed into the coast, the casualties weren't only the half a million people and the villages and the livestock and the food resources. But it was actually the political system that was hit by that storm, as well. And the fallout that sort of inextricably and inevitably led from one domino to another where first there's sort of an election that gets changed. There's a response to an election that election there and it leads all the way, believe it or not, to a very tense nuclear standoff between the Soviet Union and the United States of America. You mentioned earlier, general Yahya Khan and his response after the cyclone. Could you elaborate more on that? And also him in general. He sounds like a little miniature ED Amin with how cruel he is. It also helped buffoonish. No, absolutely. I think that's a great example. I mean, so Yahya Khan was a World War II war hero for the Indian Army, which was ruled by the British. It was a British Indian Army. And he fought the Nazis. He was captured as a POW, and actually lived the high life in a Nazi concentration camp where he actually had this sort of weird admiration for the Nazis while he was there. And, you know, eventually he sort of climbs through the ranks after World War II and becomes appointed the president of Pakistan by this corrupt military leader who did not want to get deposed in a coup. So he gave the game the position to Yahya Khan and said, Yahya, what you need to do first and foremost is make Pakistan a free and fair democracy, which is a weird thing for a dictator to say, but I think he was trying to save his face and his life once he was out of power. And Yahya Khan took that mission to heart. And he not only built the capital city of Islamabad and actually a really uncorrupted way. But he also put in the infrastructure for a free and fair democratic elected system. You know, the admiration of the world. And he figured that because he was so good at this, that everyone would vote for his political party. And so when this storm happens, they had this election scheduled for two weeks later. And he was weirdly out in China doing a mission for president Richard Nixon. You know, probably everyone who listens to this podcast knows that Nixon's major diplomatic international feat was opening up relations with China. Well, he was able to do that because Yahya Khan was both Nixon's best friend and had very good relationships with China. So he was this undercover emissary going back and forth to China on behalf of Nixon. Even at one point smuggling Kissinger into China on a private airplane, and he's there when this storm hits. Yaya Khan also has this vice, which is what he is a like outrageous alcoholic and an outrageous womanizer with just this litany of affairs and he just drinks.

East Pakistan Bangladesh west Pakistan Yahya Khan India Pakistan Muhammad hi Muhammad Hai Russia bay of Bengal Indian government Sebastian young England ED Amin Texas British Indian Army
"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

02:48 min | 8 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"So I think it's going to <Speech_Male> be quite difficult to make <Speech_Male> a meaningful change <Speech_Male> on those <Speech_Male> things. And <Speech_Male> of course also <Speech_Female> as discussed, <Speech_Male> we do still have <Speech_Male> the military. <Speech_Male> We might not be having <Speech_Male> a coup d'etat, but <Speech_Male> we do have a very, <Speech_Male> very strong <Speech_Male> role <Speech_Female> for the military. <Speech_Male> I think several <Speech_Female> organizations <Speech_Female> described <Speech_Female> Pakistan during in mine <Speech_Male> funds tenure as a hybrid <Speech_Male> democracy because <Speech_Male> the military <Speech_Male> while not directly <Speech_Male> in power were so <Speech_Male> closely <Speech_Male> involved in <Speech_Female> many of the important areas <Speech_Male> of government, <Speech_Female> say, I think it's <Speech_Male> a difficult situation <Speech_Female> and I'm not sure that we're <Speech_Female> going to see any <Speech_Female> massive turnarounds <Speech_Female> in terms of <Speech_Male> governance <Speech_Male> in the next 6 months or <Speech_Male> so before <SpeakerChange> the election campaign <Speech_Male> kicks in. <Speech_Male> And armored <Speech_Male> with all due <Speech_Male> recognition that we <Speech_Male> may be grasping <Speech_Male> frantically <Speech_Male> at some incredibly <Speech_Male> slim straws <Speech_Male> here. <Speech_Male> Do you see any <Speech_Male> grounds for hope or <Speech_Male> optimism in <Speech_Male> the fact that <Speech_Male> Imran Khan has <Speech_Male> at least been removed <Speech_Male> by parliamentary <Speech_Male> procedure, not <Speech_Male> a coup d'etat, <Speech_Male> the last two <Speech_Male> elections have <Speech_Male> seen a transfer <Speech_Male> of power <Speech_Male> in Pakistan? <Speech_Male> Is there <Speech_Male> any sense <Speech_Male> at all that Pakistan's <Speech_Male> democracy <Speech_Male> is becoming, <Speech_Male> I guess, more of <Speech_Male> a democracy unless <Speech_Male> what Samir <Speech_Male> had just characterized <Silence> as <SpeakerChange> a hybrid <Speech_Male> democracy. <Speech_Male> Yes, I <Speech_Male> think so amongst <Speech_Male> elements in the middle class <Speech_Male> certainly. Now, for example, there's <Speech_Male> a strong belief <Speech_Male> that Shabbat Sharif was <Speech_Male> probably got the best <Speech_Male> business in <Speech_Male> economics mind <Speech_Male> out of all the <Speech_Male> candidates <Speech_Male> who are there <Speech_Male> waiting to be finance <Speech_Male> minister. <Speech_Male> I give you an example when <Speech_Male> he was chief minister the <Speech_Male> last time the <Speech_Male> World Bank and the IMF <Speech_Male> praised <Speech_Male> him immensely <Speech_Male> for some of the work <Speech_Male> and the development <Speech_Male> projects, et cetera, <Speech_Male> that he initiated in <Speech_Male> Punjab problems. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> he has friends <Speech_Male> in high places in <Speech_Male> Washington, <Speech_Male> which is more than <Speech_Male> Imran did who <Speech_Male> made it very public <Speech_Male> that he hated all <Speech_Male> these American <Speech_Male> institutions <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> didn't trust them <Speech_Male> at all. So <Speech_Male> that is a pleasant. <Speech_Male> I think people are going to be <Speech_Male> looking towards <Speech_Male> what he can do on <Speech_Male> the economic side. <Speech_Male> But it <Speech_Male> has to be also said <Speech_Male> that the Sharif family <Speech_Male> along with many <Speech_Male> other politicians. <Speech_Male> I've got all <Speech_Male> these cases <Silence> lined up against them. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> what exactly is going <Speech_Male> to be the state of <Speech_Male> these cases? Will they <Speech_Male> be forgotten? <Speech_Male> Will they be shoved <Speech_Male> under the carpet, <Speech_Male> which is <Speech_Male> really not going to work <Speech_Male> very well. <Speech_Male> But there has to be <Speech_Male> some solution to this. <Speech_Male> If you're going to bought <Speech_Male> the new prime minister <Speech_Male> down in <Speech_Male> corruption cases, <Silence> it's not going to <SpeakerChange> get very much <Speech_Male> done. <Speech_Male> Ahmed Rashid and <Speech_Male> samira shackle, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thank you very much for joining <Speech_Music_Male> us here on the <Music> foreign desk. <Music> <Music> <Music> That's it for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this episode of <Speech_Male> the foreign desk. I'll be <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> back next week and look <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out for the foreign desk <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> explainer available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> every Wednesday. The <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> foreign desk was produced <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by MSL and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Christy Evans, Christie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> also produces the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> foreign desk explainer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> For me, Andrew <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Muller, thanks very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> much for listening <SpeakerChange> until <Music> <Advertisement> next time, goodbye.

