37 Burst results for "Pain"

Fresh update on "pain" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:25 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pain" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Of crap. I don't believe it. I gotta sit up here and listen to this right wing. I believe. That's what they taught you at Columbia. Okay, folks. This is a special episode of the taxes show. We will be right back with more of my no holds barred conversation with the great Dennis prager. I can't wait to see you again. Hey folks, I've got to tell you a secret about relief factor that the father son owners Pete and Seth. Talbott have never made a big deal about, but I think it is a big deal. I really do. They sell the three week quick start pack for just 1995 to anyone struggling from pain like neck shoulder back, hip or knee pain, 1995, about $1 a day. But what they haven't broadcasted much is that every time they sell a three week quick start, they lose money. In fact, they don't even break even until about four to 5 months after if you keep ordering it. Friends, that's huge. People don't keep ordering relief factor month after month if it doesn't work. So yes, Pete and Seth are literally on a mission to help as many people as possible deal with their pain. They really do put their money where their mouths are. So if you're in pain from exercise or even just getting older, or the three week quick start from 1995, let's see if we can get you out of pain, too, go to relief factor dot com relief factor dot com or call 805 108 three 8 four 805 108 three 8 four relief factor dot com. I use it, it works. Folks,.

Dennis Prager Seth Talbott Pete Columbia
Fresh update on "pain" discussed on The Larry Elder Show

The Larry Elder Show

00:38 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pain" discussed on The Larry Elder Show

"With a message for anyone struggling with pain, like I struggle with for years, and of course I want you to know about relief factor the 100% drug free supplement that tens of thousands are now taking every day. Obviously, I'm taking it every day because I like being out of pain. But I know you may be skeptical just like I was. But then I kept hearing about all the people who were no longer in pain, so I decided to give it a try. In fact, listen to Janice's story. I was skeptical at first, but because of the pain that I was having when I would substitute teach and have to climb stairs. So I have lower back, hip. And even knee pain. And after about three weeks, I found that I could climb stairs, pain free, but it wasn't only pain free. I could do it, step over step without holding on the railing. I'm really happy. It makes me feel like I'm young again. That's relief factor dot com or call 805 183 84 805 183 84. I can't stop. It's like I got this music in my. Favorite thing. I hate is gonna hate me. I'm just gonna shake shake shake shake shake it up a shake it off. And now here's special guest Carl Jackson on the Larry elder show. I welcome back to Larry elder's Joe. I'm speaking with my guest Eric metaxas. You guys know him. He's nationally syndicated..

Janice Larry Elder Carl Jackson Eric Metaxas JOE
Pope expresses 'shame' at scale of clergy abuse in France

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Pope expresses 'shame' at scale of clergy abuse in France

"The pope expresses shame at the scale of clergy abuse in France pope Francis has expressed shame for himself and the Roman Catholic Church for the scale of child sexual abuse within the church in France the post spoke about a report that estimated some three hundred thirty thousand French children were abused by clergy and other church authority figures dating back to nineteen fifty he expressed sadness and pain for the trauma that they suffered and shame over the incapacity of the church to put the abused at the center of its concerns he called on all bishops and religious superiors to take all actions necessary so similar dramas are not repeated I'm Walter Ratliff

Pope Francis France Roman Catholic Church Walter Ratliff
Eric and Author Jonathon Seidl Discuss Finding Faith in These Crazy Times

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | Last week

Eric and Author Jonathon Seidl Discuss Finding Faith in These Crazy Times

"Believe. this is my thesis. I've been saying this lately. That the the madness through which we are currently going by the way folks. If you don't think this is madness you are in fact mad. You're crazy if you don't think circumstances are crazy. They are crazy and the same people know that they're crazy but the fact is anxiety goes up because absolutely none of us has had to deal with this before most of us have not had to deal with the madness. I it doesn't I hardly need to mention it any direction you go in. It's it's very challenging. But i also say that the scripture commands us to be anxious for nothing so clearly. The lord wants to help us. He doesn't want us to be anxious. He loves us so much that even commands us not to be so that we don't say well it's extra credit this is somehow he's telling me i can be at peace even going through health issues marital issues. We're all going through things. So i know that's in part where you're coming from but you're right john. This is a really tough time. I'm glad the book finding rest is brand new. So what is your advice to people. You know what i talk about in the book and what i've my message has been to people just in the last couple of days. Eric i think we need to really establish a proper theology of suffering. And what i mean by that is we need to understand that. We are going through trials right. We are going through mental health. Struggles we're going through sickness right and even though that's not god's plan in his original design the truth is that jesus told us in this world. You will have trouble so then what what do you do with that right. And so for me. What i've had to learn since my diagnosis is. I have to have an understanding that this is for my good and god's glory that doesn't mean that he's this maniacal person out there like just you know really taking pleasure in the fact that i am going through pain but a see us louis. My favorite author talks about got shouts to us in our pain and he's calling us and using it to call us to himself

Eric John Jesus Louis
Trial against pharmacy chains' opioid sales set to begin

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Trial against pharmacy chains' opioid sales set to begin

"Testimony gets underway today in a federal trial aimed at penalizing major drug store chains for how they dispensed addictive pain killers two Ohio counties are suing retailer CVS Walgreens Walmart and giant eagle claiming they've created a public nuisance by selling some one hundred forty one million prescription pain killing drugs between the years twenty twelve and twenty sixteen and that the cost of abatement for the opioid addiction crisis is about a billion dollars for each county defense attorneys say the pharmacies were filling prescriptions written by doctors for patients with a legitimate medical need and that federal guidelines were followed right aid settled its lawsuit for an undisclosed amount I'm Jackie Quinn

Giant Eagle Walgreens CVS Walmart Ohio Jackie Quinn
Chargers' Derwin James, Joey Bosa Have 'Warrior' Performances Against Chiefs

Charger Chat

01:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Chargers' Derwin James, Joey Bosa Have 'Warrior' Performances Against Chiefs

"Some of the things that happened while we were watching this game and I remember seeing this, it was like, I think this was before the half. They show Derwin James running to the locker room and it was like, well, wait a minute. The defense is still out there. Yeah, yeah. Durham, where are you going? I didn't see this. I didn't know he disappeared. I didn't see it. Oh yeah, scared me. The telecast, they put it, it was like they highlighted it and then Tony Romo was like, oh yeah, and derwent headed back to the locker room. He was like, he was full spray. He's like, let's get this x-ray done and get out of here. Well, yeah, whatever it was. I mean, at the time, we didn't know. He wasn't limping. He wasn't carted off. It was like he was just going. So it was like, weird, like the defense is out there. What's going on? Come to find out after Fernando Ramirez talked to Joey Bosa, apparently Joey Bosa said that Derwin James, his shoulder dislocated. And so he ran to the locker room to get his shoulder popped back in, and it made it just seemed like nothing because he was pretty much back out there like immediately. So the Brandon still he said that both of those guys Joey Bosa, who was obviously playing injured, we knew that it would be might not have played on Sunday, but he did play through the pain, played amazingly as did Derwin James. Staley called them both warriors and understandably

Derwin James Joey Bosa Fernando Ramirez Tony Romo Derwent Durham Brandon Staley
Maryland newspaper gunman gets more than 5 life prison terms

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Maryland newspaper gunman gets more than 5 life prison terms

"The man found guilty of the shot gun killings of five people at the capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis Maryland has been sentenced to life without parole the assault was one of the worst attacks on journalists in U. S. history in June of twenty eighteen Jarrod Ramos hunted down staffers of the capital Gazette's newspaper office a jury found Ramos criminally responsible for killing Wendi winters John McNamara Gerald Fishman rob Hyson and Rebecca Smith and today and Anna Rundle county judge sentenced him to more than five life sentences without the possibility of parole the judge was crystal clear that Jarrod Ramos should never be allowed to walk out of prison ever state's attorney and cold blooded spoke to reporters he regretted not being able to kill more of the victims capital Gazette photographer Paul Gillespie says the sentencing doesn't erase the pain that someone wants me everyday Montana winters Geimer is the daughter of windy winters the person that took her from us will never breathe freedom again I'm Jennifer king

Capital Gazette Jarrod Ramos John Mcnamara Gerald Fishman Rob Hyson Anna Rundle Annapolis Rebecca Smith Wendi Ramos U. Maryland Paul Gillespie Geimer Montana Jennifer King
FBI investigating Missouri cops who let dog bite Black man

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

FBI investigating Missouri cops who let dog bite Black man

"The F. B. I. has opened an investigation into the arrest of a black man in Missouri during which cell phone video shows three white officers allowing a police dog to repeatedly bite him according to a statement posted on the Woodson terrace police Facebook page officers were called last Monday to a report that a man had broken into a business the man threatened officers they warned him the dog would be used if he continued to resist arrest cellphone video shows the dog biting the man's foot as he yells out in pain for about thirty seconds cops get him on the ground the dog is a bench really pulled off then the man is up stumbles and the dog lunges at him again biting a leg for another thirty seconds until the officer stops the animal the man was treated at a hospital and released he hasn't been charged with any crimes I'm Julie Walker

F. B. I. Woodson Terrace Police Missouri Facebook Julie Walker
R. Kelly jury asked to make him 'pay' or not fall for 'lies'

