22 Burst results for "Pacific Theater"

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

02:29 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"And he gets his <Speech_Male> meat and gets back <Speech_Male> on the bus and goes <Speech_Male> and visits his <Speech_Male> family. But <Speech_Male> even coming back <Speech_Male> from what he came <Speech_Male> back from, <Speech_Male> he slapped in the <Speech_Male> face <SpeakerChange> with <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> reminder that <Speech_Male> not everybody's <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> welcoming him all. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Right, and you <Speech_Male> conclude the book with an <Speech_Male> interesting point that <Speech_Male> part of the reason <Speech_Male> these <Speech_Male> stories <Speech_Male> aren't as familiar <Speech_Male> to us is that <Silence> with the <Speech_Male> formation of veteran groups <Speech_Male> after the war <Speech_Male> and all of the <Speech_Male> education <Speech_Male> that went on thanks to <Speech_Male> these groups with <Speech_Male> veterans visiting <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> schools, libraries, <Speech_Male> giving <Speech_Male> speeches and talks <Speech_Male> to different civic <Speech_Male> organizations, kiwanis <Speech_Male> Lions club, <Speech_Male> whatnot <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Male> many years and <Speech_Male> even up to this day <Speech_Male> to those <Speech_Male> non agencies that <Speech_Male> are still out there telling <Speech_Male> the stories of World War II, <Speech_Male> a lot <Speech_Male> of Japanese Americans <Speech_Male> weren't <Speech_Male> welcome into these <Speech_Male> organizations. So <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> weren't <Speech_Male> around to be able to tell their <Speech_Male> stories in the same way. <Silence> What do you <Speech_Male> hope that <Speech_Male> is remembered <Speech_Male> from their stories? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> Well, <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> for me to take away <Speech_Male> is, <Speech_Male> first of all, <Speech_Male> these guys, these knees <Speech_Male> say, they were fighting <Speech_Male> two words simultaneously. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I mean, as if one wasn't <Speech_Male> bad enough, <Speech_Male> but they were fighting <Speech_Male> one overseas against <Speech_Male> America's enemies. <Silence> And <Speech_Male> they were fighting the other at <Speech_Male> home against racial <Speech_Male> prejudice. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> what they knew <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> was that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> only by winning <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the first one, <Silence> <Advertisement> would they be <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> able to come <Silence> <Advertisement> and try <Speech_Male> to overcome <Speech_Male> the second <SpeakerChange> one. <Speech_Male> And <Silence> <Speech_Male> you know, have <Speech_Male> they did that happen? <Speech_Male> No. And <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> that's part of what, <Speech_Male> of course, <Speech_Male> we're seeing today. <Speech_Male> There's still a very <Speech_Male> strong anti immigrant <Speech_Male> vibe <Speech_Male> in this country. <Speech_Male> And you know, <Speech_Male> if you look <Speech_Male> different, sound different, <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> you're different. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> I hope that <Speech_Male> we realize that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> patriotism <Speech_Male> comes in all <Speech_Male> shapes and all <Silence> colors. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Absolutely. <Speech_Male> There are <Speech_Male> a lot more details <Speech_Male> included these stories <Speech_Male> that we couldn't get to. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> for listeners who want to <Speech_Male> check that out, the <Speech_Male> name of Bruce's book <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is bridge to the <Silence> <Advertisement> sun. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Bruce, thank you for joining us. <Speech_Male> Thank you, Scott. <Speech_Male> All right, that is all <Speech_Male> for today's episode. <Speech_Male> If you'd like to <Speech_Male> see show notes for <Speech_Male> this and all <Speech_Male> my other episodes and <Speech_Male> include sources, <Speech_Male> maps or <Speech_Male> other relevant information, <Speech_Male> go to <Speech_Male> Parthenon podcast <Speech_Male> dot com. <Speech_Male> Parthenon is <Speech_Male> the name of the <Speech_Male> podcast network that <Speech_Male> history unplugged as a part <Speech_Male> of. Along with other <Speech_Male> great history shows like <Speech_Male> James earlies key <Speech_Male> battles of American history, <Speech_Male> Steve <Speech_Male> guerres beyond the <Speech_Male> big screen and history of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the papacy. Another <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> shows

Lions club America Bruce Scott
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