Pakistan Shabbat Sharif Imran Khan IMF Ahmed Rashid Washington Christy Evans
"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:59 min | 8 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Do business with him. Presidency. Bacon's here. Distinguished guests. It's an honor for me to welcome you to The White House this evening. Mister president R talks this morning underlined again. The strong links between our countries. But nonetheless, the Americans as well as the British are aware of the human rights issues within Pakistan and the ways in which Zia was certainly abusing his power, as well as perhaps bringing some kind of stability to the country at the same time. After zero we see another restoration of democracy after another prime minister called Bhutto, this being Benazir daughter of zulfikar Ali, she had two goes at being prime minister. She was assassinated in 2007 when she returned to Pakistan to try and have a third go at being prime minister. And again, the Bhutto family do have this extraordinary presence in Pakistani politics and Pakistani society. Are they still regarded as influential in any respect? Are they something people look up to or hanker after? I think, again, it's certain sections of Pakistani society would look up to them and would see the butter.

Mister president R zulfikar Ali Bhutto Bacon Pakistan Zia White House Benazir Pakistani politics and Pakista Pakistani society
"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Tar. This is the first one by field marshal ayub Khan, is there a reason why the civil administration of Pakistan has never seemed able to entirely control the military, which is of course the cornerstone of any functional democracy. That's right, it is. I mean, one of the problems, obviously, for Pakistan, was it's very insecure, strategic situation, which gave the military right from the beginning, perhaps more input than would be normal. Obviously the weakness of the political institutions sometimes the lack of discipline within political organizations as opposed to the military has been a factor in this. Of course, once the military into being, they can then sort of dig in their influence across the society, which really happened after this first coup. If anyone called you a military dictator, how would you answer? Well, I'll say Tottenham bloody rubbish. That's all. He doesn't know what he's talking about. Somebody did charge me. So in a sense, the first ten years said the template for what happens thereafter. But once there's been one coup, it's more likely that there's going to be subsequent ones. I am can't stays in charge for a decade give or take. Civilian rule returns in the 1970s with zulfikar Ali Bhutto, president then prime minister, he's overthrown in another coup in 1977 and later executed. He was popular ish at the time by the standards of Pakistani leaders. How well is his reputation endured? Well, I mean, he was always a sort of Marmite, so I figure in terms of Pakistan, with his detractors as well as his supporters. For his supporters, he's still a symbol of the sacrifices which the PPP in particular the buto family have made for democracy in Pakistan and certainly billow wells adari buto sort of course on his speeches and talks about this legacy that needs to be implemented much more sort of concern for the poorer sections of society than has happened in the past. The general masters of people are with me. And it is because my party believes in giving Pakistan not only democracy. But with democracy, economic justice as well. Then, of course, there are the detractors who say that butcher was authoritarian and that he brought about his own demise by the mistakes that he made..