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

R. Kelly jury asked to make him 'pay' or not fall for 'lies'

"The R. Kelly sex trafficking case will go before a jury before a long a long time abuse need to be brought to account for his crimes or a man who has been framed by a series of lying with users it'll be up to a federal jury in New York to decide this as prosecutors and defense attorneys make their final pitches before the case is turned over assistant U. S. attorney Elizabeth Geddes told the panel it is time to hold R. Kelly responsible for the pain that he's inflicted on victims exhorting the jury bluntly to convict him meanwhile Kelly's attorney Dever of tenet told the jury that what they've been listening to from prosecution witnesses was full of lies and that the government let them live he counted the prosecution claimed that R. Kelly ran a criminal enterprise to procure sex partners for him telling the panel that R. Kelly was too rich and famous to have to recruit women I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

R. Kelly U. S. Attorney Elizabeth Gedde Dever New York Tenet Kelly Government Oscar Wells Gabriel
Joy Reid Shadows Gabby Petito's Death With 'Missing White Woman Syndrome'

Mark Levin

01:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Joy Reid Shadows Gabby Petito's Death With 'Missing White Woman Syndrome'

"I want you to listen to this from joy Reid on MSNBC Monday I meant to get to it but I'm going to get to it now Gabby petito was murdered And they're looking for her murder right now Her ex-boyfriend she happens to be white And so joy Reid notices that above all else A white girl A white girl This bastard joy read should ever ask fired Because she's a hate monger And she's always been a hate monger on social media with gays and others And she's hired by MSNBC part of NBC owned by Comcast Listen to this cut tango If you've been watching the news for the past few days or on Twitter or TikTok you're probably familiar with the name Gabby potato The 22 year old aspiring social media influencer who was reported missing after her fiance returned from their van life excursion without her On Sunday human remains believed to be potatoes were found in a national park in Wyoming An autopsy is scheduled for tomorrow to confirm the identity Now goes without saying that no family should ever have to endure that kind of pain And the potato family certainly deserves answers and justice But the way this story has captivated the nation has many wondering why not the same media attention when people of color go missing Well the answer actually has a name Missing white woman syndrome Missing white woman syndrome You see You all must be familiar with missing white women's syndrome because you're all afflicted with it

Joy Reid Gabby Petito Msnbc Comcast NBC Twitter Wyoming Syndrome Missing White Woman S
No. 6 Clemson Uses Goal-Line Stand to Hold off Georgia Tech

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

No. 6 Clemson Uses Goal-Line Stand to Hold off Georgia Tech

"The Clemson Tigers ranked sixth in the country entered a lightning delay of nearly two hours a lackluster offensive performance an onside kick and a goal line stand to come away with a hard fought fourteen eight victory over Georgia tech after the game Deborah Sweeney said his Tigers are a work in progress in the passing game certainly is kind of who we are right now you know we're young on that side of the ball and we got some guys that are going through some growing pains but you know you got three phases and obviously we're we're kind of led by our defense right now up next for Clemson NC state in the tiger's first true road test of the season Matt Smith Clemson South Carolina

Deborah Sweeney Clemson Tigers Georgia Tech Tigers Clemson Nc Matt Smith Clemson South Carolina
Blowers, Mowers and More: American Yards Quietly Go Electric

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last month

Blowers, Mowers and More: American Yards Quietly Go Electric

"People working from home don't like the noise and fumes of gas powered lawn mowers leaf blowers and other equipment and now there's a quiet revolution underway in American yards according to the California air resources board operating a gas leaf blower for an hour creates as much smog is driving a Toyota Camry for eleven hundred miles improvements in the quality of battery packs zero to low emissions electric landscaping equipment is leading to a lower decibel lawn care revolution homeowners are switching from gas power tools to electric ones not unlike the trend towards electric cars another advantage is maintenance many homeowners find gas mowers a pain with electric tools is just about keeping the batteries charged according to the Freedonia group the battery powered lawn equipment sector is growing at a rate three times faster than gas Andrew Brady with the national association of professional landscaper says the transition to electric is inevitable but the technology isn't quite there yet for most of the commercial sector I'm Jennifer king

California Air Resources Board Camry Freedonia Group Toyota Andrew Brady National Association Of Profes Jennifer King
Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | Last month

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
Octavia Spencer Apologizes for Prenup Joke

The Breakfast Club

00:39 sec | Last month

Octavia Spencer Apologizes for Prenup Joke

"All right. Now tabby taibbi spencer has apologized to britney spears and sam gary remember we were talking about the prenup situation and she made a joke. You know to make sure. You get a pre-nup wednesday announced britney spears announced that she was engaged. Whoa now she's apologizing for that. She apologized privately and she wrote an instagram posts. Y'all a few days ago. Sam britney announced their engagement and me being me. I made a joke. My intention was to make them laugh. Not cause pain. I restarted this lovely cup of privately to apologize and now wants to restore just a smidge of happiness. That they were robbed of. She said britney fans have seen her through a lot of pain and found happiness where thrilled for her seles. Show them love no negativity

Taibbi Spencer Sam Gary Britney Spears Sam Britney Britney
Elton John Postpones European Shows After Hip Injury

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Elton John Postpones European Shows After Hip Injury

"Elton John is delaying his farewell tour due to a hip injury Elton John is rearranging his farewell yellow brick road tour the seventy four year old singer songwriter said a fall on a hard surface in late summer left him in pain he's been advised to have an operation he had been due to play cities in Britain and Europe this year but he's postponing all European dates until twenty twenty three he promises fans at the shows will return to the road next year any plans to start the U. S. leg of his tour in January twenty twenty two in New Orleans I'm Jennifer king

Elton John Britain Europe New Orleans Jennifer King
What is Joint Inflammation?

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:35 min | Last month

What is Joint Inflammation?

"Age we really don't die from infections. That's very rare in in a first world country but the body is hardwired itself to protect itself against some sort of infectious bacteria from damaging major regions of the body. And so the way that it's it's hardwired. This adaptation is through inflammation inflammation is an immune response where the body starts up regulating all these different immune cells that damage things and they take they certainly will target damage bacteria and protect us from dying from the infection. The unfortunate thing is when they're up when when we have inflammation up for a period of time. It damages are vital organs as well. You know we've all experienced like a sprained ankle and we've had swelling and pain in that area that's part of the inflammation processes damaging tissue. It's actually breaking down tissue so that the to the tissue can be rebuilt. it's also protecting against the infection. The problem is when that inflammation never stops and when it's a low grade Kind of smoldering level of inflammation over time that damages different regions right in affects every system of the body. And of course today we're talking about joints and the main things that will experience when we have chronic joint inflammation is joint degeneration osteoarthritis. And of course we will have pain rights. We'll have pain in the joint. While limited range of motion and mobility in the joint and we will obviously experience painted discomfort and a loss of interest star ranger motion and our ability to really live the way that we wanna live. So here's an example of a normal joint here's an example of osteoarthritic joint right a inflamed damaged joint now typically takes a minimum of twenty to thirty years of chronic joint inflammation. It's not like this happens overnight. Usually a long process. Twenty thirty years of chronic inflammation in the joint to get to do to degenerate. Like this case. So it's not even like a year or two. Although you know in certain cases you can have like a car accident whiplash or you know major trauma possibly to your knee. This is a knee joint for example. That accelerates the inflammation of time however usually these are processes that take quite quite a few years decades to

Inflammation Inflammation Chronic Joint Inflammation Degeneration Osteoarthritis Chronic Inflammation
Gabrielle Union Opens Up About Dwyane Wade Fathering Baby With Another Woman

Daily Pop

01:54 min | Last month

Gabrielle Union Opens Up About Dwyane Wade Fathering Baby With Another Woman

"Union gets real about why she stayed with dwayne wade after he father a child with another woman before they were married. She says the me up today would not have stayed with him. But would i be who. I am without the pain. I remember a small voice in my heart telling myself to leave but my fear of public humiliation was so great that i didn't take my own advice. Gabriel dwayne seemed to be strong now. But what do you think it took to get to that place. First of all let me just point something out before we even get to that point. If you're a woman and all you've ever wanted your whole life was to have a baby with the man that you loved in your body just not wouldn't let you do it and then that person turned around and gave that gift to someone else that wasn't you. It's an reading. Her first book won't need more wine. You have to. You have to read this book. This part of the book was actually left out this story. This narrative was left out of that book but she talked about her attempts to get pregnant. and how about. So it's just crazy but amazing that she's opening up about this now. I think it's also probably. She feels at peace with it. I think she's done a lot of work. I think she's recognized a lot about the situation and i also feel like the one thing i do want just on one little nugget for dwayne. Say we're not together is they. He wasn't that you know he turned around and gave this gift to somebody else. When they were at an item they had hit a rough patch in their relationship. You're right you're absolutely right. And it was in a very unfortunate thing that happened. I mean a child is always blessing. They're so fun even when you wanna yak on live. Tv they're front. And i think this took a lot of work a lot of work to get to a place where they felt like they could be the couple that they are

Gabriel Dwayne Dwayne Wade Dwayne
Food Prices Go Up Globally

The Indicator from Planet Money

00:42 sec | Last month

Food Prices Go Up Globally

"Today we're looking at food prices so sally. I'm not sure if you're feeling a bit a sticker shock at the supermarket aisle or pain at the grocery counter. I mean i live in brooklyn we go to the deli but have you seen the price of bagels lately. Not getting any cheaper this month. Consumer price index came out today and it is five point three percent and that means that. Us prices of role in august with five point three percent higher than they were this time last year and food prices. They are growing at a pretty steady clip at three percent per year. But the little bit of food price increases that we're seeing in the. Us is small compared to what's happening globally according to the un's food and agriculture organization wholesale prices for food like we sugar mate. They're up thirty three percent from a year

