36 Burst results for "Pacific Islands"

Fresh update on "pacific islands" discussed on Thom Hartmann Program

Thom Hartmann Program

00:51 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pacific islands" discussed on Thom Hartmann Program

"I'm doctor Anthony Elizabeth and this is climate connections A small red bird called the EEV is a symbol of the Hawaiian Islands It used to be very common But now this distinctive little bird is in danger of extinction Evan Paxton of the USGS Pacific island ecosystems research center explains that the EEV evolved in isolation So these native Hawaiian birds never developed immunity to many diseases that were common elsewhere And so they're very vulnerable avian malaria which was brought to Hawaii in the 1800s poses an especially great threat The disease kills almost all the Eevee that it infects It spread by mosquitos which are most prevalent in low lying areas So Eevee's now live only at higher elevations where it's historically been too cool for mosquitos But with global warming and climate change the temperatures are increasing at those higher elevations And that provides more opportunity for these mosquitos to breed at higher elevations which is allowing the disease to move into these areas that historically had been disease free He says researchers are working to protect EEV habitat and control mosquitos But without help this iconic bird could be on the verge of extinction this century Climate.

Anthony Elizabeth EEV Evan Paxton Usgs Pacific Island Ecosystems Hawaiian Islands Malaria Hawaii
"pacific islands" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:09 min | Last month

"pacific islands" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Last month, the Solomon Islands announced a security deal with China, but refused to reveal more than that the arrangement is to tackle security threats and ensure a safe environment for investment as it diversifies its security relations. Lawmakers of the Pacific island nation have urged their prime minister to make details of the deal public, and the United States, Japan, New Zealand and Australia have shared concerns about the security pact with China and its serious risks to a free and open indo Pacific. While I'm joined now by Fiona Wilson, monocles Tokyo bureau of bureau chief and Asia editor. Fiona, what do we actually know about this deal between the Solomon Islands and China. They've been very shall we call it discreet. Yeah, that's a very, very good point, Georgia. I think the lack of transparency has been one of the main issues about this pact. I mean, interestingly, there was a leaked draft of the pack which probably gave people some idea of what it's about. And if you hear from China and the Solomon Islands, this is about social order, which means Chinese troops can be deployed if their social unrest and China wants to protect its interests in Solomon Islands. We saw riots there last year when Chinese interests were being burned. There were terrible riots. And they don't want that to happen again. They say it's about humanitarian assistance. Now slightly more shadowy is what it means in terms of China's military. There's a suggestion that military vessels will be able to restock there. They'll be able to dock and take on supplies. And the bigger question, I think, the thing that really bothers this part of the world is will it be the prelude to a Chinese military base in the backyard of Australia and New Zealand and that's the key question I think. So tell us more about Japan's concerns on this. Well, I mean, you know, Japan has been saying all week, it's been using that exact word. It said, we are watching with concern. They're extremely worried. I mean, you had the chief cabinet secretary yesterday here at kazuma to know saying it will have an impact on the region's security. They take that as given. And I think in this part of the world, we saw what happened with the South China Sea, which is where gradual process China has effectively militarized a number of very small barely call them islands, sandbanks in the South China Sea, initially they said they won't be militarized, and now what's happened is the sea is dotted with Chinese military bases, effectively. So I think that's a big concern for Japan. It's on Japan's doorstep. It affects it's the potential for the disruption of what Japan's big foreign policy aim is. This free indo Pacific, they keep talking about this commitment to a free indo Pacific. And Jacinda Ardern is actually in Japan at the moment. She's in Tokyo. She and fumio kiss you to the Japanese prime minister reaffirmed that commitment to a free open indo Pacific yesterday and today they announced an intelligence and security agreement, which just our derm was very keen to say was not aimed at China that New Zealand has these agreements with other countries, including Spain. It's quite normal and it can be anything, yes, security and intelligence, but also in natural disasters like the tongan volcanic eruption, Japan shared its satellite imagery. So yeah, it's a very interesting moment for this part of the world. I wonder if it's really a diplomatic failure on the part of Australia because of course they provided policing support to the solomons until I think that was under 2017 security treaty. And I mean, this must be a major blow to them. Oh, definitely. I mean, you're absolutely right. So yes, there was this treaty in 2017. There's a question mark over whether Australian troops looked after Chinese interests in the riots, it was suggested that they didn't. Which was sort of used as an excuse. But no, I think it's definitely been seen as a huge foreign policy failure. Scott Morrison is in the middle of an election campaign there and the opposition is obviously bringing this up, you know, penny Wong, the shadow foreign minister said it's the worst foreign policy failure in the Pacific since the Second World War for Australia. So it's going down extremely badly in Australia. And so it can anything actually be done to counter this. Well, I mean, the thing is that the pact is now signed, The White House is and was already planned to be sending a delegation to the Solomon Islands. In a matter of days, which is why the timing of the signing was considered quite strange. They can't wind back what's happened. And, you know, already before it even was signed, they were already raising their concerns. They knew it was going to be signed. It was signed. The prime minister of the Solomon Islands and said it won't undermine regional peace, but there's no doubt that it is causing a lot of problems in the region. And it's ruffling feathers. And it seems hard that even his own MPs don't appear to know the detail and are urging him to make it public. Yeah, I mean that is a very interesting thing. He's saying it, you know, it's a matter of some things don't have to be made public. And I think it's clearly it's in his interest not to make it public because I think many people feel that the switch from Taipei to Beijing, which happened in 2019 when he became prime minister for the fourth time. That was really the sign that the Solomon Islands was going to pivot towards China. And it's not going down very well at home. So, you know, all the polls at home show that most people would rather not have this kind of engagement with the China. So from his point of view, it's not very, it doesn't please the electorate at home. And finally, as you say, Jacinda Ardern is actually in Japan today. What else is on that agenda do you think? Yeah, I think you know she's doing a bit of a tour of Asia. And it's really about reaffirming commitments. It's important in this part of the world that the democracies within this region are standing together. That's sort of the common policy thrust at the moment so you've got you've got the quads that Australia is also involved in and India, U.S. and New Zealand is also showing that it's standing with Japan in this bid for to keep the Pacific open. Thank you very much indeed. That was Monaco's Tokyo bureau chief Fiona Wilson. Now, here's what else we're keeping an eye on today. Officials in Shanghai have said they will tighten the enforcement of lockdown measures as COVID numbers in the Chinese city continue to surge. The new measures include installing electronic door alarms to prevent those infected from leaving their homes. The former president of Honduras, Juan Orlando Hernandez, has been extradited to the United States to face drug trafficking charges. Hernandez, who governed Honduras until January was put on board a specially chartered plane to New York. The UK prime minister Boris Johnson is holding high level security talks with his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi. The pair, who meeting in New Delhi, are also expected to discuss a trade deal ahead of fresh negotiations next week. And group le monde has launched an English language digital edition ahead of the French presidential election runoff on Sunday. You can find out more about it at monocle dot com slash minute or by.

China Japan Solomon Islands indo Pacific Fiona Wilson Australia Tokyo bureau of bureau Jacinda Ardern New Zealand South China fumio Pacific island kazuma Fiona Asia Pacific United States Scott Morrison Georgia
"pacific islands" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:35 min | 2 months ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on KOMO

"Coming up more insight into the invasion on Ukraine from general Barry McCaffrey here in Seattle will have that for you shortly It's 6 34 And time for an update on our traffic conditions We do that every ten minutes on the floors from the dubin log group traffic center Hey good evening I had a crush it to come to work on a Pacific island avenue highway 7 just before 100 streets That's been cleared away but watch for some residual slowing through that area Still watching this pretty big crash in auburn south on highway one 67 at 277th street It's blocking the toll lane traffic is solid from south wat 80th street in rent and I'm also seeing heavy traffic on 68th avenue south and central avenue north as folks are trying to get around that crash It's better for quite some time Traffic is pretty solid heading through that area Also in ever it's still watching a crashed orp bound 5 just before Broadway that's blocky the HOV lane causing a stop and go back up from highway 5 two 7 in Seattle a crash nor down a 50,000 in northwest just north of Gilman drive west is taking up the two right lanes that's causing some heavy slowing This report is sponsored by O'Reilly auto perks Stop by O'Reilly auto parts for a new superstar battery get the power performance and reliability of superstar exclusively at O'Reilly's auto parts Our next northwest traffic at 6 44 Here's tech on the future sound forecast now from the 1530 mortgage dot com weather center and como four Shannon O'Donnell Well happy Wednesday night everybody we're making our way through the work in the school week with increasing clouds eventually here by the end of the week and some decreasing temperatures overnight We plunge into the 20s just about everywhere by dawn on Thursday morning even.

Barry McCaffrey Seattle O'Reilly Ukraine auburn Gilman
Death toll nears 6 million as pandemic enters its 3rd year

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Death toll nears 6 million as pandemic enters its 3rd year

"The world is on the verge of another milestone in the corona virus pandemic and Ben Thomas with the latest numbers Johns Hopkins university's tally shows more than five million nine hundred and ninety seven thousand people have died of confirmed covert nineteen infections around the world as of mid day Sunday that's just three thousand short of six million deaths over the past two plus years while many places including the U. S. are relaxing precautions evidence suggests the pandemic is anything but over remote Pacific islands are just now grappling with their first outbreaks Hong Kong is battling its worst in Eastern Europe is seeing a spike in deaths amid the surge of refugees coming from Ukraine meanwhile the US is nearing one million deaths I'm Ben Thomas

Latest Numbers Johns Hopkins U Ben Thomas U. Pacific Islands Hong Kong Eastern Europe Ukraine United States
Images reveal devastation inflicted on Tonga by volcano and tsunami

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Images reveal devastation inflicted on Tonga by volcano and tsunami

"Have have pulled pulled runway runway because because delayed delayed aid aid deliveries deliveries to to the the Pacific Pacific island island of of Tonga Tonga significant significant damage damage was was being being reported reported days days off off to to a a huge huge undersea undersea volcanic volcanic eruption eruption and and tsunami tsunami New New Zealand Zealand is is preparing preparing much much needed needed drinking drinking water water and and other other supplies supplies but but officials officials say say the the Irish Irish on on the the runway runway will will delay delay the the first first fight fight for for these these today today a a tiring tiring actually actually odd odd since since Saturday's Saturday's abruption abruption prevented prevented early early flights flights out out she's she's also also disrupting disrupting satellite satellite cools cools well well communication communication remains remains limited limited due due to to the the apparent apparent severing severing undersea undersea fiber fiber optic optic cable cable two two deaths deaths have have been been confirmed confirmed on on Tonga Tonga so so far far this this in in army army also also crossed crossed the the Pacific Pacific causing causing two two deaths deaths and and an an oil oil spill spill in in Peru Peru I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma thick thick eyelash eyelash on on the the airport's airport's runway runway is is delayed delayed he he delivers delivers to to the the Pacific Pacific island island of of Tonga Tonga significant significant

Tonga Pacific Pacific Island Island Tsunami Tsunami New Zealand Zealand Army Army Pacific Pacific Peru Peru Charles Charles De De Ledesma
Flights sent to assess Tonga damage after volcanic eruption

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Flights sent to assess Tonga damage after volcanic eruption

"New New Zealand Zealand and and Australia Australia the the sending sending military military surveillance surveillance flights flights to to Tonga Tonga to to assess assess the the damage damage a a huge huge undersea undersea volcanic volcanic eruption eruption left left in in the the Pacific Pacific island island nation nation a a towering towering ash ash cloud cloud since since Saturday's Saturday's a a rupture rupture has has prevented prevented earlier earlier flights flights New New Zealand Zealand hopes hopes to to send send essential essential supplies supplies including including much much needed needed drinking drinking water water but but communications communications with with Tonga Tonga remain remain extremely extremely limited limited the the company company that that owns owns the the single single underwater underwater fiber fiber optic optic cable cable that that connects connects the the island island nation nation to to the the rest rest of of the the world world says says it's it's likely likely to to be be severed severed in in the the eruption eruption and and repairs repairs could could take take weeks weeks tsunami tsunami waves waves of of around around two two point point seven seven feet feet high high but but crashed crashed into into Tonga Tonga shoreline shoreline no no casualties casualties have have been been reported reported so so far far although although that that concerns concerns about about people people on on small small islands islands I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