Pakistan ayub Khan zulfikar Ali Bhutto Tottenham PPP butcher
"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:19 min | 8 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"A few countries have learned the hard way that celebrity does not necessarily translate to the competent execution of high public office. Another such experiment founded this week in Pakistan with the deposing of prime minister Imran Khan by a parliamentary vote of no confidence. Imran Khan had risen to prominence as a cricket player, a fine fast bowler, solid middle order batsman, and eventually long serving captain of Pakistan's national team. By the time he retired from test cricket in 1992, Khan was certainly one of the best known people in Pakistan, probably the best known Pakistani in the world, and gave every impression of enjoying the life of a globe trotting Playboy. Khan became prime minister in 2018 by which time he had long since reinvented himself as a pious moral crusader, unsullied by the chronic corruption of Pakistan's establishment parties, the Muslim League noirs and the People's Party. This week's ousting of Khan by those establishment parties continues Pakistan's streak of having never allowed a prime minister to complete a full term. Was Imran Khan always going to crash and burn, will his successor shahbaz Sharif do any better. And his Pakistan actually even governable. This is the foreign desk. I compare much to Trump. The former president of the United States. At the end, he was ignoring the constitution. He's ignoring the Supreme Court. He was being arrogant, egotistical. The whole lineup is so reminiscent of what Trump did after January.

Pakistan Imran Khan Khan cricket People's Party Muslim League shahbaz Sharif United States Supreme Court Trump
"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:40 min | 8 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Really seizes upon this narrative. Every day people rely on the Internet.

"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:19 min | 8 months ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Who is now replaced Han. What were the promises he made when he was running for office? What did he say he would do? Two major promises. One was to root out corruption. I assure you that you do not need rocket science here in Pakistan. We only have to correct the system. We have to bring an honest team that is accountable to itself. Khan has reeled against corruption, his entire career. Despite four governments being dismissed on corruption charges, only a few people are held accountable. The rest who unknown crooks get away with it, come back to fight another election. And against the two major political parties that have run Pakistan for much of the last few decades, and then to build an Islamic welfare state was his second. The founding fathers of our country wanted Pakistan to be what was called an Islamic welfare state. Islamic welfare state? What does that mean exactly? Essentially what he means is, you know, he often looked to sort of Scandinavian countries to talk about their concept of a welfare state and then linked it to the initial days of Islamic rule in Saudi Arabia. All the policies which we make in Pakistan are towards that end. To make it into a humane country where the government takes responsibility of the weaker section of its society. Okay, so I see why he might be very popular. He's a celebrity. He's brought great honor to the country and then he's saying we are also going to take care of people who need care. Did he keep his promises? By and large, while there was progress on some of the promises he made, he was unable to deliver on all the expectations he set up. Two of the three and a half years that he was in power were taken up by the pandemic. The pandemic has actually one of the places where Han and his government actually did well. Pakistan has not had the death rate of neighboring India. For instance, and of other countries with huge populations, Pakistan is a country of 220 million. And part of the reason is because Han said, look, we can't engage in a blanket lockdown. The poor will not be able to survive. And so he engaged in what are called smart lockdowns, you know, essentially kept the country going while still shutting down key areas and key sectors, keeping the spread of the pandemic limited while not allowing the poor to starve, essentially. So that's one. He also launched a health insurance scheme. Started from one province has spread to others. And while there are problems with its implementation, it's good in theory. But the big thing that Pakistan needs are not these sort of smaller piecemeal schemes. But, you know, institutional change, you know, figure out how to shore up an ailing economy, figure out how to control inflation to control unemployment. Hans economic team was not able to do this. So ultimately, it's his handling of the economy that made the common Pakistani really upset. Okay, so some promises kept some not a bad economy is bad for any leader. That said, Imran Khan was ousted through a legal parliamentary procedure. He was not ousted in a coup. Pakistan has had coups before and they are inevitably a sign of real instability. In any country, the fact that he was taken out through a parliamentary procedure, is that a positive is that a good sign for this democracy? It is. And that is essentially the reason he was taken out through a no confidence vote, becoming, by the way, the first prime minister in Pakistan to be ousted from power through a new confidence vote. That being said, it's still part of a long history of Pakistani prime ministers never lasting 5 years in office. No Pakistani prime minister has lasted 5 years in office. And it's a parliamentary system, not one. Not one, and only two civilian governments in Pakistan have lasted full 5 year terms and handed over power to the next civilian government. A lot of the analysis about what's happening in Pakistan right now focuses not just on Imran Khan and on the man who will replace him, but also on Pakistan's military. And this, I think, raises a question if we have a democratic country that holds democratic elections. Why does it matter what the military thinks about anything? Right. I mean, I can totally understand why this is confusing. Essentially, this is part of a really long cycle in Pakistan. Where prime ministers and civilian governments don't complete their terms in office, precisely because they lose the support of or they fall out with Pakistan's military. In the past, it's been through sort of other means, right? Cools and some instances, the president dissolving parliament in others. In this case, essentially what the military's lack of support for Han meant was that the military had become ostensibly neutral when it came to Pakistan's politics. So it withdrew its support from Han. It gave the space to the opposition. It let the opposition do what they wanted to do to our time. You have a situation in which a week ago the prime minister of the country whips out a piece of paper and says a vast international conspiracy is trying to take me down. He did this right before he faced a vote of no confidence. Do ordinary citizens of Pakistan look at this gentleman and say, you are out of your mind. There's no vast international conspiracy, you didn't do good at your job. Pakistan is incredibly polarized right now. So I will say that Han supporters look at this and say, oh my God, what he's saying is totally right. This is what is happening. The other side, the opposition parties, and their supporters are trying to play this down. And arguing repeatedly that there is no international conspiracy, but Pakistan has a long history of blaming other countries for what happens in Pakistan. And pointing fingers at the U.S. also pointing fingers at India for what's happening in Pakistan. This really lands. Why though? India makes sense longtime rivalry there and also their neighboring countries. Why is the United States involved in this narrative? It really sort of took hold. Starting in the 1980s. When the U.S. was involved in the region with the Soviet Afghan Jihad, the U.S. Pakistan and Saudi Arabia were involved in helping fund arm train the mujahideen to fight the Soviets in what was a covert war for the U.S. and Pakistan. It was very much in sight and the U.S. left the region. Once the U.S. left the region Pakistan felt it had been abandoned and so there's a blame off everything that went wrong in the 90s. It was because of the U.S. abandonment. Then the narrative that took hold after 9 11 was that Pakistan allied with the U.S. and the war on terror in helping the U.S. and Afghanistan and Pakistan saw the blowback of that in the form of terrorist attacks, which killed tens of thousands of Pakistanis in Pakistan, post 9 11. Han.

