20 Episode results for "Pablo Picasso"

Managing Stress

The Daily Meditation Podcast

09:12 min | 1 year ago

Managing Stress

"This is episode. Two thousand thirteen of the daily guided meditation. How are you doing today? I'm Mary Medically and I hope you are doing well. And if you have been following along with this weeks series. It's a brand new series. We launched into this week. I hope you are cultivating inner joy. That is the theme for this week's Ceres remembering your joy you may not always remember what it is that makes you happy. It's so easy to get caught up in the drama and overwhelm of. What's going on around you that you can easily forget yourself. And what makes you happy? In this weeks series. You are going to discover insight and meditation techniques to help you cultivate inner joy. Joy Comes from within you. It's not something that happens out side of you is something you cultivate from with and before I share with you an affirmation to help you cultivate inner joy. I want to share some insight from some research. Scientists have discovered that when you go through a great shock or trauma you might not be able to really give voice to what you're experiencing. It can be difficult to articulate how you're feeling or even what's going on or what is happening to you or the world when you are in the midst of shock or trauma and I would say a pandemic such as we're going through now qualifies as trauma or shock and so in order to find your voice. They can take some time. What can help you is if you draw or paint or color or write in a journal or write music or play music or dads if you can draw from your own creative expression this is you your joy your emotions if you can draw from that that can help you to find and remember your joy so it's by being who you are that you find yourself again and I want to share with you. One of my favorite quotes. It's by Pablo Picasso and I have this on a postcard right above my desk. I got this postcard when I was spending Christmas in Barcelona Spain a couple years ago and I often refer to this postcard and the quote. When I'm really not sure how to get started on something or I'm having a hard time processing something and the quote is inspiration exists but it has to find you working. I inspiration exists but it has to find you working so when you jump in and start expressing yourself through writing through song through painting through through dry through whatever it is you do through movement to cooking you will find your voice so your affirmation for this week is much longer than affirmations that I usually share with you and it's an affirmation from Joe Tisch and Davey. Who are the leaders at a Nanda Dot? Org and I recently listened to an amazing Webinar by them regarding how to manage your emotions in challenging times and this is where I received my own Meditation Teacher Training and Yoga Teacher Training and this quote was so ideal for this week that it's longer but it's worth it so the quote is this. I'll guide you through it for a few rounds so that you can remember it you may even want to write it down or you might have a great memory so settle yourself down now and guide you through this affirmation and affirmation is a positive statement. That helps you to focus your thoughts. It's a great way to find your joy when you repeat something has great meaning to you. That reminds you of who you are so sit up straight enclosure is and keep them slightly elevated upward this keeps your thoughts uplifted simply uplifting your eyes and as you relax your body mentally of firm or repeat out loud. I welcome everything that comes to me as an opportunity for further growth. I welcome everything that comes to me as an opportunity for further growth. I welcome everything that comes to me. As an opportunity for further growth you can repeat the affirmation few more times silently. You can whisper it and know that everything you need is within you. The full guided affirmations are as always on this. Been own meditation APP. You can try the APP for two weeks. Free Access to receive a joy journal and a joy guide and over two thousand guided meditations. You are so worth slowing down for

Pablo Picasso Spain Joe Tisch Davey two weeks
Affirmation to Manage Stress

The Daily Meditation Podcast

09:29 min | 10 months ago

Affirmation to Manage Stress

"This is episode one thousand, thirty, two of the daily Meditation Podcast I'm Mary Medically and here you are getting ready to give yourself a little more peace, energy and clarity. How are you doing today? Just stop for a moment and think about how you're doing. and. Consider the challenge you have this week. which is to stress less to notice each day some area of your life where you'd like to reduce stress and think of one way you could. Decrease stress for yourself. When you're undergoing a lot of stress especially. Chronic or acute types of stress. You often can feel as though this is just your pace. You don't even realize that you're under so much stress. So this week for you to begin to slow down and just. Become aware of how you're doing and to become aware of your stress level. And to become aware of what's causing your stress. So, this is what I hope. You will find yourself doing each day this week. Now I WANNA share with you that I am over on instagram quite a bit these days actually every day where I share a little more insight, he could be a video to start your day or one to injure day. And also, there's a guide for you there. That has all the weeks meditation techniques including the breathing technique the mood draw the affirmation. All the techniques I share with. You are right there on instagram. So you also know that the full guided thirty minute meditations are on the SIP and meditation. APP You can try that APP for two weeks. Free access to over two thousand guided meditations including weekly Journal, so you would get a stress less journal for this week and also your own downloadable printable guide for yourself. This is for you if you want to go a little more deeply into meditation. For you here now you may be settled down getting ready to meditate or going about your day doing the meditation techniques I share with you during the busiest part of your day. It's all good. And I want also share with you a little insight about some research. That I found in regard to stress, you can imagine the amount of research there is. For such a subject. Well, you may be interested to know that the top stress is the death of a loved one. Divorce! Losing a job. Losing, your health. And moving those are the top. Universal types of stressors. Well in the United States where I live and in many westernized countries. But especially in the US research shows that the top stressor. Is Money. Worrying about having enough money so. You might think about money in relation to the stress. You are experiencing. You might have a great job and security, and so you're feeling pretty secure with money, but maybe you don't really follow a budget to well, or you feel like someone in your family squanders money, or maybe you feel like you squander money. You just don't have a good hold or good grasp on your budget. You might be out of work and with the uncertainty with. The economy and many other aspects of the world these days you could be having a lot of fear and anxiety in regard to money I know that is definitely a top stressor today. So I have for you a meditation technique. It's Monday I always start every Monday with an affirmation. And your affirmation is now is my time, and affirmation is a positive statement focused on an intention. So. Your intention is to reduce your stress two stress less this week. So, The affirmation now is my time. Is All about you grasping now? Because so many times it's easy to wait until certain things happen before you start to. Deal with certain kinds of stress. But there's no better time like the present to deal with stress in your life so now your time stress is one of the top indicators in many diseases including cancer. And heart disease, the number, one killer of both men and women in the United. States where I live, and also in many westernized countries, so take care of. Such. A pivotal part of your life in managing stress. Do your mind body. Your spirit, and those around you a favor by seizing the moment to deal with your stress, and that's what your challenge is really about this week, so you might even keep journal which I always encourage you to do. Regarding your stress level. Notice it each day. Notice what you're trying to eliminate something new each day and look back over your week when we come to the end of this series and notice, if you're still letting go of those stresses that you selected for each day, or maybe you notice that the stress use elected really wasn't the stress that you should have been focusing on. That would have really made a difference, because sometimes we take out lines stress. And deal with that instead of dealing head on with stress, and that's okay, because sometimes it just takes. Starting the process and then. You notice the real culprit. One of my favorite sayings. Is By Pablo Picasso and I got this on a postcard when I was. In Barcelona Spain couple of years ago, and it is inspiration this, but has to find us working so once you start digging into your stress, and what's causing it and how to help relieve it then you'll start to find solutions that you may not. Find at this moment. That may not be so obvious right now. So as you settle yourself down and get ready to meditate to repeat this affirmation. Repeat out loud, using the full power of your voice. Now is my time. Now is my time. Now is my time. And then. Repeat, the affirmation in your natural speaking voice. Now is my time. Now is my time. Now is my time. And then repeated in a whisper. How is my time? My. Time. Is My. Take this affirmation. Repeating it mentally. To your south! And, then like go the affirmation, and allow yourself simply to be. You are so worth slowing down for. A

instagram United States Pablo Picasso weekly Journal heart disease Barcelona Spain thirty minute two weeks
1226: 3 Steps to Beat Procrastination by Cylon George of Spiritual Living For Busy People on Productivity & Time Management

Optimal Living Daily

09:16 min | 2 years ago

1226: 3 Steps to Beat Procrastination by Cylon George of Spiritual Living For Busy People on Productivity & Time Management

"This is optimal. Living daily episode twelve twenty six three steps to beat procrastination by salon, George of spiritual living for busy, people dot com. And I'm just a molecule very own personal narrator today and every day even on Passover, which is today. There are no interviews here. Just short episodes where simply find the best blogs and get permission from the authors to narrate them for you to help you. Live more meaningful life cycle, ongoing free audiobook from a bunch of different authors. If you're listening from a computer or YouTube, I'd recommend using a free podcast app where you can subscribe and have episodes sent you automatically every day. Most listeners subscribe through a free podcast absolutes get right to the post and start. Optimizing your life. Three steps to beat procrastination, but on George of spiritual living for busy, people dot com. Quote, only put off until tomorrow, will you are willing to die having left undone. Pablo Picasso Seve always wanted to do something say write a book travel around the world more run a marathon. You have in your mind bunch of reasons why you have not been able to even start working on your goal or dream here. Too. Busy or too tired more too afraid. He say these are reasons why you have not started. But you know, the truth, these are excuses, plain and simple. You may have heard that excuses or the source of procrastination, but they're not. That's just a symptom of the real problem. The real reason by progressive nation, the real reason behind you're procrastinating. Follow the pain, what do I mean as long as the pain of the status quo? Does not exceed the pain of taking action. You will continue to procrastinate, for example. You may absolutely hate your job. You may daydream about starting your own business. On the side or preparing yourself for your dream career. He promising yourself that you'll begin taking steps towards your goal. But it's always tomorrow and tomorrow never comes why? Because as much as you hit your job the pain involved starting a new business or career is even more painful. The reason why we struggled procrastination is that we aren't honest enough with ourselves to state the truth as plainly as this. We fool ourselves into thinking that we have enough willpower to do more painful things, but it's simply not true. It sounds less noble that our primary motivating forces to choose the least painful or most pleasurable option, but if you're willing to examine your own experience. Honestly, you'll know his true. Here's another more common. Example, you have a burning desire to lose ten pounds in the next month or two, you know, what is required for you to accomplish this goal. But you have not been able to lose weight in years you keep saying to yourself. I know I can do this once I decide it's time to lose weight. But is that true? Didn't she already decide months ago the truth is that doing what you've been doing before is less painful than taking action to lose the weight? So instead of deluding yourself with stories might not just tell the truth. The reason why it's hard for you to lose weight is because his less painful to eat more and exercise less. The reason why I'm not working on starting a new business or career is at his less painful for me to stay in Mike fee job. And I prefer to do that right now hitting rock bottom. So what motivates people to take action and do things they'd rather? Not do they must hit rock bottom, or at least be approaching that point. What might that? Look like, you experience a panic attack on your way to work so severe that you almost run someone over where your doctor looks even the eye and tells you that you may not live as your kids grow up if you continue with your current lifestyle, all of a sudden, the foreboding sense of pain associated with your current choices. Suddenly becomes very real. In. The present moment does win the pain of the status quo begins to say. Surpass the pain of taking action his powerful motivating force. There's only two problems with it. Number one. It's painful as heck. Then again, isn't that the point rock? Bottom experiences can be effective because they're painful enough to motivate you to endure the pain of making a change. But the pain of having a face reality. You've been denying for years can cause so much spiritual pain he feel like you're literally dying and number two. It's unpredictable because no one can engineer a rock. Bottom moment. Not only that rock. Bottom. Moments. Are highly subjective. One person's rock-bottom may merely be another prison speed bump and make STAN over a long period of time rather than in one dramatic swoop. Actually, there's a third problem. Number three. It might not work even after experiencing the pain of a rock. Bottom moment, it might not work without strength, courage or the right guidance. You may get swallowed up by the pain in stay stuck who wants to wait around for excruciating painful moments that can strike at any time. And may not even work in the end, not the best strategy for motivating yourself to take action. If you'd prefer another option, here's what you can try instead, a less painful way about of procrastination, you don't have to hit rock bottom before making meaningful change in your life. Here's what you can do. Instead. Number one, tell the truth you must start by declaring the truth of your situation. Why do you stay in an abusive relationship, the pain and uncertainty of leaving outweigh the pain of enduring verbal or physical violence? Why do you not write the novel evolves? Wanted to write the pain of possible rejection and criticism outweigh the pain of not exercising creative gifts. Why do you continue to allow your finances to spiral out of control the pain of self discipline in denial in the short term away, the pain of continuing to pile up debt number to allow the truth to expose the real cost of the status. Quo to step is really a consequence of you taking the first steps serious. Really if you tell the truth every day about why you are where you are. If you refused to blame others, you'll be into experience, the true cost of the status quo in the present moment rather than as a distant way off in the future possibility bike -nology that you are choosing painful things that will become more and more painful over time. You realize that the hard choices even putting off are not as hard in comparison. Does he will feel more motivated take action to do what seems harder now to reduce the possibility of even more pain in the future? Number three, take action. Let the increased pain of not taking action motivate you to do something today. Actually, right now, if you can manage in some cases, it might mean taking some small actions such as opening a word, document and other cases, a means taking massive action such as leaving a relationship. More sending out a manuscript. Don't let procrastination hold you back. You don't have to remain a slave to procrastination. I only need to do. Learn how to harness pain to your advantage. So you can do the things you've been most afraid to do don't waste another moment. Telling yourself misleading stories about why you're not taking action tell the truth feel the pain take action repeat do these steps long enough. He may very well. Eventually learn to be procrastination forever. You just listen to the post titled three steps to be procrastination by salon, Georgia spiritual living for busy, people dot com. Come visit him online and show him your support than mean. A lot progressive nation is a common struggle that I hear from listeners, hopefully, thus helpful for you. I'm always trying to bring articles that you want to hear is you want to help support this podcast for free subscribing is actually a huge help. Even though it doesn't cost you anything most podcast apps are free and make it supercomputer. Listen on the go. You can also listen on Spotify Pandora, Amazon's Mark speakers or there's even an optimal living daily app on both iphone and Android. Whatever is most convenient for you. I don't care just subscribing is a huge help. But I'll do for today. Thank you for listening sticking around until the end have a great weekend. If you're listening in real time, and I'll see you tomorrow for Easter Sunday where your automobile life awaits. Hey, this is Dan from the optimal finance daily podcast, which is a lot like this show except more focused on personal finance Justin hand picks, the best posts he can find from blogs and authors, like remit, Sadie, Mr. money, moustache and more. And I read them to you five days a week. So if you enjoy this podcast, come on over and subscribe to optimal finance daily to and together. We'll optimize your financial life. You've been listening to Optima living daily be sure to hit the subscribe button to stay up to date on each new episode and head to old podcast dot com. That's L D podcast dot com for a free gift as well. As more actionable tips and resources to help you maximize your potential thanks for joining us. And remember, your optimal? Life awaits.

George YouTube Pablo Picasso Seve engineer STAN Georgia Dan Spotify Justin hand Mr. money Amazon ten pounds five days
Picasso

Everything Everywhere Daily

10:36 min | 4 months ago

Picasso

"He has been called the most famous artists of the twentieth century. His work singlehandedly defined artistic style. He was more loved and criticised than any other artists in the world. He created over. Twenty thousand works and legend says he could pay for a meal with justice signature. Learn more about pablo picasso. Spain's greatest artists on this episode of everything everywhere daily. This episode is sponsored by the tourist office of spain. Spain isn't just the home of the world's most famous painter pablo picasso. It was and is the home to many of the world's greatest artists across many different mediums chefs. Ferran adria and joan. Roca have both had restaurants named the best in the world painter. Salvador dali el greco and francisco goya all hailed from spain architects anton gowdy in santiago calatrava spanish actors antonio banderas penelope cruz heavier. Bardem and benicio del toro all come from spain director. Pedro meadow varas walla singers enrica and julio inglesias and opera star plus yo domingo all come from spain you can start researching your dream trip to spain today by visiting spain dot info. Were you can get everything you need to know. Plan your spanish adventure to begin any discussion on picasso you. I have to start with his full name. The full name of the artist known as picasso given to him at birth is pablo diego. Jose francisco de paulo one nipple. Maria de las raimondo. Cipriano dias antigua trinidad ruis e picasso. Picasso is actually an italian name that comes from his mother early in his career. He was playing around with different names. He tried qasr and picasso which of his mother's and father's name avoided his father's surname of we just because it was too common in spain. He didn't think pablo breweries would stand out. He also may have been superstitious. His was a failed painter and he didn't want to use the same name he did for his work. He explained the decision to use the name. To hungarian artist george brasi quote. Picasso was stranger more resonant than ruis. You know what appealed to me about that name well. It was undoubtedly the double s which is fairly unusual in spain. Picasso is of italian origin as you know and the named person bears or adopts has importance. Can you imagine me calling myself ruis. Pablo ruiz giggle zeh ruis or one nipple. Men gave ruis end quote. Well he had a point so the artist we call. Picasso was born on october twenty fifth eighteen eighty one in malaga in his birth was difficult in the midwife who delivered him actually thought he was stillborn as mentioned before his father was a failed painter. Who mostly earned money teaching and serving as a curator for museum. He did excel in teaching art in so far as one of his pupils was his son. Picasso was taking lessons with his father at the age of seven and by the age of nine he had completed his first painting called les picador. It is a painting of a man riding a horse and a bull fight to be fair. It does not look at all like something a nine year old would create. Compare this what most kids have opened the refrigerator. And you'll see a huge difference when he was thirteen. His family moved to barcelona where he was admitted to the school of fine arts where his father had gotten a job is father persuaded the school to allow his son to take an entrance exam for the advanced class. The testing usually took a month and was for students much older than he was. Because finish the test in a week and was admitted. At sixteen he was sent to spain's top college madrid's real academia debate. S artists descend fernando. He wasn't a great student. He didn't care much for formal study and was really only interested in art. Covert in madrid. He had access to museums with works of great masters which would influence his career. Here is where. I'm going to start to run into problems. Costlo was a painter. And this is a podcast to really understand paintings. You have to see them. And podcasts are audio medium. So i encourage you to actually go and check out some of the works. I'll be referencing in this episode. It'll clarify everything. So if you only think of picasso was a cubist painter. There is a lot more to him than that perhaps more than any other artist. His style changed many times over. His life changed dramatically around the turn of the century. Picasso became a young man began traveling and experiencing more which changed his artistic style. Prior to nineteen hundred. His art was more realistic than anything else. In one thousand nine hundred. He traveled to paris for the first time. Which was the center of the art world in europe and soon after he began what was known as his blue period. His paintings from this period are known for their use of the color blue and blue screens. Many of the figures in the paintings are gone and the overall mood is somewhat depressing is blue period lasted from hundred ninety one to nineteen four from one thousand nine hundred ninety six. He entered his rose period where he painted images warmer colors that were less somber in more light for seven. Seventy nine hundred nine. He began to create work that most people would start to think of as a picasso known as african period. His painting used more angular images which were inspired by african sculptures. He saw it in exhibition one of his most famous paintings. The young ladies of agnone came from this period and is currently in the collection at the museum of modern art new york many historians call this period a pro cuba's period from nineteen o nine to one thousand nine hundred eighteen. He began his cubism period. Which is probably what he's best known for. Cubism is a style. That takes geometric elements in assembles. Them together in a type of collage. In fact he may have cut up images from magazines to experiment with the style in the nineteen twenties. He changed his style yet again when he began experimenting with neo-classicism and surrealism in the nineteen thirties as picasso entered into his fifties. He didn't really adhere to anyone style. He changed styles and combined elements from different styles. He also started to become extremely prolific. It is estimated that over the course of his life he created approximately one hundred and forty seven thousand eight hundred works of art. This included thirteen thousand five hundred paintings. A hundred thousand prints and engravings three hundred sculptures and ceramics and thirty four thousand illustrations. He also dabbled in writing. Having written over three hundred poems into place. Much of this was all done at the tail end of his career. The stories about picasso are almost as famous as art in one thousand nine hundred thousand. He was accused of stealing the mona lisa. Listen to my episode about the mona lisa for more about this story but basically he was accused by police officer in paris who just didn't like modern artists and assume that only a modern artists who hated classical art could have stolen it. He was often photographed wearing a black and white striped shirt. That shirt was known as a britain striped shirt and was the uniform of the french seamen in brittany. It had exactly twenty one stripes which represented the twenty one victories of napoleon coco. Chanel brought back in nineteen seventeen and that was one. Picasso started wearing it in his later. Life rumors floated around that he would often pay for his meals by just signing his name or doing a quick drying he wants refuse to do so saying quote. I'm buying a meal not the whole restaurant unquote in another anecdote. One of his fans in paris asked him to draw doodle on a piece of paper picasso then said that will be thirty thousand dollars what the fan replied then only took five seconds. Not picasso said that took a lifetime. Picasso was famous for being a ladies man technically. He was only married twice but he had many affairs and mistresses. One of his. Most famous affairs was with marie. Therese walter in nineteen twenty seven when he was forty five you notice on the street and approached her and said quote miss. You have an interesting face. I would like to do your portrait. I m picasso on boat which you have to admit is a great pickup line. She was only seventeen. And i never heard of him but they ended up spending years together and actually had a child. Three of picasso's children are still alive as is one of his ex wives. Francois gilo is still around at the age of ninety nine and painting inter studio in new york city. Perhaps his most famous work is gernika. It's an enormous wall-sized painting which was done in the cuba style in nineteen nine hundred seven. It was created after the bombing of the basque city of gernika by german and italian forces on behalf of the spanish government. He lived in paris during the german occupation during world war. Two once a german officer came to his apartment and saw photo of the painting when he asked picasso. Did you do this. Picasso replied no you did. In one thousand nine thirty nine gernika was sent to the united states. For safekeeping and picasso requested. It not be brought back to spain until democracy was restored it was returned to spain in one thousand nine hundred one and today is on display at the museum. Radio sofia in madrid picasso became the first and only living artists to have a in the main gallery of the louvre in paris. It was in celebration of his ninetieth birthday. Picasso passed away in nineteen seventy three at the age of ninety one. He was probably one of the first celebrity artists of the modern world. Many notable artists who predated picasso often died in obscurity and didn't become famous until after their deaths. Picasso died with a net worth estimated to be around five hundred million dollars today. Several of his paintings have sold for over one hundred million dollars each. He is unquestionably one of the greatest artists of the twentieth century. As he himself said quote. When i was a child. My mother said to me if you become a soldier you'll be a general if you become a monk you'll end up as a pope instead. I became a painter and wound up as picasso executive producer of everything everywhere. Daily is james mcculloch associate producer. Is thor thomsen. Today's five star review comes from podcast republic listener ryan harris writes. I'm so glad. I stumbled upon this show as i love the history of things and also trivia. It is phenomenal short and to the point. I've binged the i one hundred episodes in just three days while at work can't wait for more. Thank you thank you ryan. That is an amazing review and thanks to all of you who've left reviews. Remember if you leave a five star review you too can have your view read on the show.

picasso spain Picasso pablo picasso Salvador dali el greco anton gowdy antonio banderas penelope cruz Pedro meadow varas walla enrica julio inglesias yo domingo pablo diego Jose francisco de paulo Maria de las raimondo Cipriano dias trinidad ruis pablo breweries george brasi Pablo ruiz
The Best Way To Learn To Make Money

The Tai Lopez Show

15:18 min | 2 years ago

The Best Way To Learn To Make Money

"Jack. Remember what Pablo Picasso said in early nineteen hundreds of sit good artists copy great artists. Steal the process of you shadowing somebody who knows how to do. So is the process of steely ethically. You're not stealing in sneaky way. Because they know you're learning from them because they're taking you over there. So you wanna make more money Govind seventy making more money than you and shadow over there. So up into the show. What do you do what you don't know what do in life? What do you do when you don't know how to make any money? What you do when you feel lost? Let's talk about it. Today's daily diary, podcast, whatever you wanna call it. I'm still here Manhattan net. I got this Instagram message from a follower that I've never met before ash Tukhy and she said, Hello tie. Whether you do would you don't know what you're good at or aren't good at anything in particular. I feel like I'd be a horrible business owner, but I wanna earn money. Lots of it. And I wanna love what I do. So well, we've got what they clear there. Also, lots of money at wants to love what they do votes. That's a good combo, I reverse the priority. Order love which wanna do something to make more money than others, but you can make plenty of money with just about anything even the things that people deller kids, you can't make money at like art music, fashions there's still money in. He's got to think creatively. Here's my answer to her today at twelve thirty four PM is it at you have to go shadows laughed apprentice under someone who is really good at something. Ideally for Europe war. That's what I did. That person's way of thinking and skills lowly will rub off on you. So let's talk about. How common of sons this is why it's no longer follow. Because for thousands of years of Zil. This is the way people. Learn like you wanted to learn how to make your dad was shoot maker. And that's why people's last name is still shoemaker or their last name is, you know, Smith son because they were son of Smith a blacksmith now five Florida today. There was a structural shift in the world that you could trace it too many things it's probably traced to war or were to was a bigger structural change to the world. You can imagine my grandma growing up my grandma lived through World War Two she's born in Germany, her family's from Berlin at his wild. Because she goes, well, she never overtly said this but growing up I was kinda raised by my grandma. My dad was. Prison when I was born my mom was a single mom. She had my grandma babysit. A lot left me with my grandmother. Mom, my mom went to work em. I grant my grandma I realized at some point in my life every single day thought about World War Two. I mean every day of her life, and this is fifty years after World War Two his over. She still thought about that. How cataclysmic it was a lot of our family got killed the bombs that America dropped dropped off. For Lynn on my grandma's house by grandma's family was very wealthy. They weren't anymore after World War Two because of the bombings. And so on migrants brother was killed in the war. He was a soldier who shot in the stomach by the Russians in. So why am I telling you this? What is the do with this? While give you a background to how we got to where we are today at how to fix you prewar to the world is still very rural. People lived in the countryside. People grew up with their mom and dad. Following World War Two about a quarter of a billion people or twenty five percent of the world almost is somehow affecting either someone's killed, but more than that people move. You had to move my grandma had to leave Berlin she came to the United States. So when people mass when there's a mass exodus in mass movement migration. What happens? Whoa. People oftentimes move to big cities and families were broken up and small towns were broken up. So what starts happening and this is just World War Two. I'm just giving kind of data point. What happens is all of a sudden people don't have their family. They don't have the traditions that have gone on for thousands of years of how to learn stuff. So out of that rose modern institutions there was institution before the universities before. But not at the scale that they were now the work. World became more industrial also because of World War. Two more factories were built a large rise in economic growth. America became extremely wealthy after World War Two the war engine that built the GPS and the airplanes all that factory was still there after the war's over in the in the mid nineteen forties. And so people went to work and may more money in the fifties came in those fluence in the sixties came in a lot of kids were born. So I'll said how do you educate all these kids when you're in the city when you're working in a factory, you send them the college. In college have lots of good things at the beginning. If you went college, guess what you were unique you have nineteen seventy if you had a college degree. I mean, most people did it you're the first wave of people. So all said, you can get a job, and it's a very prestigious thing fast forward to today. We no longer. Learn by shadowing, we no longer learn by practicing, although. Some things like the medical ill to become a medical doctor her cousin becoming a doctor. You do residency which is actually really smart that they do that. It's just they don't do that in other fields. If you're learning art history. They don't send you to live in Egypt for four years at the university. They send you to classroom to study Egyptology as opposed to send you to the pyramids to shadow under an archeologist who is digging around the Germans, that's how you learn. You shadow you apprentice, but you needed to the factory cookie cutter setting because all these people were now flooding universities because at first it was a great way to get a job made you stand out you made a significantly higher. Earning. It wasn't that expensive fast-forward day small colleges. You've never heard of private colleges are literally forty two thousand dollars a year. There's a Susan Pacific in California. How see their billboard wildland LAX going who pays for two thousand dollars a year to get into Sousa Pacific. Agree, apparently, people do not picking on that college. But I'm just saying it's absurd. Okay. To get undergraduate degree you're much better entre goes shadow under something. No, one of the sayings that people kinda know me for is the more. You learn the more you earn and actually took that from Warren Buffett a book, I read that he wrote for kindergarteners, and I was thinking man, I wish someone had told me that in school because. Yes, who'll does teach a lot of abstract stuff modern school you get history. You get social studies a little bit of math in English. But at the end of the day, it's not a lot of practical stuff. You know, one of the cool companies that that when my sponsor skill share. I like them because they're online learning platform, they got twenty thousand different classes in design business technology. You know, they got social media stuff as you know, I like photography creative writing one day are having our grandkids will look back and go you went to like a classroom. He went to a school. We took a school bus everyday is gonna go online companies like skill share. You know, it's similar to what I do in just going look. Let's skip the twenty years as be twenty years ahead of the learning curve. So if you want to deepen your professional skill set, you wanna start a side hustle. Explore new passion checkout skills share. It's one of those things about a time machine. Every like give me this when I was nineteen years old, for example for me. I think something real practical classing graphic design just something simple, even for me graphic designer because the world's moving towards websites marketing, if you have that I, you know, you know, a few little practical skills like that photography. I like I like writing I do a lot of copywriting. So that's something. That's on skill share that I think is kind of cool because those are things even now I'm always buying books. But if you're gonna learn it online in like an online library. I love that. So join millions of students already learning. On skill share today. They did a special offer for my listeners. So they're gonna give you two months of skill share for just ninety nine cents. Can't be debt. Right. It's cheaper than the Netflix. So. Yeah, that's right. It's gonna shares offering tilapia shows listeners two months of unlimited access to over twenty thousand classes for just ninety nine cents. So just go to skill shared dot com slash TI. My name skill shared dot com slash tie. Again. Go skill share dot com slash time to start or two months. Now start learning all the stuff they should've taught in school. A business owner spent a year shadowing under them or multiple ones. That's what I did. I went when I wanted to learn, you know, food production, my first businesses grass fed organic all food production. I went I lived in New Zealand with Gary towns in who I shadowed him for three months or something like that. Remember, how many months I wanted to learn about, you know, of something called permaculture, which is a way of designing landscape systems Vicks in food production systems are winning live with the founder Bill Wallison. I went there. Not for long, flew drove across Tasmania, Australia that eye shadow there. I lived with Joel Salatin for two years. I went the Amish for two and a half years to learn how to be happy because the Amish have five hundred percent lower rates of depression. According to UCLA study. A by the what's the guy's name. I forget slipping my mind right now, Jared diamond the wanna Pulitzer prize for his research in guns germs and steel. So I went to learn to be happy shadow that. So this formula of getting outside of the mass factory education system ain't going to shadow directly under people never stops working, by the way, I voted a video on YouTube. I saw on Twitter sorry about how Koby Bryant virtually shouted, Michael Jordan. He watched every video practice every move. He never met like Jordan winnings. Growing up per se shadow on her but ev- virtually shattered him, and he became the greatest players won a tremendous amount of rings became a hall of Famer like Michael, Jordan. And so even in sports, the shadowing works in the in you have to remember Pablo Picasso said in the early nineteen hundreds of sit good artists copy great artists. Steal the process of you shot. Towing. Somebody. Who knows how to do? Something is the process of steely ethically. Honest way, you're not stealing in sneaky way. Because they know you're learning from them because they're taking you under their wing. So you wanna make more money go find seventy making more money than you shadow under them apprentice under them meant lead them mentor. You day by day in the trenches day to day, watch them do the Monday in thing like paying the bills watch how they hire fire watch their body language how they negotiate deals watch. How they come up with ideas. Watch of the creatively brainstorm, look how they sell look Al they have learned toughen their emotions, and if you do it long enough is often I recommend ideally at least eighteen months. It doesn't always feed eighteen months with one person. But to really get the effect of it it it's gonna take a while college. Six four to twelve years dependent. If you get a graduate degree, you could shadow somebody still be making money on your own PS along the way. I did. I have my own businesses. When I was Joel Salatin when I was at the office, I owned businesses what I was shadowing under a guy that I heard the nightclub business from a great dead. I was a Georgia, but talks. Yes, it's not live. That's one thing that sucks about college at so. Don, consuming that you actually not only spend money, but you lose four years of your income. If you do a right you can make money while you shadow these people sometimes they'll take and don't worry if they're paying a ton. That's not the point. You gotta earn your stripes. You gotta put in sweat equity in the process of studying shadowing. This is the future I predict it will slowly, but surely replace or significantly put a dent in the amount of people going through the formal education that came out of World War Two the structured not so efficient anymore. College system. Some people would will end should continue to college. Don't get me wrong. But it will not become a one size fits all. Like, it is now people will follow many pass and many pass could be followed simultaneously fat. I don't know why people who really wanna go. Oh, college feel it's the right path. Why don't you go to college? But not graduate in four years. When I graduate in five years six years eight years twelve years or enjoyable though slower ecology could do other stuff you don't get in his dead. You have climbed to work or shadow someone else and you actually absorbed morphism, not just cramming bread brain full members -ation to pass tests because you're overwhelmed anyway, signing off that's my long answer to. This versus question who asked me, you know, ash plucky who asked this question, and I don't know if he's listening, but I hope that it will feel. Good luck out there. Stay strong.