New New Zealand Tonga Pacific Pacific Island Island Australia Zealand Tonga Tonga Island Island Tsunami Tsunami Tonga Tonga Shoreline Shorelin Charles Charles De De Ledesma
"pacific islands" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Is that right? Is it really have such ramifications like this if potentially we were to see roe versus wade overton? I think so. I mean, I think the whole system of checks and balances has been that you have a judicial branch, which is not part of the executive, which is not part of the legislature. But what we have seen, and it has gone on for decades. And it has come up from both parties, but especially the Republicans is that you make the Supreme Court a political tool that you pack it with your people. And I have to be honest with you, that not only Brett Kavanaugh yesterday, but Amy Coney Barrett also appointed by Donald Trump. We're both basically putting out legal rationalizations for a political point of view. The irony here, when Sonia Sotomayor put this up, we can not let the court be seen as a political vehicle who attacked her this morning. The Wall Street Journal saying, she was the one that was actually playing politics with this. Scott Lucas there. Thank you so much Scott. The U.S. politics expert Scott Lucas there from university college. Now we'll hear from monocles klotter rebello with the days other news headlines. Thank you, Chris. The head of the European Commission, Ursula von der leyen says that EU member states should consider mandatory vaccination to combat COVID and the omikron variant. She added that vaccines would be crucial in a fight against the highly contagious new strain. Opponents of Ferdinand Marcos junior, the early FrontRunner for the Philippines presidency, have delivered a petition that they hope will disqualify him from next year's contest. The move is part of a concerted effort to sideline the career politician, who is the son of the country's notorious former dictator. Canada's House of Commons has voted to ban LGBT conversion therapy. The move would make it illegal to have a child undergo the practice or have anyone unwillingly undergo it. Prime minister Justin Trudeau's liberals proposed a measure, but its passage prompted applause across the house. And Europe's largest startup event slush concludes today in Helsinki. The two day conference has attracted almost 10,000 entrepreneurs investors scientists and policymakers to the Finnish capital. You can find out more by heading over to monocle dot com for slash minute or by staying tuned to monocle 24. Those are today's headlines back to you, Chris. Thanks very much, carlotta. Now, it's minus two with a chance of snow on the kuril islands a chain of volcanic and rather windswept windswept islands of the far east coast of Russia, but the political temperature is rising. Russia has deployed an array of missiles to these remote islands, which it seems to do every few years, as both Moscow and Tokyo lay claim to the curls, to explain why this distant dispute matters I'm joined in here in the studio by Stephen diel, a former Russia and affairs analyst at the BBC and a regular contributor on monocle 24 Steven great to have you with us on the briefing. Now this dispute goes back to the Second World War. We'll get a bit more into that dispute, but is it right to say that on paper at least Russia and Japan are still at war? Technically yes. No peace agreement was signed. The extraordinary thing, really, is that Russia declared war on Japan, three months after the war in Europe finished. So the war in Europe finished on the 9th of May, 1945, officially that's when the peace was signed. Russia declared war in Japan on the 9th of August 1945. With the specific aim of picking up some booty you might say, and in this case, particularly what they call the core airlines, but the Japanese called the northern territories. So they were Lions last ditch claims basically made at the very end of the war. Oh yeah, yeah, because for very sensible strategic reasons, Russia had not declared war on Japan, Russia suffered perhaps certainly the numbers more casualties than than any other country in the world during the Second World War. General estimates put it about 27 million dead. And so the last thing Russian leader was a war on two fronts. So I can understand the strategic position. But there's nevertheless a certain cynicism that they then declared war so they could say, well, we were part of the war against Japan therefore, we want some sort of reparations. We'll take those islands. Now who is on the Caroline? What do they want to be? So both countries claim this Japan, obviously, once says it wants it back Russia says this is our territory rightfully claimed, who lives there and what do they want to be? Japanese or Russian? Now Russian because of course what Russia made sure was that after that they had taken them over that they put their own people in. So there's on the four islands, well, there's a four main lines I let little islands do. There's a total population of about 20,000. And they're Russians. The Russians weren't going to tolerate having people who might be protesting. This is we've seen this. We've seen this sadly much more recently in Crimea when a lot of the native population was driven out after the Russians took over in 2014. So the Russians weren't going to allow the Japanese to have a claim of saying, well, our people are there, so it's Russian it's a Russian population that's there now. So we've seen this new deployment of missiles heading over there to the carolines. And looking back through this in a way, Russia seems to do this every few years. What do they want to achieve? Do you have any fun to moscone? Would you average Russian really care that much about the color line? As a part of geography, no, not really. But as a part of the Russian Federation, yes. There's been some variance in developments, not just this week over the past past year or so. In fact, last year, the Russian parliament passed a law saying that Russia would never give up any of the territory of the Russian Federation..

Scott Lucas Russia wade overton Brett Kavanaugh Amy Coney Barrett klotter rebello Ursula von der leyen Japan Prime minister Justin Trudeau the kuril islands Stephen diel Sonia Sotomayor Steven great Ferdinand Marcos Donald Trump Europe Chris university college The Wall Street Journal Canada
Omicron unravels travel industry's plans for a comeback

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Omicron unravels travel industry's plans for a comeback

"The the only only crime crime variant variant of of the the corona corona viruses viruses and and Ravel Ravel the the travel travel industry's industry's plans plans for for a a comeback comeback many many travel travel destinations destinations are are re re imposing imposing restrictions restrictions and and Florida Florida Milton Milton Sgarbi Sgarbi with with hotel hotel South South Beach Beach is is hoping hoping the the impact impact there there will will be be minimal minimal number number one one our our our our climate climate but but number number two two we we have have extensive extensive a a number number of of outdoor outdoor dining dining options options and and activities activities to to enjoy enjoy Israel Israel is is closing closing the the country country to to foreign foreign visitors visitors Japan Japan has has tightened tightened its its ban ban on on foreign foreign travelers travelers the the Pacific Pacific island island nation nation of of Fiji Fiji is is welcoming welcoming back back its its first first tourist tourist in in more more than than six six hundred hundred days days Brent Brent hill hill with with tourism tourism Fiji Fiji says says they they are are monitoring monitoring the the new new variant variant we we want want people people to to feel feel really really safe safe and and secure secure but but at at the the same same time time you you won't won't be be able able to to just just be be able able to to enjoy enjoy and and perhaps perhaps you you know know get get away away from from all all that that craziness craziness it's it's in in how how well well governments governments that that were were slow slow to to react react to to the the first first wave wave of of the the corona corona virus virus are are eager eager to to avoid avoid past past mistakes mistakes I I made made Donahue Donahue

Ravel Ravel Milton Milton Sgarbi Sgarbi South South Beach Beach Fiji Florida Pacific Pacific Island Island Brent Brent Hill Hill Israel Japan Donahue Donahue
'Thin' Pacific island teams at COP26 spark fears of inequity

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 7 months ago

'Thin' Pacific island teams at COP26 spark fears of inequity

"Nineteen travel restrictions will contact the representatives of Pacific island nations attending U. N. climate talks to begin this week in Scotland the Pacific island nations absence means the conference known as cop twenty six may not hear much from countries most threatened by climate change despite contributing only a fraction of the wills emissions small island nations were crucial in setting up the ambitious goals adopted in the twenty fifteen Paris climate accord with smaller teams of lower rank officials in Glasgow the negotiators will be at a disadvantage even as the outcome of the summit may imperil the very existence of these island nations I'm Charles de Ledesma

Representatives Of Pacific Isl Pacific Island Scotland Paris Glasgow Charles De Ledesma
Operation Crossroads: The Test of Atomic Weapons in Naval Warfare

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:15 min | 9 months ago

Operation Crossroads: The Test of Atomic Weapons in Naval Warfare

"World war two had just ended the year before in nineteen forty-five while the war was over. The cold war between the united states and the soviet union was just beginning at this particular moment. The united states had a monopoly on atomic bombs. However it while they had vanished to create and detonate several bombs. There was still a great deal. They didn't know about this weapon. Only three atomic bombs had been detonated at this point. The original trinity test explosion in new mexico. The bomb used over hiroshima and the one used over nagasaki. All three of these were detonated over land. What no one knew was what would happen. If these weapons were used in naval warfare. What would happen to ships which were hit with an atomic blast with they sankar would they flow it. People in the navy had speculations but no one had any proof to this end of the. Us navy initiated operation crossroads. This was to be an a of atomic weapons in naval warfare. The navy search for a location where they could conduct such a test. They needed somewhere remote yet somewhere where they could set up headquarters on land and have observation posts. They eventually settled on a remote coral atoll in the pacific ocean in the marshall islands. The navy move the one hundred sixty seven people who lived on the island to other nearby islands so they could begin testing. They also sailed a fleet of ninety five ships to the atoll which would serve as target ships for the test. These were ships that were set for retirement and the scrap yard and instead would be used for testing they would get newt facilities for over. Forty thousand people were constructed. Who would be there to the tests. They had to build everything from scratch. They build bunkers to observe the test. They built barracks kitchens offices clubs for officers and clubs for enlisted men. It was a massive undertaking and all done far away from prying eyes in the middle of the pacific ocean on july first. The first of these tests took place he would be the fourth atomic bomb ever detonated. In the first above water the test was given the codename able it was dropped from a b twenty nine bomber and exploded approximately five hundred feet above the surface. It caused surprisingly little damage to the ships because the bombs were about a third of a mile or six hundred meters off target the next day. The news of this event spread around the world and everyone became familiar with this remote pacific island which was named

Navy Sankar United States Nagasaki Soviet Union Hiroshima Pacific Ocean New Mexico Marshall Islands Pacific Island
"pacific islands" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Refugees and asylum seekers even reached the territory. Of the world's most prosperous states. This is Jeff Crisp. We reached him in London. He spent many years as a higher up at the UNHCR. Since leaving. He's been highly critical of the organization and externalization, he says, and this is a global trend in the industrial as well. It's a policy being pursued by the United States by the European Union and by Australia. It's also happening, for example, in Libya, where the European Union is funding the local government to intercept migrants at sea and put them in detention in dismal conditions. And in Australia, where asylum seekers have been sent to camps on remote Pacific islands. It means migrants are being corralled into poorer countries where they aren't necessarily better off than where they started. And Jeff says the UNHCR is in a tough position to do anything about it in part Because of the source of its money. It's become increasingly constrained in recent years as um governments have pursued more restrictive refugee and asylum policies. And one of my arguments has been recently that, uh UNH, uh, is very worried about losing us support and the U. S, provides around 40% of the organization's budget. Partly, I would argue because you in Asia depends so heavily on the U. S. For its funding. It's been very wary, in my opinion of actually going out in public and criticizing the policies pursued by Donald Trump. It's the first week of March down. I'm back in New York City, and I get a call from her swear nobody. American Rondo. I can't believe what he tells me. He's decided to go back to Mexico. He's leaving in just a few days. He's headed back to Tapachula. And then right before he's about to make the trip. W H O has been assessing this outbreak around the clock and we're deeply concerned. We have therefore made the assessment. That Covid 19 can be characterized as a pandemic. Mexico and Guatemala, like many other countries around the world, announced they might close their borders due to the coronavirus pandemic. But virus or not. On the second week of March, Causeway hitchhike back to Tapachula, making it out of Guatemala just before it closed its borders. Once in Tapachula hose, we went and got a meeting at Kamar the refugee office. He records it on his phone. Okay,.