05:20 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Most valuable battlefield intelligence pieces of intelligence were these individual soldier diaries that were being collected off of the dead bodies of enemy soldiers and brought to the language team. And their tent, their foxhole, wherever they were, you know, they would read them. They would translate to M and a got a lot of information about, you know, not only the numbers of strength, how much ammunition they had, whether all their officers were killed, whether they had enough food or, and it was really valuable stuff. And then you combine that with what they were able to hear over the radio. And by the way, this Roy matsumoto, who gave those commands to the enemy troops as they were coming up the hill. Also, in Burma, climbed up a tree and tapped into a telephone line and for about ten or 12 hours overheard conversation between Japanese soldiers and at one point a sergeant who was in charge of guarding Japanese sergeant who was in charge of guardian a big ammunition dump site supply area, if you will, was saying asking his headquarters for reinforcements because he only had three men to guard it and they asked what his position was and he gave the position on the map where he was. And Roy wrote it down Clint came down out of the tree. Passed the information on. And they radioed it out and within about four hours the plane came over. Trump. One bomb, you know, right on the ammunition dump in the whole thing went up. And so that was, you know, that was again from overhearing the language. This really does fill in the gaps because when I've read accounts on World War II in the Pacific, there are points that you made earlier that the Japanese didn't code their communications, the code was quickly broken. But that's more of a story of the American intelligence getting one over the Japanese and working more effectively in that way, but it doesn't come down to the human stories that there were men on the ground who were doing the translating who were finding ingenious ways to get access to Japanese communications and making this possible. It's almost as if it's an impersonal inhuman machine when it's not. I mean, there are a lot of other characters and stories that you get into. Are there any other that stick out or others whose stories we couldn't get to? Or kazuko moto? Hey everyone, Scott here. One more brief word from our sponsors. Well,

Roy matsumoto Burma Clint Trump Roy Pacific kazuko moto Scott
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

02:25 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"And starts yelling. He remembers because he is another guy who went to school and Japan and took part in their army reserve training there and everything. So he knows all of the Japanese Army military commands. So he stands up and he's yelling like in his Japanese, obviously. To charge to do this, to do that. And the officers in the front ranks have already been mowed down on the enemy. So these soldiers, enemies, soldiers just turn around and they come up the hill and they're actually obeying Roy's orders to charge into the American fire. And so this assault, this enemy assault gets completely defeated, smashed the American battalion survives the night that day and gets relieved the next day there's reinforcements that make it up to them and get them out of there. And so for years after when they would have these reunions for merle's marauders, Rory matsumoto would always be honored as the hero of the battalion and for saving us and the way he did it was he knew how to command the Japanese troops in their own language. It makes one wonder where these sorts of, I guess you could say counter espionage tactics. Comment, this one was impromptu, but if you have soldiers who are ethnically Japanese speak Japanese, then these are the sorts of tools that are in your toolkit are actions like this common or are they few and far between. Why in this specific in terms of, you know, in the middle of an attack and whatnot, I think that's fairly uncommon, but what it was a lot more common, the Japanese soldiers were all kept diaries and what's interesting is American soldiers were not allowed to keep diaries. I mean, they could get in big trouble if you were found to be writing things down in a diary. I mean, even their letters, of course, would censored. But if you write into a diary information about where you're at, what troop movement is, whatever, and then you have it in your pocket, and you get captured and the enemy has it, or you get killed, the enemy can take it out of your pocket, know a lot about your unit, right? But for some reason, the Japanese Army, they didn't prohibit their soldiers from doing that.

Japanese Army American battalion Rory matsumoto merle Japan Roy
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

04:51 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"A what? A Marine Corps division, an army, combat unit, Merrill's marauders in Burma, who were famous for taking no prisoners because they were fighting in a brutal jungle adversary who did not take prisoners. And so now here come these ten 12 nisei on this language team, how are they treated and how are they looked at by the other American soldiers? The regular GIs. I have to say that to a man, the vets who I talked to. And he said, that's how I talked to said there was never a whisper of trouble. And part of what the GIs were told by their sergeants and their officers was these guys are not only is American as you and me, but when we get over there or in our next battle, we're going to really need these guys. They can help us. They can not only help us beat the enemy back, but they can help us save American lives. So in a lot of units, they were really protected. And it was understood that if you lost one of them or you lost a team of them, that this combat team could be seriously affected. And so they were even more than accepted. They were really honored and appreciated. And I thought that was an interesting dynamic. Are there stories that really stick out to you? Their service, whether on the field, providing critical intelligence, that really surprised you as you're considering the role of these intelligence officers in the war. Well, there's this story of Hiroshi matsumoto, also known as ray, Roy, I'm sorry, Roy matsumoto is America name. He went and fought with Merrill's marauders in Burma. And he actually was credited with saving his battalion. Which one very crucial point had been surrounded on a mountaintop by superior enemy forces. And days after days of being pounded with mortars and the Japanese were setting up to do an assault to wipe these guides out. And so, but they didn't actually know the American commander didn't know when they were going to attack or where and he couldn't protect the south side or the north side of this hilltop. And so Roy one night took off his pack and helmet and volunteered to crawl through the brush and get as close as he could to the enemy lines to see if he could overhear what they were saying because there was a lot of activity going on and there was some feeling that they were possibly going to attack in the

Hiroshi matsumoto Burma Marine Corps Roy matsumoto Roy American one night ray one America Japanese Merrill one of them ten 12 nisei
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