Pablo Picasso Joel Salatin ash Tukhy business owner America Berlin Instagram Govind Manhattan grandma Warren Buffett UCLA Michael Jordan Zil Smith Netflix Sousa Pacific
How To Hack Your Daily Routine To Be As Productive As Possible

The Tai Lopez Show

1:25:47 hr | 1 year ago

How To Hack Your Daily Routine To Be As Productive As Possible

"Kobe Bryant completely copied Michael Jordan's basketball game on purpose admitted it and he has five rings not a bad deal. Copy People Pablo Picasso. Good artist is copy great artists steal good artist in your life. Are you a good business person or great. Yeah so who here. This is a show of hands who here has ever massively procrastinate on something that you now realize is was or is very important. Raise your aunt realist. Who is ever read? Had A awesome book that everyone says you Sharid. It's been sitting on your you know couch or whatever or misleading next year bed. And you haven't finished it this year. Razor in real. And you know there's something in that I would hope everything that I'm talking about today is how you do that. It's how you systematically move through and this this is the most important kind of opening thing you have to learn when I was with my first mentor. Joel Salatin on a farm. The most important thing that I learned I I learned many things. He was a great market or people. Good marketer I learned. He showed me how to do it. Early got me started. Most important lesson was every single morning because I did not grow up on a forum. I was born kind of in the was born in one of the big cities in the world Los Angeles and Long Beach so basically if you're born in a city you're somewhat clueless about farm life. I'm on this farm and I realized after a few months even a year. been this. Thing's genius what you do. Is You wake up before you eat breakfast. So you have a reward. You accomplish a routine set of tasks that's somewhat monotonous more. Write that down unprotected. Don't be afraid of some monotony in your life. Everybody here knows I like action and new things but what I learned. Is You need some monotony in your life. It's okay approximately on a farm. You would spend spend one two three hours you would do an exact repeated routine. Does that make sense. Like if you have cows to milk and you're on a dairy farm I met a dairy reformer. WanNa live at the Amish. That said he had never taken a vacation in fifty years. He's like that I like. I'll wake up every morning at four in the morning. I put all my clothes on a walk out to the Barn Twenty feet from my house. I have twenty cow's milk the cows I put the milk. And you have an exact routine you have to do to keep track of Backhaus when you go back in in the house and then you do progress so the way to think about it is your life. Your daily routine is composed of two do things maintenance and and that's chores and progress and what Joel told me is you need to have if this is your day you need to have about so. Let's say you're awake for sixteen hours a day right. You need to have here about one to three hours a day of maintenance chores routine. It's repeating the same thing over and then you can have the remaining twelve twelve thirteen fourteen hours that you're awake. That's progress see. Everybody wants progress but progress comes first by having routine eighteen. You've got to take on a farm. You gotta take care of animals in this business. You WanNa make money you gotta take care of. You can't let stuff little stuff slide. Does that make sense. So I want to if you're this zero on your pie chart something's Roth okay if this is Ninety percent of your part if routine is ninety percent of your day. You're going to get bored. You're GONNA hate life. Let's talk about daily routine stuff. I want to give some tips on how to be organized because that is not this company strength and in some ways it's my not mine in some ways it is it depends i. I'll show you some powerful stuff so first of all. Let's talk about productivity everybody. Nobody has the same twenty four hours. Some PE- bowl change the world and other people can can't get off the couch when need a new marker here. So what some elements that will revolutionize everything first of all like like. I said it's generally what I'm GONNA show you keep it simple. Stupid is going to be the key principle. You're GONNA notice it's not anything thing rocket science. It's not what you know. Or How complicated is what you actually do. So here's just some really hyper hyper hyper practical steps civically for you guys working for me number one have a note pad. I use these yellow notepads. Yes you should have stacks and stacks of them right here. I've been using these since I was a teenager. I have little ones because I was on a farm Are those little teeny ones that. Remember if you're going to go you might as well bring five. What principle is bringing more than one marker at Time felons benders. If you'RE GONNA walk all the way to bring the one small productive to bring four another principle Meyer. You should say what's the was to be more productive ask yourself what's the downside. If you walk to get one replacement marker crab four because if you bring one what's what's the downside this one might not but if you bring four or the odds are one more same trip same amount of weight basically so okay. Okay Note Pad. Do Lots of stuff notice this board right here for marketing team yesterday. They've been working in what I consider sitter so this keeps you from being discombobulated. Most people are discombobulated that means and especially nowadays now a days more they're eight. Ad Work Patterns. It's like oh I'm doing this okay. Who here's been guilty of bouncing around okay the notepad pad the whiteboard? Look this thing you WanNa make fifty million dollars. That's what's GonNa look like in your war room you WanNa make Five thousand dollars a month or year you will. Have you know random okay. I'm not hell. No methodical is is the key word opposite of this. Is this methodical. And this by the way has been proven over and over by scientists doing research long term studies on people who make more money for people who don't people make more money or methodical the simplest simplest keep it simple stupid principle if I see somebody working not off something like this and yes you can use. What's APP slack? EVERNOTE use this Bill Gates took about ten of these when he was a teenager locked himself. A hotel room for six days wrote the structure and code for Microsoft soft and he was eighteen time richest man in the world. He said it never took a more than ten percent of his brain power to become the richest man in the world. Business is easy because what what. I'm showing you nobody. Does you can walk through thousands hundreds of thousands millions of people's offices. They are not methodically going through through building stuff and so the average business is bankrupt in three years. An average business owner makes less than a McDonald's manager in the United States average entrepreneur in the United States. It's you can see it on the. IRS website makes. Because they're not. I can tell right away if someone walks up to me to give me for example a review of what they did for today. I know. Oh if they're discombobulated they'd come up to me and go you so here's kind of things. I was working on today and they start babbling automatically. Don't even want to listen to them. Don't don't fucking come to me like that. Okay unless you want me to automatically assume you're a moron because now I'm actually telling you explicitly don't do it. It pisses me off. You're you're wasting my time. It's not respectful when I used to go to. My mentor draws out. Then I pull out my little notepad in fact on the farm. They joked that every pair of my pants had the back. Pocket was ter tearing out because I always had a notepad with a little spirals on it those little metal spiral everytime you sit down it kind of rips your pants. That's how how you WANNA look if you're methodical so when you come to somebody if you're giving a report take five and four. You walked in there and you organize your thoughts and your day your notepad you need to spend about ten minutes at the start of your day you can do it the night before but it's good to at least up eighty when you start art keep it simple nothing. Here's rocket science everything that I'm showing you. They should've taught us in school. School is one hundred percents bidding out people that cannot execute officially efficiently on anything. I've never hired somebody by the way who I upper one person in my life to people John My business partner and Alex Maher. He's an execution machine he does. I don't ever have this talk with the heat and ever watched the video. That's it so I've worked with hundreds of thousands of people in my career. There is not one dollars two so it's about a two for one thousand. Nobody here does it right just to be care just to be clear so not get on a high horse and black already know this. No you fucking. Don't Maya vaguely has learned over over nine to ten years and she phases in and out of doing it right. That's it. That's that's the closest we have here so you didn't learn it in-school your mom and dad who say they love. You never taught you how to do stuff bans on how you define the word love if you ask me. If you love your kids kids you don't let them be eighteen. Not Know How to do Jack. Shit Joel's out and son. Daniel at thirteen was running the complete farm. Joel said I'm not going to have a son or a daughter or a child. They can't run the full operation on execution proper manner perfectly. You guys don't need your phone or laptop for this. Don't said NOTEPAD I do you. You do know that I know about computers right. Don't try to one up me and be like well. Why does it on a note pat? Are you smarter than Bill Gates. Anybody Bill Gates kind of invented computers. He used notepads. Use fucking notepads. It's been proven over and over that your brain works better still in a non digital fashion on certain aspects of your day. So don't nothing pissed me off until you can have have numbers that you're better businessman than me. Don't try to upgrade the system. I'm handing you a simple system. These costs maybe two dollars for ten or something thing. If anybody's low on money needs to dollars I'll buy them for you or you can get them from the company thing. This is also if you work for me. This is more more like a direct command so if you decide to do the opposite what happens in the military when you disobey a direct command you get a court martial thrown out on Levin. Don't do it. I don't care who you are. Zero gives Zero Fox who you are do what I'm saying because I've been observing. Thanks for a year or two and it's not like I like so it's enough. Don't cross me on this. That's what I'm trying to tell you. First first of all listen Lewis talk a little side note on firing people so I realise in hindsight Joel Salatin did not need me who was already already fully operational now. I contributed a lot working there for two and a half years for three dollars an hour. There's a lot of things but he did in. You need me and I need none of U K. Let's be clear on that now. The sooner you know some people cannot handle that message because because your mom told you you're the center of the universe you went to spokane center of my universe so far any personnel fired in the last since nineteen as an entrepreneur. I don't remember WH- missing one of them ever even the next day. I'm like I always with my like we let this person go. I might miss them. The my reminds reminds me. We Never Miss Anybody. What it means is none of us are as important as we think and by the way it's also inverse? If I died a moral all of you will be fine without. I'm not that important to you and you ain't that important to me. Then's related to me my so I got some family here. Matt is my brother but don't get on your high horse man. Don't union hold shit over me do it this way or from now goodbye. We'll both refined without each other. There's not an optional. Because one bad apple spoils the whole bunch of you not organized and you know what in hindsight I realized is. I needed Joel. But he didn't need me. It's called not you know. It's a unilateral relationship. I needed Joe more than he needed me. I didn't know what I was doing. He did and he had the numbers to back it up. Do not have pride. If anybody I was just running one of my businesses I made fifty eight million dollars in the last here to bring me your fucking quickbooks where you may fit the eight million and you'll be my peer or my superior that's how the game goes Kobe. Bryant that five rings so if you've got zero rings don't fuck and talk to him in the same manner I saw today. People posting the goat the greatest ever give some respect now. I don't really really care if you guys are like tweet. Great things about. I don't care what I'm saying. Is Alex Mayor My business partner. His business in the last eight years did one billion dollars so I give respect and we talked to which I don't have this conversation with Alex I do second of all. He's appear ear or superior to me. Does that make sense. Okay so if I will watch you very closely if I get the feeling. Pride is an issue a great way to just partways. Everyone will be fine without each other. Now I'm GonNa tell you the good news if you listen to what I'm saying one day you'll be exactly like I am out. I would take a bullet. Probably the only person I'd take a bullet for this not in my family is Joel Salatin because I look back and I'm like that was the a turning point in my life. He equipped me with what no one showed me my whole life. My Mom my dad. My Grandma GRANDPA Day also they love me. Schoolteachers were paid the teach me. Nobody gave me one percent of what he taught me in terms of real world practice goals. And what jolted every day. He was a farmer so they're cheaper. He used the take a piece of paper. Sorry an envelope that he opened the mail and he would always right on the back of it. He didn't like to use notepads because he thought it was environmentally unfriendly. So if you WANNA ride on the back envelopes go ahead write it on a piece of paper. Notch your iphone now. You can what I do. Is I take a picture of and put it in my evernote that way if I lose the notepad so it's combination we're doing writing physical and keeping digital everybody. I agree okay. Is this hard ten minutes by the way you guys are getting paid. You can start this when you're on the clock not asking you to do this free. So that's why I can tell you do this because I'm paying you pay someone to build a house and I'm like I want a garage in the house and he's I and I don't WanNa build it. I'm paying you I WANNA garage. You know if he's building it for free then he can do whatever every once but if I'm paying the guy he's GonNa build what I want. This is what I want and some of you will be smart enough to realize holy crap. This works very quickly. Your Life will get better since I came back for example in the marketing department and was organizing it in the last week. You know you make an extra the five hundred grand in a week half a million dollars just from organization. That's it just organizing what's already there. Organize your day number two on any questions on this. No Pat Not speech pad not ever no not Mac book by the way little side note. Let's talk about this tools. I do not like the tools that most of you use your biggest tool is your electric tools. Now let me just tell you this. I was about to tweet this today but I was like this might cause a little backlash for all the hipsters in the world. Why didn't they like Mac? The largest corporation in history. Explain to me Mac. Apple has done the greatest hypnosis in the world to take counterculture hipsters and make every one of them carry around the largest largest corporations product in the world. Max Suck for making money. Okay if any of YOU WANNA race me for productivity activity hundred grand on the table I will destroy you. I can do for example in accounting department. We're working on something now. This is completely apples to apples. But the projection was. It would take forty hours to do something. I almost finished it last night by myself. Part part of it has happened the right tools. I've tested it. I'm neutral. I don't care about Apple Steve. Jobs has a hypnotize me. I don't think it's a sexy company. It's it's a nothing to me. They don't care about me I don't care about them so I've tested. iphones seem to be superior than anything else. I've used for seen Samsung's androids I tested it. I know some people want to argue. I don't WanNa give him huge argument. But now you guys using these little if you WANNA make on hundred the grand a year use that bright their use a touch pad someone in accounting is using a touch pad and a touch pad. If you WANNA make fifty million dollars have that setup seventeen inch screen you can buy this for twenty one hundred dollars. I give you the exact SPEC get ergonomic keyboard so you don't hurt your hands. Don't be a moron and use your and get this kind of mouse. That goes back and forward. Do you know how much faster I'll tell you a story this. I talked to my marketing team team. So they're going to hear this twice when I moved. I got a little money. Made one hundred grand or so. I went and got a roommate. Name was an Avon. Ne- never met the Guy Walked in. I don't know how we each other on craigslist or something. I had a room. He had a room in house for some reason I was down kitchen. He was on a computer. I saw him using it. I went. I've never seen somebody so fast on a computer was my first reaction Ben. Please teach me everything everything. I'm pretty sure he's the fastest person in the world on a computer and I may be the second fastest person in the world on a computer. I'm fast so if you have have a tree and it's old and it's dying you have to cut it down throws out in when I was there. One the National Forestry Award He. It was the best forest or in the state of Virginia. Most sustainable most. This is what he would do so we had to go. He had five hundred acres of woods. Roughly trees dive. People don't realize this you have to cut them down. I'm not I'm not clear cutting a forest. You have to selectively clipped trees because then new trees can grow so he would come and the winter all winter and cut downed trees selectively dead dying trees and he would spend one to do our th in every night I remember miss some of my quote Unquote Childhood Memories. Almost I was nineteen. He would sit there by the fireplace at night with this. It's a sharp. A chainsaw is basically what this little file mounted on the thing and you just follow and then you gotta move each little tr- I'd say spent forty five hour a day every day and his tools were so so sharpie good data. Jane's all one hand touch it into the tree and it would pull right through. People don't know how to sharpen a chainsaw. They are going like this. They're tired they're Joel could literally do everything to do with half the effort twice the accomplishment. You need the right tools. I'm going to slowly ban macbooks from my whole office office now. You can have MAC book at home. I have no control of what you do that but I control to do here and I'm sick of walking around and see everyone have the same basic computer. I don't make any money. I'm not biased. I don't care about hp it works better you can get one for twenty three hundred dollars. I will be talking talking to anybody who needs some kind of a subsidize thing. I'm considering paying some of it back. If you have it over time you worked for me. You buy that laptop it'll be yours company property but some kind of reimbursement because this is the thing. Do you guys like working on a touch pad. Mark is that do you like that. You don't associate pain with going in like to go back button. You have to click on a page. Take your finger goose slowly backup. I read an article about impressions. People have on US basically. It's very hard to change. Somebody's impression of you. Do you guys want me to thinkers martyrdom. Because here's my opinion you don't. It doesn't matter what everybody thinks about you. I got a lot of people. Don't like me I do like me. You can't can't worry about everyone's opinion but here's a rule learn. Do you want smart people to think you're dumb. That's different if wore. I I do this little thing. You can try this in your head. Imagine whoever it is you respect sitting right here ever seen like return of the Jedi or star wars like the old jet is come back from the dead and they float. They're like Yoda and Obi one can. Whoever yours is maybe you like mother? Teresa Mahatma Megani Bill Gates Zucker. Imagine they're floating right here. They're the best business people in the world. They're smart Einstein is. Do you want to be on an IPAD hat. Ibm Touch pad going eight. This is how I do my work for people because it's very close to stealing money from me. That's how I think about so eight hours. You're getting paid for eight hours. I always pay. Has Anybody here behind payroll on a paycheck anybody. Here knock on their paycheck. Do I sometimes forget about do I send it six weeks later. We just send it right. No qualm I want you to do. Work no qualms the same it's even that's called. WDR's ars Dr David Bus Calls Welfare Tradeoff Ratios so. I'm providing for your welfare. Does anybody here take the money that I give you and pay the bills. Five thanks Pay Your rent so I'm helping your welfare. You how my wear for exactly equal to what I'm paying you a rouse. You are what Dr Bus Calls Exploitation Person Person and most people want to be exploitation so see kind of the way I looked at them at your little fourteen inch. We're although you did get it better. Thank you set setup. Is You're stealing money from me. 'cause you could take care of this company's welfare way better than you are so how about this. Don't steal from me I'm not I know I'm not one of those people that goes worked. Eight hours machine. It's not like that. Everybody here needs breaks rigs. You'RE NOT GONNA be able to work intensely every moment of the day but have the basic setup. Spend ten minutes beginning day organizing your day if you come give a report right it out. I give people the dignity of paying attention to their time be methodical. Have the right tools rules so I think this is my opinion and some of you. You know are too stubborn to embrace this. This is nothing. I've told Ben this is an important lesson. Listen I'm going a little longer. Because we're podcasting so we'll you reuse. I was at this weekend on if you've got software snapchat four UFC fighters that are friends of mine from Europe report town so I took him out to dinner. They never seen Hollywood so it took them out. Then we went to Mel's diner. They wanted to go to strip club. I Hate Strip clubs. I ended up in a strip club because one of them never been to a strip club. Horrible experience I don't like strip down goes like this is a nightmare. You ever have a job in strip club. It's not great job so we leave. I gotta get out of there. We go to Mel's diner or eaten and emo is a guy sitting next to me. He's on the UFC see main card the next seas on the main card is I fight in the US. Put Him on the main card. He's a good fighter. So Kenneth. WHO's my friend is a fighter? Our company actually sponsors. He was lost. Fight very quickly by Guillotine. The Guy He's a big strong dude he goes. Yeah Emily I just did the way in in the pre train for the card in Saint Louis and he's basically the best condition person almost in the world he said he basically is the number one conditions. UFC person and if you know about athletics you guys are almost the most condition so if you're the most conditioned and in the most condition bid so what do you think my immediate response was to that. I didn't have a yellow notepad with me. What did I do I will show you? I immediately pulled out my evernote because I don't care a yellow pad with me all the time to a strip club. I wouldn't probably have it although believe it or not. While I was in there there was a guy with a notepad drawing the girls I was like. Oh my God I gotta get Outta here. So here is my notes. He told me the most fascinating way he basically said you have to keep your heartbeat at eighty seven percent of your Max for sixty minutes. It's a week that's it so you can do it fifteen minutes four times a week twenty minutes three times and I said how do you measure it. He said get this thing. So what do you think I immediately went out and did the next day. See when a smart person tells me about equipment. I don't go. Well look the way I do. Does he know more than me. Who thinks I'm the most conditioned athlete in the world? Okay who thinks maybe a UFC fighter whose immediately find on the main card is better condition than me. So see I understand. There's a hierarchy. I don't care if my mom told me I'm special I go. This is more special than me in this area. So if he tells me get this equipment I bought it basically the same night. I didn't get home until four in the morning. So my question is I've been sitting here with this equipment. You guys all have made more money than all of you combined. None of you wanted to walk by and see what equipment I had your that. Proud that proud of yourself. When I saw 'em alumni do tell me everything everything sixty minutes per week in the red zone with polar beat APP said eighty seven percent of your Max two days trae Grayhawk run sprint? Don't count the interval until you hit the red zone light days two or three days about two to three days sparring bike five heart intervals and five rests at least fifteen minutes a day fasted cardio not important. They're eating six thousand calories at just a whole map hap- why are you guys not excited by. It concerns me about this company. I was very concerned about multiple things yet yesterday. One of them is. I came to the daring one person who's walked by and looked at my set up and take a picture. How's that possible I? I know there's four reasons that people are stubborn. Basically all your problems come down to stubborness. That's all my problems. Are Stubbornness issues stubbornness. And there's four reasons and that's all everything you don't like in your life or the world world stems from these four things. One is sensual. This means addicted or Physical Addictions or laziness is is a physical thing like you don't sensual means you like to feel good so somebody who. Maybe it's too much to walk over here and take a picture that's an option. Sherlock Holmes said when you remove all the options whatever remains no matter is the correct answer. No matter how unlikely so sensual you could be self important I think part of it's this. It's not in your words but in your actions is itself important. If somebody tells you this is how I get in great shape and you immediately take notes on it. Is that self-important. I'm proud. No that's the opposite. That is what humble is seeing me work on a certain set of tools every single day. Zero people copy Eh. That'd be proud or humble. Seems like proud. You might say you don't have you don't have enough money to get this computer this first of all. We have ABC these down in the basement for free. This is the mouse you use them all the time. All the time so maybe itself importance. The other one is Sensitive some people listening and maybe some people in this room are hurt by my conversational tone. Get Whoop de Fuck and do welcomed the planet earth thing. Everyone fucking babies you. What plan you WanNa make a million bucks better get thick skin? You'd better get skin in life a little bit like a UFC fight if someone pokes you and you fall over and whine and cry you should go back and live with mom. This is planet Earth Earth by the way if any of you didn't get your paycheck last page cycle. Everybody will be wanting to me every buddy letty. So people want to be sensitive when you show what they're doing wrong they like Woah. Don't own accuse me don't judge but if you do one minor thing they're gonNA come Matt. You were full blaze. If I didn't pay everybody here I get about forty people at thirty people in this room. I get thirty. What's APPs yellow tie haven't been paid in two weeks? Should I be sensitive sensitive and go. Well you know I just my time. No you're like Fuck Dat. Give me my money so what I'm saying to. You is stop being so oh sensitive. Do the right thing when you're in this office. I'm not talking about morals and religion. I'm talking about business. Productivity the fourth thing is people are stupid. Yeah that's it some people have the Iq go this person's in better shape than me. Maybe if I ask them they'll help me. Some people people still out there doing jumping. Jacks some people still going on the treadmill who's been at the gym and people on the treadmill and still fat because Mo said. You gotta put the heartbeat up to burn fat. You don't burn fat walk. You Walk for six hours. It's okay to walk to not going to cut fat. Some people too stupid to open a book or ask an expert how to lose weight in the same way is so which of these is is the explanation. Why zero people have the same tool setup as me? I have the exact same tool setup here holding in my hand of Emo the exact one. I doubt I waited pulled up. They actually were very jetlagged because they're from Europe like Thai. We gotta go. I'm like just give me five more minutes. I said let's pull up because there's two polar polar apps so I didn't get the wrong I was like. Can I pull it up on your computer. Is it this one. This one is right there at Mel's diner. That's equipment I copied. I'm I'm not proud if it worked for EMO WANNA work from body care. I want to Kobe. Bryant completely copied Michael Jordan's basketball game on purpose admitted it and he has five rings not a bad deal. Copy People Pablo Picasso Great Artists Copy. I mean good artists copy. Great Artists Steal. Are you a good artist in your life. Are you a good business person or great. This concerns me. It's a serious problem mentally mentally lifestyle. His whole company's on probation. I'm like what the Hell I can't. That level of stubbornness is not allowed. You know your life changes changes the day you say enough is enough for some you let this be a turning point okay. I didn't learn this before zero people in your life. Have you ever had any of this conversation right. You remember this taught in class number your parents sitting down talking about this. The four SS of stubbornness. You remember talking about tools you remember. We're talking about organizing your day. Who had a class in college junior high high school elementary school on how to organize your day? Raise your hand. Zero Great School system them were in reducing adults. All of you are smart enough to make millions of dollars. Trust me. The I'm confident if I had the time I take basically glee any kid out of the inner city and turn them into a millionaire as long as they were willing to participate you know it's not an IQ thing anything here outside of people's Ike you you ask people if you see people using cool equipment get it for yourself. If it's a money issue find a way or at least get what you can afford Ford the mouse the key. Also I've noticed. Not all of you have this mouse pad. Why do I want this mouse pad? What is that thank you you know that keeps you from getting carpal tunnel syndrome? They might not know that. But that's why you just copy. That's it's what copying is you don't have to know everything. Lebron James fans a million dollars a year on his body. You guys not willing to invest two dollars in your own embody injuries are real dude. Number one thing keeps athletes outnumber one thing. Lebron doesn't want to have an why spend a million dollars. It's all about cutting injuries. I do think Lebron spends a million getting more muscles or faster all. He sat next to Kobe Bryant for three games. He talks half the time about his stem cells on his knee and his he did. PRP on his knee and flew to Germany. Reduce injuries. How you GONNA make money? When you don't feel good? Common Sense is not common tools. I will know when the next week who doesn't get it in this room if if you need to take pictures make sure my screen doesn't have anything. You can take a picture of the whole thing. Free Free giveaway. This is the best mouse I mean. This is the best this is one. I've tested other ones. I've spent probably thirty thousand dollars on laptops in the last twelve months. That's the best one it's the lightest. It's fast it. Does everything in its seventeen inch. Why do you WanNa stare on his twelve inch? I don't know do you WANNA go blind. Do you want to see less. Do you want to do you guys like scrolling to the right and left a lot. Is that a big goal of yours mark. Do you like to take the I pad track mouse mouse. Scroll down push it to the right then when you're on the wrong page L. E.. It's very painful to watch. And I'm not just picking on you mark but I'm vigor on you don't have a track pad around me now you throw that one in the trash. That is not allowed here if any of yours having these serious money money issue also when I had no money I went on Dell's website online and I got a twenty dollars or thirty dollars a month plan. You can finance all these so please. Don't give me the money thing draws outs and you should tell me when a human says to you. I don't have money. Just add two words for that. This is what you do all day. Do it. Well if you got a choice between a moped Jimmy you drive a moped to work or do you want an automobile. A mobile moped will get you here but it will. How long does a moped Jimmy here? Okay if you had a moped it might take you thirty or forty right so an extra fifteen minutes a day. Let's say you work twenty days. Let's say you worked here for twenty years. God help you that you had to be around me that Long Fifteen Minutes Times Twenty Days Times Twelve Months Times twenty years divided by sixty. You would waste with the moped twelve hundred hours hours of your life and by the way you have about fifty thousand hours of your life. That are your prime of your life. So Jimmy do you wanNA spend a About three percent of your life doing something you didn't have to do if you had a better tool tools matter keep it simple. This is cool. I think you guys if you want to get this thing. Polar beat the whole setup. How much are these Alma? If you WANNA take. How much is this polar strap do remember under one hundred bucks better than a personal trainer? I mean not better later but the streep is one month with one. This thing is a game changer. From maybe one of the most condition and by the way if you're the most condition athlete in the UFC let's see today. You're probably one more condition humans in history because now athletics is at the peak. Okay the third thing and what I really wanted to do. I got side side-tracked. I WANNA show you since we use WHATSAPP Allot I wanNA talk about communication tool. What's APP already dying? So that's why I said four okay. So here's what you gotta do. You need to be methodical with what's up. So what that means is they. Here's the definition methodical. I was showing this debate. And let me move this back for a second show. This is that close up enough now got good enough resolution so if you see this board this is what methodical medical means so we were working. Actually don't show this whole thing. But maybe we'll blurt blurred this out with the editors I don't WanNa see my whole business marketing thing so we we had squares here each product. We were working on. Now here's the key thing. Why does it say nothing in that square? Why why didn't we just leave it blank and move to the next one? Inflict pain on yourself. Maybe not that much. I'm not that sadistic that I want to inflict pain on people purposely. Know what thank you Andrea when you're methodically moving here. Ben Tried to do this this one this one and then he started skipping to write the action plan. The opposite. A sit of methodical is false efficiency so ben thought he was being efficient by going. Oh I don't think there's anything they're going. No no no no. That's not article is methodical is if you ever go on a plane and you can get near the cockpit when they're taking off. The copilot is reading to the pilot and the thought of coal list. That's never skipped. He doesn't go all. The fuel is probably fine. He goes fuel. Light AILERONS Landing Gear every single. One of those things are checked. They stop on keep going all right. Let's keep in the back of our head that we have no fuel and just keep you stop right there. So you're going through this. What I wanted to do was right out so we specifically in a perfectionist manner? No I know there's nothing there if you leave it blank. It can be mixed construed by another person team to be what maybe no one got it when you're right nothing to do there. It's clear so methodical is basically the concept of moving from square to square. But not going from. That's where did that square is this. This is how some some people are answering. What's at you come in to work? There's been twenty-eight conversations while you were off break or or offer a day or two you what's up. Web is a huge tool. Because you can do it on your computer so you don't need to be doing it just on your phone which might burn you out Tad bit so what I do with. What's that is is? This is a good setup right away. Good Job Nathan. Five dollar bonus to Nathan. I mean giving out these five dollar bonuses not not much I'M GONNA give out monopoly money you want a monopoly money hundred Nathan or five real. You'll take the real okay. REXBURG HOUSE OPS. Okay so if I'm in this group and there's six things there I'm literally one of the things that speed is to use your finger. I saw Zack doing this. That's good sacraments the scenic. Maybe an video is to actually move your hand down so you have your laptop or if you're on your phone you can just kind of be like boom boom own boom boom if you see something that's relevant to you if you're on your phone you right swipe it and an auto replies to that or if you're here it's a little