Pakistan Han Imran Khan Saudi Arabia Khan India Hans U.S. Soviet Afghan Jihad Afghanistan
"pakistan" Discussed on Immigrants of Toronto

Immigrants of Toronto

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Immigrants of Toronto

"You're listening to the immigrants of toronto. Podcast my guest. Today is moussa fat and sorry stuff up stuff. I think skirted anyway go. Oh sure i'm pronouncing that was perfect. Stop stop okay. So we're going to show so happy to be here excited for the podcast upper to share my experience. Welcome to the immigrants of toronto. Podcast aiming to open people's minds through real stories of immigration and now your host oscar seni- mustapha again. Welcome to the show very excited to have you here and more excited. I was able to pronounce your name properly the second time. But why don't we start the conversation by telling the audience. Who are you yet for sure. It's a my name is mustafa. I was born in karachi pakistan and i lived there for the longest time and then i moved to guida two years ago to pursue a master's degree in business. And that's when. I fulfilled my dream of finally coming to toronto. The canadian and lived in toronto for a bit but then because my masters was in queens university angling ston in monsters of innovation and entrepreneurship. So i've moved to kingston which is just doing a half a two yard strife east of grinder. And that's what i've been and all my plans of moving back have been kinda both point because the hand by i will return to grow into one day that that's interesting so so can ask you why. How was your life backing in pakistan in. Maybe why did you decide to move. Yeah definitely so. My family got the immigration. Enjoying fifteen and we came here. We lived in mississauga in the pta. And we we went back after a few months and read after that. My family did not pursue earning but iowa starting at that time. I complete my bachelor's and once complete my bachelor's then i really wanted to have better prospects of my life seer branka future Diamond karachi things weren't looking at right. It was very difficult to get a job. The jaws aren't being high enough. It was too much do requirement than the way less reward and dying. I wanted to come back to guide. it a dry the canadian life year and few things once. I graduated island. New england after my graduation wants us saw life were different matured. What currently it was different for me and you know like we don't have the apple store. Bogus stein and apple is one of my favorite brand. That and everything was on google mazarine. I rarely use google maps back home. Even though i love my life by on but for me to progress and you know be competing with all the other people from around the world. I wanted to stop everything. I once i went to you. I decide. laughter moved agana. Enter dern and start my life. And i think as soon as you start traveling going to new countries and you start understanding that the life is different. Just go a few miles from a few miles when be a couple of thousand miles away and then you find that things are completely different. Why white canada and not england. You're you're saying like england was kind of your trigger but then then you ended up here. What happened. I mean if i had the option our definitely have left to live in england to tell me the score every single day that wants a minus died of london. He's died of life for there is all that life can afford announced while that's actually rented for two three weeks of that but my dad always wanted me and my family to live in canada and he apply for immigration douglas. A long long time but once we had the residency. I knew things would be wasting. But if i go to Guida dumai monsters here at the local student and lots of benefits with that. So you said you you moved here three years ago so so the i'm assuming the goal basically what you're saying it was to move here and study your masters at queens university so you're going farther away from toronto so while i was biased on easter research everyday about guida up like to three knows your rice in queens well and i want to do this program at york but before i could get the admission to york and rice and once i got the admission at queens university my family member than my cousins. All of them who've lived in gathered. They just stop right there. Because it's like a rape prestigious. The ray historian you love it over there and any bush Gts that you know. I going to queen's university. Gabriel was pretty amazed. Family didn't give me any other option. You can go to kingston. Do your masters and you can always during dude roy to and dry the life in kingston because a dying my father game to canada and he said you know you are living array similar life that you were living in by stein all your friends of bogus. Tiny in mississauga. You got the blink cricket at walmart parking lot together. She shut get as having bikes on food. Everything is the same. You're just living in a cd with more laws and rules. But houston living the same life. And i want you to live with a canadian city. Live like a canadian. Over here and mississauga dialect. They were few days in mississauga. Would i didn't even speak english every place. Iran do were doing the a bit of fun job being i could get by once he saw dicing. You're definitely going to kingston. Yeah yeah. I think one of the things that you want to do as an immigrant is kind of like blend into the culture and if you don't speak the language it's hard to blend because you go back to comfort zones. I go this. I speak the languages that i already know and already mastered so. Why take the effort definitely. So you moved to kingston for your your masters or did you move later. Yes still. I moved to kingston or my master's degree and i never had planned or imagine that our to be here but instant So the funny thing was that i used to live in that growing from mississauga area. I ring to new york for one weekend. And once i came to new york mind took me after. Like a day to kingston and once he would meal on lifting stint West of downtown. And he's like this is it. This is dollars are used to like dog buildings. I minimal research fucking sin at that time especially came from new york at night but once i came here started living here. It was community over here. That kind of binded me year. Wanting i like about kingston. Is that the downtown university and the league and residential. It's all fifteen minute. Walk them so we. It was already a li like once. We were done with glosses. All of us to walk together to our separate won't buy reach to stop by as some borrow bubbling. Some restaurant in reach really there was a skunk community. Feeling over there. And i used to tell this to my friends in him in york in these to stay wants to glosses over. One person's going to scarborough was going to miss asada. It's everyone had the tournament adjoining left out. Tailgate is like denmark. Vote and i know where everybody lists by mental board One thing. I did that. I really liked about kingston. Yeah i've been living there a few times same thing like i like that..