Sally Brooklyn United States UN
Bike Fitting 101 with Coach Patrick Carey

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

02:04 min | Last month

Bike Fitting 101 with Coach Patrick Carey

"Let's just dive right in how to even define a good bike fit. I think that's a great place to start. Might take that every good bikes. It starts with the bike fitting the rider not the other way around and unfortunately oftentimes what happens is people are shoehorned onto their bikes. And that's really the office of what we want to happen. We want to set every bike up for each rider so that the rider just naturally falls into position on the bike. There's no pain points. You're not running into impingement and you're also not contracting yourself. In any way you're not overreaching. You're not spending your wrist some awkward way and and in that same idea if something hurts when you ride your bike. It's not right. Don't ever let someone tell you all that's just how riding a bike is. It's supposed to be a little uncomfortable. Now it's supposed to be joyful and supposed to be wonderful and when you get your bike set up correctly for you. it can be. That was is very much aligned. With what would. I often talk about it. We're not creating a bicycle. Recreating a cyborg and the interface between the animal and the machine is how you achieve that. Let's dive in even further so different approaches to fit. Probably what most people have been used to throw a leg over at approach literally. Stand over the bike. If you can clear the top tube. That's probably a good place. And then when you throw the word sit in there. Usually what ends up happening. Is you all the saddle height. The stem may be gets flipped. It probably does not get changed. And then also a lot of that is relying on the charts. So by companies. Put out the charts. Says if you're five seven you should be on. This is mike. If you're five ten you should be on the size bike. I personally believe that very often unfortunately results in people being on the wrong sized bike typically bike. That's too big which means that they're overreaching on that bike and you end up chasing the front end of the bike so the front end it becomes somewhat fixed in space and you can always shorten the stem so much so then that rider ends up being shoved way way forward on the bike and yeah like cement to create enjoyment. This takes away from

Mike
Running Injuries: When To Keep Running and When Take a Break

Another Mother Runner

02:33 min | Last month

Running Injuries: When To Keep Running and When Take a Break

"This is just a hypothetical example. I'm out for a four mile. Easy run and my left. Knee starts to talk to me or my right heel hurts or my calf suddenly seizes up I haven't stepped into a pothole or otherwise. You know run into a dog or something like that like nothing that it's like clearly like oh i that's how i hurt myself. What do i do. should. I keep running. Do i stop running like if you're in my shoes or a listeners. In my shoes christy. What do you recommend okay. So sometimes that can be the sign of actual injury. Sure but sometimes it's just information in his just your body telling you like oh. Maybe you didn't drink enough water before you ran in. Your calf is cramping dehydrated so it. It's not always necessarily an injury. So what i usually say is if you can run through it in. It's it's not sharp stabby pain like you really feel like you're doing yourself and you keep going you can keep going You can always take a break and off break and just walk it out a little bit. Sometimes that'll be enough for it. Sometimes you start In you go back to trying to round and you're like nope that is not happening. Okay then you need to stop but if it's if it's more dull nature and is just kinda there. It's not really getting worse. Not really getting better. But it's not changing. You can usually run through them. Okay and what about. If i it's dullish but i'm maybe changing my gate or i'm slowing down quite a bit to baby or something like that. If i'm aware of that which i realized might be kind of a second level consciousness but do i need to stop then. Even if i feel like i could power through it Not necessarily if. I the slowing down part to me. That's not stressful. Because again it could just be a information that you're getting that day and you may be able to go out a few days later and maybe totally fine if you feel like you're if you're limping or you're really having to adjust how you're running then you need well. I shouldn't say you need to stop. You should stop. how about that. Yeah there are plenty of people that wouldn't in done that myself. Many times are paid for it. Big time down the road. So yeah i mean if you've got to change what you're doing in terms of like you're limping or basically lumping. Because i think if you have to slow down that's not necessarily a bad thing. If you can do an easy run and finish it off then okay. Maybe you really shouldn't be doing something faster right

Christy
"pain" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

Cautionary Tales

06:56 min | Last month

"pain" Discussed on Cautionary Tales

"Core or leaving us emotionally scarred. Our colleagues jack mcdonald and mark leary. Have sort of survey made different languages to see is this. A universal thing is the specific to the english language and they found pretty universal had earns where across all of these different languages. You see people. Using pain related words describe rejection and they actually argue that we have no other way to describe experiences of rejection. Except with these pain words are language might heartache and heartburn together to our brains really experienced emotional hurt in the same way as physical pain. Naomi and matt decided to test this by putting people inside an fm ice skater and then having them play cyber ball the couple then looked the parts of the brain that were more active when people got rejected. The answer came one fateful afternoon. When naomi was beginning her data analysis in a shared graduate student office which meant that naomi wasn't the only one looking at brain scan results. My office made at the time she had done a study looking at pain. Serious pain like this was in irritable bowel syndrome patients who were being stimulated in various ways so this was real painful experience. Naomi and her office meet both had pictures of their subjects brain responses up on the screen. When matt walked in when he looked back and forth at the two computer screens he was shocked. He couldn't tell which set of results was which the brain responses of people who are in bowel pain look just like the brain response of people who were rejected and cyber ball the results took the neuroscience community by storm and made many scholars realize that we hadn't given the pain of rejection the scientific attention it deserved humans are set up to value connection to values social connections so much that our brains have figured out a way to use circuitry. That's typically there to keep us from injuring our bodies to keep us from feeling physical pain that seem circuitry is being used to make sure that we don't get cut off from others to me. That's a really amazing thing. And sort of helps normalize some of the intense fears that. I might have of rejection like okay. That is part of how we have evolved in humans to play an important value on social bonds. That the possibility of having those bonds broken really does put us at greater risk in maybe as why our bodies respond in this really intense way to the possibility of being separated from others. You know one of the takeaways from this is that you know in. Our society were were kind of wired to take everybody else's physical pain very very seriously like. Oh you sprained your ankle. Let's get you somewhere to get. That treated right away and we tend to look at other. People's social pain is something that's kind of like. Hey that's your business just like take care of that. Don't let that interfere with your work or your class worker. Whatever it is and the thing is is that the brain probably doesn't differentiate them in the way that were treating them and so i. I think it's probably made me a bit more sort of empathic. But neely and matt's findings also got thinking about creative ways to alleviate the pain that feeling jilted can cause the couple's brain findings suggested a straightforward but also incredible possibility if the brain processes rejection like a painful physical injury. Say a kidney stone. could the same drugs. We take to stop physical discomfort also. Protect us from social hurt. What if you prescribed pain medicine for people who had social pain. Wouldn't that be hilarious. Like it was almost going to be a punchline in a talk but we never thought it would work so we never ran that study but nathan dwell a professor psychology at the university of kentucky. Thought it was worth trying out. He gave his subjects pain. Medication acetaminophen the active ingredient in tylenol or a placebo pill for three weeks. Participants in both groups were asked to fill out a nightly survey on whether they'd felt teased or hurt by other people during the day he also had a smaller group of these subjects. Perform naomi and matt cyber ball brain scan task. What happened by the ninth day of treatment subjects taking acetaminophen or feeling less hurt by their daily rejections than subjects. Taking the fake bill. Their brains also showed less activity in those same pain regions when playing cyber ball so it looked like there was really evidence that the app is physical. Pain killers seems to be having an effect on social. Change him it. It is really important to include the warning label. which is that tylenol actually quite toxic. So when when. I talk about this with large audiences. I always tell them this because people are like oh cool. The next time. I get rejected. I'll just take a bottle of tylenol and that will kill you. People should not try to do this at home in self administer because it's actually dangerous. I just want echo matt here again. Do not take an aspirin or tylenol or any other painkiller to ease the hurt of rejection. it is dangerous. Do not do it. Never ever seriously not a smart strategy but neo man. Matt's findings do provide an existence. Proof that there are ways to turn off the pain of rejection when we get back from the break. We'll see that. There are some safeway's to late ourselves in the people. We love from the pain of rejection. We'll learn that we don't need a drug to alleviate the heard of being jilted but we do need to get the right strategies to make sure our rejection cuts. Don't get infected. In fact we'll talk to a scientist who's come up with a host of simple strategies. We can use to fight our heartaches and feel better. Cautionary tales is sponsored by better help online. Therapy there are glimmers of light at the end of this long twisting covert tunnel. That it's been hard for me. I've noticed how hard been working out easily. One day blurbs into others and the reopening is full of uncertainty to many people still feeling down and emotionally out of sorts and apps. Your one them may not feel depressed or a total loss evicted law or your relationships suffering. That could be assigned should talk to somebody online. Therapy can help better. Help is not a crisis line. It's not self help. It's professional therapy done. Securely online fanatic a questionnaire to help better help assess your needs they match you with your professional. Licensed therapist onto your matched. You can start communicating with your therapist in under forty eight hours. These therapists have a broad range of expertise and can provide you with services that might.

matt jack mcdonald mark leary naomi bowel syndrome Naomi bowel pain nathan dwell neely university of kentucky safeway Matt
"pain" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:33 min | 2 months ago

"pain" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"It's use so super convenience and before break. We were discussing sugar and kind of how much we're taking in as americans and how much we really actually need. And after hearing about how much. Sugar is an all these processed foods. Eliminating sugar is easier said than done right. It's not not always easy so with all that added sugar in our food products. We now have the expectation that everything we eat should be sweet. I've had premade meatloaf that i was like. This tastes like cookie. This is this oh sweet. It's crazy sometimes. My clients are not satisfied with eating real food. So i think of real food as those held the animal proteins healthy fats vegetable carbs fruits carbs. They are constantly looking for that sweetness and are often a little irritated. That they cannot indulge or get that sugar fix. I'm sure you see that to theresa. Yeah if they want to lose weight s- reduce their blood sugars and triglycerides numbers decrease their aches and pain. Which we're talking about today actually arthritis. Hello the need to eliminate the high sugar foods and all the process carbs. If they don't they will continue to crave that sugar so like we talked about the dopamine response. It's that craving that wanting of that neurotransmitter firing of that happy brain chemical feels good. Yeah sadly it. These big food companies have given us an addiction to sugar. And you're not alone out there. I've been there you know. I ate a lot a lot of sugar before before. I found nutritional wellness and i'm a dietitian so it wasn't before i got all that education was during after so if we want to break that addiction we actually need to eliminate processed foods and really only eat foods from our gardens or the produce aisle or farmers market. Great time for that right now. Meet from farms that raised grass fed animals and natural non refined oils and fats. In time when our clients follow that weight and wellness real food eating plan their sugar cravings become controllable and their arthritis pain is reduced and becomes manageable..