little list officiant and then puts the last message in see what I'm saying so now if somebody comes later and sees it they know what you're responding to sometimes a non non methodical person in this group will just reply. Yes but there's forty three messages above it. You don't know what the yeses so. That's example of using a tool correctly have chainsaw a business sharpen the thing. Use It correctly. Use A chainsaw wrong. We'll chop your hand off very quickly. Most farmers ours are missing a few fingers including Joel. So the next thing when there's a conversation going don't just interject a new conversation conversation number it even if the numbering is not right. I don't care if it's seven eight if I was gonna just inject something new in this conversation I'll just pick a number seven and blah blah. Aw why because now we know. It's a distinct new thought so just to show you why this is important to beat methodical on things like what's APP now. There is a time by the way to not be methodical. You do not always want to be conscientious. Okay there's a ton like when you're doing sales those of you do in sales when you're actually on the phone call with somebody. You don't always want to be like my name is Terry. What is your name first? Name Middle Name last eight. Thank you I have your data. You don't WanNa be like Dwight troot or spock walk from Star Wars. But when it's planning bass the time you got to know when to be hyper perfectionist methodical and the time to be hyper perfectionist. This is actually the term in Mexico score perfectionist ironic that I was on a perfectionist in his belt but perfectionist actionist in Mexico score the most scientifically related to wealth is something called conscientiousness which then divides into four things by the way the smartest not the smartest. Those competence person in this room will be the first to memorize this. You have a memorized. Good what is it industriousness. Professional Industrious Korea's ness. No He's at now. You missed that one. Oh perfection. So it's organized prudence because you. It's okay technically. The word word is diligence here. But you can use industriousness organization diligence perfectionism and that says prudence here five bucks. Thank you down thank you. I don't know why people don't memorize the more. Is it a memory thing. Let me show you how to memorize arises right now for the rest of your life. Simplest lesson practical thing by the way. Is it the most ironic thing that the school system which expects you to memorize bryce stuff. There's never been a class on how to memorize stuff who here took for one whole semester of class junior high college a whole class where where for three months or six months devoted herself to memory tools. Anybody the biggest irony if you the school system I used just to be less extreme. Now I'm like just burn the thing down. Burn the thing now and sometimes you gotTa Burns of the Noun and build it from the beginning things dumb. He just had to memorize this for the rest of your life. Van Gogh four Wacky wacky things related to these and it doesn't even have to be the full word organization organization. Let's do this org org about this Oregon. You Know Oregon that you play you. Play an organ. I don't know what the Church this word is. Okay diligence this is going to be wacky. I'M GONNA offend somebody dildo. So is the Dildo playing an organ church okay and someone sprays perfume. Humor in the dildos is okay. I was going to say but the DILDOS A prude. So there you go. There's a prudish dildo playing an oregon getting perfume sprayed in. Its is think of that picture anytime I say. What's the four things echo the four conscientious traits? You Go Dildo D. I L. Diligence deal diligence plan in Oregon. What's the big sand for they? Shit but the dildo is not very sexual. It's very prudish it's like. Oh the last thing. Yeah what's been sprayed and it's is being maced with perfume perf sands stands for now. You might be offended by that but you won't forget it is easily literally. There's they'll though playing oregon getting some stuff sprayed in his eyes because it was too prudish there you go. If you don't like that one come up with your own. That's the best I could do on the spot but that's a good one the wackier the story the more like you're gonNA remember it. Have you turn this into an organization is diligently you know planning manning perfect. You're not going to remember. It made it wacky memorize stuff. That's all that's by the way. What's the biggest tool everybody here possesses more than a computer? Your brain your memory is part of your brain. You're a MiG dillas. Part of your brain all these parts that control your memory centers. You WanNa sharpen them and not just a six pack of your body. That's great to have you want which I don't have right now but theoretically there one under here but you need we do have a six pack of the memory parts of your brain to which are like I said some of them the only thing most people remember is the amid fear memories. Maries and that's not a good thing. You don't want only remember negative trauma the main things you can remember if I said tell me don't have June five or ten negative. You can remember your bad days worse than your worst days. That's a lazy brain right as a Lazy Brain Arnold Schwarzenegger I got that picture. He signed for me and my he wasn't lazy he was the opposite of everybody else and so he had muscles. You need to develop your brain muscles by knowing how to memorize I stuff so sometimes when I say stuff to do yes you should write it down but that should be a temporary thing until you the most important place. which is your tool Ben? What's the the name of the laptop? I said you should get hp film six hundred as good. That's enough so he's remembering what he bought. And then it's a powerful tool. You don't always have to be. I know Google exists but you still need to memorize some stuff so let me just walk through a sample day and then we're going to end so we got a lot to do the day. Let's say you come in at ten in the morning your day starts you should go straight to. There's a couple of ways you can do it. I'm GonNa tell you what I think is the most efficient and you can just memorize. There's so sample daily routine the number four okay sample daily routine you can modify this a bit if you need to but please don't try to improve too much. What I'm saying Joel Salatin had a rule? You can improve on anything on my farm for one year. He said all people's ideas for the first one year stupid. I know everybody is very proud of their ideas and all that most of them are stupid for one. You want your around the business for because he used to say people would come on the farm. They've been there one we can. They blocked joy. You should move your chickens around this way. He'd be like I'm doing this for thirty years. Here's you never thought. Here's the number one thing people out assist. Joel had a system where you move chickens to fresh crash at every day. So they're not in confinement houses concrete. You're any he sa- he had these little. Flawless Penn's Penn had a roof that kept the chickens from being eaten by predators. But it had no bottom so the chickens were just walking along the grass but it gets dirty because the chicken the bathroom so every day he would pull them. You'd have to move them and it took me. I used to count. I used to carry eight tons of water and chicken pens every morning before breakfast. I had to move around a big job to two hours. You get super strong. I'm half as I came back from farm and my mom's like what happened to you. You get very strong so I was pulling these now. I don't have any chickens. Move Golo weaker but I moved move him and he said people will come to the farm the first week on the front of the by Joel. Why don't you attach a tractor to amend? Just pull them gels like you think I never thought of that twenty years moving. These think I'm not them. It was an insult is intelligence if you walk into a company and some of you. It's longer than a year and you see that I'm doing a daily structure like this just assume I thought it through. I'm not I'm not the smartest person in the world. But I'm not that computer setup as bad ass. Okay there is a better one but it cost about fifteen grand. If you WANNA get with Alex Amir has he has a fourteen thousand dollar quad cooled. PC PC easy. Not a Mac. And it's custom built with eight monitors but that's not realistic for you guys to bring back and forth from office so just go with the one I have and go with this apple daily routine so the first part of the day just going to be. ABC or going to keep it simple ABC. Just kind of a is just collect collect your thoughts. Just come in for the day. Each of these is about ten to fifteen minutes. Okay Realistically Ida God you can just come in sit down. I kind of look around the overall vibe. I check my I scan through my emails. I don't read them all immediate kind of scan through. What do you think? I'm looking for hyper urgent ones. You're scanning through your kinda scanning the what's APP okay. The next thing you do after that's about ten or fifteen minutes. The next part is I'm methodically. Go through everything so it starts high level and then it switches to methodically. Go through stuff okay and that is a tad bit longer. I would say this is about thirty minutes by the way very powerful message for you guys straight from my first mentor Joel. If you are spending less than one hour on daily Chores You're doing something massively wrong. If you're spending more than two hours on this something's wrong. You have too much on your plate. The sweet spot is you're spending around an hour a day organizing today okay. Does that make sense so it takes you eight hours to organize your day. Something's wrong if some of you are organizing your in three minutes. That's not allowed. You do not organize your Dan. Three some of you have more responsibility than others. Say an absolute minimum of thirty minutes. You cannot efficiently operate as a human being especially in business with less than thirty minutes of organizing Organiz before you build a house us. You draw with an architect what you're going to build. I once had a friend who built a house and it was very sloppy. It was the weirdest house ever been in. All the doors were crooked. And once you got one door crooked then you measured everything from the crooked angles the whole house. It was like being an Allison Wonderland House and he's like see my our house I built. I'm like I believe you built this thing with no preparation no organization no conscientiousness. So now a is a non conscientious time. You're just kind of scanning the big picture ten or you can set your timer on your phone ten or fifteen minutes because you want to find out if there's any huge fires as you need to put out you don't WanNa methodically going through your email and somebody's your mom's like I'm trapped in an elevator. When we're in Europe Craig got trapped in an elevator and he? He now won't go in elevators anymore right. So you don't want Craig texting you. I'm trapped in elevators. Let me out and then you're there methodically going through. Oh you're what's APPS wall. Somebody's near death right. So that's what the collector thoughts. That's big picture then number two. You're methodically going through. Oh and this is where I would say you go through your emails and what's up okay. That's members just ABC. Plan Dan. So you're methodically going through and then see here. So that's primarily for our company email on whatsapp all right checking messages from other people communication. The first thing in general does to build an effective fighting force. is they connect phone lines. Now of course with wireless and cellular. They didn't have to but in World War Two World War. One first thing you did before you sent troops you said a communication core you connected. People people have to be able to talk. So this is the section this. Is you think about big picture. Urgent fires this. Is You connecting to the team. The army here. You've got to be connected to the army that you work with. And then see is the yellow notepad time see is where you right out in priority order what. You'RE GONNA do yellow notepad. God that's it and when I say methodically going through what's APP I'm usually responding to them and if there's a what's up that's I can't answer right away. Where would I put it? Well what I do you put that as a bigger project of this reminds you. If you can't immediately answer something in step two to then step three you're going to ride it out on your no pet and then you go out and Organiz you go out and execute for the rest of the day this whole prod brought says that's ten or fifteen minutes that's thirty minutes or so and that's fifteen minutes so when you add this up roughly you're talking talking about about an hour sometimes a shorter. Sometimes some of you like I said have less. It's thirty minutes but there's something to always. It's it's not less than thirty minutes by the way you're getting paid to do this. So it's the beautiful thing ever you know who here ever feels like. They've missed out on some things in life because they're not diligently organized fashion going through what they should go through by the way one little thing that I didn't talk about in the military. They they have a concept of a a or who knows what that means five dollars for Nathan. Thank you ten take it. I accidentally okay A. R. Means After Action Review. I read about this years ago. In a book a navy seal they were told to go get some insurgents. I think goes in Iraq and they showed up there and they weren't that prepared they didn't have great intelligence and he said we walked in and open the gate to the house at night concede much and he said I heard something click and I realized too late that it was a trigger to a huge bomb. They were it was a trap. been false information trap and he said we ran as fast as we could to the to the helicopter but it still blew us. I mean it blew up like a square block or something like that and he said the first thing we did as always we went immediately back to our war room. Kind of like what you were sitting in. And there was only ten of them and they sat here onto all sitting around a table and they had add daily an after action review. What do we do right? What did we do wrong? And Benjamin Franklin talked about out this hundreds of years ago another thing. They never taught us in school how to get better right how to not repeat mistakes and he had a journal and he said he would ride out. He did it for one year or multiple years. Everything he had done wrong that day if he was lazy he'd Write Down Laziness as a weakness and he said slowly your weaknesses. Go Away Arnold Schwarzenegger when he was lifting weights. He would look in the mirror and go might tricep the third muscle in my tricep. My head is off and he focused just on on that and next thing you know. He's seven times Mr Olympia. You can fix your problems with after action reviews at the end of the day. Every day I talked about remember number how I showed you what to do at the beginning of the day. One two three hours so notice not all of that starts at the beginning of the day at the end of the day breath. You should do a quick a are on your same note pad so this is the two things I like to do. At the end of the day number one doing a are just right for yourself a couple of things. You made a mistake Brit. You should write out that you brought me one marker and then you should write out the principal principal. That's a mistake of that. You should write out principle. I forgot about was you know. What's the downside of bringing four four versus one mark? You should write out yesterday. Why do I have a track pad like you should ask yourself that and these these deep questions because most I there's a saying where there's smoke there's fire so when you see yourself doing something inefficiently? Is it possible. That's just a small symptom of a bigger problem in how you're thinking brick this is I promise you I have when I worked with a lot of you. I'M NOT GONNA go into on camera. Trust dismay of this was the only problem. I wouldn't bring it up. This was an aberration. This is not an aberration. The school system did not teach you how to think correctly. We're born on with animal brains just so you know if you're a Christian you believe that if you're an atheist you believe that all people in the world agree on one thing. The base human nature is basically like my two German shepherds. They only care about now. They're not good at planning for the future. They definitely don't know how to make money they don't know how to or they just do their animal's stuff. When their food they won't vote on a boy was mating season he wants to make? There's no self control. There's nothing humans you have to train yourself to evolve more into a more sophisticated person. And so when I say mark you know when I say how come known in the market team. has copied this. This is only a minor microcosm of a big problem. Here you're in the big problem is and what the A. R. Would help correct is you have improper or you have brain bad habits. Who here wishes this? Just I want imagine alternate world for a second. So let's say you're eighteen years old. The last eighteen years of your life up to that point point had been spent primarily and teaching you habit building and habit creation. So you're an absolute machine. You always wake up. You're like the rock. He said five years old his dad did a little mind trick on him. His Dad would take them to the gym because his dad was a wrestler Bodybuilder and his dad would work out and then the Rock was five and go dad. Can I work out with you and be like no. This is only for adults so the rock. He was rewiring rewiring. So you think you think you don't understand what was going on. The rocks. Dad was rewiring his brain. His Neo cortex is a migdal his memories emory's so that rock now says when he hears the sound of weights clinking it releases. Happy Memories scientists would call that dopamine. His Dad turned the gym into the most almost the most pleasurable thing in the world. And what does the rock look like. What guy here wouldn't mind looking a teeny bit more like the Rock? Would you mind the owners between us and the rock is somebody study at a young age. took the time to build brain habits healthy ones. In fact his dad made him maybe addicted to the gym. Not Not a bad addiction. If you're going to have an addiction you can drug sex rock roll gambling might as well have lifting weights even Kenneth the UFC fighter. I was talking about pro. Oh fodder he loves it. He's like man I it releases all these endorphins and stuff like that. So what I want you guys to do in the Aarp the after action review is take back. What was never given you? You know what I read more than the average person I know why it's not because I'm special or smarter has because when I was one two three four years old I was. My mom was a single mom. I doused in prison. My grandma and GRANDPA raise me and my grandma. A little. The age used to make fun of people who watch the TV. She would say they're stupid and when you're one or two. I thought that was true and my grandma used to say this is what real people will do and not only say it but they were always reading so at a young age my brain was rewired and still to this day. I by ten bucks a day. On average they're laying next to my bed. When I come in my room and I see ten bucks? Some people get overwhelmed and pain is released. Cortisol hormones those are like stress ones. uh-huh I'm like yes. What is this? It's like a present every day. That's the brain habit. Every one of you should adopt. And the only way you're going to do it is by critically thanking through. What the Hell's wrong why I'm mark? I'm a smart guy I'm almost A. CPA What is wrong with my brain wiring. That I wooder because I tried to work on your computer for fifteen minutes. I was done so much. Pain Chemicals were released from my brain. That I'm like I won't do that. You have to ask yourself. You're an adult. You know you're helping me. You know I'm not these burden help. Why would you come back with one marker? When one wasn't working why would you bring one more? That's like I ran out of gas. Can You bring me gas and you bring out of gas here. You go tie maybe not bring a whole damn can a gas is the seat you got to walk to the gas station. Why not walk back with the whole can? What's here's a handful of guest I? Maybe that'll help you. Maybe it won't so you have to ask yourself what scam happened to eat. I in this room that at whatever age how old are you if you don't mind saying twenty eight. Do you mind saying Mark Alger in what scam happened to you. Thirty to another adult has to tell you this. That's not related to you. What scam happened in our society that I'm teaching people how to memorize things and planning and the average age person here is thirty years old? How what kind of society you live in? Because the only thing that matters in life is your brain inhabits what you do your daily habits you get. I have some parts of my life. I don't have I don't love my habits. It's the part of my life. I Hate I have some things that I like. My Habits Habits I. There's all the good things in life. Basically every good or bad thing air life will be determined by habit or if you don't take some time every day even ten to fifteen minutes to go through and say honestly in a non sensitive non stubborn way. Do not be a bitch of your own brain glue. We'll move towards being mean I know being mean you know what I wish someone had done when I was younger. been meaning to me. All good things in my life came from for me people. I can't think of one. I can think of Nice things that happened to me. And I didn't for many good habits around because we were too nice who has ever had someone nicely. Tell you to get in shape. Who here deeply regrets that when you were at some point in your life ying go to some summer bootcamp? Where for three month's somebody instilled in you awesome powers of inhabits of physical health? Anybody here super happy. That didn't happen. Greatest thing get her happen. All of our summers where you so efficient right for the last for the last Twenty thirty years of your life. No why didn't someone take three months ago. Hell no you. You're going to a camp. That's what I went to address outs and trust me. I went from city to a guy who's like all right. We wake up at four thirty in the morning you. We'll move eight tons of water and chicken for two hours. I will pay three dollars an hour. You will never go on a date for two years. I know on a date with two years. Am I twenty years old. That's some most people go on a date zero. You will live in a small to all by twenty cabin that I built. That has no toilet. So here's a bucket. That's what I had for two years here. The bucket you can use your imagination it has no heating and no air condition and the wind comes up through the bottom but the wind comes up. I remember waking up almost every morning in the winter and my water next to me was frozen solid side sleep in two sleeping bags and I used to wear fifteen eighteen t shirts when I walked out in the morning because it was cold. But you know what that's when I changed some people do afraid of that if I could go back and life. I'm like I wish I had eighteen years of that. I'd be machine. Two years wasn't enough time. It only broke a few of my bad mental habits. I promise you pain person person in this room. That's even approaching one tenth of your potential zero maybe my as at two tents Benz at one point five. That's is it you guys could do and I'm not talking about just making money. I'm talking about all the things you'll want to life. You can have a modern world. Yesterday there was a kid I drove by Saturday. He did you see that Must Amtrak. He's eighteen. He has a Lamborghini that he bought himself and he said textual actually a long time. We're GONNA look through my texts texting seventeen. He bought his first Lambeau. He's makes three to five hundred thousand dollars a year at seventeen all the dreams era financial and nobody really knows how to take advantage of them. It's literally like this. This is the modern world. I told you a million dollars right outside right there under that concrete around my pool but I won't give you one tool to get it so you just get to know every day you wake up. All my financial problems are sitting there. But I'll have a tool the tools you need a Jackhammer. You need a sledgehammer. You can't go through concrete with your hands. You can't Bang your head against it. Some of you have good intentions all of us do the WanNa do good. We don't have the right tools to organize our day. We don't have the right laptops. The right methodical approach to things. We don't know how to memorize stuff. There's milk there's gold sitting right outside your in your backyard. But you can't get to it until you do in a our daily and I'll take you about a year start. Chaining out your bad habits. I expect Brit you to get better. Mark don't come in here with that next week. I'm just telling you I'm warning you now because I also I believe that we learn by Osmosis you guys affect me and if you guys are dragging me down does not going to be allowed and people. That are hyper stubborn. I made my case. It's logical and you're getting paid to do it right so there's no it's not a conversation. We're not buddies. This is like your work for me so so you always can quit at any time or leave at any time. There's no slavery here leave. If you want. We'll be fine. We'll both be fine without each other. Neither one of US needs each other. A are if you WANNA be able to hang around here and I'm going to be spot checking looking for people that do right by the way. My dream dream is zero employees. I have a truly horrific life experience with employees. Not in the sense like I don't have bad experience with employees like getting sued food or suing each other. It's not that I don't enjoy together. I know this sounds like I'm lecturing. You my Dream Life Business. Wise is what I have with Alex Mayor I go you want to bill. Mentor mentor box. Yes okay you build it up San Francisco all market at once in a while down here and it's in the last year it's probably worth forty million bucks so I own own half of it. It's made me we sell it. I've made twenty million bucks and I've spent two hours in one year. I'd love to do that with you. As far as is either thirty forty people the room that I could build a brand. I got thirty or forty bad ass. Business Ideas I cannot think of one person that I completely hand it off to like Alexander. Nobody nobody maybe my my after ten years is slowly getting there but the A are. We'll get some of you. Are there some of you in. This room will get there but you won't do it without introspection and if you're sensitive proud stupid or addicted addiction part is the hardest one. I have the most sympathy for your an alcoholic. That stuff hard to change the rest a bit we can change so the last thing you should do after a are for the day. Jim Rohn said planned tomorrow today. Do a little little plan for tomorrow. It's tentative and this can be as short as five minutes plan tomorrow because by the way in this fast moving living world by tomorrow. This plan may be obsolete. That's why I'm saying don't plan tomorrow for like three hours. Make sense okay. Let's do do three questions. There should be questions here like I said. I don't particularly love doing this. I don't that's why you'll notice. I don't do that much. I realized I hate tutoring entering people. It's Kinda my nightmare. That's why built sixty seven steps. I recorded at one time and it's been listened to for tens of millions maybe see hundreds of millions of minutes. I liked that is very efficient. How often do these lectures once a year? I've done this is my. That's all you need. Because everything else are recorded where did you follow this thing precisely one day you will thank me most of you and some of you. May you know some people might just don't I don't get it. They nothing you're going to will durant said Whoa them person who tries to teach people faster than they can learn some you ready to learn this. I respect it. I'm slow learner on some some things I look back and be like that took me ten years. But what I'm saying is I'm not going to have that attitude infect this group because we're not gonNA tear down the people ready to rock doc. Enroll would the people who don't get it if you don't get it I don't judge you. I don't think you're a bad person. It's not a moral thing. You should just go somewhere else. If you get it you get you. You know what I'm saying. This is not. This is all irrefutable. By the way. It's very hard to refute anything if anybody has a real cogent logical refutation of what I said Not that everything I said was perfect. But the general gist of it. Trust me this has been fact checked by really smart people that I spend my life around. So it's not just my opinion union conscientiousness. Google is about two hundred empirical studies on what I showed you about methodical contact. Dr David Bus sat here at my last seminar. If you guys were here and said conscientiousness this is the most important thing guy. We had a whole talk on it. If you know more than Dr bus about evolutionary psychology. If if you're a top ten. Most quoted cited psychologists in the last two hundred years of humanity. If you're a harvard professor like is then you can refute him or if you have have some other evidence but trust me perfection. N- is what are the four everybody up the mental story. The crazy one fruit playing the organ. And what does it stand for. They every once in a while we all love our parents Sharon a letter to your mom and dad and we like you know what I still love you but I realize is you didn't love me as much as you said you didn't love 'cause I'm thirty and somebody just taught me memory. Your parents loved you as a member. I'll be controversial because I always tend to be parents. Love you about fifty percent your mom because she got fifty percent or DNA and she loves herself more than she loves. You never forget even though they might die for you. That's still bullshit. They die for you. 'cause they got their D. N. A.. Inside you so you're kind of them and you're younger so they'll die for you because their DNA lives longer. That's all of us. We're all more selfish than we think. So Don ever make somebody into a saint but you don't have to demean in people either you have to degrade your parents but you can just see clearly plato. And the greatest story of all time philosophical. He's in most of us. Humans are like people in a cave. But we're way in the back of the cave in the caves dark and we've got a fire going because we can't see that will and shadows of US human sitting around this cave fire flashing on the wall and we look at the wall and we'd go. Oh I see what you look like but really you're just seeing the reflection of Hannah and at and every who wants to while somebody walks to the edge where the light is of the cave and they look out and they go on hurts too much my eyes and they go back to the back of the cave and they sit around and they go. This is reality shadows on the wall. But it's not you gotta come into the light of truth and what I told you about. Your parents is the truth and one of the things I was a port and I still have my mom and I love my grandma and I love my dad my dad a little less but my real dad wasn't even there my life. I mean I love them in a sense but you can respect your elders and stuff like that but you can also realize the light of truth is that if you don't take care of yourself nobody cares about you. You definitely not your spouse you got no DNA of your spouse. Sometimes you have joint kid to get your spouse or boyfriend or girlfriend loves as you less than you think I promise you. It's not romantic. They will not make a movie about this. This is not the notebook this is called planet earth. But there's one person that truly cares for your welfare and it is you you you you get. That's why very few people commit suicide. It's all I do. But not not as a percentage of planet earth because we love ourself even when order depressed. So what you do self love. That's effective is coming into the light. Being honest with yourself herself the day you wake up and go on alcoholic is the day you start. Stop being I mean you begin to not be an alcoholic anymore. People want alcohol. They're doomed a lot of you. Need to realize not really that good at stuff. That's what I've learned not really good stuff and since I'm not relevant to your other parts your life but I am relevant to your money making. I want you to be good at accomplishing things with business. Keep it simple stupid. Start Your Day by sitting down with the ABC's a sit down and look at the big picture scan your emails. You're WHATSAPP ten fifteen minutes. What's be methodically? Start going through all the forms of communication. What's right down a priority plan in order one to an I try to write one ten? Thanks now. That's the beginning of the day the end of the workday. What are the two things A. N. B.? You're doing a are figuring out what you're doing wrong ask yourself tie. Why are you being stupid? I can't tell you how many times I've asked myself. Don't mince words if you're stupid. Say it big deal sticks and stones br you know. What does it sticks and stones can break your bones? Words won't hurt you if you're stupid that day be like damn I I was dumb. It doesn't mean you're permanently dumb. It means you're honest. You came to the light of the Cave and you go. I kind of suck it this. What's the second thing you do plan short hypothesis of what? You're going to do tomorrow just a little bit to prepare and that's it and how many hours a day should you. We do chores for one. Two three chores is another word for chores is double check routine. What should the rest of your day be? Yes okay I want you guys to be better now all right now three questions because these question things seem to be is that still going question number one also is gonNA concern. No one has a question because I had lots of questions when Emel told me something. I'm like how the hell. How did you get such good shape? Non Time to be silent Ben. Most mythology are to get better awesome. That's very question so during your a are now. I was never in the military so I don't know I can't speak to did you. Do A ars in alternative. It's there's not a specific way. Identify station May yes. Member bringing things to the light is half the solution the day mark realizes. What the Hell's wrong with me? The bad tool day not just mark by the away. I just picking on kids. You have a touch pad which is extra or you have a finger thing not even in touch pet index. I haven't seen that by the way I I don't know people had those Al Hal. Ten years ago used to work with me and US one of US ten years ago computer days mark is a long time ago. You gotta ask yourself and what are the four things okay. So let's just say Ben. How do you use a our Nathan says does bring it to? The light is a big part. I'll tell you another another thing. How did you learn anything? This is an important. How do you learn anything? What Yeah and how do you get? What's the simplest Pablo Picasso? Just copy. This is what Kobe Bryant. I told me I posted this little short interview. I did with him on my instagram. I said Kobe did you have mentors. He said yes and he started naming them. Bob Iger Magic Magic Johnson Michael Jordan Michael Jackson. He said Phil Jackson Basketball Coach right and he just kept going. I was blown away. I said why'd did you have mentors. And he said because you have to learn from people who've created greatness before so let's pick something you don't like about yourself when you bring it to the Light Ben. Let's just do a case study not falling not do you think it's procrastinating. Laziness not liking taking daily routine. Okay so Ben. We'll do a case study on. Just you know knowing what you should do. How about this willpower? Would you say that might be the issue willpower. This is a problem for all of us. By the way who here's never struggled a willpower never seen ice cream known. You shouldn't eat and Jimmy seen pizza pizza and eaten at any way okay willpower. So what some simple thing if we who can. We copy that has more created greatness before in the willpower area area. Arnold okay who else. I just posted a picture of a book on my twitter by a guy who has a whole podcast on that Jaakko Jaakko Navy Seal Guy. I don't know how to pronounce his last name. willink or something. Unlike that he created extreme kind of ownership thing. Have you read his book. Are you listening to his audio book on your drive to work turn it on. You have to learn from people who have more willpower. Yes yes so you can reward yourself. You can do some simple brain tricks on yourself like her mom used to have tic tacs by and every time we would do is taxes right. He would eat a tic TAC and I was like. What the hell are you doing every time you enter page? He goes because he's a neuro Micro what what is his technical molecular neuroscientist and he said you know your brain you can you gotTa rewire reward so you need to bring some more reward to it but yet read. There's people who special. I have a great experience by the way with buying textbooks. I as much as I don't love college all the time. A lot of the materials does at colleges are really solid. I'm I've read three fascinating books on on different psychology things. I read that human sexuality thing world worse pickup line according to scientists is. Is that your real hair. I thought that was it fails. What's crazies it? Failed like eighty seven eighty seven percent of time which means thirteen percent of the time women respond to. Is that your real hair. The the the best one was. Do you WANNA dance and high high works much better. Nobody's saying he doesn't have the willpower to even do the thing. Yes now let me give you one last one ben one last thing.