toronto kingston mississauga queen's university guida karachi Bogus stein agana pakistan moussa mustapha queens university england mustafa canada apple oscar dern google
"pakistan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"pakistan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"A suicide bomber struck on Friday at a Shia mosque in the northern Afghan city of Kunduz. The attack killed more than 50 people, making it the deadliest since American forces withdrew from the country in August. Islamic State took responsibility for the atrocity, suggesting that the Taliban grip on power isn't as strong as it might have hoped. That power vacuum poses real problems for lots of interested parties, not least neighboring Pakistan. Its prime minister Imran Khan said instability across the border, worried him. That dual impact Pakistan, it will mean an unstable a chaotic Afghanistan. Idle place for terrorists, and that is a worry. Pakistan's international relations are complicated. They partnered with America for much of the past two decades helping with logistics and intelligence in Afghanistan's war. But at the same time, it provided a haven and training to leaders of the Taliban. A point that John Simpson of the BBC pressed last month when speaking with prime minister Khan. But the Taliban are really a Pakistani creation, aren't they? Absolutely not. Taliban were creation of the environment after the Soviets left. The warlord started fighting each other. And in that chaos emerged Taliban. And why did Taliban emerge because they give people a semblance of rule of law? It is, perhaps, no more than a semblance with terror attacks by the day in Afghanistan. America's departure and the Taliban's takeover have changed the order in a neighbor that now finds itself out of sorts. It's both good and bad for Pakistan, a good in the sense that this is what the generals who run Pakistan actually wanted. And it's bad for Pakistan in the sense that now they're Muslim extremists in power next door. So it puts Pakistan in a difficult place. Max roden Beck is The Economist South Asia bureau chief. And it's far from clear whether the tactical advantage of chasing out all the other players, which is what Pakistan is want to go this time is going to turn into a strategic advantage for Pakistan because now it's sort of settled with some kind of responsibility for what happens in Afghanistan. And fundamentally the issue here is that Pakistan was a key backer of the Taliban. Yes, absolutely. I mean, the Taliban the very word Taliban it means students and the leadership of the Taliban were students in Pakistani academies, Islamic schools. So it goes right back to the origins of the Taliban, Pakistan provided a safe haven for the Taliban when they were under pressure, but of the families of leaders lived in Pakistan. There's also been covert support from Pakistani intelligence, the ISI. They've been supporting the Taliban covertly for years. So there's a very, very close relationship. Is that to say then that the Pakistan exerts some kind of control over the Taliban even now? No, I wouldn't say control. I mean, the Taliban are not full allies to Pakistan, but certainly Pakistan has more leverage over the Taliban than any other group does. And how does that fit into Pakistan's internal politics? Well, it's complicated internally because on the one hand, there's a democracy that runs, whereas the real power actually rests with the military. So Pakistan is full of its own contradictions. And Afghanistan may have an influence on its internal politics that is quite negative. I mean, already there's been a certain uptick, for example, in Islamist terror inside Pakistan since the overthrow of the regime in Kabul next door. The Pakistanis used to these kind of contradictions and in some ways Pakistan's prime minister Imran Khan himself is a man of contradictions. On the one hand very cosmopolitan and the other hand, he's sort of the Muslim conservative. Media social media, this drank a large. And how do all of those contradictions then figure into Pakistan's relations with the rest of the world? Well, Pakistan has not been a solid partner to anyone except for China. Its closest ally and friend, actually. But at the same time, Pakistan has been an important player in western and particularly American strategy. It was crucial in the so called war on terror. It's been crucial in trying to track down and eliminate some of the most radical terrorist groups. But at the same time, it was Pakistan that harbored Osama bin Laden. So it's a complex mix of things. And the fact is that Pakistan's actual priorities, its own strategic priorities are very different from the west. It's number one priority is India. It's eternal enemy, India. And this is what really concentrates minds in Pakistan. And it's the failure to understand that Pakistan was thinking about something else, which is one of the reasons why there's often trouble between Pakistan and its western would be Friends. And what does that mean now for Pakistan's relationship with America now that America is kind of off the stage in Afghanistan? Well, I think for America, there's a huge relief in not having to be reliant on Pakistan because during the whole time that America was engaged in Afghanistan, it needed Pakistan for overflights as the only corridor through which you could reach landlocked Afghanistan. You have to pass through Pakistan. There's no other way to get there. So America needed Pakistan in order to pursue its policies in Afghanistan. It no longer needs Paxton in that way. But that doesn't mean that Pakistan isn't important. It's a nuclear armed nation. It's in a state of nuclear attention with India next door. And conflict between those two countries would be a disaster for them and for the world. So that's important. At the same time, Pakistan's influence of the Taliban is important. I mean, there will be other counter terror needs that the world has, no one wants to see, including Pakistan, Afghanistan become a springboard for global Islamist terror again. And at the same time, there's a kind of interest from the Pakistanis in working with the west because I think even Pakistan's generals, they don't really want to be a 100% reliant on one country, China, which is their main military backer and supplier of weapons and so on and so forth. And also economic support to Pakistan. Does that mean that America and the west can should rely on Pakistan now? To the extent that people are still worried about the outcomes in Afghanistan. Yes, absolutely Pakistan is the conduit to not only physical conduit to reach Afghanistan, but also the closest country to the Taliban leadership. So if you want to moderate the Taliban, you know, it's useful to work through Pakistan. So I think Pakistan remains an important country and the world will be wanting to work with Pakistan. But I think this previous situation where Pakistan was doing one thing with one hand and doing something quite different with the other hand, supporting the Taliban with one hand while pretending to help the world's hunt down Islamist extremists that will no longer be possible to play both games at once. And overall, do you think that renewed situation for Pakistan will lead to more stability in the region more clarity about all these relationships? Well, it could, that would be the optimum outcome. You know, if Pakistan is no more relaxed about Afghanistan next tour, perhaps it can take a more cool and useful productive attitude towards India. That's what would really be good for the region is to have some kind of detente or cooling of squabble between India and Pakistan. If that's the outcome in the end, then the whole world will benefit. Max, thank you very much for joining us. Jason's always a pleasure..