05:41 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Well, uncle see I put them behind bob wire. And gun towers. With machine guns on top of them. And by the way, those guns were pointed not outward, but pointed inward. And then as I looked up at the gun towers, they all knew what that meant. You would get shot if you tried to escape. And so there was real conflict in the camps. Some of these guys in a number of my characters in the book, who we follow in the war, stepped forward. Stepped forward and volunteered. Yes. I want to fight for America. Yes, I will do this. And they were recruiting them for the military intelligence. Others, as you might well imagine, other young men in that camp said, go to hell. You put me in this camp, you know? With my loved ones and why should I come in? So there were really political undercurrents. Now, most of the nisei, again, those born in the United States who had the opportunity to go into the armed forces and fight for the United States in that war did so. But there was an element, you know, there was an element that demonstrated in the camps and didn't like there. They were being treated. One honestly can't blame them. It must have been very challenging to balance these competing loyalties, but many found a way forward, and it's worth looking at the particular stories that you chronicled to see how they do this. And in the midst of a war, do their best to serve. We looked at Tom sakamoto, can you tell me next the story of nobuya Fourier? And I'll probably mispronounce names here, but listeners know that's par for the course. Scott here, we're going to take a short break for a word from our sponsors. But first, I want to give a shout out to all the great shows on the Parthenon podcast network, including key battles of American history. You can find this show and many other great ones like it.

Tom sakamoto Scott United States first Parthenon America One nobuya Fourier American
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

05:07 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"And the Japanese were very arrogant about the difficulty of learning their language and their reading and writing of it. And the Japanese Army sent a lot of stuff in the open. Meaning without even taking the time to code it, just straight Japanese, thinking that, oh, there's not going to be anybody in that none of the marines here. I need a GMO. Are going to know what we're saying. You know? Well, wrong. Because we had these military intelligence teams over about usually ten or 12 nisei, who were listening to the radios who were interrogating prisoners who were there. But again, we didn't want to make that well known. So it was not something that was advertised or written about or boasted about or anything. And so Tom stayed in this school for about another year and taught some other students who then were deployed into the Pacific. And then we follow him in the book in terms of egos to all of these various battles, some of the really iconic battles that we know about. I mean, these guys were everywhere, these say they were an EOG, but they were in Burma. They were in Okinawa. They were at Leyte. They were everywhere. And we really didn't know that. And many, many, many decades without knowing that. And that's what I chose to write about in bridge to the sun. But when Tom is on that chip, getting that surrender from the country of Japan, you know, he's sad for the people of Japan that he knows that they have been bombed and they've really suffered. He's angry at the Japanese military for what they put their own people through, let alone some of the things that they did on the battlefield. And so he was one of, as it turns out, we have these pictures, of course, of on that ship when Macarthur's taking the surrender.

Japanese Army marines Tom Leyte Okinawa Pacific Burma Japan Macarthur
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

04:39 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"That means they came directly from Japan to America, but with the laws that were then on the books, none of the immigrants from the eastern countries were really allowed to become American citizens. And in kind of a catch 22, you couldn't own land unless you were an American citizen. So it's set up these immigrants to work the land, if you will, agricultural land, mostly on the West Coast a lot in central California as Tom's parents did. But also the parents, even though they really embraced this new land of theirs, America, you know, they did have strong ties to their ancestral homeland. And they wanted their children to have some appreciation for their culture, their language relatives, even, of course, still living back in Japan. So Tom's parents and a lot of the immigrant parents and even though they didn't have a lot of money, one thinks about, oh, it's traveling abroad for a semester kind of thing. No. But they sent their young children or a year or two back to Japan to live with relatives to go to school there to be immersed in the culture in Japan. And this is what happened with Tom. He was actually there for four years. High school years went to high school in Hiroshima and where his relatives lived. And then when he graduated high school, he was an honor student and he was in what was their equivalent of their ROTC program in the high school there. And upon his graduation, he was offered a commission in the Japanese Army. And of course, this was before the World War II started. This was in about 1930 6, 7 around there. And he, of course, turned it down. He said, you know, I'm an American. I'm going home now. And he did. He came back to the United States. And so he ended up in the army. He ended up being drafted shortly before the war and was actually in the army already when Pearl Harbor was attacked. So he didn't really have a conflict when it came to his patriotism. He considered himself an American first and foremost. He was born here. This was his country. He loved it. Japan was the homeland of his parents and his ancestors. But that said, you know, what a tremendous conflict of emotions. And his parents were, as he stated after the Pearl Harbor attack, his parents really were ashamed at what their country Japan did to this country to America. And but they told Tom, they said, Tom, America is your country. You fight for America. And he set out and we follow him through the entire war.

Japan Tom America Japanese Army West Coast Hiroshima California army Pearl Harbor
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