Joel Salatin UFC Apple Kobe Bryant United States Europe Mac Kobe ABC Pablo Picasso Bill Gates pat Jimmy Michael Jordan partner Ben Meyer Backhaus
SYMHC Classics: Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas

Stuff You Missed in History Class

36:36 min | 2 months ago

SYMHC Classics: Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas

"Brought to you by the capital one quicksilver card with quicksilver. You're an unlimited. One point five percent cashback on every purchase everywhere. That's unlimited one point five percent cashback on everything you buy and unlimited really means unlimited with. Quicksilver there's no limit to how much cash back you can earn capital one. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank. Usa na cox you may know me from orange is the new black or disclosure. My hope it's at people listening to laverne earn cock show gain new perspectives. That will inspire them to live differently. They're all of these things that we just accept as natural normal and inevitable. But they're not listened to the laverne cox show and the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. Don't yuck somebody else's yum. Make sure you subscribe and chance happy saturday. Since tomorrow is valentine's day we are bringing a historical love story out as our classic episode. Today this is gertrude. Stein and alice be toke. Lous who i talked about on february fourteenth of two thousand eighteen. Welcome to stuff. You missed in history class. A production of iheartradio. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy v wilson had. I'm holly fried. Today's podcast is coming out on valentine's day so we thought it would be a good day to talk about a famous couple gertrude. Stein and alice veto klis gertrude. Stein is an icon in the world of modernist literature and although alice be is more often described as her partner and assistant she was published writer. As well and assistant does not really begin to cover how important she was to stein's life and work also together. The two of them famously hosted a salon at their paris home that was frequented by artists and writers such as pablo picasso f scott fitzgerald and ari matisse and that salon was really influential in the whole world of literature and art. Yeah it gets referenced in a lot of people's life biographies That oh we met gertrude. Stein's that she's kind of becomes a big a big connecting point in in history at that. Point so gertrude. Stein was born in allegheny pennsylvania on february third eighteen seventy four. She was the youngest of five children. She had two sisters and two brothers and her father was an immigrant to the united states. Having moved here from bavaria in eighteen forty one family was jewish and although they belong to a synagogue they were not particularly observant. Gershwin's family moved back to your for five years when she was still a baby and when they returned they started out in baltimore where gertrude had relatives on her mother's side eventually though they moved to oakland california and they lived comfortably there thanks to her father's investments and rental properties and streetcar lines. They were pretty well off. Family gertrude. stein is the person who coined the famous phrase. there is. No there there and it was in reference to oakland out of context people tended to interpret it as being dismissive of oakland is a city but it comes from everybody's autobiography which she published in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven and it's really more about the painfully nostalgic experience of trying to go home again and finding the everything is changed by the time. Gertrude with seventeen. Both of her parents had died her mother in eighteen eighty eight and her father in eighteen. Ninety one after her father's death gertrude. Oldest brother michael inherited the family businesses. He took her and her siblings with him to san francisco where he was division superintendent of the market street railway after about a year. Gertrude her brother. Leo and her sister bertha all moved back to baltimore to live with an aunt. Gertrude and leo were very close and when he got into harvard she went to cambridge massachusetts with him. She enrolled at harvard school for women which was known as harvard annex when she started but had been renamed radcliffe college by the time she graduated in eighteen ninety seven while she was in college gertrude. Stein was deeply interested in psychology. She studied under psychologist. William james published two formal papers in psychology before she graduated the first of them which was her first published work ever was quote normal motor automatism which she co authored with leon. Salomon's this paper detailed a series of experiments and automatic writing so the subjects would have their hand resting on a yet. They would focus their attention on something else like reading story and like let their hand right on its own and just to be clear since automatic writing also has some paranormal connotations. They were interpreting the writing that resulted from these experiments as the work of the subconscious. Not as the work of some kind of spirit they were no. We'd you boards president and this work in the psychology lab influenced stein's leader writing james's own work in psychology influenced her as well particularly the idea of a stream of consciousness which was first described in his eighteen. Ninety the principles of psychology. We're gonna talk more about that. Later after graduating from radcliffe stein went to on to johns hopkins medical school. She started there in eighteen ninety seven but it didn't go very well toward the end of her studies. She started failing classes. She had also become infatuated with mary. Bookstaver who is nicknamed may she was involved with one of gertrude. Stein's classmates may did not return gertrude. And gertrude already really been struggling with depression so all of this together left her feeling really dejected and despondent and a fictionalized version of may bookstaver would be part of some of gertrude. Stein's later creative work by this point. Leo stein had moved to london. So in nineteen o. Two gertrude dropped out of johns hopkins and joined him there in nineteen. Oh three. They moved to france. Where leo had a flat at twenty. Seven rue de flew in multiple us. Michael and sarah stein along with their son. Alan soon moved into a home. Nearby is well and michael had been shrewd in his management of their father's investments and it was largely his money that allowed them all to have a very comfortable life in france. It was in france at the age of twenty nine. That gertrude stein really started to dedicate herself to writing. She and her brother were also patrons of the arts. They sought out avant-garde artists whose work was at the time unknown. This developed into a massive collection of modern art by people who would become really famous. They were basically buying from people who nobody knew about at the time and then later on those those people would have a serious name for themselves. The biggest presences in that collection where pulses on on re matisse pablo picasso. A lot of other artists are part of this collection to including edward manet and read to lose the trick. This collection literally filled the walls at twenty-seven loose and in nineteen sixty eight. James are mellow writing for the new york. Times described it as the first the world's first museum of modern art. I know i- romanticizing it but this whole life situation sounds pretty heavenly like we have enough money to kind of do it we want. Let's go find unknown and obscure artists will just have beautiful art around us all the time and we live in france. That sounds lovely. it really does. And it's likely that. Leo was really the one who introduced gertrude. Presient art scene. But gertrude developed a particular interest in one specific artist and that was pablo picasso gertrude. Patronage helped picasso's stay afloat in the early part of his career in one thousand nine hundred six. He painted her portrait which is in the collection of the metropolitan museum of art today and nine. Nineteen seven gertrude. Stein met alice toke lous. Alice was born in san francisco on april thirtieth of eighteen. Seventy seven her parents were ferdinando. Glisten emma levinsky and she was their oldest child and their only daughter like gertrude. Alice's father was an immigrant having to come to poland. Eighteen sixty five. Her mother's father and uncles had emigrated from poland as well another similarity between the two families is that the to- classes were jewish but not especially observant. Alice had a well off but otherwise conventional childhood with the family moving to seattle in eighteen ninety. She attended private schools before going to the university of seattle and she enjoyed art and music and she was good enough at the piano that for a while she actually thought about becoming a concert pianist. Alice also loved reading and her favorite writer was henry. James brother of gertrude. Psychology mentor william. James the tokyo's close family eventually moved back to san francisco and alice's mother. Emma died there in eighteen ninety seven when alice was twenty in san. The to- closest became acquainted with some of the stein family in nineteen. Oh six in the wake of the san francisco earthquake. Michael and sarah stein traveled back from france to check on all their property. They're alice was captivated by the stein's stories of europe and since the death of her mother she found herself spending most time keeping house for the men in her family. She also come to understand that she was attracted to other women. All of this together made her life in california feel really narrow and restrictive so in one thousand nine hundred seven at the age of thirty. She decided to try to find more freedom for herself in paris traveling there with her friend. Harriet lane levy on september eighth. Nineteen o seven gertrude. Stein met alice veto. Togas for the first time at the paris. Home of michael stein. That was his first day in paris and we will talk about how they started to build a life together after a quick sponsor break. Do rats like to be tickled. How can paint help solve climate change and when it comes to creativity or the arts and sciences or really so different. Hi i'm mindy thomas here from npr's row in the world podcast recently named iheart. Best podcast for kids and families an our show. Guy rosen. I bring you the latest scientific discoveries all wrapped up in an audio cartoon for your mind. It's is up screen down. Jaws dropped listen to wow in the world on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts After meeting in one thousand nine hundred. Seven gertrude stein and alice. B tokyo formed a friendship that developed into a loving relationship that would last for almost four decades stein focused on her writing and on her connections within the paris and then tokyo supported that work. She offered encouragement. She transcribed she typed. She made corrections. She managed their household in their life together. Even though they often had hired cook klis was also very skilled in the kitchen and she did point embroidery including in designs that pablo picasso created for her so cool Two years after they met stein published her first book three lives. One of the pieces in it is a novella called malonga. And it's about a woman of the same name who is described in the book as a mulatto and her relationship with a black doctor at the time this story earned a lot of praise for being a depiction of black life written by a white woman. But of course today that seems patronizing and dated. And it was largely about stein's relationship with may bookstaver recast as being between a man and woman of color. Alice moved in with gertrude. And leo in one thousand nine hundred ten and things did not go very well between the two siblings. Some of leo's differences with his sister were artistic. Leo didn't think gertrude is writing was particularly good which gertrude resented. Gertrude had also become an avid supporter of the cubist art movement. Which leo didn't think was particularly valuable or noteworthy. This seems like such a sibling. Thing right yeah but on a more personal level the word homophobia had not been coined yet and as we talk about in our recent episode on an lister the idea of lesbianism as an identity was in its infancy at the turn of the twentieth century. But leo knew that gertrude and alice were not simply close platonic friends and he did not approve of that. So in nineteen thirteen. Leo stein moved out of the flat. At twenty seven loose. He and gertrude divided up that massive art collection with gertrude. Portion the picasso's. When they were done leah wrote to his sister saying quote. I hope that we will all live happily ever after and maintain our respective and do proportions while sucking gleefully our respective oranges during their time. Living together gertrude and her brother had been regularly hosting artists their home but leo had been the more outgoing gregarious. When gertrude had mostly stuck to the background and wants her brother moved out. Gertrude moved into his former role often being the one to talk to writers and painters while alice socialized with their wives a lot of stein's work from the nineteen was inspired by cubism that very geometric abstract movement that was inspired by art from africa and the iberian peninsula cubism distilled life down to geometric forms movements earlier years. You could usually still recognize what the original subject of the painting had been so for example. Picasso's les demoiselles daimiel for example is obviously a group of nude women but they're also painted in a very angular and flattened a way by about nineteen ten. Though cuba's painters were doing what was called hermetic or analytic cubism and this had a lot of overlapping angular shapes in a very monochrome palette with the real subject that had been the starting point for the painting being barely discernible. If at all stein did with words with the cuba's painters were doing with paint and canvas rather than trying to write descriptively in a conventional way that reflected real life she distilled things down to little bits and seemingly disconnected words. A good example is nineteen fourteen tender buttons a collection of experimental hermetic pieces arranged into objects food and rooms so to give listeners. A sense of what this was like dog from objects reads quote. A little monkey goes like a donkey that means to say that means to say that more size last goes leave with it. A little monkey goes like donkey. Stein's work was also heavily influenced by william james's ideas of the stream of consciousness which we mentioned earlier as james described it a person states of mind change but all these states connect to one another and within these different connected states ideas and words repeat themselves but their meaning changes through that repetition and through their relationships to each other stein. Put this concept into practice in. Works like sacred. Emily where she i penned her most famous line rose is a rose is a rose is a rose sacred. Emily was written in nineteen thirteen and published in the book. Geography plays in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. It's a three hundred sixty seven line poem. Nearly all of it. One in two syllable words which recounts the day of an ordinary woman. Home the lines are really choppy and repetitive. Seven lines in a row are just the word pale. Pa l. e. by itself some lines build on each other so one portion of it reads quote. Put something down. Put something down someday. Put something down someday in. Put something down some day in my in my hand in my hand right in my handwriting. Put something down someday in my handwriting. Today gertrude stein is considered to be a pioneer in modernist literature but there is some debate about exactly how much of her work directly influenced other writers at the time stream of consciousness became its own style of writing connected to but still distinct from the stream of conscious idea. In william james's psychology work james. Joyce wrote ulysses after being exposed to stein's work but it's not completely clear whether he intentionally followed her example on the other hand cubist and hermetic work definitely had its detractors the same kinds of criticisms that you'll hear about cubist art or modern abstract art in general people doesn't describe abstract art as not art or as just black paint or whatever people described stein's writing as unreadable nonsense that didn't mean anything and had no value she kept added though stein and took list went to my orca at the start of world war one and then return to france in nineteen sixteen where they volunteered for. The american fund for the french wounded stein learned to drive and she took list started delivering. Hospitals applies to outposts in rural france back in paris after the war starring in tokyo were still hosting their salons. They were still buying art. Although now people like picasso and matisse where two famous for them to really afford stein really kept her focus on the avant-garde and they turn their attention to finding lesser known surrealists to buy their art. It was also after world war one that stein coined the term lost generation for the american writers who had come of age during the war. And we're making a name for themselves in the nineteen twenties. She said she'd heard a garage. Owner referred to young people as a general class. Do which means lost generation and then later on. She brought it up in a conversation with ernest. Hemingway saying you are all lost generation. It was hemingway who popularized the term which came to apply to that whole generation of americans and especially to the american expatriate writers living in europe including of course hemingway and f scott fitzgerald through all of this through the war after the war. All of its darn until. Klis were inseparable. They had a whole collection of pet names for one. Another stein called. Tokyo's wifey toke called stein. lovely. They call each other. Mr and mrs cuddle whittles. These are just examples. Stein often stayed up really late writing and she would leave little notes by the pillow for tokyo's define when she woke up in the morning signing them. Why d for your darling. Although stein was definitely the more famous tokua played an active part in managing her literary career including eventually managing the small press. They establish to publish stein's more unconventional works. It was support the capstein writing through the nineteen twenties and into the early nineteen thirties. Although their salon was popular and had become sort of an incubator for avant-garde and writers herber experimental and unconventional books. Didn't really sell stein. Wanted literary glory and without tokens urging her on. She might have given up those years without it. Although people tend to describe the two women near opposites with stein being the dominating force in the relationship tokyo's defiantly held her own when she wanted to case in point ernest. Hemingway made no secret of the fact that he wanted a sexual relationship with gertrude. Stein alice be focus was having none of that and eventually got signed to cut him out of their social circle their relationship. They'll also was not a continual honeymoon with never a crossword multiple people who knew them commented on stein and his ability to have really blistering fights in one thousand nine hundred eighty. Three stein published her most commercially successful work and only bestseller. The autobiography of alice be togas. It is her most conventional book except that it calls itself an autobiography and it's written from alice's point of view. But gertrude is the author and it's largely about gertrude. the book also gave gertrude stein. A chance to write about herself as a genius without being like. Hey all i'm a genius. As an example here is how end hopeless voice gertrude. starring wrote of their first meeting quote. I may say that only three times in my life. Have i met a genius and each time. Abell within me rang and i was not mistaken and i may say that. In each case it was before there was any general recognition of the quality of genius in them. The three geniuses of whom i wish to speak our gertrude stein. Pablo picasso and alfred. Whitehead the autobiography of alice. Veto quals also really emphasized gertrude. Stein's purported personal influence on the cubism school of art. Something that highly offended a great many cubist artists. There's part of me. That's like me. And i wish i had that kind of confidence while both women had been well known in parisian artistic and literary circles this book both of them internationally famous stein as its author and toke list as its purported subject. They both traveled back to the united states. So stein could carry out a sold out lecture tour. This was a huge publicity event that included newsreel appearances t with first lady. Eleanor roosevelt and meetings with such famous names as charlie chaplin. This would also be stein's last visit to the united states. After a quick sponsor break we will get to their lives during and after world war two which in what may surprise some listeners. The extent of which surprised me includes a heavy dose of supporting the vichy government and its collaborations with nazi germany. London stock exchange group is here to be or essential global markets infrastructure and data partner wet opened is in just a platform but offensively giving you the freedom to make your mark in the world. Elsag open makes more possible. I've got one word for you. Tom cruise on this new weekly podcast meeting tom cruise. We're gonna talk about tom. Cruise going to talk to people who have met top. Why because tom cruise is the greatest movie star of all time is he though. Shut your mouth. Everyone who has met him has an amazing story to tell. And that's where he met. Tom cruise when i hear the bathroom door open. And it's tom truce. Hey everybody. I'm jeff mitchum. You might know me as josh open holes. Tv's blackish. i'm here with us to my maverick johnstone. You might know me as archie in the marvelous. Mrs may nine alec and no one knows you from anything. Listen we look. Tom proves we are inspired by tom. Cruise but while we live and work in hollywood. We've never actually met tapped. So we're gonna talk to some people who have and maybe one of them will lead us to the man himself so we can have our own stories of meeting tom. Groups does really happy just about tom. Cruise here listen to meeting tom. Cruise on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast between the two world wars gertrude. Stein and alice be kept up their life in paris when they weren't on that enormous wildly successful publicity tour. They hosted their salons they travel. They kept on collecting art. They were also fond of dogs and they had several pets during their life together in one thousand nine hundred thirty seven. They moved into a new apartment at five rue christine at the start of world. War two gertrude. Stein and alice be decided to stay in france even though as an elderly jewish couple with an enormous art collection. This was obviously very risky. And it was not a decision that they came to easily they fretted back and forth about it through much of nineteen thirty nine in nineteen forty ultimately they stayed and then they left paris for the french countryside where they had a house in billion a lot of people. Ask them why they stayed. Because i really. That is a lot of risk factors for being in france during world war. Two right the. They have their age the fact that they are gay. They have the huge art collection. Like all of this together and the answers that they gave were kind of. like gertrude. Stein was like yeah. I didn't want to travel. And i'm picky about my food. So i mean. I see how it would be hard to leave french food behind so a lot of accounts really gloss over how they made this work and the answer is that it was largely through the protection of bernard fi who was a high and openly anti-semitic. Vce government quick. Recap if anyone needs a brush up on this part of world war two. The government was installed after france fell to nazi germany. It collaborated with ceremony for the rest of the war and it's named after the town. Vc which effectively acted as the french capital during world war. two the vichy government deported. Seventy five thousand jews to knock the extermination camps. Almost none of them survived. When vichy chief of state marshal philippe attempt banned secret societies in nineteen forty fi himself compiled a list of freemasons. That led to six thousand imprisonments nearly thousand deportations and more than five hundred deaths. It's not clear how much of phase work during the war stein knew about. She probably did not know about this. Whole freemason list. She certainly knew that. Jewish people were being rounded up and deported. But she had been friends with bernard face since nineteen twenty. Six and then later on a tokyo would call him. Stein's dearest friend the reason that's darn until we're left alone was that he arranged it with billy. Putin stein had a connection potential as well in nineteen forty one at the suggestion. She translated a set of his antisemitic. Speeches into english. She described herself as a propagandist for the vichy government phase protection of stein in tokyo this extended to their paris apartment as well while they were in bill and yeah the gestapo broke into that apartment and they started packing up all the art for removal. A neighbor contact. The gendarme arrived on the scene and asked these gestapo to show their requisition orders for the paintings. They didn't have orders which bought a little time while fahy arranged for the art to be left alone. his protection didn't really extend to the rest of the apartment though. And some of stine's and togas other possessions were looted after the war was put on trial for his collaboration with nazi. Germany and stein wrote a letter in his defense to add to all of this in may six nineteen thirty four new york times. article gertrude. stein is quoted as saying quote. I say that. Hitler ought to have the peace prize. Because he is removing all elements of contest and struggle from germany by driving out the jews and the democratic and left elements. He is driving out everything that can do to activity. That means peace. The general consensus is that she probably meant this. Ironically and given that stein's entire literary career was about playing with and breaking the conventional rules of language it was probably not intended to be taken at face value but her later support of ten and the vichy government and her defensive by make it hard to just dismiss that statement with oh. She was supposed to be ironic there at the same time. As all of this. I mean she made steps that clearly seemed to support fascism and and the vc government stein in tokyo also both huge supporters of allied troops in both world war one and world war two. They really took a lot of american. Gi's under their wing acting almost as godmothers wrote them letters posted them in their home. And for stein's part. She wrote a lot of laudatory poems and stories about allied soldiers and france for resistance fighters during world war two. We don't know how stein's might evolved. After the horrors of the holocaust became more fully known not long after the war. She was diagnosed with what turned out to be inoperable stomach cancer. She died during surgery on july. Twenty seven nineteen forty six at the age of seventy two by the time. She died her body of work. Included novels short stories poems plays memoirs and opera. Libretto's she is buried at parallel cemetery in paris. After stein's death. Alice be tokyo's converted to catholicism saying that she hoped that she would meet gertrude again in heaven. She said that stein's genius would have secured her a place there even though she was a to tokyo also spent the rest of her life publishing and promoting stein's work while stein was alive. Tokens had never tried to compete with her. In the world of literature but after stein's death she published multiple works of her own. Two of these works cookbooks. The alice betokens. Cookbook blends recipes and memoir giving glimpses of the to women's life together. It also includes a recipe for her sheesh fudge which she said was given to her by painter and performance artist. Brian geisen the other cookbook is called aromas and flavors of past and present a book of exquisite cooking which is a more straightforward recipe book fudge recipe she. Yeah she was pretty. I'd i don't even know the best word. She was kind of just white hearted about it later on. She was like. Oh you just gave me that recipe but then the fact that it was in the cookbook sort of made her almost a cult figure within the counterculture movement in the sixties tokyo's also wrote an actual memoir called what is remembered which came out in nineteen sixty three and it chronicles her nearly forty year relationship with gertrude. Stein ending with stein's death. A focus published work in magazines and newspapers as well after stein died. Tokes often struggled to make ends. Meet aside from picasso's portrait of stein which was bequeathed to the met tokyo's had inherited nearly the whole art collection with stein's few allen as co beneficiary. The will included a provision. That could sell pieces of the collection if she needed to but she didn't really want to. She tried to keep as much of the collection intact as she could and she lived off the generosity of friends by nineteen sixty allan stein had died and his widow. Regina stein removed the paintings from tokyo apartment while she was away in rome and had them put in a volt at chase manhattan bank in paris rabin. Stein's argument was that the apartment was a safe place for these paintings and it is true that by this point a lot of these pieces had become very valuable and they were uninsured and being kept in a private residence without a lot of security but at the same time. Rubinstein took those paintings while tokyo was away and she was motivated in part by togas having sold some of the picasso drawings which she was allowed to do so tokyo got back from rome to find an apartment with bare walls and she was ultimately evicted from that apartment because of her extended time away so she was simultaneously without a home and without the option of selling off paintings to support herself. Tokyo says last year's difficult she had very little money. She was increasingly poor health. In addition to having disabling cataracts arthritis she died on march seventeenth nineteen sixty seven at the age of eighty nine and now she has buried peres cemetery in paris. Next to gertrude stein. A year later the rest of the art collection was sold to the museum of modern art syndicate with a few pieces. Sold through art dealers. Gwen gertrude stein died. She left her literary to the by nicki rare books and manuscripts library at yale. University and a lot of those papers are made public for the first time in the nineteen eighties which led to the publication of baby. Precious always shines selected love notes between gertrude stein and alice focus which was edited by k turner and came out in nineteen ninety nine. These notes are mostly from stein and eight of them are from tokyo. This so to close out here is one of these notes which was from gertrude to alice. Quote dear. it is not clear that i love her here here in my heart in me all through. I was a lovely way to end an episode. that had an upsetting nazi. Say nazi territory. Yes i mean It it becomes one of those engaging pieces of history right where it's a figure that a lot of people have looked up to you and really enjoyed him. It is hard to face some of the negative parts. Yes a person's life but imperial. I knew that that They had basically been able to survive in france and the position that they were in because they were protected by this one. Bc government official. I and that. I think a lot of people can conceptualize and it doesn't create a ton of cognitive dissonance. Because it's like okay. You need to survive. This person had the ability to help you. You might accept their help. And it's like awesome from your safe armchair to be like oh. I would never do that because that would violate my principles. But you don't actually know but when it got into oh and then she was translating all of these anti-semitic speeches into english and she made a number of statements that obviously seem to be in support of fascism. That's that's when i know man. I did not realize that you were going to ruin gertrude. Stein for some people today much for joining us on this saturday since episode is out of the archive if you heard email address or facebook. Url or something similar over. The course the show that could be obsolete now. Our current email address is history. Podcast at iheartradio dot com. Our old. how stuff works email address. No longer works. You can find us all over social media at missed in history and you can subscribe to our show on apple podcasts. Google podcasts the iheartradio app and wherever else. You listen to podcasts stuff. You missed in history classes. The production of i heart radio for more podcasts. From iheart radio. Visit the iheartradio. App apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

gertrude stein Stein alice tokyo Gertrude leo france paris gertrude stein pablo picasso sarah stein bookstaver Alice Leo stein William james oakland vichy government san francisco
EPISODE #413 "One Order Of Flu To Go Please!" - LIVE!

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

09:31 min | 11 months ago

EPISODE #413 "One Order Of Flu To Go Please!" - LIVE!

"The following episode of the Radio Adventures of Dr Floyd was recorded live in front of a studio audience at the La podcasters studio on April. Twenty third, two, thousand six with the cooperation of L. A. PODCASTERS DOT COM. It's time once again for America's favorite show the radio. Adventures Dr Loyd brought to you by the Floyd Dot Com. As you remember. Our. Shit Oh boy. Mr. Narrator you still stick with the flu. It would appear that way. Dr, Floyd I. Well. I guess there's no way around it. We're GONNA have to find another replacement you go, get some soup, Mr Narrators. Thank you Dr Flight. All right, so we need to replace the narrator. Anybody know how to do narrator voice. Can Enter sure sure, go right ahead. Okay it's time once again. For America's favorite show. The Radio Adventures Abductor Floyd brought to you by the Freud Dot Com As you remember in our last episode that evil mastermind Dr Steven Suck ship assistant, tomato, time jump to Paris and France and nine, hundred sixty nine were they planned on getting their hands on a public, because Oh sketch, okay, fidget! We're in Paris in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty nine. Now we just need to find out which Cafe Picasso likes to frequent. Well. We'll just ask excuse me sir. Could you please tell me which cafe that famous artist Pablo Picasso Likes to frequent? I Beg your pardon. Yes, miserable superfoods under cafe. and. Can you tell me where that is we? We miss you. Are you okay. Why do you keep saying that saying what we know? No, I do not keep saying what in fact, just now I did not say it it all to you know not what? What's then we we I did not see what van for just then word said what you're not understanding my question I'm not asking if you keep saying what then then what are you are that I? Keep saying. Who Do you think we are Abbott and Costello? Where is this cafe to? Hear, thank you. There that you just said, forget it. Let's go fidget before before. I don't know. Villains over to the cafe. Let's check in with our hero Dr Floyd, his protege, Dr Grant and their faithful robot companionship's who have just landed their time and space ship in France in nineteen, sixty nine. What do you think Dr Steve is up to Dr Floyd. Dot Grand, but you better believe it has something to do with stealing something from a historical figure, and then returning it to the future to sell on. Ebay, he sure is an expert in the art of being evil, isn't he Dr Floyd here? Is He? Wait Art that did Dr Grant I? BET THE DOUG or Steve is here to try and Swipe something from Pablo Picasso, Picasso, isn't he? That famous artist, yes, the one that cut off his ear. No, that was man go. Oh, I thought Vanco was the guy who's saying brown eyed girl. Van Morrison Oh yeah! The leads the lead singer of the doors. Jim Morrison right the pioneer with the big knife. That was Jim Buoy Ziggy Stardust David Bowie the famous statue David Statue by Michelangelo Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Comic Book Carrot Top Prop Comic like for an airplane? That's a propeller. Sad story, old Yeller, old faithful that's yellowstone the magician blackstone when the stock market crash Tuesday Goodbye Ruby Tuesday, a stone, a stone, Hut Pueblo the guy who painted boy with Pipe Yes Pablo Pablo Picasso. Why didn't you just say so in the first place? Oh my goodness. Where do you think we can find Picasso well? When he wasn't painting sculpting, you was usually hanging out in cafes cafes. You mean like baby cows. No, those are yes, baby cows. Fox let's go. Dr Grant or heroes head off to find which Cafe Pablo. Picasso is in as they do. We find the Dr. Steve and fidget have now secured employment in the cafe. And are now waiting for her to arrive for lunch. Look quite cute and your little apron fidget. Here comes Picasso now. Good Morning Monsieur welcome to the Cafe de Trois Party of one we. Yes right this way. We are now. What are you in the mood for this afternoon I'm not sure. Is the duck fresh? Let me find out. Is the duck fresh? That's about as fresh as you can get. I think we'll have that WHO coming right up so or one order of duck. As the duck in the kitchen trust took up the back door or heroes Dr Floyd Dr. Grant and chips are ducking by the front window of the Cafe de a spine doctor. Steve There's Dr Steve Waiting for Pablo waiting on Pablo. Picasso Dr Grant? We're GONNA. Keep an eye on them and make sure he doesn't Swipe Anything from Pablo Picasso. WHO's that guy over there in the corner booth all by himself with a box of Kleenex in a bowl of soup. He looks familiar your Doctor Grant. He does wait. I just figured out who that is. Quick chips get our big black fake, looking beards and follow me. Our Heroes Don their big black fake, looking beards, and suddenly into the restaurant, sitting next to the stranger, who was sitting alone in the booth with a box of Kleenex as they whisper to a much chicken with the evil mastermind Dr. Steve, who is just now bringing public of the bill for his meal here. You are Sir I'll pick that up when you're ready. What forms of payment do you accept? What we accept cash checks credit cards, and we just started accepting sketches on Napkins by world. Famous artists named Pablo. Oh, really you did. How Ironic I just happened to be a world famous artist named Pablo and I just happened to have been doodling a little sketch on this Napkin right here. Would you accept that so we would be honored here. You go have a good. Day. Thank you Mr Picasso! Thank you indeed. Leave Oh heavens. No, we have to finish off shift. Earn a little more money here. Hold onto this sketch well I go wait on that other table, the one with the guy with the Buckley next, and the three guys in big black fake looking beards, Dr, Steve Crosses the restaurant to the table where the four gentlemen sit. And how is your meal sir? and. It's Okay I. Guess Say Your Voice Sounds familiar and you three with the big black fake looking bids look awfully familiar. Didn't I meet you guys before? I don't need Joe. Anyway I! Try to SIP this milk. You brought me and I think it's turn. Really will let me try a SIP. New I think it's quite good actually. Kaha Congratulations Dr Steve by drinking out of the same class as me, you now have the flu for I am the original narrator and I have the. Flow to Steve stands in stunned silence as realize what happened, and as the three men in big BLACKBEARD's rip off their big back. Fake Wigan beards reveal that they are none other than Dr Floyd Dr Grant and chips foiled. You again Dr Steve Foiled me again. How could giving me the flu possibly? FIDGETED quick. Give me something to blow my nose with. I don't care a Napkin or something. Thank you. Know, as I was saying. How can give me the flu? Spoil my plan. Take a peek a Napkin. You just use to blow your nose. I most certainly will not. Do you know that that old sixteenth century rule of etiquette says it says it is not seemingly after wiping knows to spread out your handkerchief, and peer into it, as if pearls and rubies my default out of your head, well, then it may not be pearls or rubies falling out of your head, but what if the handkerchief was a sketch by a world artist named PABLO? Don't be ridiculous fidget. Has that Napkin? Don't you fidget? FIDGETS. Please tell me that I just didn't blow my nose into a sketch by Pablo Picasso. FIDGET IF I were you I would begin running as fast as you can. Because you're about to catch a case of the flu yourself. visit takes off running through the cafe with Dr Steve Close behind. They run right out the front door and down the street. Look go Dr. Steve Looks like he's chasing a little. Dog Oh God it Doug Grant. That reminds me I didn't order the portrait of Mr Beardie. Jen's for my mom. I have an idea Dr Floyd Gimme that album of pictures of Mr. Beardie Jen's okay here we go. What are you GonNa? Do we'll sense? We're in the same time period as Pablo Picasso Excellent, idea Dr, grant or heroes head off into the street, looking for cost Dr Steve Chases fidget all the way back to their ships where they take off into the time and space stream, where will Dr Steven Digit head to next. We'll floyd Dr, grant and chips ever be able to stop them, and just what will Mrs Floyd think of her public painted portrait upper putty mister. Where did you get this? It looks nothing like Mr Bertie. Is You're on the side of the face, and his mouth is on his forehead lined up next time on the radio adventures. o Dr Floor. This episode of the Radio Adventures of Dr Floyd is brought to you by action figure wrecks DOT COM. What do you collect?

Pablo Pablo Picasso Dr Floyd Dr. Grant Abductor Floyd Dr. Steve flu Dr Loyd Dr Floyd Dr Steve Close Dr Steve Dr Steve Chases Cafe Picasso Dr Steven Suck Doug Grant Floyd Dr Steven Digit Dr Steve Waiting America France Mr Narrators Mr. Narrator
Marie Laurencin: Avante-garde Painter of Paris