Donald Trump New York City Tapachula Jeff Mexico London European Union Jeff Crisp UNHCR Libya Asia Guatemala Covid 19 W H O UNH around 40% one U. S Pacific islands Australia
"pacific islands" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

05:59 min | 11 months ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"We want to make sure it's waterproof because we were going to be taking it to tahiti where it's basically raiding most of the time so we wanted to make a computer. That was waterproof. This computer i mean is amazing. And i wanna i wanna ask you about that but before we get there. Let's talk about the snails What can you tell us about the rosy wolf snail and what it did to the other snail populations into eighty or the rosie will snail is from the southern part of the united states in the nineteen seventies nineteen eighty s. It was used as a biological control agent to control for other snails that have become invasive in the pacific islands and so that's why was introduced and so what has happened. Is that unfortunately it got out and started evening everything else. Not just the the snails. It was brought in to control for but it was eating. Its way through everything even Native land snails. And so this is a Ah predator that can grow up to fit right in the palm of your hand it basically lives up to. Its name is kind of like a wolf..

tahiti pacific islands united states
Olympic Travel a Big Challenge for Some Pacific Island Teams

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 11 months ago

Olympic Travel a Big Challenge for Some Pacific Island Teams

"Famous athletes in sports like tennis and golf heading to the Tokyo Olympics will probably arrive in Japan at the front of the plane but for others it's a little different it's the style to which the athletes of the Pacific islands are on the custom features gold medal winning men's rugby sevens team will arrive in Tokyo along with the other members of the national team on a call go freight flight which is holding mostly frozen fish ask commercial passenger flights to and from the Pacific nations have become scarce join the pandemic the Fiji teams were originally expected to fly directly from Australia to Tokyo the plans were changed at the last minute you could you could nineteen related restrictions in Asia I'm Charles the last month

Tokyo Pacific Islands Olympics Tennis Pacific Nations Golf Japan Rugby Fiji Australia Asia Charles
Revisiting The 1977 Dutch Train Hostage Crisis

Today in True Crime

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Revisiting The 1977 Dutch Train Hostage Crisis

"It was just dawn on a pleasant spring morning. When dutch marine commandos crept up to a motionless train. The cars had been the home of fifty one hostages for the past twenty days self malone gunmen guarded their captives who they hope to use as political leverage. The terrorists demanded that their pacific island home formerly dutch colony and under indonesian rule be given independence while the marines began boarding the train. Five jet airplanes dropped smoke bombs from above a journalist with the associated. Press was reporting from about three quarters of a mile away from where the train was located. He described what he experienced. The ground is trembling. They're firing a lot of firing. Everybody reporters photographers police. Army men are ducking down behind armored personnel carriers later it was estimated that over fifteen thousand bullets had been discharged by the military at the train. One of the hostages ought to j. tweaked woke up two gunshots and tried to take cover tweaked described the ensuing chaos to the new york times. We heard machine guns then. A horrible noise. I thought they were burning their way into the train. With acetylene torches or flame throwers later. We realized that they were planes. Flying over at the same time. Additional marines driving a tank stormed a small village school twelve miles away. The terrorists were holding another four hostages there between them. The two parties of more than two thousand soldiers and law enforcement officers freed fifty five hostages. The fighting six of the terrorists and two of the hostages were shot and killed. Some citizens wondered if such a dramatic show of force had really been necessary to finish the standoff but prime minister yoked and oil defended the operation in a radio broadcast claiming the government didn't have any other choice.

Pacific Island Malone Marines Army The New York Times Government
Australia Sticks by Plan to Re-Open Border in Mid-2022

AFF on AIR Podcast

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Australia Sticks by Plan to Re-Open Border in Mid-2022

"In news. That shocked many australians. The federal government has predicted in this week's annual budget that is truly as international borders not reopen to most countries until the middle of two thousand twenty two. That's more than six months later than previously predicted and more than two years after international borders to australia with closed in march two thousand and twenty as a result of the revised forecasts corners has pushed back the plan to restart of its international flights other than new zealand until at least the nineteenth of december two thousand twenty one since february quotas had been selling international tickets starting from the thirty first of october this year and vision ustralia now says that it will not resume any international flights into at least december two thousand and twenty one. Either the only exception being virgin flights to queenstown in new zealand which is scheduled to resume in september. There is still a possibility of more travel bubbles opening with individual countries before two thousand twenty two and there are plans underway to bring back a limited number of international students before then as well bubbles with countries in asia or the pacific islands could be next although they have not yet been any specific announcements the australian government's budget documents also night. That the rate of international arrivals will continue to be constrained by state and territory. Quarantine caps are a two thousand and twenty one and the first half two thousand twenty. Two with the exception of passages from safe travels zones such as new zealand which indicates that the federal government plans to continue using quarantine for at least another year but the federal government other than expanding capacity of the howard springs quarantine facility in the northern territory has not putting any new measures in the budget or any new funding for additional quarantine facilities and tens of thousands of australians is still stuck overseas more than a year into the pandemic the tourism sector is hit out at what. It's coaling border roulette. Simon west away from the australian tourism industry council said that the federal budget outlook indicates no foreseeable international market recovery for australia's visitor economy and that is sadly spells fair the tourism business and job losses

Federal Government New Zealand Queenstown Australia Pacific Islands Howard Springs Quarantine Faci Australian Government Asia Simon West Australian Tourism Industry Co
Sea Level Rise a Major Threat to San Francisco

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Sea Level Rise a Major Threat to San Francisco

"All over the bay Area by 2050 In less than 30 years. Projections show floodwaters swamping bridges, infrastructure and entire neighborhoods. KQED science reporter Kevin Starke has been following this story as part of the Pulitzer Centers nationwide. Connected Coastlines Reporting Initiative and Kevin East Palo Alto specifically, is one community really susceptible to sea level rise in the Bay Area. How much of a threat is this? Well, already Half of the city lies in a federal flood zone. It's bound by water on three sides, the Bay and the San Francis Skeeto Creek. And it's located in the South Bay, where tides of the highest during bad storms the city already regularly experience is flooding. The average high tide in the bay is going in one direction. It's up. Scientific projections show up to a couple feet of sea level rise by mid century, and then the rate of rise could dramatically increase beyond that, so this is truly an existential threat for the community and his power out there. Great and this isn't just about sea level rise right? There are larger social forces at play here, too. Absolutely. The community is roughly two thirds Latino, has a sizable population from the Pacific Islands. In fact, we interviewed people who emigrated to East Palo Alto from places like Samoa and Tonga, in part to get away from flooding and climate change on the islands on me to find that it is an issue here along the bay, so the effects of climate change disproportionately impact communities like East Palo Alto. Many people in the community that we spoke with talk about the cost of housing. There's been a lot of pressure. There is Facebook and Google and other big companies have built campuses nearby. Yet East Palo Alto is this

Kevin Starke Pulitzer Centers Nationwide Kevin East Palo Alto San Francis Skeeto Creek Kqed Bay Area South Bay East Palo Alto Pacific Islands Tonga Samoa Facebook Google
What if we vaccinated everyone in poorer countries first?

Coronacast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

What if we vaccinated everyone in poorer countries first?

"Hello this is corona cost a daily podcast all about the coronavirus. I'm health reported teigen. Thailand and opposition journalist alter norman swan is tuesday the ninth of march two thousand and twenty one. So let's talk today about who gets vaccines when and let's talk about it from a global perspective because we've been talking a lot in australia about phase one a phase one b and all that sort of thing but really we have virtually no virus. It'll in australia. And it's running rampant around the globe and as we were saying yesterday when the virus running rampant in poorer countries. there's a high likelihood of variants popping up. That could cause problems with vaccines that we've got so ruth is ask us. Would it be betta for australia to vaccinate ourselves first and then turn our attentions to helping. Poor countries get vaccinated all to prioritize vaccinating people in poor countries first and then vaccinating australians. Second well there is a way through this but it's politically fraught one is that you could really go and make sure that all workers. That's everybody airport. Workers airport catering workers airline crews etc and their families and households are all unionized and preferably with the pfizer. Vaccines works quickly and his high performance. Hopefully against the variance and higher performance than astra. Also if you were to immunize. Australians before they come back home harder much harder to do then serious pretty well protected with our contact tracing and so on. And we've got time and therefore you could in theory divert two countries around us at an earlier. Stage the problem there is we would have to actually go into those countries and help them implement. It's not enough just to jump. Fis are at their door and hope that it actually gets there. We would have to devote resources to helping like we did with hiv by the way to helping. Those countries implement prevention and implement immunization campaigns. Many of them are pretty good at it but the probably need help to do that. So it's not just. The vaccine is the services in order to do it and the cold chain which is quite considerable so the issue could and it makes public health sense internationally if you could suppress this in countries where it's running rampant and have fewer variants being thrown off. Then you would actually make a big difference. But if you think of indonesia it's a huge country with a vast population and it would require concerted international effort to make sure indonesia it's enough doses and implements them and then you've got the pacific islands some of which are very competent. Doing this sort of thing and some of which might have problems. It's not straightforward australia's a rich country. But it's not particularly be country on the global scale would estimating vaccines really make that much of a difference. Mchugh difference to the pacific islands where the populations are small and we could certainly deliver enough vaccine to really get great coverage and places like fiji to value solomon islands and so on because the small populations and we can certainly devote enough vaccine there to get really great coverage the issues indonesia which is going too fast population as i said and chaotic health system in some parts and some of the islands massive cappella ago. So the question is what do you do. But indonesia howdy helping to nesia the sort of those. We could give would be a little bit of a drop in the ocean which require other nations to help out am and other suppliers to help heart.

Teigen Norman Swan Australia Thailand Ruth Astra Indonesia Pfizer Pacific Islands Mchugh Solomon Islands Fiji
7.7 earthquake hits South Pacific Ocean

Morning Edition

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

7.7 earthquake hits South Pacific Ocean

"Powerful underwater earthquake in the Pacific Ocean east of Australia and north of New Zealand. U. S Geological Survey says its magnitude is 7.7. A tsunami watch has been posted for those countries and for American Samoa, Fiji and other Pacific Islands. Officials in Hawaii say it is too early to determine if those islands are threatened. On Wall Street, the

Pacific Ocean East Geological Survey New Zealand Tsunami Australia American Samoa Pacific Islands Fiji Hawaii
Micronesian nations split with Pacific Island Forum

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Micronesian nations split with Pacific Island Forum

"The pacific islands forum or piff. The pacific talk. Regional body narrowly elected former cook islands. Prime minister henry puna as the new secretary. General well this much discontent amongst the micronesian nations who championed the marshall islands gerald ezekiel's will events move swiftly on and karen middleton the saturday chief political correspondent based in cambra is here to up update us. Karen if we could just start by reminding us of the mandate of the pacific islands forum. What is it. well. Joe generates a group of pacific nations eighteen pacific nations including australia and new zealand. That and it. It's a an association of of of the region. So it's It's a cooperative body. It's not a A governance body. It's got a a broad general mandate And it's about regional corporation so it's not particularly a security body or particularly a trade body but it's about a common interests around the seek and it meets once a year in terms of its leadership to deal with issues that that facing all the pacific countries. It's obviously a big difference in size. Between a number of those countries many of those countries a very very small but other countries like australia and new zealander of illogic so y- there is a disparity in terms of income but a lot of common interest to. What's at the heart of this row. Well they're the region is divided up into into three sections And be the biggest issue here is relating to micronesia which is a clutch of islands that were operating as a book. These smart asia polynesia and melanie asia and the idea generally his bane that the leadership of the secretary general position would type between the three groups. Now the two logic groups Polynesia melanesia have had to goes at h. Since it was created micronesia filtered. It was east turn it puts candidate up and under what it's called a gentleman's agreement Received enough support to get up on the basis. That was a was a fair rotation about there was a last minute. Move against it and it didn't succeed loss by one voice and so they are very upset about that. They feel that they were let down particularly by australia and new zealand. That isis spit didn't vote for the micronesian nation candidate and in the end the pull the nation candidate. As you mentioned. Henry won the vice. So micronesians very upset. They talking about leaving the forum and it's just not ideal to have a split in that forum when they're a big issues at stake particularly the climate crisis which that forum has worked very well together as a pressure bloke own achieving trying to change globally in fact and in fact Done what better than australia's done to on us. And then there are other pressing issues that are going to affect the region as a whole of vaccination program for covid nineteen And also this issue of influence of china which. Australia has been concerned about it. Which has prompted australia to re engage. Much more the see. Firstly with pacific in recent times under what. Prime minister morrison calls the pacific. Step