03:23 min | Last month

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Just a bunch of names and dates and facts. It's the collection of all the stories throughout human history that explain how and why we got here. Welcome to the history unplug podcast where we look at the forgotten, neglected, strange and even counterfactual stories that made our world what it is. I'm your host, Scott rank. The interment of hundreds of thousands of Japanese Americans during World War II in what were essentially open air prison camps is a fairly well-known story. But what's less known is that several thousand Japanese Americans were trained by the U.S. Military intelligence service and then sent to the Pacific to serve as interpreters, translators, and interrogators. Even as our own families were being held in internment camps in America. So why aren't these stories better known? There are many reasons, but part of it has to do with the fact that after the war, Japanese Americans weren't really welcomed into veterans groups, and for the most part, they melted quietly back into society. Today's guest is Bruce Henderson, and he wrote a book called bridge to the sign. The transfer recover those stories. He follows 6 of these soldiers who are among the first Japanese Americans to serve in combat after Pearl Harbor as they fought two wars simultaneously. One oversees against her ancestral homeland, and against the prejudice they face back in America. The situations of the soldiers found themselves in were truly remarkable. Thomas sakamoto was an intelligence officer who was actually on the bridge of the USS Missouri in 1945 when the Japanese empire formerly surrendered, and there were many American soldiers who looked at him in confusion, not knowing that ethnic Japanese were fighting on their side. This is one of many stories that we get into, and I hope you enjoyed this discussion with Bruce Henderson. Japanese Americans were on the one hand, the most likely people for the American government to want to be fighting for them in World War II. They knew the language of a major enemy power, they could provide critical roles in intelligence, language training, translation, and one could imagine espionage. I could imagine that Japan would have loved to have a native population of hundreds of thousands of people in Japan who were ethnically Caucasian and spoke English as their first language or fluently as their second. And that's what America has going into World War II. But on the other hand, Japanese Americans could be seen as a least likely people to be involved in the war. They're being called to fight against our ancestral homelands by nation that had recently decided to horribly mistreat them and act as if they were aliens in their own homeland. You open your book with Thomas sakamoto on the USS Missouri in 1945 when the Empire of Japan formerly surrenders to the United States. Can you describe the scene and how he's being pulled between these two forces? Yes, I thought this was very gripping scene to open the book with. I mean, it is a World War II book and we're opening at the end of the war, which may seem rather different, but in Tom sakamoto, who, of course, we go on through the book to find out how it was he ended up there on the ship when Macarthur took the surrender from Japan. Tom sakamoto was a guy who nisei, meaning that he was born in the United States, his parents at the time, Japanese immigrants.

Bruce Henderson Scott rank U.S. Military intelligence ser Thomas sakamoto United States USS Pearl Harbor Japan Pacific Missouri American government confusion Tom sakamoto Macarthur
"pacific theater" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:41 min | 2 months ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Welcome to veterans chronicles, I'm Greg Columbus. Our guest in this edition is Bruce Henderson. He is the author of the acclaimed sons and soldiers, the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler. That's the book that made the world aware of the Richie boys, who immersed themselves in the details of the German military and became extremely effective interrogators of German prisoners of war in the European theater. Mister Henderson is now the author of a related work from the Pacific theater of World War II. It's entitled bridge to the sun, the secret role of Japanese Americans who fought in the Pacific in World War II.

Greg Columbus Bruce Henderson Richie boys European theater U.S. Army Mister Henderson Hitler Pacific theater of World War I Pacific
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

01:33 min | 2 months ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"And you can find it on any major podcast app, Google Spotify, Apple, you name it. It's there. The war of 1812 series just started we're recording this at the very end of July and it just started, but you could always go back regardless of when you hear this recording. Scott and I also did a very long series on the Pacific theater World War II, which a lot of people have said is pretty decent. So maybe check that out as well. In the future, we have coming, the Texas revolution. The Mexican-American War and the European theater of World War II as well. So I always work with a partner. I work with different guys. I switch it around. Also, if you want to get in touch with me, I'm on Facebook. You can look up James R early and you can also find my group called American history fanatics. It's kind of the unofficial group for the podcast, but it's more than that. It's a place where people that love history, American history in particular, get together and post things and discuss things and got almost 6000 members. So American history fanatics on Facebook. All right, well, listeners, you should check all that stuff out. Well, James, thank you for joining the show once again and we'll have to have you back on. My pleasure. Thanks for having me, Scott. All right, that is it for today. If you would like to see show notes for this episode, along with all my others, go to Parthenon podcast dot com. That's the name of the podcast network that I'm a part of. Along with James early's key battles of American history, Steve guerre is beyond the big screen in the history of the papacy

Pacific theater World War II European theater of World War James R Scott Apple Google Facebook Texas James Steve guerre
"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

05:13 min | 2 months ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Hey everyone, super excited for this episode. We are joined by none other than James early. James is probably the guest that has contributed the most to the show. We've done many, many multi part miniseries together, key battles of the Civil War, key battles of the Revolutionary War, key battles of World War I, presidential Fight Club, probably totally, I don't know, 6 year 80 episodes where we really dive deep into each one of the battles. And now James has his own show, key battles of American history. On that show, we did key battles of World War II in the Pacific theater, and now James is doing a series on the war of 1812. Well, James is here to talk about the war of 1812 with us and really give us a nice flyover view of what he is doing on his own show. And we're going to look at the little war that had a big impact. Now, the war of 1812 on one hand, like I said, was a little war. For Britain, it was basically a sideshow to the Napoleonic Wars. For America, it did have to commit a fair amount of troops and resources to it, but it was nothing compared to the later battles that would come. Like the Civil War or that Revolutionary War before it, but the effects of the war of 1812 were far reaching. It really forge the identity of America in the antebellum period. It ended a lot of the bitter partisan infighting in U.S. government. And led to what is called the era of good feelings. Various American Indian nations also stopped posing a major threat to American expansion, leading to manifest destiny, which brought its own challenges in the years ahead. And the war boosted national self confidence, encouraged the growing spirit of American expansionism and created a number of celebrities, like Andrew Jackson and William Henry Harrison. Anyway, James has a lot more to say about this on his own show. So you should definitely check out key battles of American history. You can find that wherever you can find podcasts, but this episode is pretty good too if you don't mind me saying. Hope you enjoyed this discussion with James early. James, it's been a while since we've gotten together to talk about a war, shall we delve into the wonderful world of the war of 1812?