Stuff You Missed in History Class

40:18 min | 1 year ago

Marie Laurencin: Avante-garde Painter of Paris

"Support for Steffi missed in history. Class comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans. Finding the right house is not easy, but finding the right mortgage can be rocket mortgage is doing more to help you understand the home buying process so you can get exactly what you need because it's not just a mortgage, it's your mortgage, and they've found a better way they make the home buying process work for you. In fact, rocket mortgage is there with a word winning at client service and support every step of the way visit rocket mortgage dot com slash history class and take the first step toward the home of your dreams. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states in MLS consumer access dot org, number thirty thirty rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans, push-button get mortgage. Welcome to stuff you missed in history class, a production of I heart radio. How stuff works? Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy b Wilson. And I'm Holly fry. We are just back from Paris lead. I I'm sure highly did this to of course, I came back from Paris with a list of ideas for future episodes of the podcast. Oh, yeah. The list is long. Yeah, I'm planning to spread by now. So it's not just like all nineteenth century France all the time. Even though that is fun. This is more more twentieth century than nineteenth. So when we had our trip to Paris I went out just a little early for a little extra time. A little jet lag recovery before the trip officially started. And one of the places I went during that time was the museum Lawrence theory. And I and my husband had been drawn there by Monet's water lilies, but later on in our visit I found myself, just totally spellbound by five paintings by Parisian artist. Marie Lawrenceville, these are in another part of the museum all five of them were of women and animals with very simple and willowy lines and this muted color palette of pink and blue and green and grey, and they just seemed wistful and theory. And I just loved them. The audio guide had a little bit about what I was looking at and who painted them, but I really wanted to know more about this woman who had created these works, and that proved to be a little trickier than. I expected she produced a lot of work, and she was really well known internationally sought after in her time. But that is less true today. It is a specially less true outside of France. Her personal papers are in a French library, but they have been censored, like with words physically cut out of them either by her, or by somebody connected to her estate, and then they can also only be accessed with the estates authorization, one of the conditions of that authorisation is that unpublished material from her work cannot be directly quoted, so her biography has not gotten nearly as much indepth attention as some of her contemporaries, and a lot of what's there is in French, and she also hasn't gotten as much attention from art historians because some of the nature of her work, which we will be talking about, as well that didn't make any of this impossible. It just meant that when my husband was at the fancy library, helping me out with getting me a book. And he sent me a photo of like what would you like from? This shelf. I said everything in English. Bring it all to me a little more challenging than normal, but not impossible. Still laughing at that so to begin Marie Melanie law, Seoul was born in Paris on October thirty first eighteen eighty three I already love her as a Halloween, baby. Her mother Pauline, may have had some Creole ancestry and her father was a government official named Alfred to lay Pauline. Alfred were not married. Alfred was not particularly present in res young life. She actually didn't know he was her father until she was in her twenties. And at that point, he had died, although he didn't acknowledge Marie is his daughter, Alfred to lay might have given the families some financial support Pauline was able to establish herself as a seamstress and embroiderer and provide herself and her daughter with a pretty middle class lifestyle. They lived in an apartment at the foot of Moammar, tra- usually with at least one cat, which is another reason to love her, of course Pauline was very strict. Gertrude Stein, described her and Marie as being like a pair of nuns living in a convent. Pauline, also wanted, Marie to be educated and cultured, and their apartment was filled with books, something that Marie would carry into her adult life. She had a library of about five thousand volumes by the time that she died. Marie and her mother also took frequent trips to the Liuw and other museums Pauline love to sing and Marie love to listen to her. She would later say that without her mother's singing, she probably never would have picked up a paintbrush, but otherwise their life at home was very quiet. And almost are steer Pauline was really hoping that Marie would grow up to be a teacher, but Marie dashed that hope very thoroughly by coming in last in every subject, at least they Lamartine that included art glass although Murray was interested in art from a young age by the turn of the century. She was particularly drawn to the impressionists, the post impressionist and the forests, including Cezanne, Renoir, many to lose the track and Matisse. She also wrote poems, some of which were later published under the. Pseudonym Louise LA lanne without teaching as a possible way to support herself. Marie turned to painting, specifically painting on porcelain through the settlers, porcelain factory. And this was a challenging path for her. She was extremely nearsighted and glasses. Were not fashionable in Paris in the early twentieth. Century Levinson used learn yet or a pair of lenses on a handle to look at her work. She didn't let her vision keep her from doing anything, though. She enjoyed fencing, which she would do with glasses in one hand and a foil in the other this delighted Paul par previous pica subject so much that he made her a special costume to do it in and let her fence in his apartment, while she was studying porcelain painting. Lawrence was also attending regular gatherings hosted by Natalie Barney who had moved to Paris from the United States. Barney was a writer poet, and an heiress, and she hosted a salon in Paris's Latin Quarter. That was frequented by some of the city's most prominent artists writers. Musicians and patrons. Barney was also unapologetically publicly lesbian at time when homosexuality was really heavily stigmatized. She was actually one of the inspirations for the character of Valerie Seymour, and Radcliffe halls the well of loneliness, which was one of the first lesbian novels written in English. Barney had been nicknamed, the Amazon after being seen riding a horse by sitting astride it instead of sidesaddle when she first started the salon. She called it, the salon of the Amazon, and admitted only women, she held other women only events as well including all women pagan circles and she later established a women's art academy since academy. Fl says admitted only men, but eventually Barney made the salon of the Amazon opened to anyone regardless of gender Lawrence saw was a regular at the salon, and at other gatherings at Barney's home Pierre-Louis, who was the author of Shanshal WT's attended the salon, as well. We talked about chance onto BT's recently in our Sappho episode, but just in case. Miss that when this was a supposedly unearth set of erotic poems that were reportedly by one of Suffolk students. They were really pier Louise's own creation, though. One of Lawrence. John's I produced works of art was an etching, titled Chacel diabetes. Switch. She printed repeatedly in one thousand nine four thousand nine hundred five really experimenting with colors and techniques that she did it this depicts two women kissing with an oil lamp that looks a little bit like a waterfowl of some sort in the corner by the time she was doing this print work. Nora son had decided to branch out from porcelain painting, she started studying at the academy in bail, which was one of the many art academies, in the mouth with district of Paris. She learned drawing and printmaking and started meeting members of the Parisian avant-garde, including George black, with whom she developed a very close friendship, along with Pablo Picasso, Braque was one of the founders of cubism Brock introduced Lawrenson. Picasso and Picasso introduced her to Gilliam EPA air around nineteen o seven telling him that she would make him a good. Fiance, Appolinaire was eight years older than Lawrenson born in Rome, as Ville Apollinaire to Castroville sqi. He was raised in various parts of southern France before, finally settling down in Paris. He and Lawrence. Army had a lot in common. They were both raised by unmarried mothers both connected to Paris's, Evan guard community and both passionately creative on their own. They started an intense and sometimes volatile relationship both of them seeming to draw creative. Inspiration from each other. And from the relationship itself. Sometimes Lawrenson is described as a pollinators muse that's something that was possibly inspired and definitely reinforced by are- Rousseau's, nineteen o nine portrait of them, which is titled the muse inspiring, the poet, this is actually the picture that is used for the artwork on our website for copyright reasons. Meaning. It's the one we had access to because copyright. So if you come to our website that is what you're seeing not some of her own work, and it is clear that Apollinaire work was changed significantly while they were together. His early writings were explicit erotica. But in one thousand nine he published his first volume of poetry. He also became a literary and art critic helping to define the cubist movement, and supporting the work of writers and painters, all across the world of Parisian modern art Apollinaire said Lawrenson invented poetry for him, and he described her as his feminine counterpart, but this was not at all one way street with Lawrence, and just sort of passively inspiring Apollinaire to greatness merely by existing which is sort of how people imagined muses work. They were both really drawing from in challenging each other, and she was developing as an artist in her own, right? While they were together these were really formative years for marine Lawrence som-, her work. Through the nineteen teens was stylized somewhat influenced by the Cubists, she was often working and color palettes that were dominated by a lot of Brown, and she was also exploring her technique through creating self portraits. She did at least thirty six self portrait's during her lifetime. Those just being the ones that were titled as self-portraits a third of those were before nineteen. Fourteen Lorestan continued to live with her mother during her study of art and her relationship with Apollinaire, and we'll get into how these years unfolded after we I take a pause for a little sponsor break. This episode of Steph, I'm ever told you is brought to you by pure by Tampax are always no matter what your needs are pure by Tampax and always has a product that is right for you. Whether you're athletic, whether it's overnight, or just living life. One thing I love is someone who's always on the go is that I can trust the long lasting protection expected from Tampax. And that's one less thing that I have to worry about, and I can just get about my day another thing I love about. Pure by Tampax are always is their donation program. One in five girls in the United States. Miss school or leave due to lack of access to period products. And that's why each purchase of pure by Tampax are always helps end the period, poverty because every time you buy especially marked pure pack Tampax and always will donate one pad or tampon to help end period, poverty tempests pure tampons features a one hundred percent cotton core, always cheer pets. Have a top player that is made with sustainably sourced cotton that is gentle on your skin. New pure by Tampax and always free of chlorine, bleaching, dyes and fragrances in June. Get a twenty dollar rebate when you buy fifty dollars of Tampax or always products at your local. Walgreens are Walgreens dot com, go to W H, E S rebate dot com for details. The Parisian about guard community of the nineteen hundreds of nineteen teens was really highly interconnected. Many painters also wrote poetry and many poets also painted or did some other visual or plastic art artists and writers were gathering constantly and cafes and coffee shops, and galleries and people's homes, Lorestan was an active and visible part of the seed. And although her mother had her doubts about MAURICE future is an artist. She hosted groups of cubis at their momentum apartment Lawrenson was also frequently at the battle of wire, where Picasso and other Cubists at their studios, and she was a regular at some of the most influential literary salons in the city, she wasn't universally beloved by this community though, Apollinaire praised her work really, if you simply to the point that people sometimes thought that his feelings for her were coloring his judgment about her work, but Gertrude Stein and Pablo Picasso's girlfriend for non Olivier were both pretty dismissed. In disparaging of her both Stein and alleviate wrote derisive accounts of an incident in which Lawrence nine was drunk at a party Livia also called her affected and a bit silly and claimed that she was only successful because of her connection to Apollinaire Stein imply that Lawrenson didn't really fit in with the rest of the community, either writing quote, everybody called Gertrude Stein, Gertrude, or at most Mademoiselle Gertrude, everybody called Bakassi, Pablo and for non for non and everybody called Guillaume, Apollinaire Guillaume and max Jacob max, but everybody called Marie Laurence Marie Laurence. It's like the opposite of the Madonna thing. She wants all the names. If you're wondering why Gertrude Stein refers to herself in third person? This is from the autobiography of Alice veto clips, went was written that way in one thousand nine hundred seven with Apollinaire encouragement, Lawrenson exhibited at the salon, and impact on this was an annual exhibition of independent artists that was established in eighteen eighty four after the official salon held by the academy. Hoya repeatedly rejected the work of the impressionists. The academy royale later became the coda boozer, and this was the first of many exhibitions for Lawrence in one thousand nine hundred eight Lawrenson sold, her first piece of art, which was a painting called group of artists it. Depicts the artist herself with Pablo Picasso and Fernando Olivier arranged around. Gill Appolinaire also in the painting is because those dog freaky, Lawrence sons buyer for this was passed podcast, subject, Gertrude Stein, and eventually Lawrenson would also paint a portrait of one of Stein's dogs that dog being basket. The second in one thousand nine hundred nine Lawrence som- painted a larger version of a similar scene known as reunion in the country or Apollinaire, and his friends, this larger piece featured Gertrude Stein, Fernando Livia an, an unidentified, third woman, as the three graces on the left hand side of the frame, Guillaume Apollinaire is roughly in the centre and to his right. Are Pablo Picasso Margarito, Mobley's, Clem, knits, and Marie Lawrenceville herself. There is a dog in this painting as well facing away from the center of the frame, but with its head turned back toward Apollinaire Lawrence signed gave this one to Apollinaire as a gift in hung above his bid until his death these two paintings, or some of the most examined in Lawrence work, and they both show the influence of cubism in her early painting, especially the earlier years of cubism before it progressed to being really abstract a lot of the time. They're both very flat with primitive lines and lots of Brown grey and black and both of them show Lawrence. On its part of this group that also included Pablo Picasso but while she was fascinated by the Cubists, and was nicknamed, Our Lady of cubism Lawrenson, didn't really consider herself to be acutest. She counted people like Picasso and Matisse as contemporaries, and credited them with teaching her. What she knew about art, but she also thought they would be embarrassed by her association with them as a side note. Apollinaire was his own potential source of basement on September. Seventh nineteen eleven he was arrested for stealing the Mona Lisa from the Louvre, which he had not done. However, he and Picasso had gotten someone else to steal a couple of ancient Iberian busts for them which Cosso used as models for his painting, Dimos hills dummy, you'll Apollinaire tried to anonymously return, these busts and that leads him being held for six days for the unrelated modal Lisa theft. He wasn't a ultimately prosecuted for the theft of these busts. But this did put quite a bit of strain on his. Lawrence relationship in one thousand nine hundred twelve Lawrenson was the only woman to be part of Lamazon zone cubist, or the cubist house, which was an art installation for the nineteen twelve the tomb like the Salone days end up and on the salon dot com had been established in response to the conservatism of the academy. The cubist house was an architectural installation with a facade full of angles in interior rooms, adorned with cubist art. The response in the press was incredibly critical. This combination of a structure meant to look like a family home filled with Emma guard. Art really struck a nerve with the public in the face of all this criticism, Lawrence saw, and a couple of other women stood guard outside armed with umbrellas Lawrence continued to make connections and show. Her work in the early nineteen teens. She was part of the group of artists known as the sixty door and she exhibited her work with them. She had several pieces at the international exhibition of modern art in New York. City in nineteen thirteen which came to be known as the armory show. This was just a groundbreaking and incredibly influential exhibition, and it was many Americans first experience with modern art, Laura, and Apollinaire ended their involvement in nineteen twelve or nineteen thirteen after about six years together. Although he had a reputation as a philanderer they stayed in touch, and apparently Apollinaire thought they would get back together until nineteen fourteen. That's when Lawrenson Mary German artist auto van Videon, Lawrence's said van veteran reminded her of her mother who had died at about the same time that she broke up with Apollinaire. This is a difficult year or so in her life. And this marriage wasn't particularly happy World War, One started while the two of them were on their honeymoon and because of Vecchione was German, they had to leave France. They went to Spain, which was neutral, during the war Lawrence's says soon made connections, amongst Spain's modern artists particularly. Dada is, she also had lots of letters from France and visitors from time to time one eagerly welcomed? Visitor was fashion designer Niko glue who was Paul Poiret sister, Lawrenson and glue had met in one thousand nine eleven and they were extremely close for the rest of their lives, including a love affair during at least some of that time, Nicole's daughter flora was one of Marie Lawrence's first, biographers, and in two thousand eighteen Marie and Nicole's relationship with the subject of a novel, Jay on ten to zero or I have such a desire, while she wasn't totally cut off from her friends in France, Lawrence on desperately missed Peres, and felt isolated and depressed parts of the guard community had also really heavily criticized her for her split with Apollinaire and her marriage to a German. She eventually broke off from the Cubists, but she continued to work, and she started to really establish some of the visual style that she became more known for with lots of pinks and blues and greens, rather than the Browns that had dominated a lot of her earlier work. And depictions of women and animals more often than her depictions of men, many of her wartime paintings, also show, how unhappy she was during these years with elements that suggests being trapped or imprisoned for example, the prisoner shows a woman in blue looking out from behind flowing pink curtains with a black pattern that resembles a chain link. Fence while Lawrence was away from France Gillan Appolinaire died. He was injured in the war, and then he died of influenza van vapin also started abusing alcohol in Lawrence on filed for divorce in nineteen nineteen the split was apparently amicable though. They stayed in touch until his death in nineteen forty two Lawrenson was finally able to return to France in nineteen twenty one a year later, she underwent surgery to treat stomach cancer. And she also had a hysterectomy back in France. Lawrenson secured the representation of influential art dealer. Paul Rosenberg, who also represented people like Pablo Picasso and our Rima teeth rose. Zanberg would continue to be her art dealer until nineteen forty when he had to flee France in the face of the Nazi occupation from her return to France until about nineteen thirty seven Laura San was at the height of her career her work was exhibited in London. Paris, and New York, and she was financially successful through commissions and the sale of her work. She continued to work mainly in pinks blues, grays, and greens often depicting women and girls in dreamy slightly unreal settings. At one point she said, quote, why should I paint dead fish onions and beer, glasses girls are so much prettier in the words of an art critic quoted in her obituary in the New York Times, quote, she can paint a girl with is like a DOE? And a DOE with is like a girl, Lawrenson also started working as a portrait artist and she was successful enough to be selective about who she painted. Although her dealer repeatedly had to discourage her from just giving her paintings away to people that she liked syrup pointedly, charged men more than she charged with. Women and because she found blonde women to be the most inspiring. She charged brunettes more than blondes. She would also only paint children, if she liked them, one of her most famous paintings is a French fashion designer Coco Chanel done early in Lawrence's career as a portrait artist this is one of the paintings in the museo de LA Hoya Shelly Chanel is draped in blue and black with a dog on her lap. She has her head resting in her hand, and she looks somewhere between wistful and pensive another dog is in the background along with a grey dove Lawrence thumbs portraits, followed the same style as the rest of her art that she was doing around this time. So they were not really realistic likenesses of her subjects and their clothing. So when she saw this painting, Chanel refused to pay for it, because it didn't look like her then Lawrence refused to do it over and kept the original for herself in spite of this vicious start, Laura San became famous and sought after for these pastel, simplified portrait's, people would. Arrive to be painted wearing couture on Soames only for Laura song to cover them up with scarves, and drapes that she had around for that purpose. She also had romantic relationships with many of her subjects, regardless of their gender, and she did a lot besides paintings and portraits of the nineteen twenties. And thirties, I mean she did a lot of those, but other work as well in nineteen twenty four she designed the costumes and sets for the Belarus's labia, or the does by Sergei Diaghilev when this ballet was staged in the United States dancing in the principal role was passed podcast, subject, Maria tall chief and also designed costumes and sets for the comedy fronts as which is one of France's state theaters. Laura San was a book illustrator, as well, just as a few examples in one thousand nine thirty, she drew a set of illustrations, for an edition of Allison wonderland. She also illustrated, the garden party and other stories by Katherine, Mansfield, and an American edition of Camille by Alexander will do my fees. That last one drew some criticism because all twelve of the 'lustration, she created were of the book's main character Marguerite, goatee in nineteen thirty-one. She became a founder, member of the French society of women modern artists she taught at via Malakoff from nineteen thirty two to nineteen thirty five and she managed to stay financially afloat, even during the great depression in nineteen thirty seven a retrospective of Lawrence signs, work was held at the great exhibition of independent art masters at the Petit Palais in Paris. She also finally started wearing glasses that year and it's around this time that her career started to slow more about that after another quick sponsor break. This episode is brought to you by the Home Depot. You already trust the Home Depot for studs sheet rock electrical everything to build your house. Now you can make that house, your home by shopping. Thousands of decor, pieces that suit your taste from sofas to area rogues to that photo floral, you've been admiring, the Home Depot has all the pieces, you need to create your dream space from start to finish the best part free and flexible delivery, and no hassle returns on everyday essentials and more find exactly what you're looking for at homedepot dot com slash decor. Your perfect home. It's waiting for you in just a click away. Plus for a limited time, you can save even more on the styles you love when you use code history t h d at checkout. Now there's more kinds of doing at the Home Depot. Valid on select items. Only free delivery on select items forty five dollars or more. Visit homedepot dot com. For more information. When World War Two, you started in Europe. Marie Lawrence stayed in Paris. She published a semi autobiographical collection of poetry and prose and nineteen forty two that was called LA carnet, then wheat. And although she continued to work in visual art, her output, slowed down, as we said earlier, most critics consider her work at this point to be a repeat of the techniques and themes that she was developing earlier in her career rather than experimenting are breaking new ground to did start to use some darker, brighter colors, rather than the pastels that had become her hallmark in the nineteen twenties, and thirties, and this change in pallet may have been connected to the ongoing deterioration of her vision, although she was able to stay in Paris. Germans requisitioned her apartment during the occupation and she stayed with friends for the duration of the war, some of her art was branded, degenerate, or looted by Nazis, her politics, during this time seemed to have been contradictory. She was part of an. Intellectual scene that had lots of connections to the Vichy government. And in some ways, Lawrence was complicit with them. And with German authorities at the same time she tried to personally intervene to save her friend, max Jacob who was a poet and painter Jacob was of Jewish ancestry, but had converted to Catholicism he was ultimately deported to a concentration camp. And he died in nineteen forty four when France was liberated at the end of World War, Two Lawrenson was arrested as part of the wave of arrests and purges known as the apparition or a purification. She was briefly incarcerated at dancy internment camp. But was ultimately exonerated and released after the war Lawrenson was prone to cycles of depression, and 'isolation. Her closest companion became Suzanne Moro, who had originally been her made it is not entirely clear if the two of them were romantically involved or if Lawrenson was more like Moreau surrogate, mother. But they were together for almost twenty years, Lawrenson legal. Adopted Moreau in nineteen fifty four when she was seventy and Moreau was forty nine in nineteen. Fifty Lawrence produced a series of twenty three etchings for an illustrated collection of his poetry, which had been translated by Edith de Beaumont and her earlier book, illustrations, we're contended to resemble her paintings with similarly flowing lines and pastel palettes, these Sappho illustrations, though, are still flowing in style. But with a much, simpler, black and white design Marie Lawrenson died of a heart attack at her home in Paris on June eighth, nineteen fifty-six. She was seventy two. She was buried in parallel says cemetery. And at her request. She was dressed in white with a rose in her hand and her love letters from Guillaume Apollinaire close to her heart. I think one of my few regrets about our trip to Paris is that I didn't realize until after we were back all of these things about Marie Lawrenson including her burial at perilous says because we were there, but hers is not. Not one of the graves that we went to there are so many things to look at, in parallel says you cannot fault yourself for missing anything. Well, you could be there really. I think at that point like, because that was one of the things that we sort of did on one of our free days. Holy you're in Paris. And at that point, I think she was written in my list of ideas for podcast episodes, for after the show as something like that painter from the Orangerie like I didn't even have her name fixed in my mind yet, so anyway, although she had been well known and sought after during her lifetime, her reputation faded pretty quickly after her death. She left instructions to Moreau not to sell her paintings or to allow people to research her. So it wasn't really until the nineteen seventies, which I think was after Moreau's death. And when there was renewed interest in women's, and LGBT history that people started researching her life, and seeking out, more of her work, especially outside of France. The nature of her work also may have acted as a deterrent for biographers and art historians, there was a decorative element to Laura son's paintings. She didn't push boundaries in the same way that many of her. Contemporaries did many of the Cubists, who were so important to Lawrence's early development and artistic network, we're creating work that was increasingly abstract and Loris on the other hand, ultimately broke away from the Cubists, and she painted in a way that was pretty appealing. She wanted to make art that people would enjoy looking at added to that Lawrenson and her work were explicitly intentionally feminine given the gender standards of the day, her pastel color, palette, and willowy fluid lines impressed people as just intrinsically female. And this made it really easy to write her off, as just girl stuff, rather than as a serious work of art. That was full of nuance and symbolism and subtlety and sometimes humor. She clearly had an affinity for women in her work and her life as well. And that was something that earlier art historians seemed really reluctant to explore because of all the stigma surrounding lesbianism and bisexuality because so much of the interest into. Women's are in the nineteen seventies was coming from the feminist movement, Laura science own preferences and opinions complicated things as well. She really favored, one type of model one who was young white, fair and slender. And she also believed that women and men were fundamentally different and that women's art was fundamentally different from men's art. She said, quote, if I feel so far removed from painters. It is because they are men and in my view, men are difficult problems to solve. But if the genius of men, intimidates me I feel perfectly at ease with everything that is feminine that made her less appealing subject of study in the context of a movement for women's empowerment, autonomy, equality and independence, as a counterpoint to that idea, though. Marie Lawrence was one of very few women artists to hold her own in the male dominated world of French modernists. Although she was connected to the Cubists in her early work. So some cubist influence she ultimately broke away. From all that and developed her own distinct unapologetically feminine style, and that was transgressive in its own way, there's been more interest in Marie Lawrence's life and work in Europe and North America over the past few decades, but she's been, especially beloved in Japan. Japanese collector, Masahito Takarno developed an interest in her work and acquired a huge amount of it founding. The Marie Lawrenson museum in Nagano Japan which first opened in nineteen eighty three to Mark her one hundredth birthday at the time it was the only museum in the world, dedicated to the work of a woman artists. The museum closed in twenty eleven for financial reasons in two thousand thirteen pictures from the museum were part of a temporary exhibition at the Musee mammal, dumb Monet in Paris after that the marine Lawrenson museum reopened in Tokyo. In July twenty seventeen unfortunately closed again on January fourteenth of twenty nine thousand nine when I was looking at the website for it because sometimes. I am calendar challenged somehow I thought January fourteenth twenty nineteen had not happened yet and I was like I gotta go to Japan right now. And then I realized that six months, yeah. Ready to late? But yet. The wording suggests that, that there may be like a future exhibition at some point in the in the future. And it's also clear that the people who have all this art of hers. Really, love it and her caring for it. So maybe it will be on public view somewhere at some point in the future. Anyway, I I love her. Yeah, she's great. I her art is very pretty. It's not my jam but I appreciate it. And think it's beautiful. Yeah, it's I, definitely I kind of came around the corner where all five of the paintings that were on display all were, and I was immediately, like I am here for this. Yeah. That's the beautiful thing about artists when you have that visceral, just unexplainable emotional reaction to it. That is why I love arts much. Yeah. And there's also we'll have a link in the show notes that episode because we couldn't personally put some of her artwork onto our website. We will have a link to the museum's page on her that has all all five, I think of the paintings that you can look at their I think they're really beautiful. Do you have a little bit of listener meal? I do. I, I want to thank everyone who has updated me on where to find crispy cream in New England. Some of these crispy cream locations have opened up since the day that I looked and went on man. The closest is in New York City, and then some of them either either the store locator was lying to be about where they were or I was thinking, I'm never in that part of Connecticut. I'll have to wait till I'm in New York. But anyway, we've gotten a number of letters from folks telling me about various places in Connecticut, and Maine to get crispy cream donuts. Thank you. And then I have this Email from Carey. Carey says good morning, Tracy and Holly. I just finished listening to your red summer episode, and I'm appalled and embarrassed. This will probably end up being a longer letter than I intended to the short version is thank you. I lived engineer Washington DC until I was in my thirties, I loved my history classes growing up I'd never ever heard anything about what happened in the summer of nineteen nineteen when I was trying to figure out why I think I nailed it and highlights. Why podcast like yours are so important? I remember very. Clearly learning about colonial America, the revolutionary war. The civil war reconstruction. And then there's a gap I learned a bit about the great depression a little bit about World War One a fair bit about World War Two and keep presidencies like Nixon, and Kennedy. I learned about the civil rights movement in the sixties, but it honestly, came across as a somewhat isolated set of events that gap while as a kid was seemingly insignificant at the time is really telling I went to a mostly white suburban high school in Virginia. My history classes taught me that the civil war wasn't really about slavery. But about trade in Maryland. I learned that Maryland's lawmakers were trying to be peacekeepers, and that's why they didn't succeed from the union. I knew my history classes were whitewashed untrue. But I'm truly disheartened and saddened that I wasn't taught any of the material in this podcast. I didn't know that it happened. It put things into perspective for me when I'm barest to say that I didn't put these pieces together before, now it's sort of this gap in my head between historical America and modern day America that gap. Is exactly this post reconstruction pre World War One gap. That's so, so important to understanding a lot of today's politics and the struggle of black and other minority Americans, it's a whole generation of people who were quite actively in horribly oppressed that I didn't realize existed. Anyway, thank you. I feel like the world an apology for my lack of understanding, and then carry sent some pictures of cats. Always happy to get cat pictures. Thank you so much Carrie, I wanted to read this Email because I really feel like it is the same experience, that a whole lot of people have had in history class. I know it's my experience in history class. I honestly, don't recall whether my history classes in North Carolina tot that the civil were wasn't really about slavery. But it was obvious to me as a child that it was. So it's like I don't know that I was just reading between the lines of the textbook or if the textbook actually said that, but otherwise like this is one hundred percent. What my? American history class was like, and I talked to so many other people who that's exactly what they're, they're, they're American history classes were like. So don't, don't feel appalled and embarrassed. That's like so common, especially among folks that are maybe a little older on the spectrum of when we were in middle and high school. I think a lot of classes are doing a better job of this now. But I feel like whenever we are doing live shows, and somebody asks us, like, what's one of the most important things that we've learned by working on this show. One of my answers is usually that like I learned slavery and the civil rights movement, as like these two totally disconnected events. Oh, yeah. Without the progression of everything that happened between them as like one long continuum. So thank you so much. I really appreciated this letter and. I have a feeling that we have lots of other folks in the audience he one hundred percent identify with it, which is huge disservice to all of our collective understanding. If you would like to write to us about this or any other podcast, Ray history podcasts at how stuff works dot com. And then we are all over social media at missed in history. That is where you will. Find our Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram and Twitter. You can come to our website, which is missing history dot com where you will find show notes for all the episodes, Holly, and I have worked on together with today's including a link to paintings by Marie Lawrence on, you will also find a searchable archive of every episode ever and you can subscribe to our show on apple podcast, the iheartradio app and wherever else you get your podcast. Stuffy missed in history classes, a production of I heart radio is how stuff works for more podcasts for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This week on ephemeral. You do the math. I think they're two million plus breadth of our work in the collection. I don't even think a brain can hold them any emphasis stuff to comprehend it and we get four thousand every year. Much of. Hit to intellectual passions as a teenager, and they were crossword, puzzles, and chess. So I thought I would love to be able to be a Professional Chess player or cross greater for a living. I tried chest but by age fifteen or so clear, I was going to be the next Bobby Fisher. So I thought, well, okay. Maybe maybe I'll be the Bobby Fisher for us for. Listen to now on apple podcasts, the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts, and learn more at a federal dot show.

Apollinaire Lawrence Marie Lawrenson Paris France Marie Laurence Marie Laurence Guillaume Apollinaire Pablo Picasso Cubists Apollinaire Stein Apollinaire United States Lawrence som Marie Lawrenceville Gillan Appolinaire Holly fry museum Lawrence theory Natalie Barney Laura Monet
NPR News: 03-26-2019 10PM ET

NPR News Now

04:57 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 03-26-2019 10PM ET

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Jack Speer. The US Supreme Court has delivered a tough defeat dividers in the families of the seventeen crew members killed in L Qaeda, tack on the USS Cole nineteen years ago. And beers Nina totenberg reports the court ruled today three hundred fifteen million dollar judgment against Sudan for providing support in the attack must be set aside for now in November Laurie triplet whose husband was killed in the attack emerged from the supreme court shaking. I really wanted to screen while I was sitting there. But I knew I couldn't this case has lingered so long so long. It will be longer. Now that the supreme court has ruled that lawyers for the Vic. Items made a mistake by sending notification of the suit to Sudan's ambassador in the US instead of Sudan's foreign minister at his office in Sudan, that means the lawsuit will have to go back to square one. There may be a way out. However, if Sudan as has been reported is willing to settle this case and others like it in exchange for getting off the State Department's list of countries that sponsor terrorist attacks, Nina totenberg, NPR news, Washington. The Trump administration is telling a federal appeals court at wants to see the entire Affordable Care Act struck down as unconstitutional, Senator Lindsey Graham defended the administration's action. There's argument that take it down legally, it makes sense to to do that. Because all of us believe is is not working won't work at a two cents letter delivered to the court. The Justice department did not elaborate on the administration's reasoning prompting this comment from Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer, President Trump said the Republican party will be the party of health care if that is true. God help middle class Americans. Millions of people that are enrolled in as tax payer subsidized private insurance plans, though enrollment in the plans has been declining in Chicago prosecutors say although they've dropped all charges against actor Jesse chassis small it for filing a false police report. He has not been exonerated from member station WBZ miles. Brian explains smell let who is black and gay had been facing sixteen felony charges for allegedly staging a hate crime against himself. But in a shocking, turn prosecutors dropped those charges still Cook County state's attorney Joseph Magadan says he will not go unpunished he says smell. It will have to forfeit his ten thousand dollar bond to the city and do community service as part of an alternative prosecution. I think it's being read as some type of indication or statement that there was something wrong with the police investigation in this case that is categorically not true Smuts team disagreed saying. There was no deal at all. And his record had been wiped clean smell. That said he was looking forward to getting back to work for NPR news. I'm miles Brian in. Chicago much Fort Lauderdale, Florida is in the dark tonight after a fire broke out and the electrical substation there. A spokesman for Florida power. And light says more than thirty three thousand customers are without power following the incident on Wall Street, the Dow's up one hundred and forty points. This is NPR. The all female staff of the women's supplemented, the Vatican's official daily has abruptly resigned for what they say is a Vatican campaign to discredit them and put them under the direct control of men and Bure, Sylvia. Petrole reports this is just the latest in a year of upheavals in the Vatican's communications department. It does get a FIA a historian feminist and mother accused the new editor of the daily lucid Vetere Manno of sponsoring women writers with competing points of view, thereby pitting women against one another editor on the moon that denied the charges. Scott founded women Church World seven years ago and worked without pay in an open letter to pope Francis. She said we are throwing in the towel because we feel surrounded by a climate of distrust and progressive de-legitimize ation, one member of the editorial board of French nun told NPR last month that women at the Vatican are unobserved invisible ignored and not respected, Sylvia. Poggioli only NPR. News Rome twenty years after it was stolen off a yacht owned by a wealthy Saudi. Investigators say a painting by Pablo Picasso has been found Dutch art detective Arthur brands, saying he took possession of the nineteen thirty eight Picasso painting. After tracking it for years in Amsterdam Randers also known for recovering a pair of bronze horses sculpted for Nazi leader Adolf Hitler. He says he's turned the painting over to an insurance company. It's estimated the painting is worth boards of twenty eight million dollars. Crude oil futures prices posted a major up to today with oil rising dollar and twelve cents a barrel to close at fifty nine ninety four barrel in New York. I'm Jack Speer. NPR news in Washington.

NPR NPR Sudan Jack Speer Nina totenberg US Supreme Court Comcast Washington Brian Florida Chicago Senator Lindsey Graham Sylvia L Qaeda USS Cole Pablo Picasso Adolf Hitler Justice department Chuck Schumer Republican party
1047: Don't Be Afraid of Hard Work by TK Coleman of Office Hours

Optimal Living Daily

09:08 min | 2 years ago

1047: Don't Be Afraid of Hard Work by TK Coleman of Office Hours

"This is optimal living daily episode, ten forty, seven. Don't be afraid of hard work by TK Coleman of Tiki Coleman dot com. And I'm just a Malik. The guy that reads blog post to you kinda like bedtime stories, but hoping that you don't fall asleep and actually listen to the article, say, suppose, comes from Tiki Coleman. He and Isaac Morehouse of a great podcast called office hours that's worth checking out am have Isaac more houses post soon for you before we get to today's post. Thank you to babble for their support. It would have been especially useful back when I was learning Spanish in high school, but great. If you're trying to pick up a language right now, bowels lessons are designed to get you speaking confidently in your new language and actually remember what you learn. You can try babble for free, go to babble dot com or download the app and try it for free. That's Babbel b. a. b. b. e. l. dot com or download the app to try it for free at Babbel dot com of now's get right to it. As we often. Is your life. Don't be afraid of hard work by TK Coleman of TK Coleman dot com. There comes a point, everyone's life when they realized that hard work is overrated each person in his or her own time. We'll have a moment of piffling that forces them to respect the complex array of variables that go into the making of a success story dissipate any is at once heartbreaking and liberating heartbreaking because we're aroused from the comforting allusion that were incomplete control over all the factors that determine our destiny liberating because we're freed from the stress of believing that we always need to be hustling and bustling in order to make good things happen. Souris Abouna people who toil day and night only to suffer the disillusionment of a world that doesn't always on a rigorous day's work were also flooded with movies and TV shows illustrating the emptiness and regret of the person who spends too much time at the office and too little time doing things like sitting by the ocean, washing the sunset gazing at the night sky, conversing with friends, watching the children grew up and so forth. These narratives have created. Legitimate demand for task management systems and other approaches to work that can help people minimize the harmful effects of the daily grind. A great deal of self Alvin personal development now, centers around the idea of showing us how to hack productivity, how to optimize creativity and how to get more results out of less effort. And I love every bit of this cultural shift towards making work more fulfilling and less stressful. I wholeheartedly believe that everyone on the planet could benefit from learning how to simplify their work load and increase their efficiency. But I also believe that we're running the risk of forgetting one very important empirically attested fact hard work isn't a sufficient condition for fulfillment and success. But for most of us is very likely, unnecessary one in his advice to other artists, Pablo Picasso counseled quote, learn the rules like Perot so you can break them like an artist and quote that is there's no point in reinventing or rebelling against the rules. If you're completely. Clueless about what the rules are, why they were established in the first place and how they can be useful in certain contexts. Some people are so eager to be unorthodox or so afraid of being seen as rigidly orthodox that the holy disregard, the valuable lessons to be learned from custom and convention. I consider Picasso's observation concerning art to be true of hard work. You have to know what it means to step outside of your comfort zones. Push yourself and work vigorously before it means anything to master a bunch of techniques for hacking your schedule. After all, you can't optimize a process unless the process has already begun. Optimization isn't a precursor for action. Optimization is an aide to action. You have to act before you optimize. You have to learn how to hustle before you learn how to hack is easy for people to make the fallacious leap from hard work. Isn't everything too hard work isn't anything. We may very well be a culture guilty of working too much, but that doesn't mean. We should abandon the idea that there's such a thing as working too little. I travel the country giving talks and lectures at dozens of colleges, high schools, churches and conferences per year am noticing a trend among many young people, a fear of becoming an overworked adult who wastes thirty years doing meaningless work. These sincere and well-meaning students are disenchanted and discouraged when they see us adults running around looking stressed and exhausted by our jobs and lasting they ever want to become is us. But for many of them, this fear translates into an inability to stick with any tasks beyond the point where it ceases to be fun or spiritually fulfilling. If I work on something for a longer period than what feels exciting on up being trapped with a meaningless soul-sucking job until I'm too old to change things. Many of them seem to think this weekend I gave to talks on the valley of entrepreneurial thinking for artists at the moving picture institute. The seminar was attended by several young business and film students during a pale. Discussion, someone asked to see you over production company for advice on how to be successful in highly competitive fields. His advice was interesting quote, be more of a worker than a dreamer. Everybody claims to be creative and passionate nowadays, but nobody knows how to work hard anymore. If he can consistently work eight hour days, you'll be way ahead of most people. It sounds sad, I know. But the bar is that low, nothing is harder to find than a young person who can be consistently reliable with executing ideas and following through on the things they start and quote, my have no interest in debating people about how big of a problem we have in this country with young people being afraid of hard work. But I thought I'd pass this CEO's advise along in case he up and be one of those people who struggle with the fear of getting stuck with a monotonous life as a result of working too hard of has several business owners over the years. Tell me about creative types who came to them seeking opportunities, but who were turned away because they had improved their ability to stick with something. For longer than a few weeks or a few months, contrary to the contemporary fat of mocking the follow your passion idea. I'm one of those people who still believe that you should follow your passion, but here's the key. If you give up on your passions when obstacles, inconveniences and hardships get in your way, then you're not actually following your passion, you're following your obstacles, inconveniences and hardships. If you truly wanna follow your passion, then you have to keep pursuing it even with stuff gets in your way. That's the difference between following something versus just focusing on it when it happens to be standing in front of your face. If you're a young person hearing this, here's my two cents for you. Follow your passion, but dole mistake that for having a easy all the time go after your dreams, but keep going after them. Even when they drag you through muddy pile of hard work, don't guilt trip yourself in doing things you hate, but love your goals enough to hustle beyond the happy hours of comfort and convenience. Being creative in today's world means so much more than. Having a big imagination in a cool Burs analogy. It also means having the sense of artistry to create massive opportunities out of mundane tasks. Nelson means having imagination that's big enough to discover new ways to manufacture your own inspiration. As you navigate the peaks and valleys of the creative process in your quest to create a four hour workweek, don't forget about the value of the forty hour workweek freedom from hard work is often the reward of learning to find freedom in hard work. Utilise into the post idled don't be afraid of hard work by TK Coleman of TK Coleman dot com. Massively relatable to my own life recording and editing and episode every single day, actually five episodes across all of our podcast. So that's twenty seven episodes a week that I edit. That is a lot of hard work, but there is the reward of finding freedom in that hard work, and I've had to be consistent to do that. Hopefully found this article valuable to they get into babble for their support. You can learn Spanish, French, Italian, German, Russian Swedish, and more and using babble. You can be speaking your new language within weeks. I've been using it to get a refresher on Spanish in it's super intuitive. Babbel's lessons are designed to get you speaking confidently in your new language, and here's the key actually remember what you learn and thus through interactive dialogues and Alaa more. I really wish I had earlier because it would have helped me progress way faster, but his great. If you're picking up a language right now, whether you're brushing up or starting from scratch, and you can try babble for free, go to babble. Dot com or download the app and try it for free. That's Babbel b. a. b. b. e. l. dot com or download the app to try for free at Babbel dot com. Leave it. Therefore, today have a very happy rest of your day. And I'll see you tomorrow where your optimal life awaits.