theresa arthritis arthritis pain
"pain" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

01:53 min | 3 months ago

"pain" Discussed on Science Friction

"Bobby's on welcome to science fiction. Natasha mitchell here. With belinda smith on so hungry you and me both. it's smells so good. What's on the menu okay. So it'd be here on the lips. We have some lamb which i've marinated overnight in lemon garlic and rosemary now domain to be rude. But you know. I'm not going to eight that well. Luckily for you. I have accommodated your vegetarianism and on the rights. We have some halimi bed. Oh yeah loon me. I love live me but look miss meal that we're preparing on science fiction this way. It kinda presents a dilemma for you. It really does. I look at these shops. And i think yum but also i love animals and the photo of them being pine really. It's my heart. So i spoke to write your anka ni. Who's a professor at the university of adelaide who researches this kind of thing and i asked am i alive now so there's actually a name for it. It's not just about pain but even knowing that they had to be killed to become your meat right. And so it's known as the meat paradox. Something we've done some research on my colleague who's a psychologist also does research around what's the cognitive dissonance. In fact that many of us create to be able to be meat eaters and so in some part what we find is people either. Don't think about it when they're choosing to buy prepare consumed me or they they in some sense how themselves stories about the humane conditions under which the animals have been kept now here in australia. You know there are very high standards of animal welfare but there are still some puzzles around how we could make practices even more humane and pain is one of those areas. I think that presents a lot of opportunities for trying to do even better.

belinda smith Natasha mitchell halimi university of adelaide Mike hutchinson Spacey australia acute pain paul psyche cancer Burt mark hutchinson natasha mitchell
"pain" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

01:39 min | 3 months ago

"pain" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"Great thing about fasting. As fasting stimulates autophagy genes were body recycles damage components. So fasting itself is is very anti inflammatory. Whenever we eat food we need food. We are bringing. In bacteria in different potential pathogens and so our body creates more inflammation so the act of eating is more of an inflammatory act whereas fasting by nature. Because we're not eating. we're not increasing insulin. And insulin will activate inflammation because of that. it's inherently very anti inflammatory. One of the best ways to reduce inflammation is to do a fast and fasting will stimulate self-healing through this process of autophagy where our body will break down tissue cells and organ cells within the tissue like meadow conju that have been damaged by oxidative stress. Miscavige great impact on pain levels as well as chronic disease and things like that and so on a regular basis really good idea. Do intermittent fasting and so there are many different ways of intermittent fasting. If you're in chronic pain. I would really recommend doing something like you know a sixteen to eighteen hour fast daily and then once or twice a week doing like a full one day fast or even like a thirty six or forty eight hour fast possibly once a week doing a little bit of a longer fast can really help down regulate pain and stimulate morale tafa g and help you get

pantaleo helio valley Heart disease cancer Systemic infections Turkey chronic pain alzheimer's disease multiple s Cardiovascular heart diseases allergies asthma youtube crohn's disease inflammatory acne psoriasis
"pain" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"pain" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Me thank you. I love you our first guest in twenty three years to bring his own sound effects should have done. That's going to be a disaster. Just feel very positive things. I gotta start by asking you about the npr concert. You went into the tiny desk concert. Yes when he fifteen. It became at that point. The most watched tiny desk concert ever more than twenty four million views like that. But i i just recently watched it again. And you seem to be a little confused as to where you are would exports so the story behind that the look on my face was one. I'm just naturally ugly I had no idea what i was doing. You know my manager was like you're going to do. Npr insane like you got to like sing songs and stuff. They didn't say any of that. And it was just like you gotta go do. Npr's i'm like. Okay cool so. I can go hungover like freshly smoking cigarettes. I was smoking cigarettes at a time. Since quit. i really thought. I was going to do like an interview and you know when you think. Npr you'd take really close up to the mic talking and this is how this is going to go this week and we have pain coming in and we. I didn't know what was going to do. So yeah. I didn't think that it was gonna be three hundred people staring at me singing songs with nothing going on and in anticipation for it to be bad and not only and i love this. Was it the most popular tiny desk concert ever but everybody was so blown away that they invited you back to do a concert at npr on the anniversary. And you think. I would have been prepared for that. But you're smoking cigars you yeah. It's just like ours. But no i had a sinus. Infection isn't an sinus infection. Just nature's auto.

fifteen twenty three years first guest more than twenty four million this week three hundred people
"pain" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

Optimism Vaccine

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"pain" Discussed on Optimism Vaccine

"The brother is like they mentioned hey, he went to prison for nearly beating someone to death when he was a teenager but I think he's okay. Now I like literally the first time anything happens movie just runs and beat see kyw nearly two dead that's like only method of coping. And he's apparently bidded like a growing relationship with another character doing really well, and it's like who functions like that and it doesn't make any sense to just runs inserts beating the crap out of this guy. The film again just can't quite get work needs to go without leaps. Now, the tipping point doesn't make any sense. It would work it would work at a straightforward genre film, but this doesn't want to be one of those but it's definitely not better than any slasher film you've ever seen. Incompetent slasher down Leon competence last year because it doesn't commit to the premise, it treats the whole. Of the movie like it's this thing about it's like some psychological melodrama about. I guess you could go that row where there's no actual killer but maybe there's a mastermind whose pinning these people against each other. And they end up just kind of being their own undoing. But then one of the fucked, we have the mass guy with the hammer just often people left and right he just eat thousand work together there is there's two movies fighting each other here. He has the most weird fucking coincidence ever. You think that you think that there's somebody in the know who's like using the camera. We should mention there's so they find cameras in their showerheads and two of the characters who are business partners, but not in a romantic relationship have sex in the shower, and then there's this question about whether or not the footage is GonNa get leaked and but then it's this guy who Is Somehow as everybody's cell phone numbers, and he's texting them the footage and displaying it on the TV's because he hacked the the AIRBNB. But yeah, the the slasher guy in the second half who never learned the identity of is completely inexplicable. It it just it doesn't work. You WanNa, make the movie about insidious landlord who murders people rents to great make that fucking movie. You didn't. You didn't make that movie. You didn't really intend to make them. You're being dishonest. This is not that movie at all I'd enjoy that movie. The script really has the feeling like something that Schwammberger and Franco wrote literally over a weekend late really late feels like this was put together super fast and then direction of the film is sort.

AIRBNB Leon Schwammberger Franco
"pain" Discussed on Living a Relational Life

Living a Relational Life

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"pain" Discussed on Living a Relational Life

"I just see a lot of pain I see a lot of. People. Sharing their pain for the first time in a big way where people are finally listening. And I think that a lot of people probably don't know how to listen and we don't know how to help and we don't know what to do and sitting in pain is uncomfortable. So. Pain. Is the biggest. Thread that I've seen woven into this whole. Moment. In history that we're all living through and I've just I've pulled back and I've really started examining. What pain? Does to us. And I like to tackle in my head I like to tackle these problems in a way that I can like scale it down inside of my own head so that I can understand it and the best way that I can. Bring you along on that journey is to just tell you I know what it feels like to be in pain. I've I've suffered a lot of emotional pain. In the past. Emotional. Pain is one of those difficult things to recover from like if you're not careful, you always think you're okay and then a trigger comes and you're like Oh my God I didn't heal at all. It's a very delicate back and forth. Fight in yourself for a long time. So I think the conversation that's happening around race and racism is really a conversation about pain and I I want you as you listen to this, I want you to just try to think. Positive you have to, I want you to think about a time where you were in pain. And you just wanted to be heard you wanted somebody to. If. They couldn't reach in to your pain and pull you out and give you a guiding post or guiding. string maybe to follow as you come out of that deep dark place. If you couldn't have that. Somebody physically pulling you out of it. You at least wanted to be heard you wanted to be. If not understood than it least. Validated in your pain so that you didn't new longer believed that you were crazy pain convinces us that we're crazy paying convinces us that our problems aren't big enough. We shouldn't talk about them. We should be ashamed of them. Pain does crazy things in our heads if we allow it to. Actually. It's not even a matter of if we allow it to or not. It's going to convince us of crazy things and having somebody else there with us to listen to us to validate us to make us feel like we're being heard. It's like the first step of being able to come out of that painful area. And I wanted to ask this question. When was the last time you struggled and felt pain felt like you were in pain felt like your emotional pain was mounting. When were you in your closet of pain? Maybe, you were suffering in some type of emotional agony may be you know you just experienced a break up or maybe you are confronting or dealing with having a dysfunctional family? were, you ever scared to let your pain be known. For fear or rejection. Rejection sound like a serious thing. But if you've been in that place, you know just how serious it is because you're already exposed pain makes you feel like you're an exposed nerve you're already in a place where you feel like you've circled the wagons, you've batten down the hatches and everyone has kind of become an emotional enemy of sorts like anybody that you look at you realize they have the potential to make your pain exponentially worse. They may not have the attention intention to do that. They'd likely don't have the intention to do that at all but because you're such an exposed nerve. Anything and everything can cause pain of some sort. So you're always on the defense and any inkling of someone not hearing you or not believing you are not taking your pain or being curious about it will only cause further damage. This is a risk that most people won't. And I think that they're in the right for being fearful. In my experience nine times Outta ten someone you go to for help won't respond well, the first time you choose to reveal your pain to them because pain is isolating. And uncomfortable for other people to see in here. Now imagine your own personal pain. and. Then magnify it. By millions of people. An magnify that by the number of generations since America was established. And you can hopefully gain. Even a baseline understanding. That racism isn't just a skin deep issue. It's not just about skin color I. always hear that argument. Oh, it's just a skin color. It's not just a skin color. Were talking about generations of pain that has been perpetuated for literal centuries. Slavery was abolished in Eighteen, sixty five and we're still dealing with the ramifications because nobody knows how to talk about it. There's no language establish for whatsoever and even when slavery ended, we had segregation. We had areas of the country where a black person in white person can even use the same drinking fountain or go to the bathroom. They're just they're so much pain. Everywhere when it comes to this. So we're talking about a subculture that has. Really. Largely hidden themselves in the shadows because we didn't know how to respond to them. We're talking about a people group who was raised to always be on the lookout for anyone responding to them simply because of their skin and they were likely taught how to de escalate situations when they got bad like I remember a couple of weeks ago just starting to think in my own head like. What must it.