Pakistan Taliban Afghanistan America Kunduz prime minister Khan Imran Khan Max roden Beck John Simpson South Asia India ISI BBC Kabul Osama bin Laden China Paxton Max Jason
"pakistan" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"pakistan" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Introduce yourself reno mary. Senior fellow and director of afghanistan regional policy initiatives at new york university minister karachi noted that afghans were looking for hope and peace because of the failings of the previous government yet. This all taller. All-male government that a lax entirely lacks inclusivity in terms of ethnicity that has eighteenth sanctioned individuals. Hardly engenders hope and a among the african population. You see this in the exodus of the of han population. You see this internal displacement of the population. It's also an inherently unstable government. Yes so my question to you. As pakistan has seen as having had a hand in the composition of the government there is still a need for a political settlement. What will talk son in the region do in order to engender a government that is not going to lead civil war because that is not what we see right. Now thank you ma'am. That's your opinion that we've had a hand in putting a government together. Believe you me believe you me. The very independent. They do not like to be told what to do and what not to. They have always working and they take their own decisions right and we have in the bossed. Meet certain suggestions. They paid no heed to that. So this impression that you're carrying that the government that is in office over that placement is not correct to begin with if you follow what i'd say earlier on. What are we suggesting. We are suggesting what you are asking we on the same page in a in fact if you if you dispassionately loot or pakistan is advocating pakistan is advocating motorists or the international community is asking you know we we we we are in fact the spokesman's off the international community. We sensitizing them. What the world. How the world is looking at things and how they have to respond a to international indian if they want acceptability and if they do not get acceptability You know how will they will sustain themselves. His country dot was being basically run to international funding to have the resources to maintain these security apparatus. That was in place to run the government that they were running. Don't that money came from the west. The us contributed in large numbers. Europeans played their role. So why do they want to add to the difficulties. They have plenty of. Why would they want to add by ignoring that. We are suggesting we are advocating. What the international community's saying what we are saying is donor. Rub them the wrong way. Nudged them in the right action. That's the difference minister. We will like you be watching events closely and we hope that What i would describe as your cautious. Optimism is borne out by events. And the next time you come here when we welcome the opportunity to welcome you. We can look at the record. That has that has evolved. But i want to thank you for getting us. Back into the business of in-person or hybrid meetings wanna thank you for spending an hour with us this morning. Wanna thank our members years. Virtually and also let people know at ten o'clock tomorrow morning we have the t. shook for those of you not fluent and galaxy that is the prime minister of ireland will be in conversation with us tomorrow. Talking about the situation in ireland northern ireland and europe across the board again does four minutes to crush initial. Can i just clues. One-sentence guess her objectives are the same approaches. Could be different objectives. Remain the same well. I'm i hope that's the case. I am skeptical in a few areas but It's your choice that is My my experience from history. But i'll end identify thanking you and wishing you wishing you and your country walter. For more event audio subscribe on itunes or visit us at c. f. r. dot org..