Pacific Islands Piff Prime Minister Henry Puna Gerald Ezekiel Karen Middleton Cambra Pacific Nations Eighteen Pacif Australia Cook Islands Micronesia Marshall Islands Melanie Asia New Zealand Karen Melanesia JOE Polynesia Asia Henry
Biden makes good on pledge to heal America's racial divide

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Biden makes good on pledge to heal America's racial divide

"Joe biden on tuesday issued a firm. Call to heal. America's racial divide taking several steps and promising more to confront racism and inequality that he said has plagued the united states for far too long. Racial tensions simmered during the turbulent four year presidency of donald trump and in issuing several executive orders by noted that the january six siege on the us capitol by trump supporters was carried out by thugs insurrectionists political extremists and white supremacists but biden said he believes the vast majority of americans believe in equality biden took executive action on four fronts. Curbing the us government's use of private prisons bolstering antidiscrimination enforcement in housing on the scoring commitments to native american tribal sovereignty and condemning discrimination against asian americans and americans of pacific island descent. He said had risen during the covid. Nineteen pandemic biden and other critics accused trump of pursuing policies built around white grievance in a nation where the white population is declining by percentage. The united states still struggling with the legacy of slavery was rocked by protests against racism and police brutality in many cities last year in response to incidents including the death of black man george in minneapolis. Police custody in may twenty twenty. On the day he took office. Last week biden signed an executive order. Establishing a government wide initiative to address racial inequity and systemic racism in federal prisons laws and programs

Biden United States Joe Biden Donald Trump Us Government Pacific Island Minneapolis George
"pacific islands" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Gathered to this point we've come to the conclusion On individual name. Anthony Warner is the bomber. He was present when the bomb went off. And that he perished in the bombing. Warner became a person of interest Saturday, and federal agents searched his home in suburban Nashville. Ultimately, it was a DNA test on the vehicle identification number on the RV use in the attack. They confirmed Warner's identity a motive for the bottoming still not known. 14 year old boys shot Sunday afternoon on the south side of the city. Police say it about 2:20 P.m.. The boy was near an alley in the 1300 Black of was 64 Street when he heard shots and felt pain. He was struck in the hip brought to comb Ear's Children's Hospital in good condition. No one in custody in that case, Although the covert 19 vaccine is finally here, it isn't widely available to the public just yet. And because of that blood banks are still looking for people to donate plasma to help those who are struggling with the virus Don ever Ket decided to donate after recovering from the virus. There are so many people in our country who are suffering from Cove, it And this class MMA Is going toe, possibly help them recover from it. People who have fully recovered from coma 19 and haven't had symptoms for two weeks are encouraged to donate plasma. Mile. On Sunday, the Illinois Department of Public Health reported just over 3700 new confirmed cases of covert 19, including 104 deaths attest. Positivity rape remains, said 6.8%. Illinois's legislature is trying to find a way to safely conduct business. New proposal filed this month would allow Illinois lawmakers to meet and vote remotely in emergency situations. Democratic leaders call it a launching point for discussions on how to meet going into 2021 amid the ongoing pandemic. Legislators last met in person and made to approve a budget. Public would be able to watch sessions and committee meetings in real time online, Roger Bad ish WGN news. Many Pacific Island countries and territories have had few confirmed cases of covert 19. But the pandemic has compounded the region's food issues. The isolated islands have little arable land ever light on food imports. The disruption to the supply chain has sent food prices soaring. In response, some governments have extended fishing season's expanded indigenous food gathering lessons. Also bolstered seed distribution programs that allow residents greater self reliance. The programs also helped drink decrease the amount of highly processed imported foods. That contribute to high rates of obesity, non communicable disease and under nutrition. Look at WGN sports A bears make it three wins in a row, beating Jacksonville 41 17. Close one for the Bulls, but they couldn't do it. The Bulls losing the Golden State 1 29 to 1 28 college basketball. Loyola beat Illinois State 90 to 60 Providence over to Paul 95 90, a double overtime game. Their Southern Illinois beat.

Anthony Warner Illinois Illinois Department of Public WGN Bulls Many Pacific Island Children's Hospital rape basketball Nashville Loyola Jacksonville Roger Bad Paul
Why are we still waiting for travel bubbles?

Coronacast

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Why are we still waiting for travel bubbles?

"I'm health reported teigen tyler and opposition and journalists filter norman swan it's choosy fifteenth of december and for anyone who has loved person who lives overseas. Which i think is most of us. where all kind of wondering when we can open up the borders again yesterday norman. We heard that new zealand is okay with having a travel bubble relationship with ustralia. But there's still some other hurdles that they want to jump through i. What's the delay. And why aren't we seeing. Travel bubbles opening up with more countries where we could. Interestingly china could be one of the countries that we do. Singapore were done at very low levels. Taiwan not south korea anymore Once upon a time you might have thought south korea so there are a few places in the world. The pacific islands who desperate in indeed of our tourism dollars so there are a few places which have our virus or very very small amounts of virus circulating. I don't know what new zealand is waiting for. I mean we've got virtually no disease spreading in the community nor infections spending the community hotel quarantine. Yes but they've got quarantine to maybe they just wanna see us being tested again for a little while just to see how we were going case. We're lax about hotel quarantine that might be what's going on there with new zealand but we could open up right now at an incredibly low risk. The problem is is that it's a bit like sex ak go on next to party talk. This is my now so we what we're talking about here. Is this the all sorts of sexually transmissible diseases. When have sex with somebody. You actually having sex with everybody else. They've had they've had sex with and the virus got something else. You can contract that. That's the problem here with travel. Bubbles is wayne you get into bed sexual analogy with a country. You're getting into bed with all the countries they've got a relationship with in terms of air travel bubbles or how they do it so new zealand is is pretty safe. There's strict as we are in terms of who's coming in and going into hotel quarantine and therefore you can be pretty sure that their border is not is not loose and therefore at risk. Singapore is another issue and the pacific islands are if they're not careful about their borders or somebody's not transit. Here be careful. somebody's not just transiting through. Singapore and singapore becomes a way station for people trying to get into australia. The back door and that requires just filthy. Mine teagan just to yourself. I stopped analogy a while ago. And you're just key ongoing planet to say to him ahead anyway. That's the that's the risk to be sure that their border controls because essentially it's only as safe as their borders and if their borders are open effectively. You're opening the borders to australia vibe. Whatever country we have the bubble with so it's pretty safe with new zealand pretty safe with the pacific islands. There's probably a lot of negotiation before you do it with singapore. I would thought very safe with taiwan very unsafe with almost anywhere else in the

Teigen Tyler Norman Swan New Zealand South Korea Pacific Islands Singapore Norman Taiwan China Travel Wayne Australia
Borders are coming down. Were they based on science or politics?

Coronacast

05:06 min | 1 year ago

Borders are coming down. Were they based on science or politics?

"It is thursday the twenty sixth of november. And we're approaching the festive december norman. Which at least for me in queensland means that board is reopening to almost the rest of australia entirely which is a first for months now which is really great especially families who wanna get together For christmas and new year but were the borders. What do we know about border closures. In terms of how useful they are in stopping the spread. Is it more about science or is it more about politics. It depends on the date. So if you look at the victorian second wave new south wales the clusters in new south. Wales did originate in victoria before they closed the victorian border the where some people who turned up in queensland who would be in victoria so borders do work when you've got a fair bit of virus circulating there but the question is once you get almost no virus circulating. Do the borders need to stay closed. And if you remember queen opened up for a short period before closing gone again before the second wave occurred westminster. There has never really opened up. Although it's it's saying it slightly less onerous now but it's really effectively closed the moment if a borders closed and it's really now from now on wwl i think really effect most other places are open. South australia will eventually have access to states. Once they get over this pick up with the current outbreak. I think from now on is just politics because the risk is so low question is. Are we going to slap a border on again. If there's a cluster outbreak in new south wales or accuster outbreak in victoria me. The probably will be customer outbreaks because we're bringing people from overseas. The provia customer outbreak can in queensland because bringing people from overseas. I we're going to keep going backwards and forwards well propeller. She says no. She's not going to do that well. She's not gonna do that then. Why would she do it. Not in other words. She could do it in the future. Why has she done it in the past. I think that's no that the queensland election is passed then poltics becomes less of an issue. The west australian election is still to come. And i think quite honestly even though the risk is incredibly low if not nonexistent w borders will probably remain closed. Because there's an election coming you can see why states want to protect the resources of the health department's and protect the people that leaving there but it does seem like quite a blunt instrument to control spread. When you think about the size of the states that we have in australia blunt. It may be but it's probably been fairly effective when you had a lot of virus circulating but now is almost non and we're pretty much well in control. The problem you've gotten w for example is people have gone back to virtually back to normal and the virus comes in then you got a problem because it could spread but their risk is much more and the primary mcgowan has said. This martin mcgowan said this much more from hotel. Quarantine then is from new south wales victoria and they would have to do what south australia's done. Which is reboot contact tracing when the get outbreaks. So they're not ready for it and that's part of the problem as well so like you say we're coming into the end of the year with almost completely open borders across australia. What do you say the first half or the. Let's let's start with the first half of twenty twenty one looking like well. We're still waiting for vaccine rollout. Well i think that what will happen is that will continue to bring back people from overseas. Australians from overseas. I suspect we'll see a bubble open up with new zealand. Maybe the pacific islands as well. So there's no quarantine between us because we've got almost no cases so the new zealand to keep on quarantining us going there. We would almost cases. I suspect they will relax and open it up to us. The need us is poorly more than we need them. But that would be nice. Pacific islands pretty low low risk then got singapore which is a bit more awkward because the it being a transportation hob so i think you start to see. Some international bubbles opening up and. I think that you're going to see the odd outbreak here or there in australia but kept under control and we'll get back to some kind of normal life throughout australia and circulating normally no then the question will be at. What point. would you open up our borders to international travel and that will depend. I suspect on digital vaccine passports in other words except you people from overseas if they'd been immunized and of course that will depend on whether the vaccines prevent infection or just covid nineteen disease because if they don't prevent infection then you could be bringing people in from overseas who are carrying covid nineteen and could spread it here but if they prevent in which is going to take a little wild into the twenty twenty one to discover. You may not see vaccine passports being used in australia until we're sure how effective the vaccines are preventing transmission. But i think that you could see international flights starting sooner than many expected. Well

Queensland Victoria WWL Australia New South Wales Martin Mcgowan Norman New South South Wales South Australia Westminster Wales Mcgowan New Zealand Pacific Islands Nineteen Disease Singapore
"pacific islands" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on KOMO

"Ra Medium Island Grill just opened its doors last month. And features cuisine from the Hawaiian Islands, Philippines, Guam and the coast of Vietnam. Stepbrothers and owners Sean and Joe have over 10 years of experience in the Las Vegas hospitality industry and decided to move to Seattle in 2017, where they took over your cocktail. Serve short jittery cheese boards and cost sales too much success. Joe was even voted Seattle's favorite bartender and the stranger last year, But after all that success, they decided to actually pursue their dream, which was opening a new restaurant potato march to the Pacific Islands, where they spent much of their childhood and unfortunately when their parents were laid off from their Vegas jobs during the pandemic, they moved on over to Seattle to help with this launch of Ra medium. Brothers feel that their restaurants a chance to explore the comfort food that the Pacific Islands break bread with family and learn about different cultures. They want that for their customers to We've got more information on her medium, which is an intentional of business that spotlights ever small businesses online now and yes, before you ask, they are open to take out. Yeah, these poor guys here they are just launching, and now they've gotta shut down because of New restrictions. I know, But let me tell you, I've seen the food. I haven't tried to see the photos the food and I feel like we can get the word out. This is a great place to deliver from, and they will do just fine as soon as people try their food. Okay, go to Seattle. Refined dot com For more on that. Well, they call it the most happiest, magical place on earth, and they're giving fans a gift to ring in the new Year..