Pain America
"pain" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"pain" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Pain and all these things might be signs of cancer in many cancers don't have any side some people just shocked with me here Hey I have a cancer I don't have any pain or suffering or weight loss and that's true at the beginning when the cancers present like a mass in the pancreas often they'll be no pain or no suffering or prostate cancer the B. no bleeding or difficulty with your editing then so that they could be kind of secret Salvator and we don't like secret saboteurs sometimes it's just worth Wilder make an appointment call us at two one two choices to get checked out even in these difficult times even in these difficult times we're here for you we're treating patients with cancer because of patient with cancer what's the best chance for the cancer to go away for the pain to go away for the political way that's the work that we try to do every day here at thirteen eighty four Broadway with innovative treatment well tolerated treatment out patient treatment away from the hospitals which is also a big plus you know your own private cancer treatment boutique at thirteen eighty four Broadway and so many people prefer that to chaos elsewhere in the uncertainty of elsewhere so you come in if you want to pay a visit and pick up a package of information you can call us to get a package of information the calls you get a package of information we call even now it two one two choices or to make an appointment or you can come in and many people come in and pick up a couple packages one for themselves and for their loved one friends when you come in thirteen eighty four Broadway were there from seven o'clock to five o'clock Monday through Friday business hours you get more information we have information about brain cancers breast cancers and body cancers and prostate cancers skin cancers and English other languages we also focus about the history of radiosurgery why get a second opinion the art of radiosurgery me of DVDs also in multiple languages so you may want to come by and pick up some information many people do it it's really easy to get to us because so many methods of transportation so close to us whether subways or trains or buses or easy excuse me good luck with a man who is eighty three years old is with old and had a history of lung cancer went for the big hospitals in the cut out much of as long as last long for that long cancer and he had that surgery and then he had more shortness of breath because when you cut out part of the long we did our logs to breeze and well when the surgeons cut out part of his longings than is breathing diminished and he's been seeing a doctor for twenty years and he has a new scavengers scare shows a new Massey had a history of this left upper lung cancer years ago and he lost that part of the long and he is an ex smoker and has COPD and is shortness of breath in his sources brothers pretty bad he walking one block yes to stop three times to catch his breath so removing that long did not help him and wouldn't he had the long removed what we were doing radio surgery then but the surgeon never told him about non invasive treatment so just remove that part of the long and since it is breeding is been worsening and worsening of COPD and emphysema short of breath and he's more short of breath after part of that long was removed and that we as a mother long cancer he has another mass long cancer and this is a man who's been through removal part of as long as he doesn't want to do it again he's eighty three years old he doesn't want to do it again he had a pet scan a couple weeks ago it showed a one point three centimeter mass in the right upper long pet scan positive with no spread of the cancer is taking some medicines for blood pressure is on low dose aspirin for cardiac surgery and long surgery and carotid surgery and he comes eighty three years old is coming from Staten Island to us and I saw him and he once our treatment he does not want to go through surgery and what's our treatment about for a long cancer well we talk about all the options first of all we talk about surgery and chemo and combination therapy no therapy and standard radiation but this is a man who once pinpoint precise treatment in a few treatments you once I have the best chance for his for his quality of life you want to keep as long he wants to avoid the hospitals he wants to avoid cutting and bleeding and chest tubes and that's the work we do non invasive treatment no cutting no bleeding and we make a mold around the body we computerized the body and we send in beams thousands of beams from thousands of angles to attack the cancer end of experience over decades with body radiosurgery the longest experience in New York the longest experience in America the longest experience in the western hemisphere this is the work that we do every day and every doctor would tell you you should go to the most experienced doctor that's why he got on the bus to go to the express bus from Staten Island he came directly to our office he got off the bus he came to me I reviewed his records we talked about all the options of this is the work we do make the mold around the body the computer as the body and we said that visible beams painless beams and he keeps as long and of course people say Dr leader and you follow up your patience and yes of course we follow up our patients we continue to follow the patience for the rest of their life to make sure the patient understands everything's okay and that we understand and that we can come here every day and talk about the results tell you what happened to this man who said the site had part of his long removed and ended up more short of breath than ever with emphysema and COPD and his sister smoking and now has another cancer she doesn't want another part of his long removed he just does not want it and that's another thing that motivates and he spent on the other side you see the other side and now he understands the importance of stereotactic body radio surgery for lung cancer and we treat many many cancers cancers of the brain of the knack of the throat the long of the breast of the pancreas and the liver the spleen kidneys bladder prostate primary cancers bone cancers lymph node cancers we have the experience more than anyone else really doing stereotactic registered many people said to do it but we look at the data it's not that way at all this is the work we do this is an experienced man with now too long cancers and kind of got two stories the left side they were moved along the right side radio surgery I could tell you why he likes our treatment why if god forbid you need treatment you would probably like to know that we exist and this listen to the show for a few minutes might save your life and save your quality of life and save your breathing save that of your loved ones and friends and neighbors that's why it's so important to listen and we're here everyday with new cases and new experiences every day talking about the special work we do but I'm such a limit is going to say hello to a specialist in our life who's out there caring for her loved ones and god give you the strength to continue on to a hundred and twenty and everyone should live to be a hundred and twenty in good health that's we.

Pain
"pain" Discussed on Better Back Show

Better Back Show

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"pain" Discussed on Better Back Show

"Show. The goal of today's episode is to help you ask. The question of whether massage is the best method for relieving your back pain. Okay so first, let's look pretty quickly here into the existing research regarding massage for relieving back pain, and before you start cringing. No, it's boring, but it's important to consider and I encourage you to do some digging on your own why? Because almost everyone I know who's experienced. Consistent back pain relief does their own research or has done their own research in the past, so just keep that in mind, okay? So. All include by the way a few articles that mentioned today's show notes for your reference, so we don't get lost in that rabbit hole and I off these boring tangents about. X. Study and Stuff like that. We want to focus on kind of the bread and butter, which is. You know massage is GonNa is the best thing for you to do specifically or not. That's all okay. So. By and large, there's a fair amount of pure research that suggests wide success. Success rate in short term back pain relief. However. Not long term so basically what that means is, there's a lot of great and positive. Research out there. That suggest short term relief from back pain. And I think actually it's kind of just common knowledge. But what we're trying to get here as consistent long-term relief from back pain and chronic back pain. Assuming that it worked. Assuming that it worked for long-term. Just keep doing it I mean even if it's not the true causes of the paint I mean maybe it would be addressing in a true 'cause if it provided long term consistent relief. But the problem is. Almost everybody that I've met in my life. You know on the subject of chronic back pain. It usually goes like this. Yeah whenever we get a big band, flare my back. You know I'll just go and massage your car, practical or something of that nature. Let's talk massage because this is the episode massage, and then I'll you know, and then that'll be it the next time we get a flare up I'll go back to the massage and then, and that'll be it. and then you have the other side, which is kind of more like my story of. While I would get massages regularly because I did have quite a bit of issues and then at one point. The massages started to actually feel more in pain after the massage. And, that's kind of the curve that. The Life Cycle I've seen repetitively with both frankly with general forms of either my fashion release or different types of massage. Of course not everybody reacts the same I always say that not everybody's going to have the same result for said treatment. So it's I like to really hammer that on the head because. I don't want anybody else. They're thinking that or complaining. Frankly that all you just making these generalized. Statements not really because everybody's going to have a unique response to any given treatment. And, we're trying to get to the objective. Kind of. Markers. In getting consistent relief. Because this show is for people that have. tried. What seems to be every method alter promise. It's Ha. It's not the every method. You haven't tried every method, but. Seems like it and so that's what this show is all about. So. Like, I said there's a fair amount reviewed. Research suggests that the some great. Results do for short term. Relief with back pain, but massage done really hold much water when it comes to long term consistent consistent relief. and not to mention nearly all these studies use objective pain markers that means subjective means what I think what I feel and I understand that it's kind of the only measure. You can really use because at the end of the day. It doesn't really matter what the you know. Let's say the scale says matters what you feel what you're feeling. Is if the computer, says all. You're really healthy and whatnot, but you're like you're a lot of pain. Does it really matter what the computer says? No, because you feel the pain, so I get that. However! You know the generalized way of approaching are back. Pain hasn't obviously worked. Up to this point so again going back to the. Root of this entire show it's about finally becoming active in a lot more in tune in touch with our. Health really, but are back pain and specific. So now in terms of massage for long-term back pain relief, it just does not have a great track record. And Episode Number Five. We discussed stretching for back pain, and a lot of people normally do stretching stretching stretching and somebody, stretchable massage, or stretching, and then eventually massage or a combination, and unfortunately massages just about as inconsistent from one person to the next one providing back pain relief. some people. report great results from massage and. Other methods kind of general methods. That you would see on Youtube and then you try to repeat the same thing for the same result. This kind of like a rolling of the dice like up, said in the past. And let me just quickly. Add that during my years training and competing in triathlon I would get weekly massages because I was still kind of evolving my understanding of. and. How? How Helping chronic pain chronic back, pain actually works. In the brain and wherever the pain is signaling in the body, I'll still really new early like learning. How this special my own body! How my pain! The. How how it works in my own body, let alone physiologically no back and forth the brain. So. Over time basic, my back pain progressively became. So bad, that massage just aggravated my back even more. It made my ups even worse. And I would get to the point where I'd like. I'd have people actually offer. To to give me. Just a quick massage on their own use that the traditional just. Trying to help relieve pain, but I would like be scared of of like how I would feel after. Just imagine that it's like. Back pay back. It's not supposed to make you worse than that may make supposed to make you feel worse afterwards. It was supposed to relieve. But I would get the point where I just. I got the point where. I didn't want anybody to touch my my back. Human just gently because.