James Pacific theater Fight Club America Britain U.S. government William Henry Harrison Andrew Jackson
Hope Springs Eternal From the Ashes of History

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Hope Springs Eternal From the Ashes of History

"Now I want to go back to the very beginning of the book and probably the greatest insight for us looking forward to the competition with China, which is underway on page 83. This is set in 1939. And then 41. The gigantic struggle for the United States that began with the Attack on Pearl Harbor and ended with the dropping of the atomic bomb was different from any other major war in history. Different in its dimensions and topography, different in the weapon systems and support systems, carry air power, landing craft, fleet trains, then emerged to be war winning ones, different even in the sort of fighting units, the Marine Corps, the seabees, that would have to be put together. It was geography that the country emerging bacteria here would have to become a special sort of maritime power. The combatant that understood that first and better would be the Victor. So everything had changed from World War II to 1941, doctor Kenny, have they changed again from 1945 to 2022. Yes, indeed. First of all, the basic the basic strategic position that the United States is the is still despite deficiencies in the center of the western military economic order remains, but the it changes because of newer technology, which may be coming so fast that nowadays we don't really realize the dimensions of it or how we have to respond to it. It changes because we are probably not going to think again over huge, huge American military reinforcement of 2 million plus men to the European theater and 3 million plus men to the Pacific theater. It may have gone up into the sky to the ESA and yet we still need to be have the basic ship systems and weapon systems growing across the Atlantic and the Pacific for this for this year of 2022 onwards into the middle of the century.

Pearl Harbor United States Marine Corps China Victor Kenny European Theater Pacific Theater ESA Atlantic Pacific
"pacific theater" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

Key Battles of American History

04:20 min | 7 months ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

"I did not know that. That's fascinating. All right, so I'm just going to call them Ben and Charlie throughout the rest of this. Most of these people, I'm going to call by their first name. So bann and Charlie are part of a large group of other young Navajo men and they have volunteered to join the United States Marine Corps so they get on a bus and they head to their state recruiting station. They're sworn in and then they're taught the code, which is based on their own language. And this is the code that they're going to be using to send and receive coded messages that direct artillery fire. Primarily. So they're not just speaking straight Navajo. It is a code as they are careful to point this out in the movie, but it's heavily based on their language. Yeah, and let's talk about what the code talking is. And so code talking actually a rose as a result of the use of radio in warfare in the United States. And it was pioneered in the First World War by Cherokee and choctaw peoples, but there's a lot of Native American American Indian, however you want to refer to it. Tribal groups that were used as code talkers in all the years, not just Japan and the Pacific theater, but in North Africa and in Europe, we actually in my podcast, the come and take it. We talked about the Comanche people and how Comanche code talkers extensively were used in European theater as code talkers. Now they weren't as large an effort in European theater as they were in North Africa and in the Pacific. But Comanche code talkers 14 command because you just could code doctors did take part in the invasion of Normandy. So and we extensively talked about that. And they used the same substitution method as Navajo and the deal was that made Comanche in some of the language groups, but especially Navajo and Comanche, they were relatively unrelated to more studied languages, right? So like the Cherokee language is actually written language. And so there's a lot of there is a lot of capability for translating the Cherokee language, but the conventional language is pretty difficult..

Charlie bann United States Marine Corps Pacific theater Navajo North Africa Ben United States Japan Europe Normandy Pacific
"pacific theater" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

05:11 min | 10 months ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Greg Columbus. Our guest in this edition is Matthias Matt gutmann. He's a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II. Gutmann served in the Pacific theater and achieved the rank of chief petty officer during his 22 years in the navy. Gutmann served aboard LST 5 53 and was coxswain during several important missions, including the beach landings at the battles of peleliu and Okinawa..

Greg Columbus Matthias Matt gutmann Gutmann Pacific theater U.S. Navy peleliu Okinawa
"pacific theater" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"That the country could produce its way to victory, but they ignored the political and social realities of a world in flames. Little men sneered at the four freedoms severide recalled, and the great vision of the century of the common man was sneered at as globally. That's not the way we remember it now. We imagine that everything changed overnight, but as the historian Richard W Steele carefully documented by early 1942, only two months after the attack, members of the Roosevelt administration were already worrying that the public had lost interest. On February 16th, time rent a story with the headline, the people, smug, slothful, asleep, at cataloged a list of warnings expressed by everyone from Eleanor Roosevelt to James Landis, the executive head of civil defense, to Edward R murrow, that, as Moro put it, Americans do not fully appreciate the Need for Speed, do not quite understand that if we delay too long in winning the victory, we will inherit nothing but a cold, starving, embittered world, already there are signs that we are coming to accept slavery and suppression as part of the pattern of living in this year of disgrace. General Johnson was more succinct. The general public simply does not seem to give a tinker's dam. The further irony is that it is far less convenient to remember the Pacific theater than it is the European. The brutality of the war against Japan often racially motivated on both sides as dour chronicled and war without mercy. And it's ready association with the internment camps at home does not easily fit into the narrative of the good war we prefer to remember today. While Pearl Harbor was the catalyst for our entrance into the conflict, we have ever since tended to overlook the Pacific in favor of the war against the Nazis. The real and immediate consequences of the war we have chosen to remember, chiefly the liberation of Europe from fascist tyranny, offered then and still offers us the most attractive version of ourselves. Yet that liberation together with the establishment of a new world order gave us a false impression that the violent force we inflict on others would inevitably yield virtuous results. Our memory also emits certain compromising details,.