Seattle Ra Medium Island Pacific Islands Hawaiian Islands Joe Las Vegas Vietnam Vegas Guam Philippines Brothers Sean
Washington State School District Decides Asians Aren't Students of Color

Tony Katz Today

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Washington State School District Decides Asians Aren't Students of Color

"A school district in Washington state that has decided that if you're Asian, you're no longer qualify as a person of color. I have absolutely no idea what I'm supposed to do with this information. 16,000 students in the north, first in public schools. And they have Asians in with white students when measuring their academic achievements against students of color. Which includes black, native American Pacific Island there, multiracial and Latin X,

Washington American Pacific Island
"pacific islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My from NPR news. I'm Korova Coleman. In the past 10 days, More than one million new Corona virus cases have been reported in the U. S. According to Johns Hopkins University confirmed virus infections around the world now total roughly 51 a half million. NPR's Giles Snyder reports and global deaths are approaching 1.3 million people. The Pacific Island nation event. You want to have been one of the few virus free countries, but health officials there now reporting their first case in Europe, Hospital bits are filling up again as winter approaches. But Asia is taking steps to revive the region's economy. Hong Kong and Singapore of laid out plans to create a travel bubble to encourage tourism that Australia is considering opening its borders to Asian countries, including parts of China. NPR's child Snyder reporting. President elect O. Biden says Returning students back to Classrooms is a national emergency NPR's Anya Kamenetz reports. Biden has promised to bring more support and coordination for public schools, but resource is will be up to Congress. Biden, whose wife Joe Biden, is a community college professor, has appointed doctors to his transition Cove in 19 Advisory board, who have spoken in favour of opening up schools with proper safety precautions in place. He has pledged to point a career educator to be education secretary, in contrast to the current secretary, Betsy DeVos, who had little experience with public schools. Biden also has backed calls for tens of billions of dollars in aid to schools so they can improve infrastructure rehire educators laid off to do the pandemics, recession and increased salaries for others. Experts say the most immediate vehicle for any new education funding would be a second Corona virus relief package, which the Republican controlled Senate has yet to approve. Anya Kamenetz NPR NEWS president, Trump continues to reject the outcome of the election and does not recognise Joe Biden as the president elect. Trump is refusing to let federal government officials work with Biden's transition team. Biden is downplaying this, saying his transition work is going well. Stocks open mixed this morning. While the bond market is closed in honor of Veterans Day. NPR's got Horsley reports, The Dow Jones industrial Average fell about 40 points in early trading. Asian stocks were mostly higher. Overnight indexes rose in Japan and South Korea but slipped in Shanghai after the Chinese government pointed to a possible antimonopoly crackdown on the Internet giant Alibaba and the parent company of we Chat. Tech companies in the US are also facing pressure. Companies that have thrived during the pandemic.

Joe Biden NPR Anya Kamenetz Giles Snyder Korova Coleman Johns Hopkins University Trump secretary President Asia Pacific Island Betsy DeVos Senate US president Alibaba Shanghai Congress
A small Pacific island nation recorded its first Covid-19 case

Morning Edition

00:07 sec | 1 year ago

A small Pacific island nation recorded its first Covid-19 case

"Island nation event. You want to have been one of the few virus free countries, but health officials there now reporting their first case

"pacific islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Our website stardate dot org for the McDonald observatory I'm Billy had it made the breezes blow whose Gath reversed the sun's direction in the sky Samuel courage said that about the albatross I see bird whose real life behavior while not supernatural is none the less remarkable I'm Jim Metzner and this is the Polish the sounds of albatross reported in courtship ritual by this week most of the albatross Australia and other South Pacific islands have finished mating and now they're tending their at as linking fair trial National Park Service tells us it's one of the few times that you'll find these birds on shore during on reading it's a long process oceanic birds and they literally wander the Pacific it's only during breeding that they come to land at all albatross is a mostly solitary until later when they choose one third will be their partner for life in nesting season the new couple takes turns tending their eggs on shore and during that time there anything but along the nesting sites are packed with birds and albatross is used their complex vocalizations to mingle with their telemedicine because they are singing the line of the land so typically what they do is they land on the beach of the island and then walk to their nest which may be as much as a half.

McDonald observatory Billy Gath Jim Metzner Australia South Pacific islands National Park Service partner
"pacific islands" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on AP News

"Small Pacific island nation died Thursday he was seventy eight years old I caliche PO heave a died at the Auckland city hospital at about nine o'clock in the morning after being medically evacuated to New Zealand a day earlier he had been hospitalized in Tonga for two weeks suffering from pneumonia before his condition turned critical pull he evil was first elected prime minister in twenty fourteen and he won reelection three years later he spent more than three decades in political office after he was first elected to Tonga's parliament in nineteen eighty seven for now lawmakers to me see seca is tongas acting prime minister. a house committee has approved guidelines for impeachment hearings against president trump read a fully has the story the house Judiciary Committee has approved guidelines for impeachment hearings chairman Jerry Nadler a New York Democrat says this is an impeachment investigation conduct under investigation poses a threat to our democracy we have an obligation to respond to this threat and we are doing so but angry Republicans say this is a dog and pony show congressman Doug Collins of Georgia welcome to fantasy I. Republican Jim Jordan of Ohio scolded his fellow committee members maybe if you were a little less focused on taking people second in a right to the pizza the guy they made president we could actually do what this committee is supposed to do even some Democrats are worrying aloud about an impeachment investigation one saying it's sucking the air out of all the good stuff that we're doing read a fall les Washington Democrats debate in Houston I'm Tim acquired within a P. newsman at the top ten candidates running for the democratic party's presidential nomination are on stage in Houston former vice president Joe Biden defending his healthcare plan while questioning how rival rot Bernie Sanders and other backers of a single payer Medicare for all government plan would be paid for without causing sharp income tax increases president trump in his speech to congressional Republicans a Baltimore also attacks Anders plan could dramatically raise middle class taxes eliminate private health insurance for one hundred and eighty million Americans and destroy Medicare for ever the trump administration is dropping a water protection rule put out by the Obama administration in twenty fifteen EPA administrator Andrew Wheeler says the rule created confusion for developers and farmers environmental groups say the end of the role will hurt people as well as the nation's waterways and wetlands I'm Tim acquire. AP digital news back in a moment..

president house Judiciary Committee Tonga prime minister Medicare trump vice president Houston Jerry Nadler Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Small Pacific island Doug Collins Jim Jordan Auckland city hospital democratic party Republicans Andrew Wheeler New Zealand pneumonia
"pacific islands" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"But I'm convinced that the people of the Marshall Islands the people understand that having partners that are democratic are the best partnerships for the people that will continue to make their lives better I'm John Clemens Republican rand Paul taking to Twitter to talk about his most recent health issue the Kentucky senator says he's had part of his long removed the result of an attack at the hands of his neighbor back in twenty seventeen the man breaking six of his ribs and bruising his long the procedure done at Vanderbilt University rand Paul tweeting he should be able to return to the Senate in September this is

USA radio Tim Burke United States China Chicago Chris Barnes marijuana Robert Wilensky teddy Weissenberg cook county Illinois two years
"pacific islands" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Okay. Well, we wanted to try this new formation. Okay. Yeah. Worked, we got thirteen goals, so I have no problem with thirteen goals. I think you, you keep scoring. I mean you look you're supposed to go out there and score. You don't just stop scoring that would be insulting to the other team. The other team has to stop you know, problem. My problem is after goal probably seven eight nine. Maybe I'm not celebrating quite as much. That's all. That's all I'm saying. Love to know what you think on that one. My name's Greg Knapp, I'm in for Schnitt on the Schnitt show. Greg, ruby nap dot com for more. And I got a free gift for you there. And I wanted to get this to you from the UN time magazine has a new cover. It shows U N chief and Tonio Gutierez standing in water and it's supposed to be off a Pacific island and it's sinking. That's what we're told time has a tweet out. Time's new cover the leaders of these sinking. Countries are fighting to stop climate change. Here's what the rest of the world can learn and shows the water is just creeping up. Well, here's the problem. There are studies out there daily caller reporting a bunch of these different studies that show most of the low lying Pacific islands, heavy, the remained stable or increased in size over the last couple of decades, including Valu, which is where the UN chief is supposed to be standing on the edge of in fact, one Reese. Richer, said the loss of land is unlikely to be a factor enforcing the depopulation of value. Twenty eighteen study found the to lose total land area, actually grew nearly three percent from nine hundred seventy in two thousand fourteen even though there were some rising sea levels. In fact, satellite, and aerial photo showed eight of to lose nine holes and three quarters of its reviling reviles increased in size over the last four decades lead author was Paul catch. And he told they have this the dominant mode of changed over that time onto Valu has been expansion, not erosion. There was another study that found similar things in two thousand ten climate change isn't alarming enough for the liberal media. Here's what here's what they now call it is a is a another related study to that. Well, here's what the research showed on the basis of this research. We project a markedly different trajectory for two volumes islands over the next century than is commonly. Envisaged. Well, we recognized that, you know. The habitability, rests on a number of fact, loss of land is unlikely to be a factor, by the way. Even if these islands hadn't been increasing, would it be because of so-called climate change? And how much of that would be because of us and would there really be.

Greg Knapp UN time magazine Valu UN Tonio Gutierez Richer Pacific island Schnitt Reese Paul three quarters three percent four decades
"pacific islands" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:56 min | 3 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on KCRW