Pain Youtube
"pain" Discussed on Better Back Show

Better Back Show

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"pain" Discussed on Better Back Show

"I would teach myself if I could go back in time. Ten years ago the particularly time of you know wherever I felt helpless and hopeless over my pain over my my back pain it would have been a made things a lot easier if I could. No just a couple of these items and I'm going to share with you But they have changed my life. These three steps It is important and I want to quickly note If you have not listened to episode one quite yet then really quick pause this and go back to the first episode because episodes one two three set foundation for your long term success feeling consistent back pain relief so go back and knock out episode one. I'll be right back here and I'll be waiting for you just like the song goes so we're going to go through these steps and obviously sequential order and step one is identifying the cause and I like to see this as kind of the identifying weaknesses the first step here is the first step number leaving your back. Pain rather is to identify for the true cause too often we start by assuming that the painful spot the painful area is the cause unto itself. But when you stop to think about it. That doesn't make any sense. How can the cause? Which is the pain. The the the pain be the caused unto itself. There has to be something else going on for that. That result of that resulted factor pain. So we have to identify the. How do we do that? Let's get into that so I wanNA use the following analogy..

Pain
"pain" Discussed on Pain Free Golf Performance Podcast

Pain Free Golf Performance Podcast

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"pain" Discussed on Pain Free Golf Performance Podcast

"Discomfort that you're experiencing control and unfortunately when you're just waiting for the pain to go away and not addressing the source of these things then that can lead you down a road that you don't want to be down right so a big reason why we want to start this podcast survive better information out to? Hey how can we mitigate or reduce elected of people getting hurt but also improve their performance in the same time? Because those definitely can happen. Both of those can be paired. It's just a matter of figuring what the happy medium is to get both of those to get you at at high level so you know ultimately to when we look at the healthcare system and how it's set up and I know we kind of touched on this before but unfortunately the healthcare system that we have here in the states. It's not set up for being proactive. It's very reactive in that of sewn is dealing with this comfort. That's when people want to get control they don't want to look at. How can we reduce elected of some getting hurt? They just want to say okay. This person's hurt now. What do we do so our goal is to try to be as proactive with a person or especially a Golfer's health to help improve their ability to perform in this golf but also to ensure that whatever is going on doesn't spill into their everyday life. That's the last thing in the right if you're dealing with nagging issues while you're playing golf that's one thing but also starts to bug you with your day today. That is something that would be a red flag for us to get under control as fast as possible ours. We're going to wrap her very first episode with this. If you're a golfer listen to this podcast right now. And you're thinking yourself I've been dealing with an injury that's been going on for weeks months years however long and maybe hasn't gotten better or you're really kind of just stuck in the same place as when you first started. Then you really should find a provider that as well versed and understands the sport of golf you know be able to put a plan in place and find a framework to be able to assess what's going on find the root source but also to come up with a plan to get things under control so you can get back to playing golf as soon as possible. That is so crucial. And I think a lot of times when people come to see us seem providers that maybe aren't well versed in the sport of golf as to why they're not progressive with the way they want being that we have our tallies performance institute certification background as well it gives us a better framework to assess. What's going on? Is it a movement? Issue? Is it a sequencing issue. Is Baxter issue downswing issue? You know these are all things that may be general. Healthcare provider might not be well versed in which ultimately leaves a lot on the table when it comes to be able to get back to playing golf pain-free but also playing at a high level so our thanks so much everyone for listening to the very first episode of the Pain Free Golf performance. Podcast really excited to be able to provide a lot of great information for you guys. Move forward how this podcast is. GonNa work is. We're going to have to formats moving forward. We're GONNA have a format where it's just going to be myself talking about injuries. How to manage them performance and training in how to implement them and then the second format is we're gonNA have some People come on In interview format and talk about their experience with golf and how best infamous on the strategies that they utilize wall whether that's instructors strength coaches physiotherapists. Hopefully everyone in between so again. Our goal provide as much content. As you guys can handle so that you can implement it as you see fit into your daily practice with golf. Thanks again so much.