TK Coleman Tiki Coleman Babbel b. Isaac Morehouse Pablo Picasso Babbel dot moving picture institute Souris Abouna Babbel CEO Perot dole Alaa Nelson thirty years eight hour forty hour four hour
Short - Music Controversies

The Discographers

06:37 min | 9 months ago

Short - Music Controversies

"Hey everyone, tyler here, and it's about time we have another short episode. Let's talk about artists stealing from other artists for a bit. We all know that stealing is bad, but artists do it all the time, and then we praise them for it. I famously once said good artists copy great. Artists Steal. But I stole that also I exaggerated a bit for being famous for it, but that's not important i. know the good artist copy. Great Artists Steal Line because people always say that Steve Jobs Stole It from Pablo Picasso as an example of one artist, stealing from another, but I looked up the interview with jobs, and he actually credited Picasso, so that's not really the ironic example that people like to say it is. Well. What is a good example? I think this song amen brother by the soul group. The Winstons is a pretty good one. This is the most sampled song history appearing in over four thousand other songs including. Straight OUTTA COMPTON BY W A. I know who you are by Scroll Ix. Data. and. Everyone's favorite perfect drug by nine inch nails. We've all heard that blurred lines by Robin Thicke. Is a rip off of Marvin. Gaye got to give it up. Other transgressions such as writing a song that really hasn't aged well for Williams thick found liable for copyright infringement by a federal jury in March. Two Thousand Fifteen and gave was awarded posthumous songwriting credit report lines. A lot of people think that ice ice baby by vanilla ice was possibly inspired by Queen and David Bowie under pressure. Side note I didn't realize how serious the second half of ice ice baby is. Here's the last verse the chumps acting ill because they're so full of eight ball gunshots ring out like a bell. I grabbed my nine. All I heard were shells falling on the concrete real fast jumped in my car slammed on the gas bumper to bumper. The Avenue's packed. I'm trying to get away before the Jacquards Jack Police on the scene. You know what I mean. They passed me up confronted all the dope fiends. If there's a problem y'all solve it. Check out the hook while my DJ revolves it. I guess I. Just tuned out because I felt like I got tricked in the beginning of the song because I thought. I was going to be treated by Queen and Bowie, but instead I got Robert Van Winkle, where you mother. At least the new metal version he did eight years later is. Better. Different, let's go with different. The right! To. Anyway ice famously insisted the to melodies asked because he added a beat between notes ice later claimed at the explanation for this was merely a joke, and it was just a prank bro. Dozen fifteen funk by Mark Ronson and Bruno Mars is another song that was controversial while the song received high praise for mixing Funk, pop, soul, boogie and disco pop sounds of the Seventies. Some parts felt like they were directly lifted from things. The gap band along with keyboardist Rudolph Taylor and producer Lonnie Simmons were added to uptown funk's writing credits due to their similarities to their song from nineteen seventy nine. subsided. Side. Also that year. Another lawsuit cited similarities between more bounce to the from nineteen eighty by the funk bands APP. Finally, it seems that uptown funk also drew inspiration from the theme song of a BBC Children's nature programme called the really wild show when Ronson was asked if he heard the similarities, he said quote, open the horns. I understand what they're saying. Yeah, we owe them a little bit. I'm sure you're familiar with Nirvana's nineteen, ninety hit come as you are well. That sounds a lot like a song called eighties by killing joke from Nineteen eighty-four. It also sounds like a the damn soul. Wife goes on from two years before that. Killing joke couldn't have stolen the song from the damned because Alex Smith Guitarist of killing joke admitted to interpreting the riff from another song called baby. Come back by the equals. That was released in nineteen sixty eight. Freddie Mercury famously said you can do anything you want with my music. Just don't make it boring. I don't really know what's right or wrong. When it comes to sampling or stealing, but I know one thing. I. Really don't like ice ice baby. Mange.

Mark Ronson Robert Van Winkle Steve Jobs David Bowie Queen funk Pablo Picasso Robin Thicke tyler Freddie Mercury Gaye Marvin Lonnie Simmons BBC W A. Williams Nirvana Rudolph Taylor Alex Smith
158 | Smile

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

10:29 min | 1 year ago

158 | Smile

"Our world is full of the unexplainable and history is an open book. All of these amazing mazing tales right there on display just waiting for us to explore. Welcome to the cabinet of curiosities. Tom had been sentenced to die. Born blind slave in eighteen fifties Georgia. He couldn't perform the typical duties of the other slaves however the infant and his family were sold to Neil James Bethune soon a newspaper editor and secessionist who let the infant live rather than joining his parents in the field. Though the young Tom was allowed to wander around the plantation by himself itself one day while walking the grounds the toddler came across in new sound. He'd never heard before it was beautiful. A tinkling of ivory against taught strings things. The plantation owners daughters were having their piano lessons and Tom listened intently as they played he found. Ways to eavesdrop on their lessons and and whenever someone would sit down to play for company by the time he was four years old he was allowed to use the piano and could plunk out the songs that he'd heard a year later. He was composing his his own tunes. His I was inspired by the sound of rain hitting a tin roof as he got older his skills advanced and Bethune took notice. Tom Played His first. I concert when he was only eight years old after that but Thune started hiring tom out as a slave musician charging fifteen thousand dollars per performance. You see Tom Mhm possessed an incredible talents. One that he'd had since he was only a few years old. He only needed to hear a song once before he could play on the piano. His memory extended to more the The music though poems and foreign texts were also retained after a single listen in fact when he was just a boy. Tom Could listen to a conversation. And repeat each person's side verbatim for up to ten minutes and he was an impeccable mimic even going so far as to impersonate the birds. He heard on the plantation. Like the roosters. I and the crows when he was sixteen years old. Tom Could sit down at the piano and play Beethoven Bach and Chopin with ease again after hearing the songs just one time even got a chance to perform his original songs for Mark Twain and president. Buchanan he play one of his own melodies once then repeated exactly the same way eight to prove he wasn't faking it. He was a marvel several years later. Tom's tour was put on hold for the war effort where he helped his owner raise. Money any for the confederacy. It was gross injustice and a poor use of his talents but sadly one that he had no way of avoiding after the war wiggins was. It's still indentured to the buffoons and continued to live on the plantation as their ward. They traveled overseas to Europe where Tom would give performances to great acclaim e and the buffoons eventually moved to a farm in Virginia where they would stay during the summer but then tour all over North America the rest of the year after the turn of the a century. Tom took his act of Vaudeville. He performed his first concert at the orpheum theater in Brooklyn over the next year. Tom Toured extensively pudding increased strain on his his body. His frenetic schedule caught up with him. Only one year later in nineteen o four. He suffered a massive stroke that caused partial paralysis. By December of that a year is days of performing. Were over a few years later. James passed away and his wife. Eliza gained custody of Tom. The two of them moved up to Hoboken New Jersey where Tom continued to practice the piano from dawn till dusk. Much to the consternation of the neighbors he was hit by another stroke in nineteen nineteen o eight and in June of nineteen nine blind. Tom Wiggins finally passed away at the age of fifty nine by that time. He had officially become a freeman since his death. Plays Films Poems and biographies have all been written about Tom. His compositions have also been performed by musicians from all over the world. The BETHUNE street at Tom as a sideshow act and a cash cow but unbeknownst to any of them Tom was changing the face of music. Every time he sat down at the Piano Hanno some may remember him simply as blind. Tom Wiggins but he was so much more than that. Tom Was a revolutionary Take a look around. And you're certain to find something you take for granted however if you woke up one one day to find that it had disappeared your life might be changed forever if the coffee shop where you get your Morning Cup or the grocery store where you do your weekly shopping. Were suddenly gone. You'd be lost at least for a short while more importantly you'd be reminded just how valuable these things really were when you had them in. Nineteen Eleven Evan. Something else had disappeared but nobody really knew how valuable it was until it was gone. It was a Monday in August. And Senzo Peruggia. Yeah had an idea. He was going to walk into a museum and steal a painting. FERRUGIA had gained work for a short time at the museum as a handyman aid. Helped install install. The glass covers that protected. The paintings from visitors grubby dirty fingers. It also kept the white smock. He'd worn as uniform which he wore as he strolled into the building with two helpers that morning they were brothers Michel and be Senzo Ancelotti. Who followed Peruggia right into the building? No one gave gave them a second. Look perhaps they fit right in or maybe everyone was just a little hungover from their celebrations the night before as the other employees moved achingly around around the floor Peruggia and his accomplices made their way to the room. Where the painting hung they picked it up off its hooks as Peruggia took off his smock wrapping it around the glass asked enclosed frame to hide it as they hurried outside with their loot? It had been that easy for one. This was nineteen eleven. Before electronic China sensors and cameras were able to detect so much as a strong sneeze near a painting secondly no one really cared much about the peace outside of a few art scholars. It wasn't particularly memorable or noticeable among the larger more impressive work surrounding it. Believing that he'd gotten away with the perfect crime perogie rookie erased home with the painting and stashed it away. He had hoped to sell it quickly and split the earnings with the two brothers who had helped him but the painting nayed stolen was more important than they realized. News about the theft spread across the world within days. The New York Times reported that sixty detectives had been tasked with locating in the missing work of art. While conspiracy theories began to emerge some believed a millionaire like J. P. Morgan had purchased it for his private collection others thought artist artist. Pablo Picasso had committed the theft out of jealousy and there were even rumors that the Kaiser had orchestrated the whole thing in the lead up to the first World War. No one had expected three average joes to simply walk into a museum and walk out with a painting but the museum shut down for a week to help. The police says says they began their investigation when it reopened crowds of hundreds flocked to see the empty space on the wall in fact that opens spot on the wall had become more popular. Learn the painting that had once hung their peruggia panicked. He couldn't sell it now not while everyone was looking for it. He held onto it for two years. Intel the heat surrounding it finally died down. Peruggia had become paranoid and the longer the painting was in his possession like telltale heart beating in his floorboards towards the worst. He felt he booked a trip for himself and the painting back to his home country of Italy where he met with gallery owner. Alfredo Jerry Jerry. I couldn't believe it seriously. He could not believe Peruggia had been in possession of the painting. Everyone was talking about so he asked another gallery owner to examine it with him and they confirmed it. Peruggia had been the owner of the most famous painting in the world for the last two years. Peruggia clearly wanted to get rid of the curse thing and they told him to leave it with them. They would make sure that. Got Back to the museum without anyone knowing who had stolen it or how just kidding they called the police who arrested tested Mr Peruggia. That day when asked why he had taken it in the first place. Peruggia claim that he'd been performing his patriotic duty to return the painting to its country of origin origin. It had been born in Italy and it should be hung there but that had turned out to be ally. Perogie is grand plan had always been to sell the paintin gene and make a boatload of money instead. He got seven months in prison after his release he fought in World War One and once the fighting had ended he settled down to start a family. His life of crime was over. The painting also got a new lease on life. Once it was returned to the museum. It's picture has been printed in hundreds of newspapers all over Europe and the United States were two years it was all anyone could talk about and the frenzy surrounding. It had not quieted. In fact ever since then it's only gotten louder today. The iconic work of art can be seen hanging in the Louvre. But you better get there early if you you WANNA set your eyes on it. The famous smiling lady on the canvas always draws a massive crowd attracting millions each year from around the globe even to this day day. The Mona Lisa still steals the show. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Aussies subscribe for free on Apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. PODCAST DOT COM. The show was created by me. The era in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called law which is a podcast book series and Television Show and you can learn all about it over at the world of Lor Dot Com and until next time stay curious.

Tom Senzo Peruggia Neil James Bethune Tom Wiggins Tom Mhm Europe orpheum theater Italy Georgia Mona Lisa Alfredo Jerry Jerry editor Lor Dot Com Buchanan FERRUGIA Intel Pablo Picasso Mark Twain theft
Dead Celebrity Ep 13  Picasso: The Taxman Cometh  With Sarah McDaniel, CFA

Dead Celebrity

28:23 min | 1 year ago

Dead Celebrity Ep 13 Picasso: The Taxman Cometh With Sarah McDaniel, CFA

"Support for today's podcast is brought to you by F. S. investments finding income for your clients is tough F. S. investments makes it easier by designing solutions that help investors astor's reach their income goals and secure their futures F s investments never settles so advisers and investors won't have to either visit F s investments dot com slash dead celebrities and discover what it means to never settle. This is not an offer to buy. Securities investors are advised to consider investment objectives risks charges and expenses carefully before investing. Welcome to the dead celebrities. PODCAST in this podcast. We breakdown high profile celebrity estate planning cases for advisors and their clients most celebrity estate catastrophes. These are based on the same issues that everyday people face just with the volume turned up. Our goal is to identify and extract the Individual Estate Planning issues that lie at the heart of each story. We then discuss what advisers should expect and how to avoid common pitfalls hosted by Wealth Management Dot com senior editor. David Lennick alone. Everyone one and welcome to the latest episode of wealth by Dot Com. That celebrity podcast. My Name is David Lennox senior wealth plenty editor of Management Dot com entrust states for new to the podcast and each instalment I saw in a guest take on a different celebrity estate attempt to extract some key lessons that planners can apply to their more traditional clients. The idea being that celebrity estate planning catastrophes although often ridiculous in their details generally have at their core. You're very basic issues that can just as easily apply to non famous or fabulously wealthy clients. Our guest today a ceremony Daniel. She's in managing director and head of wealth. Strategies Group advanced planning centers at Morgan Stanley. Sarah has over twenty five years of financial services experience working with international clientele and a demonstrated history of working with private clients. Endowments foundations with regard to asset management including trust tax tax and estate planning as well as allocation manager research portfolio. Construction is also an art history major as an avid traveler having visited over sixty five live countries to continue learning about diverse cultures. And there are. Thanks for joining us. Sir Thank you very much for having me up before we begin. Just GonNa drop in. Click a quick disclaimer. Here we're GONNA be talking about are planning for the most part and Morgan Stanley does not provide any investment advice or advice regarding the purchase or sale of any our and this presentation tation daughter recommendation to art or at art as an asset class. Now that we have our fun legal stuff out of the way. Let's the six topic. The subject of Today's episode is Pablo Picasso. Perhaps the most famous artist ever certainly the most famous modern artists ever. The Casa was amazingly prolific both in terms of his his body of work and his womanizing creating an estimated. Forty five thousand pieces of art as well as for children with three different women also also so never wrote a will supposedly his superstitions surrounding death effectively he believe that writing a will would jinx him somehow and hasten his demise Abed Youtube so we it didn't Obviously not a great idea of his death. His estate resided roughly a billion dollars according to the New York Times other were one thousand eight hundred eighty five paintings one thousand two hundred and twenty eight sculptures seven thousand eighty nine drawings thirty thousand prints hundred fifty sketchbooks and three thousand two hundred and twenty two ceramic works. which is just a huge body of work? There were vast numbers illustrated books contemplates and tapestries. And and there were two shots hose and three other homes to one person familiar with the estate. There was also a four point. Five million in cash and one point three million in gold because because why not they're also stocks bonds the value of which was never made public of these elements conformed combined to form a wildly really complicated an explosive estate situation that touches on newly every aspect of estate planning and particularly for this episode art planning the Division in his holdings took six years featuring often bitter negotiations among the seven airs only one of which was a child the board of wedlock which actually mattered under French law. At the time was a lot of which you read it as a lot of legitimate legitimate with all the scare quotes involved and that's actually legally mattered than in a quote attributed to writer. Deborah Trust. The family resembles one of Picasso's Cuba's constructions wives mistresses legitimate and illegitimate children and grandchildren tall stronger than access like the backbone of figure with unmatched parts ultimately a settlement was reached the years and years and cost some thirty million dollars. And that's in nineteen seventy-three money so that's a lot of money. The family drama was arguably the smallest problem compared to the problem posed by the French government itself France at the time opposed harsh inheritance taxes up nearly ninety percent of no real estate plan. In place to mitigate these taxes but Picasso estate found itself in a a bit of a Barnes Particularly since so much of the value was tied with works of art which weren't particularly liquid assets ultimately the president of France. Valery Giscard. Hard to sting which. I'm sure I have just murdered that name at to step in and agreed to accept the works of art in lieu of state tax on so the French government received two hundred in three paintings. A hundred and fifty eight sculptures eight ceramics nearly fifteen hundred drawings. More than sixteen hundred prints and thirty-three sketchbooks which they used is to form the collection of the Picasso Museum Paris. So yeah you heard that right because the state was tax so heavily that they had to national museum to pay it all off and that was the compromise that they came through that was like the the low ball so on top of all that drama there was another challenge. Unique art heavier states that precautions. They're still fix and that's authentication. Nation his areas. Hold the keys to maybe. The greatest art collection ever assembled. But that's a big responsibility. Also their job to protect the legitimacy of the sales of his works lest public trust erode and the value of his of their sticks plummet. But that's really that's no easy feat. Mukasa was still the most reproduced widely the exhibited most faked most stolen and most pirated artists in the world. And the fact that he was for instance known to pay his bar tabs by doodling on Napkins. It doesn't really make keeping track of the province of his some forty five thousand works of art an easier so Sarah. That was a lot on packed. So let's tort which the very basic question. What are some of the most important things to be aware of planning for a client with with valuable? Holden's thank you very much. Thank you again for having me I think the the story that you just unraveled is incredibly helpful and there are a lot of details that we can discuss. I think the first thing to make the distinction between is the being an artist and being an art collector different rules so for focusing then on the the art collectors That's fortunate because they're more things that art collectors can do. During their lives for estate planning landing then an artist necessarily can do. But I want to jump back if I may really quickly to your point of the Casa didn't have a will and as you said it might have been superstition. It may have also been because at the time he was trying to divorce his first wife. He was going to have to give up half of everything that he's ever created and he wasn't willing to do that. It's also contentiously as I said in the United States during life there isn't as much estate planning that an artist do right as what they could potentially do at death so then if if we turn to then what an art collector can potentially do during life and during death as far as their art collection what I would say the first thing is not making. The decision is making a decision to your point. Is If you're not making a decision you're effectively delegating the decision to the government and they will decide how to distribute your wealth off. So it's important for someone to be very intentional about not only their financial assets but they're tant tangible assets as well and being very Deliberate and how they want to distribute the the assets in particular with art because it tends to be so illiquid and it tends to be an emotional and passionate asa right right. There are additional ancillary considerations that need to be taken into place so for example. Governance is utterly important so if you are an art collector and you're alive and you potentially want to go sell your art collection or part of the The Art your cost basis is actually the purchase price. It may be that you can add some of the cost of acquiring the art as well but then your capital gain tax is twenty eight percent for collectibles. It's not the twenty percent for normal other other financial assets. You might be able to mitigate some of this by setting up something called a crt a charitable remainder unit trust which implies that you want to be charitable as swell and effectively. What you can do is put the art in the charitable remainder trust? You sell it in the trust you're able to potentially get a tax deduction upfront inch. Do not pay the capital gains tax mmediately and the remainder goes to charity. And that's how you're able to get the deduction but in the meantime the assets in the trust are not taxable there is a distribution back to family at which time then they're paying the capital gains tax as it gets distributed out so that's one way of mitigating getting potentially the cost of the higher capital gains tax. If you're if you are an art collector during life as well if you want to give to charity they're stipulations that arise in that it has to be a related use for the charity. So if you're trying to give something to I've only like a local SPCA and they're not going to do something with the art that's not related use and they changed the amounts They also changed cost basis. So it's important to understand whether you coming to public or private charity. That's also very important to understand whether there's related use or not because the deductions are different. We're talking about charity lot so far and I think that there's a role. Charity plays a larger role. And maybe the world with any other asset class right. There's a reason that so many museums so many people are so willing to to give. There are two museums. That is just sitting in the basement door. No that the museums have an overwhelming amount. That they kind of it's show. Oh that's because it's almost the way if you if you were serious are collected have large multi million dollar collection the charitable aspect of it almost becomes non negotiable and the third way depending on how the rich apparently is so useful. There's so many different techniques. And so many different ways that you can mitigate group these illiquid asset by using charity. So it's not when we're talking owned by charity in the art context. It's much less about. I mean I'm sure that they're the goodness of their heart and they want to share it with humanity and all that but really it's also it's just good planning an it's very widespread absolutely. There's been a proliferation particularly in the past couple of decades of private art museums. And I would say that's not an accident The tax laws changed in the mid nineties. ten so Giving to public museums wasn't so much as advantageous as it had been prior so then with the private art museums. Exactly to your points would collect wants to give their art and have it end up in storage or would they like to potentially set up their own. Private Live at Art Museum get a great architect but in their hometown right make sure that it governs the way they'd like to govern naked accessible to the public and make it for loans as well so effectively. What they're able to do is actually be better stewards of their own legacy because they set up an institution in their own name with the people that they've hired specifically to maintain the collection in their legacy for the betterment of on the perpetuation of their name would also part the culture and the locale where the institution ends up? And you're just For anyone who's willing to look more into that the movie. The Art Art of the steal is a good example of sort of how you set up your private museum when you're dealing with such cultural artifacts and things that are important so the people in the locality said of over the the museum is there could be a lot of bleed over between charitable and government and and what we want so it's not just as of nothing very interesting documentary that sort of touches. It's a lot of these These issues right. Well I think what's also interesting to the to the point that you said with the government stepping in with the Cosso and the number bird the enormity of the artwork to actually go to the museum to pay for the estate tax Not only was it bright and good because it resolved contentious attention issues but it also was to. Can you imagine if they tried to sell the art and how much art they'd have to sell to pay the estate tax that effectively kill the art market for Cosso so building adding on what you said earlier too is it's not only With Kosta to is the the point of the copyright right in the legacy of Cosso and the art market itself was at stake nick given the situation in that by setting up the museum they were able to do an income transfer. It didn't have to flood the market with a lot of costs. Art Then potentially jeopardize the Price Picasso but then at the same time they set up. The Casa Administration with the Sun God to maintain the copyright but then the integrity of Picasso and Picasso's Arc market so for any collector has a concentration of one or two artists or have grown up with an artist and build an help facilitate their career. They they might have concentration right the financial assets you might have a concentrated stop with an art collector you might have one or two concentrations of artists and should you die. Then you need the planning because you could potentially maybe not to the extent of Kosovo flood the market and when we are in the art world it was something that would call blockage discount. You do it with an artist estate it can also deal with an art collector to its art of then understanding after someone passes away. What is the value of the art? And if there's a concentration and you feel that you you might have to sell it all at once. There's something called a blockage discounts. There's potentially the ability to get some sort of deduction as part of that so then getting back back to what I think is really important. Not only is the governance right because it's not only the ongoing maintenance of the legacy and the integrity of the heirs and how fruitful root for their lives are as you said earlier is it's the art market right particularly if they're concentrations and now there's disruption or there's uncertainty or it's unclear here whether something's real in the authentication process isn't transparent you have the potential to disrupt the art market a little bit and some people might say while financial markets are more important Martin right because they're larger but the markets a lot bigger than people think it's more because of the uniqueness of his assets even if you're looking at a print run of two hundred and the traditional marketers financial advisors do stock market right where is millions of shares being sold so to move is that market. It really has to be a lot. You know but the sale of a single Picasso because there's so few it can really have a very much more show than the sale of a building or something a real estate market you know. These are very limited very unique assets and each one needs to be carefully sort of valued and because they do have marginal effects on the market. Now you mentioned sort of in passing the idea of a of kind transfer. I think this is a very important -portant concept particularly for collectors of art and people who advise them to be aware of you mind just telling us a little bit about what that means and sort of. What the use of that technique sure so unfortunately the kind transferred the the ten thirty one exchange that was essentially feasible in the art market but with very strict drools was taken away with the two thousand seventeen tax acts of that's not necessarily something that's accessible to an art collector right now and that's usually on during life when they're buying and selling whether or not they can take the capital that was in the first work of art and put it towards another far it remains for real estate remained for other assets asset because so many things in our president's wonderful tax plan? They remained for real estate for longer than for other outlets on how that works. So then how does one really deal deal. But we brought up the issue of of illiquidity and that seems to be one of the main stumbling blocks of large art collections. What are some of the ways to really obviously catches? Don't the whole collection because you don't want to have concentration as you mentioned that would tilt the market in new who is probably not good for you. What are some ways to tackle this this issue of illiquidity so first thing right off the bat I can think of two things things right but again you have to be very careful if you're an art collector? Depending on what estate planning you've done. Sometimes insurance right to the death of the insurance can by the art from the estate and provide liquidity that. Why necessarily have to think about equated as much during life? there's also for lending art lending The loan values may not be as high as other financial assets. There is potential Again if there is the right provenance if there's the right title right than dot right documentation as their art collection. There is the potential then for people to get loans against the artists well to create liquidity. But you're absolutely right is the art market is very peculiar nuanced. And we all all know that it's still unregulated so those people who have more information have more power in the market to understand what is and isn't and good price or a good value so it's really important to work with art advisers. Who can help you understand where to sell the art right right whether it's through a dealer whether it's through an auction house whether it's through an art fair right the the distribution channels really important as well as the locale internationally because their budding collectors all over the globe these days that WHO's again we're talking about the economics of tastes which change changes and grows over time so that if all so having an adviser understand up you understand not only the value of art itself but where you might sell it how you might sell it and then transaction costs are quite prohibitive they might be upwards of twenty or thirty percent sent right on top of the taxes that we're talking about so to your point art is very illiquid but let's also remember that it's passion asset it's an experiential asset so so while you own it you can experience it can you know Appreciated on your wall right. You can have stories about heavy accumulated you have these conversations about artists while it is deer and it is valuable to passion acts asset but it's also subject to the economics of taste. I like to this idea of a passionate instead of the ten. Pack a little more because ultimately like it was something that we see maybe more in the collectible space But equally replaced art on which is much more valuable collectibles. If you think about it on that a lot of times with a passionate collection you'll have it'll be the person who's collecting it. It is their whole life. They know everything about it. Maybe they even the foremost expert on it or amongst the one percent of people in terms of knowledge about this particular topic particular collection the world but just because they have that knowledge that passionate does not necessarily mean that the rest to their family or their heirs. We'll share that passion so there is a lot of room first of all when passing these things on. There's a a lot of areas for slippage things to fall through the cracks. Both in terms of just the very obvious. We don't know what this is worse because we're not as familiar with it but with art. Maybe it's a little bit easier to figure breath and say baseball cards or something but also like transport and storage and care and you know we talked about just having it on the wall all but some things aren't meant to just have on the wall and those all of these aspects that really needs to be addressed while the expert being the building person is still still around to address them and prepare has to be some realization that luther future generations may not share or likely won't share level of expertise in the little passion should four this passion asset that the initial collected. I I completely agree with you if I if I can begin with does the next generation want the asset So oftentimes back when I was in the art world right we had these credible collectors and then we could talk about the state planning techniques but then the media question was to the Arizona the asset and in particular if the heirs to want the asset which pieces they want right because does not mean equal to have to figure out how might you divide it amongst the heirs but then exactly to your point is there's a lot of expertise around not only any asset but specifically the art world again it's unregulated market. There's there are disparities information in how it's disseminated and so yes if you're an air and you really want let's say Cosso but they're two or three of them and you won- and you don't want the other two and you don't know where to sell them or how to sell them right then. You're faced with the with the one that I want. How do I maintain the condition can hang it on on that wall? Should it be in. Sunlight is the right climate control right. If it's damaged. How do I potentially repair it? Does that destroy value. Does that enhance value. Who do I go to to do this? And if you WANNA sell it then you are challenged with while the art world is fun and interesting. It's incredibly complex in there a lot of nuances and then and again. That's why are saying is it would be great then for the maintenance of the collection and potentially the sale of the art should that come up to work with art advisers who incredibly knowledgeable oftentimes. They've grown up through the auction business. They know the collectors. They've started their own businesses. And they can help you navigate the public and the private markets of the art world to understand again and where they're potentially is more value and as I mean. This is sort of a rush rain on this podcast but as with anything we talk about with the state planning. It's always us to bring me art advisers in before the person dies or coming in after is very helpful Don Biz and don't just blow that off but as with anything preparation. Is Everything planting. It's right there at the estate planning and the better you plan. The more effective plan will be so so it's important advisor. Not just to look at their clients who may have just inherited art but also look at your own art and bring someone to ensure that their plan is corrected that you're you're not sort of a value where where you could really easily protected absolutely also suggest to sometimes what collectors too is. They'll set up a family limited partnership and they'll gift LP shares effectively. What they've done is they've collect kept the collection together rather than piece by piece that might appreciate differently in value over time and favors mares other other other others thank can also put governance structure in place where they have like an art executor? They have an adviser is as part of the family limited structure to make sure then that the the heirs can truly appreciate the art not feel overburdened. By the responsibility of the means to take care of the art and potentially sell in future as we're talking about governance and making sure the wanted and what they're gonNA do with it brings us back to the again another afraid of the podcast have to talk about this stuff As with anything with the state planning it always seems a little ghoulish to sit there and while someone is alive and sort of just divvy up their stuff. It's very it's very mercenary way. But it's also very necessary especially especially with assets like this with so many different directions things can go And so while it may be awkward at first as long as everyone's on the same page backs acts. That's what that's what it's weird but it's plotting from my sister that that's where things get that everyone in the family. All the potential air. Sit down an open conversation about these things. You can really head off a lot of problems and you're going to really get a lot of just planning on even without writing anything down just in that moment at a table a lot of understanding they get a lot of things could head off on even though starting that conversation can be a little bit. You're absolutely green effectively in what you just mentioned. Right is all the steps towards having a good government structure and have the right documents structures. You can have a council of your decision makers might be a governing body of these back spurts saying. Here's what's important. Here's what less important here the decisions that you need to make you said. Hey let's have an understanding. It could be a tacit understanding. But sometimes it's more powerful to have like a mission statement men of what are we trying to accomplish with its art collection either intact or if we get if we sell it and potentially have bylaws of how do we make the decisions who's making the decisions tobacco then to another part of what you said. I truly believe right with the art planning as well as planning overall is you need a strategy. Because you're trying to maintain the assets of the potential potential future state and mitigates liabilities. If you put structure in place it mitigates the behaviors that become potentially the liabilities so the assets can actually flourish in the way that they were intended and be passed from one generation to the next intact as much as possible. Because you put the construct rounded support near just to you draw. A distinction talked about the idea of dead hand. Control in previous podcasts and good governance is very different than the head controller. Governance empowers the air's guides and empowers to make their own decisions Boston maintaining family values. That's what we're talking about councils and mission in statements and these sorts of things and that's a very separate world from you can have this if you marry a Jewish person or if you graduate from Harvard only when we're talking about good governance. There's plenty of ways to put exerted pass on these values ensure that things are handled the respectfully and and well and good governance in place without stepping on your toes of your areas and really limiting space that can be with the sort of control that kind of real danced in in other podcasts. I would say effectively what we're talking about People inheriting passing on art as well as other financial financial an inch assets to me rightly Raleigh. It's like a capital allocation decision. Right what goes to your family that goes to charity. It's you wish and what goes to taxes and you want to be the intentional about it. You don't want to take the decision from the rules that are outlined by the government. Because they don't know you they don't know your family they don't know your values and they don't know your intentions. Take a little time that we have for this episode on Really WanNa thank our guest ceremony title. She's been fantastic. Hopefully we'll have you on again. Thank you for joining us. Thank you very much for having me. I appreciate it and on August. We'll throw listeners. Allah to you guys or you'll hear me next time. Thank you for listening. into the dead celebrity podcast. Click the subscribe button below to become notified. When new episodes become available the information covered and posted represents presents the views and opinions of the guests and does not necessarily represent the views or opinions of INFORMA- wealth management dot com the content has been made available for informational and educational purposes? Only only the content is not intended to be a substitute for professional. Investing advice. Always seek the advice of your financial advisor or other qualified financial service provider with any questions. You may behalf regarding your investment planning support for today's podcast is brought to you by F. S. investments finding kefir clients as tough F. S. investments makes exit easier by designing solutions that help investors reach their income goals and secure their futures F s investments. Never settles so advisers and investors won't have to either either visit F s investments dot com slash dead celebrities and discover what it means to never settle. This is not an offer to buy. Securities investors are advised to consider investment objectives risks charges and expenses carefully before investing.