"In stretches from the seven ten or check back with just a little bit right now. It is sixty nine degrees in Santa Monica at three fifteen. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley Ari Shapiro author. David berry is fascinated with animal, navigation when a wasp flies off on a hunting expedition. How does it find its nest again? How does a dung beetle roll? It's full of dengue in a straight line of suckling an entire ocean. What strange since guides ac- total back to the beach, when she was boom to lay her aches turns out, sea turtles use the alignment of the seas waves to leave the shore and the earth's magnetic field to guide them back. That's just one of the many how's that berry answers in his new book, super navigators, I started off asking him. Why animals would need to navigate with such precision? Well, awesome when we're talking about, migratory, on moles. It's about returning to a place where they can breed successfully and breeding successfully means having access to the right supplies of food. It means a place of relative safety from predators and disease, and so forth. So many, many different kinds of animals have developed these extrordinary migratory strategies that enable them to breed successfully and the full to maintain that that species. And there is no one answer to this question of how they do it as we go through the book, we meet some animals that use sense of smell others. That navigate based on, polarized, light others on magnetism. I it seems that there are as many ways to find your way as our species you write about. Yes, I'm probably quite a few. We don't know about yet to, but I think one of the other things I learned in researching this book, is that no animal that's been really well studied relies just on one mechanism. There's always a degree of redundancy. They have several may be full five or six different mechanisms that they can use, and they can switch from one to another, depending on need so in many ways, it's just like human navigate. I went into kind of Suming that animals with bigger brains would have more advanced navigational capabilities, and that's actually not true at all. You give some really impressive examples of tiny animals with tiny brains that can do remarkable things will you tell us about one of them? Well, one of the ones that fascinates me is an animal desert, and which lives in the Sahara desert in North Africa. And the is Donna, Shing it unites, this tiny animal with little brain, the size of a pinhead, and it can use the some it can use polarized light. It can use wind. It can content steps to what half forints gum like an odometer it can use landmarks. Very recently, it's turned out that it also has a magnetic, compass sense. How does an animal with brain size of pinhead, have all those things going on? Well, that is a fascinating question. We don't fully know the onset of insect, brains have evolved over hundreds of millions of years. I mean don't forget human beings, we've only been around in our present form, for about three hundred thousand years, so insects have had hundreds of millions of years to perfect, the most economical, efficient navigational systems, and they are breathtaking. Absolutely taking the desert is any one example. The Bogo off in Australia is another extraordinary migratory, animal goes a thousand kilometers and uses the magnetic field to send its coal it also, again, this very news. It also believes not uses the alignment of the Milky Way the might Stein. I love that definition of hot news, just in vogue, on moth uses the alignment of the Milky Way in the night sky to find its way. You heard it here first. Well, some people think that's exciting. This is a great story in this book about how humans I got hard evidence that birds make long migrations from one continent to another. Tell us about the arrow. Stork. Oh, the dog. It's a sad story. Really? But in the eighteen twenties. That'd be a lot of argument about what happened to that disappeared in the winter that they go to the moon. Did they go to the moon? Yes. Seriously? Some people that maybe they went to the moon. Maybe they disappeared onto Walter step to the bottom of poems. But in the eighteen twenties, somebody spotted a store in a ton in north Germany, with an era stock right through it. And when they cook stoke, I have to say, I think they probably killed it fist, which is sad. They discovered that the Arab was an African era said the stoop had been shot by African art. So it had to have been to Africa. And it became known as an IRO stool do humans have these in eight abilities to navigate the way that other animals do. Well, I believe we do, but we have to cultivate. Them. The trouble is that we've been civilized of while, and we've become more and more dependent on technology. You know, Asian line hundred years ago, the magnetic compass came into use, and we had the Sextant and the chronometer. And, and so we've got GPS GPS is a marvel. I mean, it is an astonishing technological achievement, but are increasing and exclusive for Luntz on its is turning us into kind of navigational idiots will losing the ability to exercise on natural skills. And from my perspective, more sadly, with being more Kostov from the natural world as a result, we no longer look out from little glowing screens unobserved the world around us. I think we may. Discover this has quite profound implications both from physical health, but also for spiritual health to there are some groups of humans that are trying to revive these ancient navigation techniques, for example, you mentioned the Polynesian voyaging society. Yes, this is really rather, wonderful revival. That's taken place over forty or fifty years, or so, in the nineteen sixties the traditional skills of the Pacific island navigators, which truly breathtaking had all much disappeared. But just by the skin of that tees they were preserved a few of the old expert navigators will persuaded to come and teach a new generation of navigators, and the Polynesian voyaging society was established in Hawaii, and then various other foraging societies being sound up in other parts of the Pacific. In fact, the traditional methods of Pacific island navigate. Using the sun. The stars wave patterns clouds, the pave your animals, and so forth have been saved, but there is a danger that the skills employed by the in wit up in the Canadian optic, for example, will the aboriginal tribes, people of the desert in Australia, some of those may not survive unless steps taken to preserve them and I worry about that. Why does it matter that human abilities to navigate survive? The coast amongst the most beautiful cultural artifacts. I mean our abilities, navigate using all senses native, wits was a key to us of idle, I two hundred ninety thousand years existence as a separate species, and for those extrordinary abilities to be lost just because it's more convenient to push button. Read outnumber on screen would be I think a tragedy. David berry, his new book is super navigators, the astounding new science of how animals find their way. Thank you for speaking.

David berry Australia Pacific island Santa Monica Mary Louise Kelley Ari Shapiro NPR North Africa African art Walter north Germany Africa Donna Hawaii Luntz Stein Shing two hundred ninety thousand ye three hundred thousand years
"pacific islands" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

16:27 min | 3 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And welcome back to coast to coast. George Noory with you along with Gregg little, as we talk about Edgar Casey in terms of Casey. He mentioned, the history of ancient America. Give us a little overview, if you can Greg. Oh my well Casey, I can America's history, sort of intertwines with that of Atlantis, which Atlanta's began in two hundred ten thousand BC, but there were people here in the Americas, according to Casey as long ago, as ten million years, they were mainly in the southwest how much influence they had was not a lot that would only be traces left of them today. But that's where that's where the history of the ancient America's began with Casey. He did say that lots of people came in here before. Before the standard timeframe. Say that there was nobody here before, say ten to twelve thousand BC now the date, by the mainstream archaeology. They say there was nobody here before roughly seventeen thousand BC or so. And that's all that's all. Just that's ridiculous. Casey said that they were here as lots of people were here by fifty thousand BC. More people came in and twenty eight thousand Basie more people came in and ten thousand eight they came in mainly from Atlantis, they came in from the South Pacific, and that I find most interesting, he said that, that a whole group of people from the South Pacific came to South America, and then eventually came to the south west of North America by fifty thousand BC mainstream archaeological genetics research shows that, that is the case that it is very, very likely if not an absolute certainty that some people came in to South America. From the South Pacific islands like New Zealand, and Australia at least by fifty thousand BC, and there are traces of those people still present today in South America. So Casey's history is about the destruction of Atlantis, the destruction of MU Orla myriad in the South Pacific, and the migrations of those people to the Americas. He said that the purest blood Atlantique into exists today were native Americans, Casey was very specific to call them the red race. And he said that the noble, the nobility of the Iroquois was, essentially, the purest blood, Atlanta that, that remained. There is a type of genetic research called mighty Conrail DNA, which is kind of pinpointed the type of the NFL. A that they may have had it's known as hapless group x long involved story, and it would take more than our explain, what might Conrail DNA is if we even can. Well, we can explain what it is, is just that you just gotta keep a lot of things in mind as you go through the explanation, and that that's really graduate school type stuff actually taught in psychopharmacology and talked a lot about the mighty Conrail. The mighty Qendra got involved in all this research. Because native American tribes has some of them have high rates of obesity and diabetes. The Pima tribe in the south, west really is the tribe all the might convert research started, and it was about forty five years ago. It all started in Atlanta at Emory University, and they were trying to figure out why the Pima Indians in particular had this high rate of obesity, even at birth and type two diabetes. At birth that research. Paradoxically has pointed out where native Americans came from and win. And it's, it's a very complex picture of many people making many different migrations here and amazingly, it all falls in line with what Casey said back in the nineteen late nineteen twenties, and nineteen thirties, h in America, so strange either Casey, a remarkably good guess which would be pretty incredible coincidence. Or there is something real to making some psychic predictions, and getting information from that psychic ether, whatever it is. Well, and he knew how to tap into that, for sure. You've got a book coming out, is it in September with Andrew Collins called Denisa, then origins, they Denisa wtn's is a newly discovered branch of humanity actually dead branch that was even before the knee Andrew falls. And then ISA in DNA has been totally sequenced. And we know that native Americans carry some Denisa in DNA, and the Andhra thal DNA, as well as fully modern human DNA. So the, the theory that's in that book. Is that the that in very early times Denisa vans, and the end of falls and modern humans worn around two hundred thousand years ago, the evidence is that people came to the Americas? Well before two hundred thousand years ago, the earliest people that came here didn't leave much of a trace, and they apparently didn't make it. They died off. And then a more groups came in there were giants and the term giants means nothing more than unusually tall, people, I tell the story all the time, I once stood next to Wilt Chamberlain, and Wilt Chamberlain to me, who I'm five foot nine and three quarters close as I can to five ten he was like seven one or something. Yeah. But he was a giant, the man was huge. And I mean, imposing and somebody that saw him. Him somebody that's average size that would stand next to somebody like that would call him a giant and we know that they were still these giants were still around in the Americas. When the first year opinions came into South America, and in North America and her Nando this outta fifth in fifteen thirty nine in his excursion through the southeast bounce sites, which were still being inhabited in the southeast had seven foot tall chiefs that were the leaders of them, and that's all very well documented, so we know that they were real, and we know that they were here. So we believe that these seven footers is genetically define group of people that probably do go back to it Lantis. Although we don't say that in the book, what we say is that they are specific type of the niece, then hybrid with, with fully modern humans. They did Dina. Here of mound building, which is which started roughly in one thousand BC. In their mounds? That's where all of these almost all those seventeen seven footer seven to eight foot tall. Skeletons were removed by the Smithsonian almost all from the Edina. Where do you what do you think the mounds were used for? Well, we know what some of them were used for there were I actually listened to the first two hours of your show. Okay. Very impressed. Wonderful stuff knows his business. Yes. There were probably this Massoni and identified a hundred thousand mound sites. Now, those sites heads like you mentioned, Cahokia hokey, once had one hundred twenty mounds at at, at the main site, and there's there's around ninety right now, which they've identified I think it's sixty four in the park itself, so that, that would be one of the sites that they found. So these sites could have a hundred miles, some of them can just have a few Alabama had thousands of them along. What is now called the ten time the Tennessee Tom Biggby waterway when they built that thing which it's actually a canal they did, and archaeological survey and probably found the thousand mounds that were there that are in very remote areas that are swampy that are dense woods, and they just weren't known about those were discovered in the seventies. So they're still finding them. But there were. Probably million. Most of them more than half were are conical cone, shaped burial, mounds. But then there are lots of them that are geometric mounds, that like he mentioned, the, the octagon and circle in Newark, Ohio, and the great circle, and the Newark mounds are actually the world's largest geometric of works. It anywhere grand handcock was impressed with it so impressed with that. I think he's more impressed with American earthworks than he is like Stonehenge just a couple of places in the America in America, overwhelm everything in England. Avebury in England, which which is the world's largest stone circle. It's very impressive, because it has this earth, work around, they call it they would call it a barrel out around the outside. So it's a huge circle it's roughly fifty acres and size, and it has a moat on the interior while the great circle at Newark. Ohio is dental to it and in the center of it, it has an effigy of a mound effigy built of an eagle laying on its back. There's only one opening in this in this, manned, great circle in Newark. When I say it's a great circle. It's a perfectly flat area that has a roughly sixteen foot tall earth work along the outside perfect circle. And on the interior of it is a seven to eight foot deep in the moat very, very strange, but the exact same sizes. Avebury a lot of the mounds were in fact, stone covered the one that he mentioned of Miami's Bergen Ohio enormous amount, but it was once covered with stone slabs all of those stone slabs where we moved by the first settlers that came in and they were used for buildings. It was just very convenient and used them for building. But about four feet down into that mound are more stone slabs. There are many mounds that were in fact covered by stone. They they're not technically stone pyramids where they're solid stone. You also mentioned Cahokia Cahokia has in its base the mound. It covers fourteen acres. It's a hundred feet tall tall ten story building monks mound. Yes, ma'am, it has at its base. A huge stone structure that is roughly forty five feet long, thirty feet high. Nobody knows what it is. They have found it through drilling. They've drilled into it and they've done ground penetrating radar. Now what it probably is, is a tomb very elaborate tune, but we'll never know because the laws preclude digging into it, and we'll probably we certainly won't know in our lifetime someday, they may have some sort of technology that can see into the not in our lifetime. So other mounds are used to make alignments to the stars actually did a series of studies that the research is included in that new book where these mounds aligned to the setting of the stars Orion. And, and then ebb of. Cygnus and the Milky Way and the winter solstice sunset, so you could stand on one mound and look across the 'nother, and you could see a star setting right behind a mound, and it was done for a death journey which the debt journey appears to be the way they controlled the populace, and it was these elite seven feet tall. Plus people who were the leaders of the you can call them tribes. Although we don't know what they call themselves. They would erect these geometric earthworks for these ceremonies, and the death journey is one of many, but it is believed that it was the most important one and we know all of the all of the components of the death journey now it's not something that I'm speculating about is now in mainstream archeology and actually did all that work because they couldn't dig into mounds anymore. Starting in nineteen ninety they were not able to do excavations in burials anymore. So they turned their attention to something else. And that was, let's figure out what all these all these symbols mean that we've recovered from that. Why would Casey Greg be interested in mounds in areas like that? I don't think Casey hit any interested at all. He was about it case. He wasn't interested in a lot of this stuff some, but people would ask him. He would go into these psychic transit, and in these psychic trances, there would be a conductor, that's what they called the person off, and it was his wife and she would have a list of questions. So Edgar would go into this hypnotic trance south at trans, and he would just be going. Edgar would check out. He had no idea what was said. In fact, a lot of the time he wasn't even interested. They began to write down every single word that was set in these ratings in nineteen twenty three and there's over fourteen thousand of these, there's it's like fifty thousand pages. Now, you can access all of that online, if you're a member of the ARE, you can look up these things on in the readings all online, but you have to be a member. I and for example, you could stick the word. Automaton interesting word. I'm I deliberately chose that you can stick the word automaton into the readings and you'll get several of Casey readings popping up that talk about how the land teens genetically created a group of automatons they're also called things, and they were made generically to do work. They were like worker bees. And then there was a group of very negative people in Atlantis who began having sex with them, and they created a different race of people, and that, and so it's all about a Solis race. I mean, it's, it's just fascinating stuff. But there's so much of this in the Casey, readings and even after all these years, no one has really put it all out there. And there's thousands of books about Casey, but who knew about the Automata. John's and the things those old movies about Atlantis where you see, can't remember the name of the one, but it shows the crystals and death rays and all that. It also shows the things all of that stuff came out of the AKC, readings everything in that movie. You now it's a very sensationalized version of it, but Casey gave a really detailed explanation of it. Sure did Greg. Let's give out your websites. Yeah. Go to the, the Casey organization has a special just because of your show and it's WWW dot Edgar, Casey. C. A Y, C dot org. Free book. And if you become a member, and they have an incredible magazine you can only get it being a member and get access to the readings in a whole lot.