golf Baxter
"pain" Discussed on Pain Free Golf Performance Podcast

Pain Free Golf Performance Podcast

11:52 min | 1 year ago

"pain" Discussed on Pain Free Golf Performance Podcast

"Performed brother whether you're practicing on the range whether you're on the golf course so when it comes to why we got into this field and I say we because again it took an to get me myself to this point when I look at the training that idea when I was a kid playing all types of sports well trained by myself or whether I was training with the team When we look at the training what it is now compared to in the past. There is a stark contrast that there's no question about that. I was definitely interested in the lower the fitness and the training when when I was in high school was. Let me to pursue my bachelor's in exercise science at the University of Buffalo and while I was pursuing my extra science degree I want to become more in the performance in the conditioning side of things as to why I decided to get my strengthening our certification so again when we look at training what it is now compared to what is in the past. You know. I still think that there's a narrative even today that There's a lot of coaches that are still utilizing their own personal experience to train kits and while. That isn't necessarily a bad thing. Most kids won't respond to a coach's personal experience what kids will respond to is the best available evidence and what a lot of the science is showing currently so I think what I struggle with is from a training standpoint. There are a number of different ways to skin. Can't there's no question about that but when it comes to understanding how to manage one kids Or you know adults when it comes to training. There's a there's an art to that right and I think you know we don't want to put a square peg in a round hole. We WanNa make sure that everything is customized individualized to that athlete to ensure that they are getting and maximizing their performance for whatever that may be. That's playing golf. Whether that's playing hockey order may be in this case. We're focusing on golf but getting back to kind of you know my background. You know when I got my bachelor's in Exercise Science I became a strength inititing coach and I ultimately want to understand a little bit more about the injury side of things you know when I was doing a lot of the training that I was doing personal training while I was in my Exercise Science degree a lot of the athletes allow. The adults are coming in to see me. We're kind of banged up already right so I wanted to kind of get better understanding of the injury side of it so I decided right. After my ex science degree I decided to pursue my doctorate in physical therapy again at the University of Buffalo. Just to give me a deeper understanding of the why behind certain conditions athletes were dealing with and how to manage them not only in the short term but also in the long term so. I've been a licensed physical therapist for eleven years now and counting And I feel like I've leveraged my skill set to be able to look at Rehab from a lens of strength coach who prioritizes. The idea of movement is medicine right. I think when you look at Rehab in the way it's set up A lot of what we're looking at is. Hey you need to be able to rest until you're paying goes away and once you're paying goes away you can get back to doing whatever were doing part of getting hurt. And I think that's a way start said a way of looking at it and then also I think I think it's a way for athletes who won get re injured but to maybe not fully ever recover from the injury itself so I think you know when I look at movement and I look at strength. Training that to me. Seems like the best long-term solution from someone who is recovering from an injury and that's just our opinion on it so I spent the early part of my career As physiotherapist doing travel work so worked in specifically orthopedics across different states and then After a year of doing travel PT. I ended up settling in Baltimore Maryland. Where had the opportunity to oversee a few clinics being the director and just oversee patient care or client care in addition to overseeing some of the business side of two so While I was there Iran three clinics and one of them just happened to be the Rehab director at under armour corporate which was a phenomenal experience. And I'll tell you this. That's what really kinda shaved my idea of wanting to integrate more strengthened performance in Rehab I had the unique opportunity to to see a lot of clients. They're on a one to one. Basis and ultimately that allowed me to collaborate a lot more with a lot of the strength coaches in personal trainers there which again the integration there was. Just something that really. I gravitated towards wanting to kind of implement if I ever moved on which I did. And we'll talk about it in a little bit but after a couple of years in Baltimore we had our daughter in two thousand thirteen and we decided we wanted to be a little closer to family. So my wife's family is upstate New York so we moved back upstate new to Rochester New York were again. I took a job in the traditional patient. Setting worked there for a couple of years and just felt like again. I want to get back to the more strength conditioning. Performance Training and integrate with so After a couple of years of working in the Trudeau traditional PT setting. I decided to open up my own practice. It's called manner performance. Therapy is one on one. So that we feel we can best tailor and customize their Rehab in Recovery Program For them but also to try and integrate as much strength conditioning. Principles in there. So that athletes clients whatever may be they can be active for both not only the sport but also for long term life as well so We were fortunate enough again. This is the power of social media. I would just you know having conversation with a local strength coach. Shot Joe Atari But we were just having a conversation about our philosophies and why are there we feel? There's a there's a gap that's missing when it comes to rehabbing and strength conditioning. So you know we've had a couple of conversations over the course of a couple of months. They were looking potentially bringing. Pt In their facility One thing led to another Nate van Calemburg. Who's the owner of next level strength conditioning? And we hit it off and it was a match made in heaven at least in my standpoint. So we've partnered with next level now. We opened up our business in July of two thousand seventeen. And we've been open since then so we're approaching our third year of being in business and Again it's the model that I've always really strive for. Ever since I left under armor where again it was strength. Conditioning coaches the floor. Being able to get ideas to how athletes are doing if they're having issues they can pull us onto the floor and getting ideas to what's going on and then from there if they need issue if they have issues the more guidance or help we can hopefully help with that so You know again. My background is in physical therapy and shrinking conditioning I happen to be avoided certified sources therapists as well so again. We understand sports. We understand that the man's that go with sports so we wanted to make sure that we can best put put ourselves in a position to expose ourselves to a number of athletes in a number of clientele that I would have the athleticism and the background of sports so that we can help them as best as we can. Because we feel that's where our skill set is suited toward so After we opened up next level Year into being there Or a client had reached out to me and said hey listen. I think you should reach out to the fitness director Cobblestone Creek Country Club which is about seven miles down the road. And he's I think you guys would it off you know you guys share the same philosophy in terms of training and getting people active and moving And again while we had worked with some golfers Wasn't Alessia a niche? That we were really Kinda into at that point in time but you know that she changed pretty quickly because we signed on with country club were now we are the provider the PT provider on site at the at the private country club there so we provide the PD services for their members in their family members to help them play better golf but also help them with any other issues. That could be going on outside of Golf. So it's been a really great partnership and that's obviously what led us really to deep dive into golf because all the clientele is that we see. There are mainly golfers and they want to get back to that sport. So we're trying to do as best as we can to figure out. How can we help the Golfer not only locally but hopefully across the country or across the world be able to play play at a high level but also play without the likelihood of them getting hurt right so these are all the things that kind of materialize over time and ultimately it's been a great ride for us in something that we would not trade for the world you know so when we look at the athletes that we serve we serve a lot of rotational sport athlete? So not only. Do we see a lot of golfers but prior to being a Cobblestone Creek Country Club? We were working with a lot and still do wear a lot of work with hockey athlete. So I think the combination of hockey in golf. They actually pair well together because the man's of the sports in terms of rotation are very very diverse specific right so we want to make sure that when we are looking at a rotational athlete Ken they rotate properly in Ann. Arbor rotating from the right areas and is the body able to handle the over an extended amount of time right so I think the combination of treating or managing both hawked related in golf related. Injuries actually fits really well with the model that we're trying to kind of put in place so when it comes to my own background in golf itself my exposure to golf came when. I think I was around eight years old when my brother and I were both first exposed to golf. My Dad would take out. He buys a junior and we would just go out and play. I really nothing. Kinda crazy was very very relaxed But I really kind of gravitated towards that sport or over that time and while. I didn't play golf on a team in high school or in college. I did play a lot recreationally. The most golf ever played was actually during my doctorate degree in physical therapy. I was at the three year span. I probably play the most golf ever which I think led me to want to work with rotations board athletes because there was a very specific demand that is needed with regards to golf baseball. A lot of these different. You look at the sports. Across the board most of them are rotational athletes rotational based movement. So I think you know when I was playing golf in college I really felt like at some point. In time if I can gravitate towards that specific niche of working with a lot of rotational based athletes. That would be really well suited for our skill set. Because I felt like I could do a great job with managing those injuries and getting back to a high level performance. So again the Nice thing about golf is Something that I gravitated towards. Was you know you control every aspect of your game right? There's no one else that relying on. So you know if you played poorly it was a direct correlation to you right. It wasn't anyone else's fault and if you played well it's because you hit the shots will and you made the putts when you need it to so I think you know. Golf is such a such a great sport and I think it's a humbling sport as well which is why we started this podcast in hopes that we can take a lot of these moving parts that are happening in the sport golf and Organiz them well enough so that you can easily digest material that we're covering or having conversations about and be able to implement that into your own game so people always want to know why we wanted to start this podcast and I think ultimately the reason why I wanted to start. This podcast was because there are a lot of golfers struggling with injuries for whatever reason a Lotta golfers they wear injuries like a badge of honor. Like Hey I've got this low back pain. That had just started at the beginning of the season. But I'm GONNA go through. It is much advil. Ibuprofen as I can and just kind of play eighteen thirty six on a weekly or daily basis and just try and gut it out until the golf season's over but the problem with that is. Let's say you live in an area where the golf season never really ends like Florida or down south right so if that's the case..

golf hockey University of Buffalo Baltimore director Cobblestone Creek Country Club Rehab director Maryland New York Nate van Calemburg Trudeau advil Ibuprofen Joe Atari Iran Florida Rochester
"pain" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"pain" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Association of nutritional consultants and she's created several health formulas now there literally helping millions of people out there regain their health and wellness indicted in a I want to get right into this we were talking about pain today and it always amazes me that you know we have the technology to put men on the moon and bring them back again we do and yet we can't seem to get a handle on pain relief and what's going on the last time I was here it was estimated that for eighty three million Americans were dealing with pain in their body just astounding now that number's double to an estimated eighty six million American adults and that's why I'm here today I really want to talk to you about this epidemic what kind of pain we talking about here all the I. diss rheumatoid and osteoarthritis got the bursitis the tendonitis we have fibromyalgia neck pain and low back pain hip pain knee pain joint pain of course we have injuries you know we have a weekend warrior type things to and actually crosses over one hundred different types of pain syndromes but the real issue Chris is were failing to get to the root cause of the pain what's causing this pain epidemic out there what is going on this is the day that we live in right now we have more stress than ever before pain syndromes ultimately but I can tell you that there is a real natural solution that can help you get to the root cause of that pain I created my glucosamine cream to take that cream applied exactly to where it hurts mommy in it goes in instantly because I wanted to give targeted relief okay immediately all right if you're in pain you what relief it now exactly what how fast is your formula work within fifteen minutes really fifteen minutes it's worked for me my family and hundreds of thousands of other people that work for someone that that may be interested in in considering your glucosamine creamy what what can it really do for you okay first of all in fifteen minutes.

osteoarthritis tendonitis knee pain Chris neck pain fifteen minutes
"pain" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"pain" Discussed on WJR 760