Cosso Sarah French government Art Museum Pablo Picasso advisor managing director and head president Morgan Stanley Wealth Management Dot France David Lennox New York Times David Lennick astor Picasso Museum Paris
The Best of Tall Stories 2018

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

28:31 min | 2 years ago

The Best of Tall Stories 2018

"Hello. I'm Andrew talkin. You're listening to the oven est or monocle twenty four. Now, we've decided to kick off the new year with the very best from twenty eighteen hardly any visitor will go more than a few hours without desperately seeking a moment of quiet inside one of the city's Rondi retreats. We take a look back at the best tool stories from the year gone by including thriving garden in the middle of the desert and a former government building in Oslo with the Picasso on its facade all that much more in the next thirty minutes with me, Andrew talk. Stay tuned. We started out to through some of the best horror stories of the past year and Morocco during spring Monaco's Kiara Ramallah took us to Marrakech to reveal the secret behind his plant filled courtyards, and as we found out the city in the middle of the desert could become a haven for gardens such as the peaceful Jadan secret. The road from Mara cash to the atlas mountains is about fifty kilometers long. It's an hour's drive more or less and one that zooms only straight through a rosy. Rocky doesn't seen from any of the city's flat rooftops. These mighty mountains may will look like a Mirage with this snowy tips, they seemingly belong continents away from the baking heat of the Medina yet. They stand proudly close enough to provide more than just an escape from unbearably sunny days. What the atlas have given our cash easy access do for the last millennium is far more important resource water without the city would not be very different from the baron land, which surrounds it. But inside it's courtyards and within its palaces walls, Marrakesh, hides palms plants and flowers that stubbornly defy the dry terrain. Marrakesh is gardens defined as city just as much as it's maze. Like roads. Hardly any visitor will go more than a few hours without desperately seeking a moment of quiet inside one of the city's from the retreats outside people scooters children bikes constantly rush through stalls Laden with pomegranates bread and all manner of vegetables, they whiz spas, shopfronts covered in plates teapots interest dot but inside the gardens the noise stops not much of them. The Russell of the wind and the soft pouring fountain. This stubs a sit down in the shade of a party. It was only because of the productivity of the atlas mountains that the imperial Amara. Vid dynasty decided to bring a system of irradiation Tamara cash the first kit thera, a network of underground tunnels and wells was built in eleven o seven to transport water from the aquifers on the Neath the mountains all the way to the city's only garden residents where ecstatic the water they said gave the city an air of sparkling brilliance mortgage. Fires were added Mogens planted an atmosphere of sophistication spread through the city. The system eventually grew to feed the city's mosques public hamams and fountains but for centuries having water flow into the grounds of a private home remained, prestigious privilege, an unmistakable symbol of wealth. Only Marrakesh is richest were able to afford it families like those who would come to inhabit the grandiose palace on ROY Moore seen in a nineteenth century one of the biggest in the. Whole medina. This. Majestic Riyadh had two courtyards a ham of its own and vast during pavilion at seventeen metoo stole its tower was almost as high as some of the city's minarets, but perhaps most importantly, it had a magnificent garden its owner, the Cade allege allow OB he didn't get to enjoy it very long suspected of political intrigue. He was killed with poison t his beautiful home started passing from one powerful hand to the other until in nineteen thirty four it stopped being looked after at all by two thousand and eight it had turned into a melancholy ruin only a few stubborn date plants still grew in its grounds. Yet. Life was not to stop flowing in these gardens that same year British landscape architecture. Tom Stuart Smith was called into rethink and restore them an eight long years later, the host finally reopened it stores with a new name the job on secret the secret garden, everything from stuccos, two tiles and walls whispery up, but the two courtyards returned the hoses deservedly central feature the so-called exotic garden was the host plants sourced anywhere from Mexico to Matt Augusta the traditional Islamic garden. Instead brought in Morocco's romantic bounty. Lavender Rosemary, fig olive and orange trees were chosen for this section. And even if the narrow channels running through these monarchial patches, no longer carry water flowing in from the atlas the system running between these basins is still the same ancient one of the buildings beginnings. If you look hard enough in some of the Riyadh's nooks and crannies you'll see. The pipes and reserve was that still ensure these plants survive in Marrakesh is boiling summers. Perhaps this is really is gotten biggest and most fascinating secret. Monaco's Kiara Malehda in Marrakesh stay with us after this is my turn to head south. Well, just south of the Thames here in London is the story of a brutal wonder built by the architect. Sudanese lassen. Why not take a wonder into the wonderful world of Monaco with an annual print subscription you'll receive ten issues of the magazine year plus are seasonal specials. The forecast and the escapist subscribes to our one year, plus and premium packages, also receive our new annual the Monaco drinking and dining directory, and that's not all age of our plans comes with a free tote bag delivered to your door. We invite all fans of the Ernest de-subscribe today and receive a special ten percent discount on any of our year long. Subscriptions, simply visit Markle dot com forward slash urban est. That's never been a better time to sign up Monaco, keeping an eye and an air on the wall. London's national theatre is perfection. In concrete is the work of the architect sedans last, and it was completed in one thousand nine hundred seventy six, but this story is about the recent fetishes ation of brutalism is not about the power of theater. Not only nor the role of the Southbank in London's cultural life. It's about light touch dark sanctuary and rare focus and perhaps an ice cream in the good. I've been going to the national for three decades and seem Shakespeare on time and numerous star turns I've mostly seen things I've loved occasionally plays have been sleeping juicing. And sometimes a play that shakes you against the sea of troubles. There's something about that theatre that no matter the quality of the production. Just makes you feel good safe and away from the world. It begins with me leaving my house or work and crossing over Waterloo bridge to reach the theater, you have to turn your back on the city cross the muddy depths of the Thames and leave at least some of the day behind. Then down some stairs. And there you are on the broad Southbank promenade where life somehow unfolds the more leisurely pace walking lock, Tom seniors or foot pumping skateboarders. Then into the nationals vast lobby where lip staining, red wine and flap jacks being consumed by a crowd. The crosses ages. Ready looks done up for night-out. Let's join them in a glass as we see the sun slink down through the epic windows. Tonight. We're seeing a play in the national theaters little space and hear those nice up hosted seats that you know. So well, there's just time to either crowd and guess at their lives when United here then phones off lights down and. Tonight is performance of network and the story of the news anchor gets angry. But there's something else. The fuck of a day is eased off like a discarded jacket people begin to laugh and move the gentle synchronicity, and you you're in a different world. Your mind finds a rare reset to clarity you are here. And in the dark all is good. In may Asia bureau chief urine Wilson to to the very heart of Tokyo to tell us the story of the Suziki Honganji or but his temple right next. What was one of the world's biggest fish markets, which is sad packed up and moved elsewhere. In the meantime, let's listen. If you were trying to picture, a traditional Japanese temple, it probably wouldn't look anything like squeegee Honganji and yet this Buddhist temple in the heart of Tokyo is rich in history. The story. Cagey Honganji starts sixty and seventeen when the head of the mother temple in Kyoto established a branch temple in Sakha in Tokyo, or does it was known them like so many buildings that first temple went up in flames in the great far of sixteen fifty seven, and when it came to rebuilding the shogun's had other plans for the site and offer the temple instead a dump plot of land on the shore which had yet to be reclaimed from the sea. The project was undertaken by the temples devoted followers and the new building which was finished in sixteen. Seventy nine was known as ski g Goebel ski g meaning reclaimed land. That area is still known as ski g and it is here that the temple still stands next to the world's biggest fish market. The main hall that was built for Honganji on the ski g site had a huge sloping roof. It was one of older does great landmarks and a beacon for shifts entering the port of Tokyo. That building was destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake of nineteen twenty three and was replaced in nine hundred thirty four with the current building a striking temple designed by to ITO an architecture. Professor at Tokyo University the abbot asked ITO to build something inspired by India. The birthplace of Buddhism. So today. It's catchy Honganji has all the features of a regular Japanese temple the main hall the tower the drum tower and so on but in an unusual guys borrowing motifs from South Asian temples. It has round copper covered roof granite walls. Carved elephants on the staircases and monkeys on the walls, the hybrid style continues with Lotus flowers and stained glass above the door and a German-made organ with two thousand pipes that was donated to the temple in nineteen seventy. The temple is a lively place of worship open every day from six AM, the smell of incense is unmissable. And if you drop by in the morning, you might cut your service with two dozen months chanting visitors are encouraged to take a seat sketchy Honganji is an important central. Put is learning. It's style of Buddhism is called judo Shinshu or true pure land. But is dates back to the thirteenth century today. Jodo Shinshu is one of the largest schools of Buddhism in Japan with more than ten thousand temples. Last year, a new information center and a Buddhist bookshop were added with a smart new cafe the deluge of tourists now flocking to the fish market has increased the numbers of visitors to Honganji two guests are welcomed warmly and services are held in English on the fourth Saturday of every month. A rarity in Tokyo, lunchtime organ concerts, feature everything from classical pieces to Buddhist songs and the free to all. Many visitors come out of ski station and make a bee line for the famous fish market. But if they pause for a moment, they'll discover there is another piece of Tokyo history right in front of them. If you're a regular set to multiple twenty four you'll know that we've just opened a new bureau in Los Angeles. So with that in mind, let's take you back to La Land. For this tool story proudly sitting in the downtown area of LA, the Disney concert hall is hard to miss in the shape of ships and sales the three and a half acre complex they fully at first. But it's sharp imposing stainless steel edges. But once inside the tone is change and the whole becomes warm and inviting opening doors in two thousand and three sixteen years after its initial commission we hear how the construction the console was anything, but plain sailing. Welcome to the music center and our Walt Disney concert hall. Mine. Aim is Howard Sherman. I'm the executive vice president and chief operating officer here. I also have the privilege of being the unofficial historian of the music center because I've been here for more than thirty years, and if a deep seated love this place. Villian disney. Walt's widow gave a transformative fifty million dollar cash gift to the music center in the late nineteen eighties with the understanding that this would build the fourth theater of the music center. A home for the LA philharmonic in the master chorale, which would be acoustically perfect and represent MRs Disney's love of gardens after an international search for an architect. Frank Gehry, although Canadian we like to call him are homegrown Angelino because he's lived in Los Angeles for so long won the competition and became the architect of while Disney concert hall. Thursday, April thirtieth nineteen ninety two world news this morning continues for my Schneider. More wants to get our top story. This morning comes from Los Angeles following the verdict in the four police officers who were accused in the beating of motorist Rodney King. They were found not guilty of all the charges. Newsroom there has been a major earthquake in southern California. We are getting reports of locks of bama's to the buildings and the roadways. There are reports of live spread power outages. Gas leaks and land flock petition was one Frank design the building and then in the nineties we had the earthquake. We have thrived after the Rodney King verdict and the city sort of came to an economic halt the county of Los Angeles had committed to and completed the garage on which Walt Disney concert hall would be built and then everything stopped because fundraising needed to happen. Although the Disney gift was incredibly generous and Balare gift of its kind of the time between escalation time moving forward and the brilliance of Frank URI's design, obviously more money was going to be needed to be raised so alternately after the economic downturns subsided. A trio of three incredib-. Leaders the mayor at the time, Richard Reardon ally. Brody who's a well-known Los Angeles philanthropist, Andrew van decamp, who's chairman of the board of the music center. At the time said we have to fix this L A has to come back and the symbol of its resurrection will be the building of Walt Disney concert. Construction began we raised two hundred forty seven million dollars to complete the building of this building and Togo of two thousand three it'll heralded as an architectural success acoustically, it's been loud throughout the world is being one of the most perfect halls to perform. In fact, there are many artists who are terrified of performing in this hall because it is so acoustically perfect that it's fairly unforgiving. And if you're not at the top of your game, you'll hear that you're not at the top of your game because there is no hiding what you do in this room. Shortly after the building opened we realized that a very small portion of the building was causing reflective glare into certain areas. Ninety six percent of the building is finished with a brushed stainless. But about four percent of the building is finished with a shiny reflective stainless. And naturally, that's what was causing the problem is we did a complete study with UCLA doing a son positioning study looking at where the sun was in relation to the shiny surfaces of the concert hall over three hundred and sixty five day period. We then determined which of the panels were absolutely the most egregious causing the reflection and then worked with Frank Erie to determine a system to dole just those specific panels. It was one percent of the building like forty or fifty panels that we needed to go ahead and do a hand brushed. Treatment to we invited. The press did a whole big thing about it. And some of it is being good neighbours. We are downtown LA, and we are in what is rapidly becoming an incredibly residential area. So we want to respond to the neighborhood. And some of that was making sure that we weren't disturbing our neighbors by glare and reflection. When MRs Disney gave her gift she said she wanted to honor her husband and she wanted to things in the hall. She wanted it to be acoustically perfect and she wanted to represent her love of gardens. So to that end. Frank broad doctor Toyota from the beginning to make sure the KU sticks. Right. But he also designed gardens that are hidden throughout the building the third floor of this building has a complete exterior garden that wraps two sides of the building that when you are in you are in a complete urban oasis, you have no idea you were in the middle of downtown, Los Angeles, the designer designed the garden such that there was always something blooming. What you forget is that you are three stories up in the air and actually over all of the rehearsal spaces that are backstage at Walt Disney concert hall. I think my favorite spot in the hall is in. In the terrorist view seats, which are one flight of of the orchestra and behind the stage on stage left and stage. Right there are these idyllic little pods that are not expensive seats, and because of the acoustics of the building the sound is the same everywhere. So we're ever you sit in that room. You're gonna have the same experience. But if you sit in those terrorist few seats, you get a view of the conductor, you get a view of the audience, and you get a view of this magnificent room for creating performance and because of my unique position when it's empty. It's also the most reflective place at the attendant to sit and think and reflect the good the bad, the ugly the day the problems, and that's probably my favorite place in the building. That was how Shum and executive vice president and C O of the music center, an special thanks to Sam Impe for that report. Now is almost time for us to wrap up a grand tour of the very best tool stories of twenty teen bump before we do this time for a more is the story of a form of government building in Oslo left in limbo since the two thousand eleven terrorist attacks in no way, cool the white block twi- shape. The building's future is now out for debate with many believing it should be demolished bump this strong case in favor of his off textual value manage to the lodge mural on its facade designed by Pablo Picasso designed to Nolan Giles explains. It. On a snowy winters day last year. I find myself trudging through also city center when I saw building of such a striking nature. I was halted in my tracks a curved concrete, brutally structure some five stories high wrapped its way around a quiet corner of the city centre with a nod to the nineteen fifties built UNESCO headquarters in Paris and more than a hint of the net. Cassia style thrown into the design makes a new I was staring at this Mabo on close inspection meticulous detail of its architecture makeup became more. Parents the concrete that clambered around wooden window frames was given wolf by a rich pebble dash texture and one facade stood at giant fresco in a simple line drawn style. It was unmistakably work of all work very much inspired by Pablo Picasso, and it scaled writer into the sky. Humbled by my discovery dash to my appointment with always an architect who revealed that indeed the mural, featuring local fisherman casting the nets into the sea was Picasso's and the building itself known as why blocker or why block was formerly part of The Hague's Q of the Norwegian government, an architectural masterpiece from the nation's modernist era by Arlington Shah. But why were the windows all boarded up I asked and where the hordes of architectural. Appreciate is snapping its fine wools on the phones. And then I learned the tragic story of Vic Shas and Pasos masterpiece in two thousand eleven just one month after government consensus was reached to preserve the nineteen sixties building and its system building the hates block the Cobb attack. That marked the start of the nation's most horrific terrorist incident rip through two buildings all stored around three thirty. Friday afternoon Oslo the capital of Norway explosions from a car bomb rock several government buildings including the offices of the prime minister, killing at least seven people and injuring dozens more the bomb killed eight of the seventy seven people who amid in the bloodiest day in Norway's history since the second world will while both buildings were left, structurally, sounds security fears and the haunting memory of that day, a two of the reasons why the why block will soon meet the wrecking bowl as the Norwegian government plans to rebuild a new hedge Q on the sites, but many Oslo and far beyond fighting back for the y block. And when you dig a little deeper into its natural history. It's obvious why they're doing this. Despite those more conventionally minded seeing the building a bit of a brute, it's designed is. In fact, a true homage to the nature of Norway that pebble dash concrete. So woman in character was in fact, a material pioneered by Vic, which he called his natural concrete and features thousands of small stones gathered from the nation's streams and rivers the materials contrast against the sandblasted elements, which would designed to be used as giant campuses for stick works is so beautiful that when Picasso I saw pictures of the proposal he dashed straight out to his Gaden elated to show, his gardener. Just what could be achieved with concrete? It's a building of off at architecture and Vic she even took reference from the storied stave churches of Norway in its design. These timber is managed to be both marvelously on eight and practice. Ical inform and went costs off the architect. How long his building was going to lost? The reply was about one thousand years after all some of these stave timber churches are still standing despite being older than thousand years. But while people like Siri Hume from the society for the preservation of Norwegian, ancient monuments and other local action groups continue to raise awareness for this buildings profound design plans to destroy it Motorola heads that will be at least a considered effort to somehow preserve the giant Picasso mural from the building yet this works. Real value was in bringing both artists an architect together to create something more powerful than both of disciplines could muster individually to simply chop the mural off the building and place it somewhere else as a monument would be a disservice to both because and show today pressure mounts quickly on governments in reaction to terrorism twelve a safe solutions citizens and these decisions not always the best ones for the city. The y block can no longer be seen as a safe building. But the debate surrounding its destruction points to one of the greatest challenges of city. Planets. Those in office need to make us feel safe in all cities, but maintain urban fabrics that give us a sense of place highlight history and promote the civic pride. We all crave. That's this week's episode of the today show was produced by call us Rabelo and was edited by David Stevens and pay you out this episode of the his flatland cavalry with tool city blues. Thank you for listening to love us. The band. Go down to the bar beach, drink too. John. Always in. Down. Explore the original brilliant, hot back volume from the writers and editors behind monocle magazine, the monocle guide to cozy homes is available at a very special price exclusively for listeners to buy the book at half price just twenty pounds plus postage. Visit monocle dot com slash urban this book offer, that's monocle dot com forward slash urban est. Book of monocle keeping an eye and an air on the world.

Los Angeles Walt Disney concert hall Marrakesh Tokyo London Morocco Norway Monaco Oslo Monaco MRs Disney Honganji Rodney King Tom Stuart Smith Riyadh Frank Cagey Honganji Pablo Picasso
Night Photography - Exploring the Creative Possibilities