Richard W Steele James Landis Edward R murrow Roosevelt administration General Johnson Pacific theater Eleanor Roosevelt Pearl Harbor Japan Pacific Europe
"pacific theater" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Australia. The united states in the united kingdom of entered into a new defense agreement designed to counter. What's euphemistically referred to as the growing military threats facing the pacific theater. That's a clear reference to china's massive military buildup which is included new spy satellites warships aircraft carriers submarines and nuclear missile silos. Then this china's threats to launch a preemptive nuclear strike on japan it's ongoing harassment of its neighbors around the south china sea which beijing now claims to be its own territory in the violation of international law the illegal annexation of hong kong threats to invade taiwan continuing border skirmishes with india human rights abuses in tibet the persecution the felon gong. Who are being used for forced organ harvesting and transplants and the alleged genocide of the muslim league is in concentration camps. The new australian united states in the united kingdom trilateral partnership with the unfortunate acronym of august will see australia boot eight nuclear powered submarines the nation's first in adelaide australian prime minister scott morrison the future of the indo pacific will impact all at futures to make these challenges to help deliver the security and stability originates. We must now take our partnership to a new level. And so friends orchises born a new enhanced trilateral security partnership between australia. The united kingdom and the united states a partnership where technology as scientists are industry at offense forces are all working together to deliver a safer and more secure region that ultimately benefits all orcas will also enhance out contribution to act growing network of partnerships in the pacific region and anzus amazon friends at bilateral strategic partners the quad five is countries and of course idea pacific family the first major initiative of orcas will be to deliver a nuclear powered submarine fleet for estrada. I've the next did months. We will work together to say to determine the best way for to achieve this. This will include an intense examination of what we need to do to exercise and nuclear stewardship responsibilities. Here in australia we intend to build these submarines in adelaide a strata in close cooperation with the united kingdom and the united states. Early reports suggest. The new subs will be based around the ten thousand. Tanya says virginia class if correct proportion will be through an s. Nine g nuclear reacted evolving forty thousand shaft horsepower with a smooth service. Speed of thirty five knots and a service life of around thirty three years in the current. Us configuration of the gt class or one hundred and fifteen meters long. Have a complement of one hundred and thirty four and fitted with twelve vertical launching tubes and four torpedo tubes. The other option is the slow eight thousand town ninety seven eight along. British stoop class whichever complement of ninety eight and around with six torpedo tubes. Astute uses the rolls royce. Pwi two core h nuclear reactor app but it has a shorter service life of around twenty five years. Well all the attention span on the new subs just as important is cameras. Decision to purchase tomahawk cruise missiles. I'm the new subs. And for their ages class destroyers the tall is a long range weapon. Powered by solid fueled rocket launch stage and a jet tischbein stage. It's currently used by birth. The united states navy and british role navy is originally developed in the seventies and eighties delivered. Wmd and later w eighty four thermonuclear warheads. Using what at the time was an advanced terrain following renovation system of course it's been extensively upgraded since those days and now relies on satellite navigation and read out early traffic radiation targeting systems in line with australia's non nuclear weapons proliferation treaty agreements. The australian tomahawks will carry four hundred fifty kilograms of conventional high explosives. And we'll have a range of over fifteen hundred kilometers. The new tomahawk deal comes on top of cameras. New strategy to develop significant sovereign guided missile manufacturing program cameras already paying a key role in the development of the next generation hypersonic missiles and is a partner in the us precision strike missile program. It's also purchasing you advanced. Agm one fifty eight. C long reign stealth missiles and is part of the standard missile. Six block. one program the walk. His partnership also see enhancing existing cooperation across new and emerging arenas including cyber applied quantum technologies and undersea capabilities. However the new agreement does mean scrapping the controversial in holly criticized ninety billion dollar twenty sixteen deal to build twelve lodge conventional french barracuda class attack. Submarines that's made paris very unhappy and the french have recalled their ambassadors to camera and washington in response. It seems now might be a good time to sign that deal with the french. Railway's sncf an awesome to build that long promised. Sydney to camera high-speed tgv rail line the one the politicians cape promising reelection but never quite get around to actually building a three hundred twenty kilometers per hour high speed line from author sydney south west. The camera will allow ninety minutes. City said it to city centre travel times in the process opening up vast new areas for sydney's ever growing residential housing market in fact making both sydney and camera don't worry suburbs of each other.