pakistan new york university karachi afghanistan ireland us northern ireland europe walter
"pakistan" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"pakistan" Discussed on The World Next Week

"We talk about human rights but then we have selective application for human rights. That is important if that can be addressed if the chin grievances in genuine cushman. Who can be taken into account And if there is a little over there yes This you don't the they want their stood restored and then branched or moody invited the leadership. That was an engagement in the them. Previously the form coalition governments with them is what you've done on. The fifth of august is unacceptable across the board. We don't think that people who have been in coalition governments with delhi. Saying this is unacceptable. So if you revisit that we're willing to sit and talk and normalize understanding that there are some difficult issues it they will take time but then let people breathe but is that are you saying. That's a precondition to normalization or dialogue. Or you want that to be the subject of dialing. What i'm seeing is vitiated. The climate and they should create a conducive environment. Full ostracized. doc will resist the temptation to follow up. I want to get the members involved in the conversation. So i think we could take the first virtual the first physical and this is all on the record. It will take one virtual and we'll come to people in their own and just remind everybody including the minister. Yourselves this is on the record. Anything you say will be used against. So let's let's get a virtual question from digital land. We will take our first virtual question from raji rasi hashmi good morning and assam aleichem Foreign minister my name is rosie. Hashmi i am attorney member with the council on foreign relations and i Cover a south asia in the office of international religious freedom at the state department so freedom for religious minorities in pakistan continues to be a challenge with the continued enforcement and abusive blasphemy loss. Persecution and denial of the rights of groups like mad muslims and growing number of force abductions marriages and conversions of hindu. Women and girls authorities imprison question. Yes You spoke earlier about selective application for human rights. So what is the government doing to protect religious minorities in reform laws that may restrict their practice. Thank you. We are sensitive to what you've said We recognize that. The christian minority the hindu minority and the sikhs and others pakistan have played very Constructive very positive for the are the are new laws in the country that discriminate against them you referred to the blasphemy law. If you look at the cases registed on that law ball of the cases are against muslims and not minorities gonna sample one of the members of the party of prime minister. Ron han when he when we found out that he was involved in almost conversion. We out of the party so we are sensitive to these rights and the constitution guarantees fundamental rights. And we are clear that we'd need to protect our minorities and an example of that is the guitar initiative that we took colorado that we opened up the seeks to come and a was one of their holiest traits. Sir here in the room for me to get people's names with the mask. And i apologize if i know you and i can't tell who it is i apologize. I christian sued. I'm a member of. Cf are as well two quick questions one for just do one. We'll do okay. Just one question. Prime minister khan said after the fall of the government have gone is done that. The country has been freed from the shackles of slavery. What does that mean..

raji rasi hashmi council on foreign relations a cushman office of international religi moody Hashmi delhi pakistan doc south asia rosie Ron han colorado Sir Prime minister khan
"pakistan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"pakistan" Discussed on The Current