"In pain management. Once again, here's Warren Pierce with locations now. And when we began Jeff you had the Troy location have expanded because of the increasing need for those two somehow some way begin to reduce and eliminate the pain. So it's Shelby in Bloomfield in Brighton as well. You always bring a guest by. And I don't know if we've ever had the opportunity to talk with someone like Aaron runnings forty nine years old. He's in our studio good. They have you and your wife here as well. Danielle nice to see her here to a you just started using I know painfreelifecenters this past October. And I'm guessing you would have probably love to have started. But if they weren't around eighteen years ago, so take us back to two thousand one when you begin to experience this very, I'm guessing unusual pain. What? Was it like where was it? Well, thank you. Thank you very much. It was. I remember the day vividly. It's like anything. I would that we go through. I guess that's so significant. Is heard off in the morning and inserted in my chin and slowly progressed up the side of my face, and it was on my way to work and. It was just a burning. And then the burning would spread up the side of my face around my eye and. How long would it last? Oh, it was non stop. It wouldn't go away would not go away at all. You had what a doctor's appointment happened to schedule one for that same day. Yes. Yes. Exactly. I went to the doctor's appointment. And we thought the doctor thought maybe I had Bell's palsy, and he sent me to he looked at looked at me, and he sent home with steroids. To hopefully, try to nip that in the bud and and get that under control because he wasn't sure what was going on. I didn't display any signs of Bell's palsy. But that was his I guess when did you discover that it was something called neuropathy facial pain. And I'm guessing, by the way, Jeff Morton in all the years you've been doing this. This may very well be the first patient with that situation. Quite to the contrary. Really? Yeah. We've treated Marie lesions. What's called? I never heard of it. But then again, I'm not in the business TriGem neuralgia. It's actually called the suicide disease in there's a big support group and how I met Erin was we'd Dr Wagner, and I did a two hour presentation at Beaumont hospital further. Try John Munro Algis support group in Aaron was the first one out of that whole group that came in and it's horrible condition. I I've had patients describe it to me as if someone slicing interface with a razor blade. Twenty four hours a day is at an accurate kind of description, Aaron it's it can be that that definitely it's for me. It's a it's a constant aching pain. But then also spreading in there. Some other. Oh. Neuropathy. Other kinds of pain other kinds of nerves. Symptoms that you can experience like water running down your face. Torture, people some countries country. But so the Bell's palsy is obviously an incorrect bag noses with a doctor that you saw that day. What happens after that he gave some treatment? Obviously if you thought it was Bell's palsy, he thought it was gonna work. Bell's palsy wasn't at work. Right. He sent me to an ear nose throat specialists. And I think they did I don't remember exactly what happened, but we did a bunch of tests and nothing would show up. He could feel that. There was something going on with maybe one of my glands long my neck, but. After looking at that. And deciding that there was nothing really malignant about it or anything of interest because I think I did have. CAT scans at the time. He said he said, I'm very sorry. But I think you have some form of Leroux. And I said what kind of cancer is that? I'd never heard of such a thing. That was just that was a completely foreign language to me. That's for. Sure. Right. So you don't get better as a result of that? And you go on what year after year, maybe five years experiencing the pain. What kind of impact was that having on your job? For example. It was difficult. It was difficult of engineering. Were you right, right? I was it was very difficult. There were times. There was times. I couldn't work for a while. Yeah. And so how many doctors did you get involved with that you go see to try to figure out? Okay. What is this pain? I am experiencing all over my face. I do. After the diagnosis or after I should say after that first your nose throat. Specialist will make some form of dicta row. He sent me to a neurologist, and it was going to the neurologist probably for a few few months. Yeah. And they put me on anti-seizure medications, and that helped with some of the other symptoms of the of the burning, but the pain was turning into real pain, and it was aching constantly. And it wouldn't go away. I was waking up with it in the morning and going to sleep with it at night. Could it have been? I don't anything dental possibly. I went to a. Dr that looked that did Orel Mexico facial surgeries. And that was one of the doctors that he said that there was nothing that he could do for me. He turned me away from his practice because there was nothing there. There was nothing there to fix. There was no problems with the with the temporal TM J joint. I'm not using the proper terms. But I've heard that turn TM J Jeff Morton from folks in in the dental profession. Yeah. It's a it's a problem with the joint in the jaw. Yeah. We sometimes when you open your mouth, I recall corral, if you open your mouth, there's a clicker click. It can get sore can even come out of out of place. Right. So so it wasn't TM. Jay, the doctors test show, nothing and the doctor didn't want to perform any kind of surgery on you. Did he no he didn't? I have a lot of respect for that doctor because he he turned me away. And didn't he didn't want to try to do any kind of surgery for fear of making something worse because there was nothing there. So he he recommended I I keep moving. I guess I mean he couldn't recommend for me anywhere where to go. And what about the you said, you were taking this anti-seizure medication after you've seen the neurologist, right? Any side effects from that for you. In addition to the pain you each and every minute of the day. Yes. I we you start to take the NFC your medication at night. So that it when it hits you and gets into your body. Your body has some time to acclimate to it. But eventually you're going to have to take it while you're awake. And the first time that I took a while. I was awake. I stayed an extra half hour at home. So that I could wait for those affects the kick in. And I thought it would be like a average Tylenol. My mistake. That it was going to that. If I were to feel any effects, I would feel them within a half an hour. So well, I didn't. And so I went off to work and everything was fine. And boy did I but six out for about four hours later at lunchtime. I felt the effects like you wouldn't believe I thought the room was moving so fast. I screaming. Cleaning leave it spinning around. Well, just move. Yes. I felt like I was moving really really slow. Yes. And then we had a pause now. But we'll come back and talk about your mother-in-law, and you still at this point what five six seven years. No one has been able to tell you exactly that. It's this neuropathy. Facial pain is what you're experiencing, correct. No one rack when we come back. Tell us about what your mother-in-law found for you. And what kind of in a way led to the pain free life centers around town and Jeff Morton will talk about a two because he says he's experiences before..

Jeff Morton Bell Aaron facial pain Facial pain Warren Pierce Danielle Bloomfield Troy John Munro Algis Beaumont hospital Marie Leroux Brighton Orel Mexico Dr Wagner Jay Erin five six seven years
"pain" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"pain" Discussed on WJR 760

"But for the people around you as well. And every time we get together. I usually find some sort of new story new story unfolding and the latest revolves around this one, Jeff you may or may not know about this one for the first time Americans odds of dying from an accidental opioid overdose are higher then from a motor vehicle crash that at the new data. Yeah. It was came out. Yeah. They came out. I read about that a couple of weeks ago, and here's another here's another statistics in two thousand and twelve there have been seventy six million. Less prescriptions written for opioids, but the overdose rate is higher. Right. And when we talk about Oprah's there is let's began there is a large number of non opioid pain medications, including anti inflammatories. Like ibuprofen. There's tylenol. There's muscle relaxants. There's anti-seizure medicines antidepressants and topical preparations as well of all those the mainstay of treatment for chronic pain has always been always been the opioids habit-forming painkillers or narcotics. What why did doctors go ahead and prescribe that because they overbook themselves, and it's it's easy to easy answer in really in today's society. We want quick fixes got this take a pill. You got that take a pill you want? You know, I can't remember I was just on somebody other day. I can remember my dad when I was growing up here this old Buick Electra two twenty five thing was a tank and it lasted forever, right? Even today's society is we get cars every three to four years. I mean because they don't last things started going around were were more active and big pharma is a big reason McKesson cardinal health. They're they're under attack by everybody, except for the US attorney general wouldn't prosecute them. That story's everywhere. I am sick and tired of on the weekends turning on sixty minutes. Twenty twenty and Nightline in hearing some sort of opioid story. Some tragic story about opioid abuse know, everybody will talk about the opioid abuse. Nobody talks about this. Solution and now with the new laws doctors are free to prescribe opioids. There's just a big bus Shelby township a few months ago. Our phones are ringing off the hook because people are looking for drugs. And we tried to explain to them this not what we do where noninvasive non addictive, no side effects. No, contra indicators, and we can treat any type of pain. And it doesn't matter what it is. And you to yourself as a living breathing human being to come in and get your free consultation, your free treatment and just see what it's all about. And this national safety council that came out with these recent statistics suggest that the opioid crisis is fused it. It's it's fueling the council's grim probabilities, they call it, and that crisis is worsening with an influx of this elicit, you probably know about this federal. Oh, so okay. So here's the deal. Right. So I if ten year old twin girls, right? The other day they say to me dead your sophomores in high school. We're going to be juniors next year. Would you rather have a drink or do drugs like neither? So we're we're out to dinner is really interesting that you brought up because what I did was I took a salt shaker, and I poured some salt on the table. And I moved all assault way except for three little granules. And I said see that they're like, yeah. I go. That's all those three Gant granules, if someone leases your joint or a pill or something with that much fat. And I'll do you know what happens to you? And they looked at me, and I go you're dead. And then I took to more of the salt granules away, leaving one granular salt. And I said that's car fat not which is an elephant tranquilizer that they're putting in all these in Cincinnati drugs that are coming in from Asia in Mexico. That's why our overdose rate is higher because it doesn't matter blue collar, white collar professional unemployed. If you have pain nearby. Your brain needs that drug to give you the dopamine release to feel better and block the pain. And I said to my daughter, I said, look that one little granules salt that's Carfax. Now, if you take that, and it's in something that you ingest, you're dead. And so that's how I left it with them and just neither. But I'd never gave him an answer. That was a hard shot. But but you give them reality. And that is why the overdose. Even though the prescriptions that are being written are less. The overdose is higher because doesn't matter key be a Corp CEO of a fortune five hundred company if you're if you're an addict, you're nobody wakes up. No one's going to wake up tomorrow morning and go I'm addict, I want to be an attic today. No one. Does it happens by accident? I Jeff Morton hang on. Because as you mentioned, you always bring a guest in this as far as I can tell this guest is unlike any of that has ever joined us to talk about the pain, they experienced and we'll get to that. In just a jiffy here on news talk seven sixty WJR as we continue to try and reduce and eliminate the pain you or someone close to you has so stay right with us. You've suffered enough with your pain..

opioid abuse Jeff Morton Twenty twenty McKesson cardinal health ibuprofen Electra painkillers US attorney Shelby township Corp CEO assault Cincinnati dopamine Carfax Asia Mexico sixty minutes four years ten year
"pain" Discussed on Move Forward Radio

Move Forward Radio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"pain" Discussed on Move Forward Radio

"My opt in then i needed to do certain things like only wear big loose shirts and hold them out in subtle ways that people when really notice um i had to do things ease gestion pain like cut out theory in meat and gloom from my diet i needed to always be prepared for a nausea flare up because they never really knew when that would had and inevitably it would hit the worst times so i was making all these little changes to try and help the secondary and tertiary symptoms but absolutely nothing was hoping my abdominal pain and that was really frustrating because the pain was getting much worse over the years it was getting much worse at the time and since basically so prime may senior year that pain it was it was really interfering with my school and my daily activities because he was so severe insensitive today ingles got my abdomen was in that i was needing to randomly excuse myself from cry i was needing to rush through exams because the pain was just spiked so high and i actually ended up about senior years college i ended up having my gall bladder removed two um but unfortunately that didn't help me abdominal pain and needed to come out but it didn't end up helping be abdominal pain and so i made it through senior years barely able to finish that up and graduate with my business degree in may of 2016 from texas cnn university um but all of my complications for just drastically increasing in both frequency in severity it was just getting out of control i was supposed to go back for one more years for um.

nausea abdominal pain ingles texas
"pain" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"pain" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"And when i read those words it made me think back to a book that i read a while back titled the body and pain by all lanes scary hooker in it's a this is a one of these deep deep considerations of the idea of pain not only in terms of physical experience but what it means philosophically and politically socially it is a is a deep read but but one of the things that she talks about in premature main statement in the book is that an individual's physical pain has no voice but when it finds of say begins to tell a story a story of uh of of the vast distances between your experience of pain in my own she even describes its distance is being interstellar like that's the that's the the space between my understanding of pain and another person's experience of pain is a really good example of how hm lonely humanity can be in a way in that like there's no way for us to possibly understand what another person's level of pain is yeah very the the limits or at least the challenges of of human empathy right uh and then on top of that we have their the complications that are inherent in that distance for an ability to to understand each other's pains and in the very nature of human creation so she ties all that up okay and of course authors and artists often cite pain is a necessary part of creation some more than others.

pain