united kingdom australia us pacific theater indo pacific adelaide china scott morrison muslim league south china tibet british role navy taiwan beijing estrada hong kong japan
"pacific theater" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"The town of portugal is located on this assume estuary which flows into the north end of the san francisco bay about a mile from where the town was located. Was one of the primary munitions facilities for the united states pacific theater. The portugal naval magazine later renamed the concord naval weapons station during world war. Two the facility served as an armaments depot for munitions that were going to support the war in the pacific bombs bullet shells mines torpedoes and all manner of explosives were sent here from production facilities from around the country at portugal. They would be loaded onto ships and sent to other ships thousands of miles away in the nineteen forties the loading and unloading ships was mostly time consuming and manual process. It wasn't like today where everything is in shipping containers and they can be loaded and unloaded without anyone ever touching them in nineteen forty four. There were at least two ships being loaded twenty four hours a day at portugal. The work done at portugal was hard physical labor that was both dangerous and important to the war effort because there weren't enough civilian dockworkers to load the naval ships. The navy had to take over the task and assign sailors to do the work. When the united states entered the war the military was still racially segregated. Black soldiers were not allowed to serve on most ships in the us navy. The assignment given many black enlisted men in the navy was to work at the naval yards unloading and loading supplies at portrait. Kogyo all the enlisted men who were doing the dangerous work of loading explosives were black. And all of the officers who oversaw the operation or white moreover the men assigned as officers. Were not the navy's best. Those officers were out in the pacific or had other duties which were perceived to be more important. The commander of the base was captain merrill kinney he served in the navy and the first world war had left the service twenty years earlier before returning to duty likewise the other officers that portugal were mostly older men who were reserves and had no experience in the handling of munitions. The safety regulations at portugal were poor to nonexistent. Moreover many of the cranes which were used to move munitions on and off the ships were in poor condition as well and often didn't work. The events of concern began on july thirteenth. Nineteen forty four when a liberty ship named the ss ea. Bryant arrived at the dock. Its cargo hold was empty but it had a full load of fuel oil for its trip across the pacific. It held five thousand two hundred and ninety two barrels of fuel oil for four days. The ship was carefully loaded with munitions into its cargo. Hold were loaded. One thousand pound bombs forty.

portugal pacific theater The portugal naval magazine navy san francisco bay Kogyo united states merrill kinney Bryant
"pacific theater" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"pacific theater" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Really liking your radio voice. I've done this for a while. But i also got a nifty new microphone which was sounds good raising funding. But i have known you for quite some time. We go way back in fact To this day. I still credit you as the person who unlocked the key for me to learn how to write books because you told me one thing that literally changed my life and i never forgot it I have taught that to students. And you know i. I literally took one-sentence you gave me and turned it into six figures so Needless to say a fan of yours have been of your work You have a new book out which we will talk about but as you know i very rarely start any interviewed by talking about your work. sorta start by saying what is one of the most important things that you learn from one or both of your parents that influenced and shaped who you've become an what you've ended up doing with your life. I would say that. My dad taught me that when the going gets tough the tough get going. He was in world war two in the pacific theater. My dad was quite a bit older. When i was born and that both has been something that has gotten me through some really difficult tines to dig down deep and go and keep going and keep trying. He was a very much a self made man. He was born into pretty great Poverty and got out of the war and got home from The pacific an spent many many years building a supermarket little supermarket. Empire in the sixties fifties sixties. And so i would say that toughness is something. I really learned from that. I can also say that. That has led me at times to Grinding myself into rubble. It wasn't always. I didn't always take it wisely. And i think from my mom. I really learned to be a good hostess to not something i do when i teach.

pacific theater The pacific
Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

"The pandemic has cost us a lot, but the hope that someday post vaccine we would return to our favorite places that hope has carried us through the hardest parts of these last 13 months. Well. News came this week that the iconic Arclight cinema and 58 year old Cinerama Dome in Hollywood would not be reopening post pandemic. In fact, the owners of ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theater said none of their locations would be reopening. Post Cove it. That's right. No more ArcLight caramel corn or movie pore size glasses of wine. Joining me to remember these theaters, particularly the iconic Hollywood location is Christy Lemire. She writes for Roger ebert dot com and Who hosts the podcast breakfast all day, and she's our regular one of our regular and most beloved film critics on Fridays. Hi, Christie. Hello, my friend. What a sad day it is. I know, And we have all spent so many glorious hours at the arc lights, especially the one in Hollywood. Talk about many, and yeah, from your perspective. So it's funny when you're a film critic, especially if you're a freelancer like so many of us are like you don't have an office, right? You watch movies at your house or you right at your house, and so going to the Arc light on a Monday night to see a big studio release, and all your fellow critics were there, and there's a buzz in the audience as people who love film You know, it's It's like going to your favorite office but also your favorite watering hole and there's such a great energy the minute you walked into that lobby with just the job. Soaring feelings and the huge marquee with all the times and the big clock, and you felt like you were walking into a cathedral of swords. And yet there's also a very intimate sense of community because you could go and have a bye deep beforehand or have a glass of wine afterward and talking about what you have just seen

Arclight Cinema Cinerama Dome Arclight Cinemas Pacific Theater Hollywood Christy Lemire Roger Ebert Christie
California's ArcLight and Pacific Theaters to Close for Good

Tim Conway Jr.