"I am speaking to you at a moment of grave crisis. I'm jeff turner and this is recall. It's a series about history not the ancient past but history. That still hot to the touch. In this first season i explore a revolutionary political movement that brought a modern democracy to the brink. You can find recall how to start a revolution on the cbc. Listen app or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. It has been a month now since the taliban took control of afghanistan while most of the world is still waiting and watching to see how they plan to govern pakistan has an officially recognized the new government but has expressed its support. They want an inclusive government. Women women rights in their own context. They want human rights. They've given amnesty so sofa what they have said clearly. They want international acceptability. That's pakistan's prime minister imran khan's speaking with cnn. His first televised interview with western media since the taliban took power cbc senior correspondent. Susan ormiston was recently in pakistan and she joins me now susan. Hello good morning heard from the pakistan prime minister there. He said that the taliban deserves the benefit of the doubt from the international community. Why would the government in pakistan want that regional influence boils down to that. Islamabad proceed the ashraf ghani government as really too close to both the us and to india and not sympathetic really to pakistan's interest so the night of the taliban. They named their all cabinet. I met with a special assistant to the prime minister is his name is rav hassan and he described pakistan's early relationship with this new taliban government. We feel more secure in the sense that we knew that the government we have in kabul. Today is much more sympathetic to the concerns of the neighboring countries We also feel secure in the sense that the government in kabul is inclined to working with neighboring countries and regional countries for forging peace and facing other challenges so that august fell for the future definitely so pakistan sees. This new taliban government has some sort of regional partner for the first time in decades. Yes but not you know and many do that for a long time. The us and others have accused pakistan's intelligence services of supporting the taliban with training money with weaponry. Now pakistan's government denies. This has for years. So i asked to tucson about that history. The complaints that you know some of the leadership in the taliban lived in pakistan were educated in madris's that's religious schools there and went back and forth across the border. We looked after over. Four million deputies for the last so many so many years and We had just a few families taliban families living in our country. So you look at it you know you must make make a combat as we had looked after millions of accounts but a number of years now but why is it that the world but i just talk about those few families not about four million refugees tech we still house impacts so pakistan feels as though it's looked after its fair share of afghan refugees. How do afghans feel about their neighbors. Well it it is mixed and of course but here here's one perspective recently so matt. They're chanting death to pakistan. This was a protest recently in in kabul and pakistan says that this was staged by foreign actors but among those who oppose the taliban still in the country they see. Pakistan is a player who Really helped in the fall of the ghani government and they alleged that he was trying to help. Put down the resistance even after that pakistan roundly denies this. But here's an important nuance now. Remember matt in the first few news conferences by the taliban spokesperson ebola moudjahid's said the taliban wouldn't allow any country including pakistan to interfere in its affairs and i asked haroon rashid. He's a longtime pakistani journalist about the talibans public strategy vis-a-vis pakistan. They want to show a bit of a distance between pakistan and the taliban now that they are in control because they don't want to be seen as pakistan's stooges or something like that internally inside of an islamic will be very difficult for them to counter this kind of narrative bears up. These are all men even control. He says that pakistan wants to show distance but the reality is the first visitor. The taliban had even before the interim cabinet was announced was the chief of intelligence for pakistan. Yes lieutenant general phase hamid head of the isi. He popped up. At the serena hotel in kabul on september four so early on pakistan says he was invited to talk about border concerns and there are many Haroon rashid said it was very interesting optics for i think general hamid was trying to bring different sections in some sort of an agreement as well if you go by the taliban statement. The visit was helpful. I mean i don't know the picture of dental meet with a cup of tea Was it intentional or will it just to show off that. Isis in quite comfortable position in afghanistan. Or something like that. But my is that that was the behind. That picture was that Things under control. It would appear that that the taliban in pakistan retreading some sort of fine line in terms of how they represent their relationship to the international community. And what that relationship actually means And two afghans in particular. It was interesting. You're speaking with the assistant to the prime minister earlier. And he mentioned the number of afghan refugees that are already in pakistan you spoke with longtime afghan refugees in islamabad. What did they tell you about their situation. You know there have been waves of afghan refugees in pakistan over forty years of war. Really you know one point. Four million registered and probably a couple million undocumented as well so pakistan is saying look it can't afford another surge of refugees it already has millions so the borders are currently closed matt Close to afghans except those with visas to enter pakistan or with medical necessities. We went to rawalpindi. Which is actually really close to his arm about. It's a sprawling city and afghan refugees. Here have kind of settled into the fabric over the decades and we found a doctor at a tiny clinic clinic really on a shopping street and.

pakistan taliban cbc kabul Susan ormiston ashraf ghani rav hassan jeff turner haroon rashid madris imran khan ghani government afghanistan ebola moudjahid cabinet Islamabad cnn matt susan tucson
"pakistan" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Front Burner

"Season i know according to the un about one hundred and twenty thousand people fled the country by by air. And of course. We're all very familiar with those scenes from kabul airport. Do we have a sense of how many afghans are are making their way to pakistan by land. I don't have that figure Partly because technically pakistan has closed its borders to afghan refugees. Meaning that those with pakistan visas can get through legally and those with medical necessities are also allowed but we were out the boredom border at tar him near the khyber pass and we saw just a trickle of people coming across the reason pakistan says is look we have You know four million tops undocumented at and registered afghan refugees already in this country. They've been there for decades and we cannot handle a flood surge of more so they've very tightly controlled that border. They're also worried about People who are posing as refugees coming across and creating havoc on either side of that border extremists or Groups like that so they've been tightly controlled so there aren't a lot getting through That border Now we're seeing a different surge in that is that countries like canada are now actively Helping people who are on their list to get to that border and get across of course. This is a negotiation and canada. I think has reported. It has already got more than one hundred and thirty across in the last few weeks right right. You talked earlier about the. He'll fearing the taliban in pakistan. When you talk to other people Other afghans there. What did they tell you. The taliban takeover what what were their feelings towards the taliban it was very interesting we went to some neighborhoods where afghans have settled into the fabric of pakistan for twenty years in this case in rawalpindi which is a city very close to islamabad There was a neighborhood. They're called the g colony and we spoke to many people along the shops in the streets. There and one of them stood out. He was a doctor in his son and they ran a small medical clinic. And the sun know tusla com. New reside said very bluntly that he believed. The taliban is good for his homeland for afghanistan and his father. Dr matola news that he got his medical degree at kabul university but came to pakistan twenty years ago and he says now he'd like to go back and the politics are right. He said and he tried to convince us that. With the taliban empower it would be safer in afghanistan and that for women. It would be better better better for women now. No woman relax healing relaxation now no woman. He said that his rationale was that after twenty years of insecurity and wars corrupt central government in his view nato attacks and taliban i e d threats women vase the video difficult dime during the last twenty years. It was difficult for video difficult and it will be better for women now. How can you say that many women say they can't get educated. They can't picture. I want to extend picture of the taliban. He said that the west was fixated on this black image. A black picture of the when reality many people would Feel that it was more stable and perhaps more hopeful for peace and you know that is a perspective one of them unique.

pakistan taliban khyber kabul un canada Dr matola rawalpindi islamabad afghanistan kabul university nato
"pakistan" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"pakistan" Discussed on Front Burner

"From pakistan as a refugee crisis.