Edgar Casey Casey Greg Americas Atlantis South America Atlanta Casey organization North America America Newark mounds George Noory Newark Denisa vans NFL South Pacific obesity Wilt Chamberlain
"pacific islands" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on World News Analysis

"If Australia quits discard in KOTA woman, satiety and atop the more open mind to countries can join hand in this region to bring benefits to the Pacific island countries and also toss straight and China most important points. It's a season guiding China as a real or potential enemy. Well, the all student government has so far avoided any commitment to known shave freedom of navigation operation in which it was in a ship through the South China Sea to challenge China, but given the FU press offensive on China by the Trump government how much pressure is there on camera to side with Washington against China like militarily. The United States has been exerting pressure upon Australia to join the freedom of never against so called freedom of navigation operations. Australia husband is this thing. I think Australia has independent in policy making and strategic consideration. So falls has come to the US the pressure and request. But I think well, maybe one day it might give at some point which I think will bring tragic deterioration by raising raising ships China straighter, China has been making poetry progress towards neutral understanding and cooperation with other craven countries in the South China Sea, we hope Australia and other countries respect. Oh, interesting towards peace stability prosperity in the region thinking to ten hone executive vice president of Jani association of Australian studies in China and director of Australian stood at center at East China normal university Comey off e Parnemann costs were freeze on Ke's membership talks this. Today. Stay without. I am.

China South China Sea Australia East China United States Jani association of Australian Pacific island executive vice president Trump Washington director one day
"pacific islands" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

13:22 min | 3 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"We will be there for you. I'm Joe Kelley host overland does morning news Jackie and Ed or on the ground, and Eric is in our helicopter flying high over Orlando to give you triple team traffic every six minutes in the morning. This is where Orlando turns first for traffic alerts. News ninety six five WDBO. Now, the data show on news ninety six point five. I think first of all I think it's really interesting that you have these candidates coming through New York City to announce on late night TV. But I don't think that that's where the primary is going to be held. But the whole bear primary is a thing. But something bigger this primary is going to be held on social media. And really, you know, the it depends on which voters you need to reach. Right. And again, you know, I I am specifically I haven't spending time specifically looking at millennials millennials are thinking about this. But only thirty one percent of millennials watch cable news and by twenty twenty millennials are projected to be among the biggest voting bloc in the United States. And sixty one percent of them watch TV on seeming services. That's true. Although I don't think it's necessarily all going to be on Twitter. I think a lot of it has to do with. I mean, there's a lot that goes into it. Welcome back to the show. I'm Dana bash on Twitter official dental lash on Facebook. That's why you see all these people doing these stupid. It's like eighty accuracy. Just because it's on social media doesn't mean that you have to strip away, and you sort of self respect or profession. You know? I mean, you can still don't know. I don't know. I just aggravates me with all of that. So Kamala Camelot Harrison. Who is it? Bernie Sanders is thinking about jumping into the primary as well. Amblin and the primary mandate is going to be a bloodbath. Politically my gosh, he set to announce a twenty twenty presidential run. Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh. So you still have all and then you get the Starbucks guy. What's his face Howard Schultz? I keep wanting to call Charleston. See have. Charles Shulz sorry Edward Howard Schultz chimney Christmas. Change your name. Starbucks guy. He's going to be the Democrats Ross Perot. He says he wants to run as an independent and Democrats are now mad that he's even talking about it because they said that that actually could divide Trump. I'm totally finding results running totally fine. Go ahead. He's been giving interviews and speeches around the country. All you need to know. Is that Democrats are gonna go hard left? It's going to be a socialist candidate. The socialist wave has arrived. It is a socialist primary. So yeah, he'll he'll and Scholtz will peel off democrat votes because there are a few Democrats. I don't even know why even identify as Democrats, but they are more moderate than their socialist party. And so it'll be interesting to see how that breaks down as we get closer. We're still pretty we're still pretty far off. We're still pretty far off. But we'll see this. He says that Howard Schultz advisor said he'd bring Trump down to a floor of twenty six twenty eight percent. I just I don't think. So I don't think that people. Remember what I think all with some with some people Trump would have to do is be like remember how much you hate their cops during Christmas. But at least this guy has an idea about running business. So we'll we'll see with that. But I, you know, it just she have a very crowded very crowded. Birth. So to speak. Really kind of amazing to see everything just. How? Many people are and they're all lefties super far hard left. Super far super far hard left. So this is going to be a bra, especially if you've got Bernie Sanders in it. Elizabeth Warren is pretty much done. Bernie sanders. Elizabeth warren. Kamala Harris is in Cory Booker. Now, he said he wasn't remember now he's believable. I I don't think he's got a shot in Haiti's. But we'll see. But it's it's this is it's gonna this is gonna be something else. I tell you with this on a move on because I got a couple of other things to get into. So here's a sad state of affairs. I got to the worst stories for you ever. It's so sad. So the first is a pill for loneliness, and I actually saw the star the story yesterday. This comes from the guardian. Scientists are working on a pill for loneliness. So you can just what remedy everything with a pill. Really were there. You're just everything. Modern life has led to greater isolation which can fuel array of disorders. If there are medications for social pains like depression and anxiety. Why not loneliness because that's awful. We are social creatures. You wanna medicate our way out of that as opposed to just having people go, and socialize and stay a part of that community. Oh my goodness. I think that's even more detrimental. I mean, it is I I do think social media encourages that isolation. But oh my gosh. Just to the point where you would take a pill. Loneliness isn't a chemical. It's that loneliness is isn't that response to stimuli? They can they can boil it down to all things in your brain are essentially just chemically, you know, what I mean chemically put together, but you're right instead of being the person who connects with other human beings and fulfilling that as a human being they just wanna throw pillow at you. And I don't think we've seen the side effects on all the pill. Have we not seen a list of? So I mean, listen, the one minute commercial you see on TV forty five to fifty seconds is dedicated to telling you the side effects of the damn thing. Can you imagine the side effects for this? I just don't think I don't see how you make a pill to treat. What is a response to the lack of stimuli? I just I that's what I don't know. So here's the other stories ridiculous. It's a tiny Pacific island called new. Lot of AL's their new Neely. And it ended up after a storm last year. A dot com. Our was blown into this island country jagged landscape of coral which doesn't provide an ecosystem for many wetlands or ponds for ducts in which they can reside. And so this one Mallard Trevor the Mallard was blown in to this Pacific island by a storm, and he lived in a little puddle by the side of the road. The nation has a population of under two thousand and this stuck became famous amongst the people there's just a little puddle by a muddy road. And that's where he lived. And he lived there for the past year. The new e fire service would stop by with their big trucks to top his puddle from time to time. So that they could maintain his little habitat with him. Oh, the New Zealand High Commissioner because new east considered to be a part of New Zealand. Also once fed Trevor Mallard, some BOK Choy, and he was named after literally Trevor Mallard, the speaker of the New Zealand house of representatives, and he was actually even a local landmark people would say, well, you just turn right at the duck. But he had a little pond right there on the side of the road. And that's worry little puddle actually was a puddle. And that's where he lived. Well, now tailored the Mallard. Trevor Mallard is no more. Because despite the fact that he was much loved by the locals, apparently he was not much loved by an area dog that attacked him dragged him into a Bush and killed him. And he is now dead the only duck on the small Pacific island. His little pond is now almost dry little puddle by the side of the muddy road is almost all dried up because he's dead. The duck is dead. The food chain. Okay. I love dogs. I don't like this dog. Why did they bring another duck? That's the issue. The duck could have been so lonely at wanted to die. He thinks that the that the Mallard walk toward the jaws of this dog, basically climbed in like that one pathetic duckling, and Tom and Jerry, right? When he tried to get this cat to eat them. And the cat was so overwhelmed with morality that. He could beat the sad little duckling that wanted to kill itself. Your weight, you're bringing a cartoon into prove my point this note. No, I'm just saying that this most likely just like you hear in nature, the cries of baby birds get pushed out of the nest or whatever that will attract predators because they're never going to survive. The just never going to survive. This duck was probably so lonely that he ended up making cries that made the Doug come over and eat them, just nature. Doesn't mean wanted to die. You don't know that he did that. He did we got eaten. Jeez. I don't know if he was actually eaten, but he was just dragging. How many ducks were on this island one? How often will the will the dog have an opportunity to eat duck. Exactly. Well, now, no one will ever. Why didn't they just get another duck? So the dog can eat that one to have more than one duck naked maybe put a fence around the puddle. Jeez. The work on the board of city. Don't like I don't like Saturday animals. You know what I mean? Yeah. He was of course, he was there aren't they like, they don't they like to be with their little mated pairs the animals like I like eating animals, if I know they're happy. That's why huntings Greek because they're happy and then bam. They're you know, they don't know what hit them. You don't always eat hunted food, and you can't guarantee the food. You buy in the grocery three ten was happy. But I can I can lie to myself about. Your selves. Because I've seen a picture of it. You don't still if the duck was so depressed and literally wasn't going to survive play armchairs duck around. It wasn't going to be able to carry on duck. Visit didn't try to leave the island though, stayed in that puddle it got fed BOK Choy. I mean hell couldn't have had that heart of life. You leave at that point. If that was going on people providing for you like what if it was like an antisocial duck. What if it didn't like other ducks? Then the story wouldn't be at blue in on this nor'easter. Whatever it was the glue it into the into this. It would have been the duck voluntarily flew there because he wanted to be by himself. Probably who is like the hell with you people and then left. And then he gets on this. But he would have to say to hell with you other ducks is what he would have those are people because he ended up going, but people well, he doesn't know he probably thinks we're weird. Who knows I don't know. But I just I'm like why didn't they just get another duck? And have it has a could have a friend. You know? Why are you laughing? Cain was like don't you? Eat duck. Flicked you've never had in that. You didn't love about it. Like if you're dot com team. They're completely doing their own thing and totally happy. And then they're killed. You know, they're happy up into the point. I'm totally fine. With know that he wasn't happy until he was dead because he thought oh my gosh. This dog wants to play with me, and then tunnel and think about that all the hell is this thing. Eat me up as possible. It just bothers me. I don't know. I just I just I don't know. This whole thing is. We just got to let nature do its thing. Yeah. Well, I love dogs. But that's the time that that are the dogs. And this is time a dog made me mad. You know? It was if it was like a bunch of ducks in that puddle. I'd be like, yeah. Go kill bunch of dog. I don't care is this this one it had a sad it aligns with the original statement. No. Because those are they're happy fine ducks that got friends but being attacked by a dog. Yeah. No. But I'm totally fine. With that. The thing is is that this duck was sad attack. Yes. Okay. I said that's why I think this dog is a jerk. I think I'm starting to clearly see where you're coming. This. Doc. I read this last night. I was so mad like we're we're talking about this dog story. Bothers me right depressing and his little puddle was it was a mud puddle. He lived in a mud puddle for crying out loud. He was like a what do they call the? Here's like a urging. Doc. Thank goodness. We have to take a break..