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

California's ArcLight and Pacific Theaters to Close for Good

"Theaters. They're closing down. Which ones you tell me about here. The Arclight Cinemas and the Pacific Theaters, which include the Cinerama, the Cinnamon. What is it? Cinerama Dome in Hollywood. Right? And aren't you? Well, you were right. That's it. That's a big deal. That's a bummer. Well, I

Arclight Cinemas Pacific Theaters Cinerama Dome Hollywood
ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theatres Won't Be Reopening

The Big Picture

01:09 min | 1 year ago

ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theatres Won't Be Reopening

"Our favorite movie theater. Our movie home. Since we moved to los angeles amanda five years ago me nine years ago. The arc light movie theater chain apparently is not reopening. And i'm i'm really sad about this hour feeling amanda. I am personally gut it i listen. It is ben a year of loss and on the scale of things like a movie theater that charges. A lot for tickets is is small but as you said it has been a huge part of my life. A huge part of your life. A huge part of the lives of a lot of people in los angeles who go to see movies which by the way is primarily what los angeles does so a pretty big community. And i've really been looking forward to it reopening i drove by the pasadena location just this weekend and tempted the fates and said to my husband. Won't it be so nice. When the arc light reopens so close because we move during the pandemic and we can still go back to the ark light. And i just kinda feel like my insides. Dropped out a little

Amanda Los Angeles BEN Pasadena
Black Sparrow and Buffalo Soldiers

Your Brain on Facts

04:22 min | 2 years ago

Black Sparrow and Buffalo Soldiers

"Since colonial times African Americans have fought in America's wars. In every war in fact, The first person to die in the revolutionary. War Christmas attics was black. Black soldiers have put their lives on the line for a country that for centuries enslaved segregated and discriminated against them. Until the Korean War black served in segregated units under racist leadership and often relegated to labor and service units. Despite the continuous discriminatory treatment that denied blacks full participation in America's military efforts, these brave men and women lived lives that deserve to be remembered. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Possibly the best known all black military unit comes with a bit of mystery in its history. They were called Buffalo soldiers, though there are competing reasons as to why. In eighteen, sixty, six and active congress created six all black peacetime regiments later consolidated into four, the ninth and Tenth Cavalry and the Twenty Fourth and twenty fifth infantry. Initially the Buffalo soldier regiments were commanded by whites with being forbidden from holding the ranks officers. These. Troops often faced extreme racial prejudice from the army establishment. Many officers including George Armstrong custer of boo and a his there. Refused to command black regiments, even though it costs them promotions. Further black troops could only serve west of the Mississippi. River, because many whites didn't want to see armed black men near their communities. It even sometimes happened that the buffalo soldiers suffered deadly violence at the hands of civilians. The Buffalo soldiers main duty was to support the nation's westward expansion by protecting settlers, building roads and other infrastructure and guarding the US mail. They served a variety of posts in the southwestern great planes, taking part in most of the military campaigns during the decades long Indian wars during which they compiled a distinguished record with eighteen buffalo soldiers awarded the Medal of honor. We don't have time today to dwell on the irony of African American soldiers, fighting native people on behalf of government that accepted neither group as equals. The exceptional performance of these soldiers helped to overcome resistance to the idea of black officers paving the way for the first african-american graduate from West Point Henry O flipper. Who will hear more about later? But. Fellow soldiers played significant roles in many other military actions. They took part in defusing the little known eighteen, ninety two Johnson County war in Wyoming, which pitted small farmers against wealthy ranchers and a band of hired gunmen. They also fought in the Spanish American and Philippine American wars and played a key role in maintaining border security during the high intensity, military conflict along the US Mexico border during the Mexican revolution. In Nineteen Eighteen, the tenth cavalry fought at the Battle of ambos Nogales where they assisted enforcing the of the Mexican federal and militia forces. Discrimination played a role in diminishing the buffalo soldiers involvement in upcoming major conflicts. During world. War One the racist policies of President Woodrow Wilson among whose claims to infamy include segregating federal offices led to black regiments, being excluded from the American Expeditionary Force, and placed under French command for the duration of the war. The first time ever that American troops were placed under the command of a foreign power. Then prior to World War Two, the ninth and Tenth Cavalry Regiments were essentially disbanded, and most of their troops moved to service roles. However the Ninety Second Infantry Division known as the Buffalo Division did see combat during the invasion of Italy while another division that included the original Buffalo Soldiers of the twenty fifth infantry. Regiment fought in the Pacific theater. The last segregated. US Army regiments were disbanded in nineteen,

Buffalo Soldiers Tenth Cavalry Regiments America United States Ninety Second Infantry Divisio Us Army Buffalo Division George Armstrong Custer Army Twenty Fourth American Expeditionary Force Congress President Woodrow Wilson Mississippi Ambos Nogales