Bernie Sanders Trevor Mallard Howard Schultz Pacific island Twitter Orlando Starbucks Elizabeth Warren New York City New Zealand Mallard Trevor United States Dana bash Joe Kelley Ross Perot Facebook depression Kamala Camelot Harrison
"pacific islands" Discussed on X96

X96

16:15 min | 3 years ago

"pacific islands" Discussed on X96

"Schedule your cleaning with Zerorez today. Watch this. Get up on the wire. Okay. No net. Okay. Zerorezify. Well, you're you're a pro. I just. Yeah. I've been at this game awhile. You know, the cast of the marvelous MRs Maicel? Yes. Oh, let me backtrack a little bit. I just thought of this. The the sag awards were last night. I think and. Mahershala Ali one. Well, I heard a lot of people on CNN discussion about saying Mahershala except they weren't saying Herschel you've taught me how to save a Herschel. And but they were saying I'm on a one woman quest. They were saying they were saying how do people usually mispronounced wait some some her? She was easy for Gina but zero reservoir is not. Okay. Crystal Nichols, just walked into the room. And she's she looks a little disheveled. Yes, she got up and put makeup on this morning talking about she walked in. I I heard some bottles clank, and then she stuck her tongue out. Anyway, they were trying to say Mahershala, but they kept saying I can't even pronounce it wrong anymore. Good. And then I r l Sears does. I also heard a CNN. Employees refer to Alan Alda as as Alan Alda know, what were they fifteen years. I don't know. Also in giving a nice speech because he won a special award was Alan Alda. No fire that person Allan album. Anyway, the marvelous MRs Mazel cast they are in contract negotiations and every single one of the principals in the cast says, okay, we're we would love to do another season. We all want raises Stam, right? Well, they they're they've won a bunch of awards. The practice has been employed by the broadcast networks for decades with NBC's. This is us. As a recent example, and also has been adapted by the screaming platforms illustrated by recent salary bumps after season two for the actors of Netflixing stranger things and thirteen reasons why. Now the marvelous MRs late Mazel originally picked up with a two season order the period series from Amy Sherman Paladino was renewed for a third season. In may months ahead of its November premier since launch. Mrs Mazel has been in an award juggernaut winning a slew of top awards, including Emmys and Golden Globes, and they're in the whole cast when you say, oh, the whole cast gets raised. I think it's they're all essential to to that show. They all deserve a raise for sure. Yeah. You know? But it's it's interesting, and I don't have the figures in front of me. But if you still if you compare probably the viewing audience for the marvelous, MRs Mazel to the viewing audience for the big bang theory. Not going to get that kind of money. They can say they all want to raise. They're not going to get a million dollars each and episode. Yeah, it's a it's a negligence. It's a little tiny show compared to that. Anyway, this that's an expensive show to make. I bet that shows that's true multiple times more expensive to make the big bang theory, hundreds miles separated to Utah men who met the same fate over the weekend buried in avalanches snowmobiling in Utah and one in Idaho. The first victim was identified as thirty nine year old Scott Peterson junior from Monticello Utah snowmobiling in dark canyon basin in the LaSalle mountains Friday, he was buried his body recovered Saturday afternoon. San Juan county expressed their condolences saying it is in times of heartbreaking tragedy that we pull together and support the members in our community. The Pearson family has been a consistent example of lifting others, and now we have the opportunity to love and support them. He wasn't the only one though thirty five year old. Tommy Hawkins from Layton lost his life in an avalanche in Idaho. He was. Snowmobiling up there. People have posted in his memory that they looked up to him. He was a talented man in so many ways said his friends it is because of the heavy snows the avalanche danger in the back country, still very very high. The driver of corvette that drove off I fifteen near the virgin river gorge rolled one hundred and fifty feet down the mountain had to be rescued on Friday. Surprises doesn't have happened. More often. That's a really well. I'm surprised. He's alive. Yeah. That's a dangerous. A stretch of road. The crash happened just before four thirty between Saint George in mesquite, corvette went over the side and down the mountain according to a statement from the Bieber county or the beaver dam little field. Fire department crews worked their way to the victim provided at advance life support and utilized a low angle rope rescue for extraction. A man was taken to the local hospital in critical condition, but he is alive. He will recover they say a witness to the accident saw the car go off the road and there it's under investigation. But they're saying excessive speed was probably what caused that. Tragedy. Trevor. The world's loneliest duck. Duck. Has died after being attacked by dogs all on a remote Pacific island that he called home. Trevor was something of a celebrity in the tiny nation of Louis. He was the only bird of his kind living on the island. How he he had arrived there in two thousand eighteen it is unclear how Trevor got me he lived on a roadside puddle. He lived in a puddle 'cause they're snow river early. Puzzle during his in his short life where he was regularly fed and taken care of by local people showed up in new in January last year. After a big storm think he flew or blue here said Ray, Finley newish chamber of commerce chief in the person who behind Trevor's Facebook page. It's soon he came from New Zealand, but it also is possible he came from Tonga or another Pacific island. He was a Mallard. So we call him Trevor Mallard after a local New Zealand politician and the name stuck during his short, but happy life on the Trevor lived in a large puddle. There are no rivers or streams or lakes here. So Trevor chose to live in a puddle. And though he has. Seen is the world's largest or he was seen as the world's loneliest duck. It seemed he was anything but lonely Trevor's puddle was regularly checked on by concerned locals and even the islands fire brigade who would fill up the puddle if the water levels got too low. This is the saddest story and to have it all end with him being attacked by dogs. There were calls by some locals to bring in another duck as Trevor's mate. But Trevor's home is only big enough for one duck. Doc puddle people in New York do all the time. How about your sign off? This is a one dot puddle. He did however become friends with a rooster chicken and a bird native to newish who all lived near the puddle, the rooster, the chicken and the Vecchio were looking a little forlorn today. Wandering around near the dry puddle looking for Trevor this is going to be a children's book after a year driving around with a bag of oats in my car. I'll miss the stops on the way to and from work to feed Trevor he captured many hearts, and he will definitely be missed. She was one of a kind. He was an original Trevor the world's loneliest. Kamala harris. Did not mention President Donald Trump by name as she officially announced her run for president on Sunday. But she did issue a sharp mocking attack on his relationship with Russia in one of her sharpest attacks on Trump's perceived coziness with Russia. She decried a time, quote when we have foreign powers infecting the White House like malware. As a member of the senate's select committee on intelligence Kamla Harris has been cautious in how she has described the ongoing probes into Russian interference in the US election, and particularly allegations that the Trump campaign colluded the Russians with the Russians, but she deflected questions about whether Trump should be impeached stating that she wanted to see Muller finish his investigation. I I like her a lot so far. She's my gal, by the way, Trump has lifted. Sanctions on. Three businesses linked to Russian oligarch and Putin ally. Oleg Oleg Dera pasta on Sunday. The companies have all agreed to unprecedented transparency for treasury into their operations by undertaking extensive ongoing auditing certification and reporting requirements, and so this this oligarch who was sanctioned in part for his ties to Vladimir Putin still stand, but Trump is lifted the sanctions now, I don't think I don't think he did it because Ladimir Putin wanted him to you better. Get some of this stuff done. We talked about before your office. Oh, no, no list of things. No, no. This is this is just good news practice and a a Donald Trump, sculpt course down. I think it was done at mar a Lago had employed a lot of undocumented workers. But then they got fired because of the people started looking well, it was because of the government shutdown. They had spent years on the on the staff of Trump's golf course winning employee of the month awards and receiving glowing letters of recommendation, some were trusted enough to hold the keys to Eric Trump's weekend home, they were experienced enough to know that when Donald Trump order chicken wings. They were to serve him to orders on one plate. But on January eighteenth about a dozen employees at Trump, National Golf course. Oh was in Westchester county. New York they were summoned one by one to talk with the human resources executive from Trump headquarters during the meetings, they were fired because they are undocumented. According to an interview with the workers and their attorney the fired workers are from Latin America, the sudden firings which were previously unreported follow last year's revelations from undocumented labor at a Trump club in New Jersey where employees were subsequently dismissed the firing show. Trump's business was relying on undocumented workers, even as the president demanded a border wall. Yes out such known about this for years. I'm wondering why. Now, fire them. Well, gets does look people are noticing. Well, it's because it's because of the people that are looking into it even more, and it's following a story in the New York Times last year that featured on documented worker at another Trump club in Bedminster. And after that story Trump's company fired on documented worker at the Bedminster club. So Eric Trump said, well, we're making a broad effort to identify any employee who has given false and fraudulent documents. Eric Trump was asked about something. Yeah. Ask him about it. Well, listen because they had keys to his house true. And listen while we're working on our pronunciation Marshall. And all that I believe it's his name is pronounced epic. All right. That's it. Sports sports, weather traffic. So so the Pro Bowl was yesterday. And nobody cares. Nobody ever cares. Even the people in the game. Don't care. It's trip to Hawaii. And in the AFC always wins. And it's not very exciting. Mentioning it. Then the jazz. That's exciting. They continue to win. They beat the timber wolves one twenty five one eleven they play next on Wednesday in Portland, whether it's gonna be nice thirty eight we're not so smoggy yet. But it's coming back. So do try to her tail you're driving. If you can't today carries going to try to get a right up to Park City sharing. I. Working on it. Right. Probably. Mariah cody. Oh, thank you. Cody. And traffic. I've got green cameras all up and down the Wasatch front so far. According to the dot website. If you see something, and you want to share it with other friends of the program, you can text it to us three three nine eight six. Thank you. Listen, you got plumbing. Now, we've got about five minutes here. But we do. No, I was counting on Amy Donaldson to be here with sports, but. Uh-huh. Builder. All right. All right. We got like five minutes here. If you have some do you wanna talk about yesterday or we could? Yesterday. We had a great time with our. Your are. Life brunch. At squatters that was really terrific and get again. Thank everybody who came and we will have a recording of that. They're not safe for work podcasts. That'll be available in a few a couple of days yet. We're gonna we're gonna post a bunch. Maybe people don't know. So we're going to be here all day today. Recording interviews with filmmakers and actors and directors, and we're going to post all of those at the ex ninety six pot radio from hell podcast. And then once those are all posted, we'll then post the not safer work episode of the podcast. I did have an Email here from somebody to go over a little bit. I don't know. Why people think things like this? This is from a guy named John. And he says I see that Franken weather. That's Brett Benson used to do. Whether he was the way he was like, the lead weather guy on FOX for a long time. I see the Franken weather has done his one year, non compete obligation and is now on channel five. Will you guys still have him back on once in a while? So so he somehow thinks that because he's on channel five we don't like him anymore. I think indicates on KSL all the time. So he's in a bowl. What? No, it isn't make Brett Benson a bad, man. No. But if he's associated with KSL he thinks that, but there are people who work at channel five that. I like, but but we don't have them on the show. We don't have them on the show ever. Jimmy Martin is on channel Martin is on channel five AM on the show. We have him on the show. Okay. I mean there there there are people. Actually, let's turn this around. We have tried to have people on and the folks at KSL won't let them beyond with Bill. You have tried to interview. Amanda Dixon on your podcast. That's true. No, it's I don't think it's the channel five won't let won't let her. She doesn't want him. She won't do it. Because we've talked not very nice. Well, yeah. But I know, but I don't say anything bad about Brett Benson. He's a nice guy. I like him. Okay. We'll have Franken weather on probably listening. There's nothing to report right now. That's why he hasn't been on with this. But once that storm comes to to knock the smog out. But of course, what we'd have him on again..

Trevor Mallard Donald Trump Eric Trump Trump MRs Mazel Mahershala Ali CNN Vladimir Putin Brett Benson Franken Alan Alda MRs Maicel New York KSL president corvette Zerorez Crystal Nichols Gina NBC