B&H Photography Podcast

51:04 min | 2 years ago

Night Photography - Exploring the Creative Possibilities

"You're listening to the beach autocracy podcast for over forty years being h has been the professional source for photography video audio and more for your favorite gear news and reviews. Visit us at bien h. dot com or download the beach app to your iphone or Android device. Now, here's your host, Alan whites. Greetings, welcome to the beach photography podcast. Today's topic is night photography. We're gonna start our show by defining night photography. What is it and why are so many people willing to stay out all night long, the freezing cold to take night photographs from there. We're going to go into gear. We're gonna discuss cameras, lenses, and other accessories, and if everybody behaved themselves, we're going to finalize the show by having Gabe gives his secret recipe for taking successful star trail photographs. And while you listening, feel free to give us your opinions on Twitter at h. photo video with the hashtag be h photo podcast. Our guests are quite qualified to comment on the subject. Todd foreign camp is a writer and night photographer, and Gabriel beat them in is a night shooter as well as the author of night photography from snapshots degrade shots. Welcome. Gabe. Let me throw the first question at you. What is nighttime photography night photography opens up the doors to more creativity. Think of really plane with time and what we can do with that. Now, we could obviously do that with and during the day with strong filters, neutral density filters probably have now sixteen stop neutral density filter. So you can go to time square during the middle of the day and get a probably eight or ten second exposure at noon. And that's kind of cool who's got that shot. But night photography right off the bat without the help of these filters, you're talking about longer exposures. And if there's movement, what happens and the surprise the element of surprise I've been doing photography for over fifteen years, and I just continue to go back to it because that element of surprise is always brings a smile to my face. I have a good idea of what I want to achieve, and and I can often get there. But there's a lot of always new explorations. I guess it's just as much fun as. Stopping something in an eighth. Thousands of a second in the girls would be watching something that takes place over, say, eight minutes or dental hours. It went in these things. You can't see these longest butchers. It's hard to visualize with your eyes. It's you have to tap into your minds. I really, but talking about that, that's funny. I was just I was in Iceland earlier this year and I went to tons of waterfalls there. Right, right. And I went there and of course, I'm like, I'm like, going up there thinking, okay, what do I gotta get? What's the sweet spot? It's is it two seconds, four seconds, eight seconds where you know you get a little bit of detail in that water on instead of just, you know, whiting out, but then my friend next to me is like, oh, no, no, no, you wanna capture that at like eight thousand eight thousand of a second. You wanna really captured every little bit, and I was like, I would have never thought about it and I tried it, and I tried to actually doing that and panning with it. And I got some really cool stuff. I was really, I was like, wow, so it's always, I always enjoy shooting with friends, you know, and going out there. Because we can bounce these ideas off of each other. And you know, sometimes we get, we have our visions and it's a lot of times we're trying to get there at first. But if you shoot with friends bouncing that, those ideas off of each other are can open up more doors. I think night the word night or the term night photography can be a little bit of a misnomer because I think it's more accurate, say low light photography as gay mentioned. Like, you can do some of these techniques in broad daylight with the right equipment and the aviation world. Nighttime is the moment of sunset to the moment of sunrise in the maritime world. It's half an hour before sunset and half an hour after sunrise us when you have to have your navigation lights on. So we're pirates at night right? So you can do night photography at night obviously, but you can also do it in a dark place. Like if you go to Grand Central terminal, if it's not one of those days where the sun comes through the windows, it's pretty dark in there and you're going to need quote, unquote night, photography techniques to get your images. That's true. So you know, you talk about knife Pataki graffiti it sounds like everything is really perfectly dock. At the truth matter is you go out on a clear night with a full moon and let your eyes acclimate and you could be the middle of the darkest field and there's a whole world out there that you see drew. So in some ways, it's not much different from daytime, photography. She set the exposure longer and the way the light falls different. Plus you have all these little white things start showing up in the sky which you don't see during the day. That's true. And you also pick up movements. It is a whole different dynamic to it, but many ways that kind of similar to they are just need a better tripod. Your your eyes are. He definitely do need a better tripod. Cable release also helps, but going to see your eyes are actually very adept at CNN night because for a long time there wasn't artificially and right. Our is had to work in the dark and they still do that fairly well. We just have artificial lighting surrounding us almost all the time. So when the sun goes down, if you're in a place where there's not a lotta artificially your eyes will adapt to that darkness and you'll be able to see not quite as well as you see during the day, but you'll be able to see, well, the camera. Also sees well, but it has to see that same stuff over a longer period of time because it's sensitive to daylight lighting. It also might see better than we do because during the day, our is our star central point of focus. The center of vision is actually quite good at night. It's not because it's the outer portion of our vision field view that has the light sensitivity. The center is actually less sensitive. Our eyes seem more monochrome at night because of the the difference in the rods and the cones cameras, see color twenty four, seven. So when you do night photography, that's one of the things that you get to see colors they is. Don't necessarily ever get to witness and a perfect example that is the the Northern Lights, right? Right. A lot of times in the Northern Lights can can vary between being very vivid and you can see them or if they're not as vivid, the look like the is milky clouds, you know, and I've learned to recognize them because they're obviously different shapes in the clouds were used to. But. If you point a camera up to those milky clouds, they'll change from that white to a light green. So it's very interesting to see how much especially with that color range. The cameras can see at night. Have you have you actually been stumbled upon taking pictures at night, say up in the northern latitudes and we'll send you realize you picking up the Northern Lights, but you didn't know what was happening when you're actually shooting for the first few days for sure. Before I had experienced that right into blew my mind and then I got, okay. All right. Okay. Then I started really pointing my camera to learn how to see these. And then after a few days, I definitely got accustomed to it and you know, I've, I've Sean out Northern Lights for, let's say a week's worth of time. So I'm, you know, I'm not super experienced in it, but I've, you know, I've definitely have played with it and and had a lot of fun with it. And it's, you know, the key with that is again how to see them, right. Those exposures aren't that long. They're quite short, but it all. Depends on cancer because they do move them. I've, I've actually slept her in the three times. That's my claim to fame, but I know that there's a certain movement light. They distributed, like sort of like a large curtain if you know that that's going on, how do you change your your, your technical approach? What was now you're not going in for really long exposure, trying to capture something very specific yet the definition of it. So it's just like the same ideas almost like with capturing clouds, do we want to capture their shape or to want to capture an essence of their movement rights. So my general rule of thumb when I say what to shoot clouds at is usually no more than four minutes because after that most clouds will schmear right the, you know, really depends how much the wind is right? Is blowing that much or is it gentle? There's I've seen some clouds just hang, you know, for several minutes at a time. So you have to look at your conditions and then with with the auroras you have to look at how bright they are. Right. And that will definitely define how bright and how they are. They get really close to the earth, you know, and. So I was finding that I was shooting around and no, usually not longer than eight seconds somewhere between two and eight seconds to capture it at a moderate ISO something like eight hundred to sixteen hundred often. I could bring that down and I was shooting like one or two stops down. So somewhere between two point eight, four, that was sort of the range I was at and I would adjust, but they're really the key to shooting the wars. Yeah, it's the, you know, is to actually take your head away from the camera and actually enjoy them a little bit too. Right? We can get caught up in it and the tip that I'll tell you is to make sure that you are continually shooting. Put that shudder on a sort of a continuous mode, right? Because they're they're always changing, right? So just put it on a continuous mode. Get that get the composition, right. You know, for a while, but then also just look up there. Maybe leaving lay down and look up there and enjoy it because the show because you know the pitchers can capture so much of it. But our memories are. More when you're shooting at night, one of one of the realities that you have to deal with, what you don't have to deal with during the day is the fact that everything you're photographing that's not on earth is moving or rather there is movement in the sky because the earth is rotating. What's your window of time? If you wanna freeze the stars, if you wanna see specific very well defined pinpoints of light is stars as opposed to getting star trails, what? What's your cut off point for catching sharp night photographers around the world of gathered together and at their that their big symposium, they lay down some rules. Right Todd, right. You know the rule in right, five hundred rule, right? Which is defined which you you look at. You have to look at the lens right? Because each lens will zoom in to a certain degree into this into the sky. So you use the five hundred rule and you look at your full frame, focal length. So if you're using APS size sensor, you know, first off do the multiplication wanting one point exactly the things that we want to divide that full frame focal length into five hundred. So for a fifty millimeter lens, that would be ten and that ten is your second of ten seconds. Now before star start to trail. You know there is a little bit of leeway on that and some people, there's there's a movement this want. Some people want to go to the four hundred world because he used to be a six hundred role. But five hundred seems this I win little bit of research. I know is a six hundred. And then it was disputed by people who said yesterday the people on the west coast, especially they really didn't like this. But so fifty millimeter lens not doesn't give you a lot of time. So that means you're going to have to go higher ISO's or obviously a faster aperture which a lot of fifty millimeter lenses have. One of my, I like my sort of if I'm stewing star photography. My favorite focal length is somewhere between like eighteen and twenty one millimeter because those are frame cana- full frame camera. Those will get you somewhere between twenty one twenty seconds to thirty seconds so that that's that gives you now I can kind of lower my ISO down to at least thirty two hundred. You know, maybe even sixteen hundred. So I can get a cleaner image. And then depending upon the lens, you know, do I need Qassam lenses do need to be stopped down right for this. I use his ice twenty one point eight. The generally wide open at two point eight. It's pretty good. There are going to be listeners out there that already getting breaking out in cold sweats, listening to this math. I know as soon as he's throwing a lot of numbers, I get kinda shy about rocking in my seat once latitude adjustment to the rule of five hundred. That's when it gets all the math fears radically. Is there a basic for somebody who's a beginner? Is there a basics exposure system? You can give us a base eyeso- Abass shutter speed in app. An f. stopped that would get you in the ballpark and give you a place to start from is their starting point or is it too many variables on this? I mean, it really all depends. One qualified customers listening. They have a PSE DSL on and they have the eighteen to fifty five millimeter kit lens. It's four, five, three, five, two, five, six mega maybe not optimum, but for a lot of people that's their base Cameron. They wanna get tasted it, not what you recommend. So I would recommend probably starting out at sixty four hundred ISO okay. For about fifteen seconds wide open, three, five. And then you get to see right f. and then you'll get to see it right there do review it. And then here's the key is when we review our images at night, everything moves down, move slower. Right? When we. Doing night photography. I always talk to my students and friends that like, listen, we're gonna take our time. We're probably going to only come away. This is specifically for star photography. 'cause we talked about how much night photography dozen compass and low light and city stuff and all that stuff. But specifically for for star photography, we're going to move a lot slower because we're gonna really take our time and and and into its shooting like medium format, large format, we're gonna take our time. We're really going to focus on that composition, right? And we're really gonna make just micro movements to get make sure everything is perfect, and then we're gonna take probably five to ten test shots before we settle on what is going to be that final shot. So oftentimes when I do star or rural night photography, I'm only coming away with like maybe five setups, eight setups, maybe tops, and I'm happy. So you could probably get away with a one gig card doing that, you know. So those high, you know, capacity cards maybe aren't needed. You know, but but whenever I see you have to grow with the attitude that I'm shooting with the four by five hundred eight by ten camera. This is not bang, bang, bang. This is very slow, very methodical. Nothing's happening fast, which is kind of neat. Yes. It gives you a chance to watch this. I I was going, there are instances IRS scenarios environments where you can shoot that DSL are on auto and come away with something really nice if there's enough ambient light. If the, if the the lens and the metering was working well for you, but other times you have to work for, that's correct. That's correct. I would say actually, right? Finding those dark dark skies, especially in North America is very difficult, you know? So most people scenarios are going to, there's going to be some ambient light kicking in and now with a lot of these cameras and almost every Cam really doing a pretty good job at definitely thirty two hundred ISO and oftentimes sixty four hundred is so they could be an auto or shutter speed priority. I would actually, I would kind of think of going to. If they, if they're afraid of manual, shoot Emmanuel. But if you really think about nine photography, low light photography, and maybe whether you have a tripod or not, and especially if you don't, you actually got to think shutter speed priority because how how much can I hold this still? You know, a good tip for that. If you don't have a tripod is putting your Cameron burst rate because if we wanna go below sixty of a second, especially you put it into burst rate. And I found that even with the bigger Esa DSL LARs, I can go down to a quarter second. But that thing at birth rate, let afire gig at ten shots. The first two or three are not sharp because I am not a good tripod and my hand is triggering the cameras. So there's movement there by, but by the thirties, Hagley by the shot. Points. I would imagine newer cameras with with higher isos sensitivities with less noise or have been really good boon for night photography, making it that much. We are at an all time high at night photographer. So many people are doing it right now. I mean, it used to be this arcane aspect of photography and to be honest, and and I remember those days because I shot it when it was film. I still shoot a little bit of film actually at night, but but back in those days, no-one shared their locations. You needed massive math theorems to figure it out because he had all reciprocity failure and all this sort of stuff like that, and it was sort of you had to be in the click yet to be in this little. There was ten people who knew about it, so you have to be friends with them. We're friends of friends from them and starting off. I imagine you had to leave knowing that you most likely skunk because you're not gonna know you results for another few days. That was interesting. Part is really, you had to be good note taker. Yes. You really needed to be not only just all your your camera information, but weather conditions and. What time of the, you know what, what phase of the moon or what, what all these things are are going on. So now this world we live in were sharing more than ever the technology is there. There's more workshops and videos and all these ways that we can kind of get get that information the and it's and it's it's really easier because. You can see it right away and make those adjustments on the fly. I make mistakes still, you know, and I can make rookie mistakes zone. Don't tell us. I, I don't. Let me ask you question for you. What makes a good night photograph you or the parameters? What are the? What are the subjects that you'd look for? What are the kind of things that you hit on? I, my master's thesis was industrial abandoned landscapes at night, and we're shooting the restore fair amount of ambient light, but not a lot. I really, personally, I like the interaction between artificial lighting in the environment. Like if I look at, you can walk down the street and you'll get a wall that has a Scott Slade on it, or you know, outdoor lighting fixture and during the day, it's just a wall with a light on it. But at night there can be really interesting texture in shadow cast by that lamp. And that's what my I. That's what I really enjoy capturing I like doing star trails. I like doing landscape stuff outdoors, but it's the industrial, the interaction between man-made light and the night as what I, what draws me a lot. You fill in light, bringing extra lighting, flashlights, headlights. Torches flame throwers. Anything of that sort? Not in not generally. I've done some light painting usually at workshops. I think that's on in it's for those of you who listeners out there enough? What like painting define it for us, lay painting when you're you're doing a long exposure, and you add your own artificial lighting usually in the form of flashlight, you and it's paintings actually a very accurate term because you're moving the flashlight through the scene in highlighting a certain section or a certain object that's in the frame and much. I mean, you actually use like painters stroke, literally. It's kind of interesting. A lot of people are. I mean, that's actually light paintings like a huge thing. I, it's not my norm. I've done it and I enjoy it. But it's I'd rather somebody put a lightbulb somewhere and that's an that. Does the light panning for me? Why? If the record? I believe the first photograph using light painting a Pablo Picasso is in it. If I know staying that was one of the first really amazing images that proved. Light writing actually yet. That's actually what? Yes, correct? Yeah. And and that we're that just blew everyone's mind before. People had introduced artificial late to two scenes before that, but this was the first sort of creative, really creative. I think it was mealy mealy am I l. Oh yes, who who's a photographer? And he just, oh Picasso. He said, listen, create whatever you want. Here's a blank canvas in the dark, treat whatever you want that I'm going to pop a flash on you at the end to freeze you. So when you're done, tell me and I'll and freeze and I'll pop the flash. So that's how we can see him and then he had to work out. And this was tricky at the time that the that light went overpower the pen light. Yes. Picasso was used a which is essentially just a white drawing white going joined in. It was a life magazine was I think, published the mission. Yeah. If you go to the life magazine website today, you can find those images. It's really, really impressive, great stuff. When we come back camera choices. We hope you're enjoying this edition of the h. photography podcast. Send us a tweet at b. h. photo video Pash tag h photo podcast. Let's talk about cameras in and formats. What works? What doesn't side from the fact that you have better detailed, probably lowered noise. It's a higher isos. Is there a big advantage to using a full frame Murless DSL OR or is a PSE will fourth urge or point shoots even good enough? And I just to qualify that. I know that I've gotten some shots hand held in the middle of dark fields with a point and shoot Reich down the stars in the frame. It's mazing. So that's, I would say it's the more expensive cameras, the best. You get what you pay for. The lines are thinner than ever before? Yeah. I mean, it used to be you needed a full frame camera, but the the technology, the sensor technology is so good right now issue the Backley see, most sense. Imagine it's been a been. I mean, digital used to all be ABC, and those worked really well for a long time. There's an, there's a noise advantage, an ISO noise advantage with full frame, but you should APS usually and so do, and so do I. So we got to APS guys on the white. I try a lot of different cameras, and I'm sure you get to play with a lot as well, but but that that line unless it's sort of like a a higher mega mega medal pixel. Right that you get more detail and thus you get more of a tonal range. Those cameras can can definitely benefit. Those are generally full frame. I mean, these Vanessa's is definitely the winner here. You know, just that it can go well beyond most cameras are good up to sixty four hundred ISO these seven s to which is out now that claims to go what whatever ten or fifteen stops above that. I then my testings. I've, I like it three to five stops above, you know, sixty four hundred. It's everyone. It's all subjective to our own likes and dislikes about it and where grain starts to really affect it. But but so that camera is is probably you know, when I see a lot of night photographers, a lot of them have that in their in their back. But a and I used to be guest point shoots totally. But I've been using a bunch of point shoots lately, especially those one inch sensor, yes, shoots. Yes, those can do a real good job. At a the higher isos and then longer exposures. But the the drawback with a lot of point shooter said they don't have a bulb feature. Okay. They don't have a general Bo feature which you find in Mira less an Esa LARs. A bulb means that you can go beyond thirty seconds. Most cameras go up to thirty seconds and bulb means I trigger it and I can go as long as I want until the battery dies or I I said it with a with interval ometer a remote. Okay. Well, mostly points you go the limit. They cap it at like two or three minutes. That was going to be a question why? Okay. So you have what point shoots currently. Can you think of that? Do have that bold feature tested the Rx series by Sony, and that's great. But that goes up to believe three minutes. Okay. I'd have to look at the the canon g. x. maybe it's other APS ones. I'd have to really look at that one, but I'm pretty sure again, they, they generally cap them. My my guess is there's cameras that you. Do that with using camera control through WI fi, possibly. I'm throwing that out there because I know that there's some very basic point and shoots off when you use wifi in control it from your phone, you have expanded options on how to control it. I would say, but the the the takeaway is if you're if you're thinking about buying a point and shoot and you're thinking about night photography, manual control of aperture and shutter. Speed is the key, and if you can get up to thirty seconds. Awesome. If there's a bulb then that's even better. But yeah, I think one camera we, we definitely need to mention for night photography as the Nikon d, eight, ten, a, which it's Astro photography, specific camera. I've been dying to get my hands on it. I really haven't tested it, but I've talked to a lot of people who have and I've read all the specs and the main thing is it's got a wider sort of color space, white balance, especially for Astro photography. So looking at the nebula looking at Milky Way, looking really deep into different solar systems. It's Canley knows colors, much richer. And much more realistic than most other cameras out there. Digital cameras, see infrared light, but they, we put filters on them. So the images look like what are is see because you don't want to have a wonky. I are image from your point shooter, whatever. So the Nikon has has a different infrared filter, which allows a certain wavelengths of infrared light into the camera. So you're nebulous pop yet, basically formats aside in Cameron's what doesn't work if somebody was starting with with night photography and it could be star trails, just basic imaging, whatever. What should they not? What should they stay away from what cameras were acquitted? Should they avoid one of the your license? You phone? Yeah. I mean, you use your phone because as wonderful apps on it that we can kind of figure out a lot of these, this math and stuff like that. Yes, trying to take a picture with that and low light, it's still not there. And maybe at the end of the year, it will we, you know, because that technology is going, they're getting better and better. I mean like you can. I do handhold nights stuff on my iphone, five all the time, and it's better than the four in, but it's getting there, but it's limited. It's it's low light, but not really. You know, some of the those longer when coach, what about image stacking? I know Olympics, I believe it is, has that near smother companies that is also an advantage where you could? Yes, Suzanne long time lapse stuff. You know, the more and more Photoshop is happening inside the camera and especially the mirror less cameras are getting more creative with sort of the apps or with internal software that you can. You can be more creative with Sony has a star stacking app that you can put into their their their cameras. It's a pay for one, but he can add it to it. And then Olympics right off the bat, their their software, right. They have a few different ones, but composite bulb doesn't amazing job of a, you can preview it on the c. on the back of the screen. And no, and it basically, it will not burn out your highlights. So that's a great a great thing for a light painting. You can see when you've done enough, lay paintings is will continue to fill in the shadows until you want it to. So that's, you know, I've worked a little bit with it and I want to work more because boy, if you know, I'm sure other camera companies are going to pick it up, but that could be a real big game changer in the NFL mistake in that technology also holds down the noise because you dealing with multiple images. And the noise is basically filtered out from fresher pixels for was doing some sort of dark frame subtraction, that's kind of eating up that any noise in there and it touched, I was gonna talk when we talk about noise ISO in like the higher the ice or the more digital noise and right Haya so is like the golden ring that camera companies are trying to get. The Sony is like that that's one of their advertising points is higher ISO in. In a knife. Divers embrace high is, oh, I have to say if you're thinking about doing night for Raphy, don't base your camera purchase on that depending on what kind of knife dog are you going to do if you're doing hand-held photographs and a Williamsburg bar that hasn't two candles in it? Yes. Get a high ISO camera, but the photography that I do, it's tripod based. I'm not like the industrial stuff. I'm not really worried about star trails or pinpoint stars. So I was shooting a usually shoot mostly at the native ISO at two hundred and most cameras at two hundred zero are going to have very great noise performance so you can get away with you can do a lot of knife tag at slower isos again, it depends where you're doing. The other factor is the environmental, like if you're out in the cold in the winter, very low noise when I was shooting off the coast of Thailand on a ship, it was ninety degrees and superhuman at two hundred ISO thirty. Second exposures. I was getting noise that made you think you're shooting much higher isos. Yeah. So in that good way for people understand that it's think of your camera as a computer or laptop when we are working with our laptop on our lap and it starts to heat up, right? That processor is overheating and it's getting hot. Same thing happens with the camera. It overheats and if you don't have a good or the latest processor in there that can help do that overtime work because it seems like it's a herculean effort to lift up that shudder and keep it open for a long time, you know, and and that really makes up that processor work overtime and create noise within it, amplified by heat. I was just shooting at sixty degrees which I thought we usually was safe, and I was still getting noise at thirty seconds. So right now it's the winter, so TIs the season to get out and get longer exposures right now, you touch briefly on lenses early that wider angle or enter what what if somebody was said they wanted to take one lens ad in particular for CEO, full frame camera. What would you recommend? What folk lanes are the best for just Jeff. General short time. Well, I'm gonna go against what I said then. Okay. Good. And because you know, wide angle, I think the the, the better choice for night sky photography, because for me in my my night shots, I want include a lot of the night sky, but but often I also want to include some sort of landscape doom. So the wider the better for me for doing that. However, for most of the general public, what's an easy lens for them to get a fifty millimeter lens. They're inexpensive there anywhere from one hundred to three hundred dollars, so everyone can have that in their kit. And that's often the first lens I'll advise to people who just buy a kit lens because it gives you a fast kind of normal vision. Think of our I are is would sort of with a barn doors on them. So we can't see out to the periphery. And and again, all those lenses are fastener cheap, so so you can. You can cut down in indoors and more. The common low light scenarios. Would it be recommendable to somebody say with the kit lens in eighteen to fifty five, which is usually a three, five, two, five, six. Somewhere in that range, would that be reasonable? Lends to go out with was that I guess that would depend on the camera that you're having in the ice. Oh, sensitivity lot of variables, but a a camera made in the past year where there is good, low light sensitivity would akin lend suffice. It's not the end of the world, but you there's better options. Okay. So I mean, I get out there and get you feel. I would say, I mean that that applies sued daytime photography, too. That's the those lenses are fine for a lot of what people wanna do, but if you want to update enough of government work, yeah. If you want off your game, you're gonna want a larger aperture lens of maybe a prime, and that's going to be better for your daytime stuff. Taking pictures of the kids at the birthday parties as going to be better for nighttime stuff to and autoclaves most likely better. Yeah. And I often ask the audience what you're focusing, how do you see the world? Right. Get a prime lens. And that focal length. And it's really easy way to figure that out as obviously most of us get zoom lens at to begin with. So where are you stopping? And you can easily look at that and all of programs like light room and capture one and stuff like that. You can see in my zoom. I'm often stopping at thirty five. It would be who've looking favored, tick, enters your favorite pitchers comic. She didn't want folks that you should. You know, I often go up to photographers and I might never know know anything. My first question would be like, hey, what's your focal length. Cameras reports. Okay. Because again, there's a limit to how, yes, you can do a burst of images and actually get short picked that ridiculously low speeds. But what are the minimum requirements? What would you recommend people consider if they're buying a good light support for night imaging, a tripods are often the same things cameras, like what you what you, you get what you pay, get, what you pay for it. There's a balance between heft and portability. The best tripods in the world are gonna wait, four hundred pounds, but you can't carry them. You got a very stable shot with that because we're not gonna move. So the lighter you go, the more it's going to be subject to vibration in wind, but the lesser back is gonna hurt for hearing it out into the woods. Carbon-fiber has advantages would has advantages. Aluminum has advantages as kind of it's more of a budgetary decision. What I do tell people when they're shopping for tripods. Zo is gay. Get the best one you can afford like don't skip because if you buy a low end inexpensive tripod chances are you're not going to be happy with that. You're not gonna wanna take it with you after a while because it keeps failing you and then you're gonna buy another tripod. So save up a couple more paychecks by nicer tripod get a nice used one, the try the tripods, not going to break in half somewhere. If it scratched and used a tool like it gets used, it's like a screwdriver. It's a brand new screwdrivers just as good as one that's been turning screws for twenty years. You know, Soviet just struck me also. You don't need a tripod. If you're doing night imaging, you don't need to try pot. That's at your quote, unquote. I level new could buy a lower more compact, heavy duty tripod. It's easy to carry if you're going out middle nowhere and is less susceptible to wind and is more stable in generally more stable. If you just again, just get something that's half his tools you need. If you're. If you have a tilt string, if he's not doing ten minute exposure off a tripod, you're not going to be looking through the camera for sixteen minutes. So you don't have to worry about being bent over for sixteen minutes. Very true, very true up and walk away important consideration. I think for anyone buying a tripod is looking at your height and matching up a tripod that matches your height without the center column extended. Yes, you know. So that's, you know, Senator com is when we start to compromise a little bit. That's the last the last ditch you, right? So so finding a tripod that measures up to you is the first I think is you know we have the budgetary considerations, but then what measures up to you and then also right? How low can you go? Not every shot should be six foot above sea level. As long as it's not plastic. You generally have to spend about over one hundred dollars. So have that in mind. That's fair. You know, you could find good ones over one hundred dollars. What about wall heads? Tripod heads, what's recommended would you prefer is a ball head. Good. Is tilt until involved is kind of the best of all worlds. I mean, if you're. You can get geared heads. If you have an unlimited budget, you can also weight, then you're carrying. There's always compromises the ball head is kind of like that's the the, the best performance for the wait for dollar some people like the three way, the five had these geared heads. Yeah, can give you a little bit more precision and it's more of that. Okay. Let me think. XYZ, you know, where's the ball had you people do suffer from trying to get it level, right? It's lighter. We like it. It's easier to use oftentimes, but we do suffer because there's no leveling point which one right after a ball head and try. But I like to buy spirit level of bubble level and put that on the hunt. You. I know a lot of cameras have a level of electronic find that to be two percent accurate. It's a nice start, especially if I do get off access one way, then it can get a wonky. So I do like the twenty bucks, you know, it's a simple little thing. I've got two of them one in each bag. Always make sure I have when they're and now bracket to a really l. brackets because you set up. Tripod and you lock down your head and you like, I want to try this vertical. You just roll the camera on the bracket. You don't have to adjust the head anymore. You have to do move anything. Good point. You don't use the plates right. To bring five of those plates because I often lose them. I would say the tripods in general, supports in general, save up a little more money by something you like buy something that's good because you will use it for years and years and years. If you skimp and you got something just as a temporary stopgap, you're, you're gonna pay more in the leads, good advice in general for anything you look in to try sentences, things she's living with for a while. Any other gear that should be considered? One of my favorite apps personally, for doing scouting and figuring out all sorts of things from, you know, how long did do a star trail to where the Milky Way is going to be two when the sun is going to rise set at any location that I can plug in is photo pills. It's an expensive app. It's at ten dollar app, but it's worth every penny. It's there some similar than offer a lot of the features. But I like photo pills to, I think photo pills has a lot like combines three or four different apps into one in. It's great interface cable releases. The next one we talked a little bit about Bogue and how do we get? How do we take advantage of that? Both features you gotta plug this cable into your camera and the these cables. These cable releases can be six or ten dollars or they can go up to. I know there's some remotes the, there's a room remote by company promote. That's like five hundred dollars, you know? And that's great for all this sort of. Time lapse. HD are all that sort of stuff like that. It's more programmable, but usually I believe it comes with a hassle blood stellar camera. That's why don't start that. Sorry. Need these and I always bring. I always have two or three as a backup. Some of them work with batteries. Some of them are off. The battery of the camera is usually AAA battery. So I have some of those. But again, the benefit of now I can program with these ones that have an interval ometer which usually start around fifty dollars. That's a key thing what you need for star stacking as well as time lapse. And then as well as just making making it easier for you, you could just program in, hey, I know I want this exposure to be two minutes, two seconds or two hours, and you don't have to be sort of tending to the camera system. The whole time can actually maybe go set up another rig or hate into town and have a hot Cup of coffee. Exactly. Exactly. There's also a lot of wireless remote these days. Yep. And that's a, there's definitely is a battery consideration there. So the what the wired ones might be a little more reliable user to use, but your phone can trigger your camera, and so the app from the camera or things like trigger trap or something like that. Exactly. So you don't need that wired release. The or you do it through wifi can control the exposure and all that stuff. So once fast question for shooting in cold weather, had you deal with batteries because some a lot of batteries batteries are affected by cold. So is about that more batteries. But I mean, you can't swap the battery in the middle of a long exposure. No, you can't. You gotta keep an eye on your battery level's for sure. And that's something, especially if you're doing the star stuff in rural photography with those exposures a longer. That's what drains the battery as well. It's, it's, it's, it's, it's really taking the energy from the processor in the battery, go quick and they're going to quit or at an colder nights, so good. So might be to keep you batteries in your pocket and keep until you're ready to get ready. Don't carry them an hour and a half out to the site and let them be exactly sometimes you swap out batteries and that one that was dead. You put in your pocket and economic revival little of the life back into it. But again, I often go with three or four extra batteries don't ever go out on a nice shot with like a half full battery thinking you're going. To you're going to get far gonna. Yeah, I'm going to be like, get to that Williamsburg bar. Next up, Gabe secret recipe for taking successful star trail photographs. If you'd like to reach out to us with your questions or comments. Email us at podcast at h. photo dot com. What do you need for taking a perfect star trail photographs soup to nuts? What do you need to get this stars. Bottom line wants a famous piece of good New York City to star. Sometimes it's airplanes sometimes as the helicopter exactly. Sometimes it's Venus. Now you gotta get to a rural location again where you can see the stars and I know people people talk about stars as well as the auroras I go. You can't do it during a full moon. That's BS you can. You know, just you obviously want to point away from that to the darker part of the sky. So if you can get dark skies and there's apps, there's a dark sky Apso find that you know the northeast is tough, but you can get a little upstate and find some stars. So getting to that location is key and then the fundamentals, a good camera, a wide lens, a wide and fast lens, whether it's a twenty four to seventy two point eight or fixed wide lens that sturdy tripod and a cable release. Now, this is one where I would say, hey, now's the time. If you wanna stack stars, you want to get that cable release. That comes with an interval ometer because that's where you're going rogue Graham in some key features and others. There's two ways to stack stars or to get star trails with so to speak. A star star trail. I would say about after thirty seconds as a general rule of thumb, how far do you want to get them to trim those epic shots? You see where the north star in these great circles of stars that's about an hour to an hour and a half, gay. But the longest exposure isn't always the best exposure, right? And we need to experiment, and we need to look into sess the situation. So good stars trails, I think start to happen really at about four or five minutes and that four to five minute fifteen minute is really nice and realistic, and still gives that wow factor. But again, if you wanna get those epic ones, you gotta you'll be committing to an hour and a half, and there's two ways to do it. We haven't talked about it yet, but every camera has the function called long exposure noise reduction. Yeah. Okay. And now most of the times this is defaulted on on most of our cameras, and I'll tell you to take that off. Right at the beginning. You know, that's something I go through my menu and I, I get a camera and I turned that off because I don't need it. And I want to explore what the cameras capable of before I put sort of a lock on it. Right. So lungs, butcher noise reduction, Todd talked about how noise comes from higher ISO's, but it also comes again from that processor heating up and and how hot it is outside. We need to test our cameras and see what it is capable of. So oftentimes when I'm teaching a workshop, I'll have the students go to their hotel room and shoot just an interior may include a table and do a test shot. You know, turn out all the lights in the hotel room and do an exposure for one minute, two minutes, four minutes, eight minutes. Maybe go up to ten or fifteen minutes, and then you look at those images at one hundred percent on the screen and see look, especially to the shadows 'cause knows appears first in the shadows and look at that and see when you start to see the noise and what was the temperature in the room, maybe concern it down to six. Eight or find out what the temperature's outside, try to match it, but that's sort of the best controlled way to kind of test your cameras. See what's capable of, again, knowing your camera, understanding the camera, the lens, even the tripod would it's all capable of is going to make you a better prepared night photography outside in the lesson when he was find out all these things in the dark in the door in the middle of it. Yeah. All weird animals howling at shadows. Now there's two, there's two. I mean, you could just rip along exposure just set in both, but the thing and do an hour, you know? And then for that, I would turn on the lungs, Bush noise reduction because almost every camera I've tested unless it's ten degrees outside. Is going to have some noise from long exposure after about six minutes. That was my next question to one point two, six minutes as you cut between four and six minutes is a general rule of thumb for about sixty eight degrees. You know, on a new camera, something that's been released in the last one to two years. That's a general rule of thumb. However, if you turn on your lungs potion noise reduction, what that does is it will lay down again, it's called dark frame. Subtraction will lay down a dark slide and sort of sandwiched on top, and that will eat up any noise that it's fines and sees the slight drawback to drawbacks to it. And that's why often turn it off is the first drawback is it takes time and almost every camera it'll do be a one to one factor and really all depends on the buffer of the camera. Now, I know some of the canon cameras to five three and especially. I know had a better buffer in the Wendy exit better buffer on it. But basically, if you do a five minute exposure, it's going to five minutes of exposure noise reduction. And during that time you can't do anything with your camera. Can't even look through the viewfinder k every it's on shutdown mode. We're focusing on this and then when that's done and is draining battery by the way the whole time you know and when it's done now you can take your next shot. It'll show it to you and you could go onto your next shot. So for five minutes, you might be like, that's not bad, I can stay productive, but for an hour, long exposure, you're gonna be waiting an hour that's like, but the camera in your bag and go to the Williamsburg bar. Back to that, we got, we got to find out what the name of that bars. But I might do that as my last shot of the night. What go to the bar. No lash out of the night. I might be like, hey, you know, I've done all these testing. I've done some other stacking of experiment with other things. I got the energy to stay up for another hour, but I don't want to stay up for another two hours. So I might from Lashari like, okay, I know what I've done. All my test shots do turn on long Sposa noise reduction. Take that shot and then let the camera keep cooking on the drive back home. So that's that's one key the safer way. And what most sort of quote, unquote professional night photographers do as they do star stacking. And then what they'll do is they again, no, the parameters of the camera, no, the temperature outside they've tested or Cameron. They know that in these conditions, it's okay to get a five minute exposure before noise starts to creep in. Now, if I go back to Nerva Allama that's plugged in. And if I go one second, if I program it in a one second break, which is the quickest break, you can have between images. So I said it for one second. I said it to if I want to do an hour. So five goes into sixty twelve times. So I set up for one second break, twelve shots, each shot for five minutes. I press go and the cameras going to do to do the job. It's going to collect that information, bring it back home. It's not gonna stack it together internally, I guess, unless you have the Olympics, but you'll now you need Photoshop, but you take it in, you do your work on the image. You bring it into Photoshop and you can stack it the very. Easy ways to stack in Photoshop, which by combining the layers and going into lighten mode and doing it's in, it's beautiful thing to see happens back in the dark room. When you see the image come up when you kind of take twelve images or some people do it thirty seconds stacks because again, it's hot out so they might do thirty seconds stacks. So that'd be one hundred, twenty shots, see better have a good computer to process those far, especially if it's a high megapixel camera, but then see kind of pop up in stack up together. It's pretty magical and fun and and that's and that's how you get it and it'll be the cleanest star stacked image out there. So it's interesting how many things you feel like going back to the dog room and say, the perfect temperature is sixty eight degrees. Have you noticed how we're still back in the day? Some familiar. I remember those times in temperatures. One of the things about my photography is when you compare it to regular like daytime, photography is it's a process. It's not hope hold the camera your face and take the picture and then move on. It's not a click. No, it's not a quick. There's there's a, there's a tripod involved. There's a cable release involved. There's a exposure that takes several seconds at least you know, and it's like it's not instant point and shoot and go, it's there's a process and that's and there's a in the process extends to the computer sometimes, but it's definitely slow. Like Gabe said you your world slows down at night and the process slows down in it becomes. Photography? Well, there's two types right away. We take pictures, we either capture or we create, and I think night photography opens up the creativity. Cool. Yeah, thank you gave Todd John l. producer and sitting in for our engineer, Jason tables, the inimitable, rob Reeves, checkout Gabes night photo. Workshops ruin isn't dot com. And his recently created national parks at night dot com. And towards night photo work could be found that r. RV photo dot com. As y'all at home, you wanna see your pictures, tweet us your night photography at the h. photo video hashtag d. h. photo podcast. Also, if you have a few moments, radio podcasts on itunes, my name is Alan White's. Thank you so much for tuning in.

Cameron Todd Photoshop Gabe Olympics Pablo Picasso Williamsburg bar Sony life magazine Twitter CNN
Tall Stories 128: Y-Block

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

06:59 min | 2 years ago

Tall Stories 128: Y-Block

"The. Imagine talk, you're listening to stories twenty four brought by the team behind the show all about the cities we live in this week. We head to Oslo to hear the story of a former government building cooled, the wipe locker due to twits shape. Its future has been left in limbo since two thousand eleven when it was hit by a car bomb during Norway's terrorist attacks. But as the city considers whether or not to demolish it, many are arguing in favor of his architectural value, especially because of the large mural on its Assad designed by public Picasso, intrigued, let him or is designer to Nolan. Giles. On a snowy winters day. Last year, I find myself trudging through Oslo city center. When I saw building of such a striking nature. I was halted in my tracks a curved concrete brutal structure. Some five stories, high wrapped its way around a quiet corner of the city centre with a nod to the nineteen fifties built UNESCO headquarters in Paris, and more than a hint of the busiest style thrown into the design makes a new. I was staring at a modernist marvel on close inspection. The meticulous detail of its architectural makeup became more parents. The concrete that clambered around wooden window frames was given warmth by a rich, pebble dash texture, and on one facade stood at giant fresco. In a simple line drawn style. It was unmistakably work of all work very much inspired by Pablo Picasso and it scaled writer into the sky. Humbled by my discovery at dash to my appointment with the Norwegian architect who revealed that. Indeed, the mural featuring local fisherman casting their nets into the sea was Picasso's and the building itself known as why blocker or why block was formerly part of The Hague's q. of the Norwegian government, an architectural masterpiece from the nation's modernist era by Arlington Victor. But why were the windows boarded up? I asked and where were the hordes of architecture appreciate is snapping its fine walls on their phones. And then I learned the tragic story of Vic Shas and Kosovo's masterpiece in two thousand eleven just one month after government. Consensus was reached to preserve the nineteen sixties building and its system building the hates block the car bomb attack that marked the start of the nation's most horrific terrorist incident ripped through the two buildings. All story around three thirty. Friday afternoon in Oslo Norway explosions from a car-bomb rock, several government buildings, including the offices of the prime minister, killing at least seven people and injuring dozens more. The bomb killed eight of the seventy seven people who were murdered in the bloodiest day in Norway's history. Since the second World War while both buildings were left structurally sounds security fears and the haunting memory of that day. A two of the reasons why the why block will soon meet the wrecking bowl as the Norwegian government plans to rebuild a new hedge on the sites, but many Oslo and far beyond a fighting back for the y block. And when you dig a little deeper into its architecture history, it's obvious why they're doing this. Despite those more conventionally minded seeing the building as a bit of a brute it's designed is in fact a true homage to the nature of Norway that pebble dash concrete. So warm in character was in fact a material pioneered by Vic, which he called his natural concrete and it features, thousands of small stones gathered from the nation's streams and rivers. The materials contrast against the sandblasted elements which would designed to be used as giant campuses for autistic works is so beautiful that when Picasso I saw pictures of the proposal, he dashed straight out to his garden elated to show his gardener just what could be achieved with concrete. It's a building of art and architecture and Victor even took reference from the storied stave churches of Norway in its design. These timber churches manage to be both marvelously ornate and practical in form and went Carter off the architect, how long his building was going to last. The reply was about one thousand years after all. Some of these stave timber churches are still standing despite being older than a thousand years. But while people like Siri Hume from the society for the preservation of Norwegian ancient monuments and other local action groups continue to raise awareness for this buildings, profound design plans to destroy it. Motorola heads that will be at least a concerted effort to somehow preserve the giant Picasso mural from the building. Yet this works real value was in bringing both artist and architect together to create something more powerful than both of disciplines could muster individually to simply chop the mural off the building and place it somewhere else as a monument would be a disservice to both, but Casio and fixture today, pressure mounts quickly on governments in reaction to terrorism to offer safe solutions citizens, and these decisions are not always the best ones for the city. The y block can no longer be seen as a safe building, but the debate surrounding its destruction points to one of the greatest challenges of our city. Manners those in office need to make us feel safe enough cities, but maintain urban fabrics that give us a sense of place, highlight history and promote the civic pride. We all crave. Listen to tool stories among twenty four production. I thanks to note in Jarl's for today's episode, remember to tune in every Thursday for the full thirty minutes. Addition of the. Good. Bye. Thank you listening. Explore the original brilliant hardback volume from the writers and editors behind monocle magazine. The monocle guide to cozy homes is available at a very special price exclusively for urban listeners to buy the book at half price, just twenty pounds plus postage visit monocle dot com. Slash urban est book offer. That's monocle dot com. Forward slash urban est book offer monocle keeping an eye and near on the world.

Norway Oslo Pablo Picasso Norwegian government monocle magazine Oslo Assad UNESCO Nolan Paris Casio Motorola Kosovo Siri Hume Arlington Victor Victor Carter
Episode 217: The Robert Nathaniel Group (Guest - Daniel Umstead)

Rotated Views

1:00:16 hr | 6 months ago

Episode 217: The Robert Nathaniel Group (Guest - Daniel Umstead)

"Welcome to episode number to seventeen the Robert Nathaniel group. This is devoted views podcast with Jimmy and the crew giving you life from various perspectives. Welcome our level we hope you enjoy the views. brought. To you by the blessed lifestyle brand visit DL, three S.. S. E. DOT com. To get blessed also sponsored by the motivation fouls on leashed this motivational mixed your fuel for success available on all platforms. All right you were now tuned into the rotated views podcast. I am your host Jimmy. Nevil is I'm here with gave and Daniel the Robert Nathaniel group in this episode, the crew welcome Special Guest Daniel Instead, we cover topics that range from radio shows credit repair real estate. Writing, motivation and much more. We wrap the episode up with quotes From Walt Disney and Pablo Picasso guys for new. Thank you for joining us. Don't forget to download and subscribe drop a new episode every Tuesday morning for your listening pleasure kicking things off Daniel. Thank you for joining us. We appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you. Appreciate you both on the suffer me man love it absolutely absolutely are. Going to jump right into it episode to seventeen. Thanks for traveling over here for those of us who do not know who you are what you do. Let us know. Sure. So others run straight through. So Daniel `instead. I. Run, my own radio show, orangey radio show, but I come with many hats. So I'm really turned Philadelphia credit repair specialists. I also do some motivation resume writing and. This time next year, you should be seeing me at one of the local law schools in Philadelphia. So Nice. Like that a jack-of-all-trades giant to be man be man I. Love It. All right. So let's talk about the Robert Nathaniel Group how did that come about what is it? What do you do and is it all those things encompassed together let us know yes sure. So it honestly started I want to say the name itself actually came from. My middle. Name my son's name. Was Robert My son's MELANIA MS Nathaniel. So I honestly just combine the two in round with that because eventually I'm going to be passed down to him and then you know he could do he wants shoot a company hopefully making it. Trillion dollars. So. Y- The whole goal summer to honestly what you guys are doing is just helping others. Being better right now, my goal right now is to create a million millionaires. Through the radio show. So just doing that by bringing guest on same way you guys are doing but in addition talking about free credit repair tips, free real estate advice, free motivational advice, and free career tips to help you get a job. So everything is break when it comes to me but definitely, definitely want to help others because there's a lot of free information out here in some people think. You've got to pay to go on Google for whatever reason sure I love that I love that, and so there's a lot of you know in the self help industry or the you know the inspirational industry motivational whatever you WANNA call it. There's a lot of books out there for people to read and a lot of times, and there's a lot of information on the websites what have you. People get overwhelmed because there's so much information here we have yourself. Putting it all together basically and. Four free. and. I wanted to highlight that because I myself you know growing up. Not Knowing you know not knowing too much in specific areas, I would go buy a book, read a book, and then all of a sudden there was a new book the next day that had get with the latest and greatest information. Oh No, and then I'm jumping from website to website I'm like who do I believe right and then you you get frustrated and then you're inundated with information and you don't know what's what what's the truth and yet the stiffer through, and then you have to apply all these little techniques and everything that they're telling you each one and then he read a book that's on the same topic with contradictory. Ideologies and it's like what? And it is a while it's the wild west. So. I love it and I'm fascinated when someone can actually put things together which is basically what I do as well but it's It's so much more concise and usable and and I guess Friendlier when you go out there so. Instead of someone getting a headache, how can they come to you? You know wh when it comes to real estate let's say. I'm very open book I mean the best thing to do is just honestly cortex me my numbers two, six, seven, seven, zero, two, three, seven, five, six. That's the best thing in contact with me. Even if you're already dealing with the realtor I don't have anybody sign anything until we're actually sent down at the closing table. So if you've got a question or something doesn't seem right. I do have a day job. So I'm not there yet as far as being a multimillionaire success, but check me out next year wink. Wink. But yeah. The best thing to do I'm an open book, people can follow me on line. Honestly I feel proud of myself and I pride on this. If you just Google Daniel Armstead Sti you will find me and they're plenty plenty of opportunities to reach out with inequalities at all. I love that all of that. All right. So so let's talk about credit repair. That is the one that I see all over the place I see a lot of people struggling with I remember there was right before my wife and I bought our house I went to A. Seminar or something locally to kind of give us like the you know the low down on what it's like to own a home. And one of the biggest things that class was credit for for most people and all questions are well if I had X. Y. and Z credit, you think August. You think I'll you know I can get this kind of loan and it was like. That portion of class like. From what you know the majority of what I was really there for and I'm like, but I was astounded by how many it was probably like nine hundred ten people were asking about credit and how they can better their credit. So they can become homeowners or what should they do if they have jacked up credit etc So let's talk about credit repair. Sure. How did how did you even come around that? Sure so Woman She's actually vp now with the credit repair program and Melody based more. I work with a career program but I I know. I. Probably shouldn't be doing this but I give everybody free tips. The same thing that you could do in this credit repair program folks can do on their own. The biggest thing folks should be doing right now is honestly draft enough credit dispute letters googling that and then sending it out it's not that much. Information. The only thing that you need to do is pull your credit report and that is free through April twenty twenty one you go to in your credit report dot Com police report there's something on there that you don't like or even if you like. I. Think this off I'm pretty sure I pay this off or maybe I am paying on it's still now. It's fine. The the the reason why folks get into the credit repair programs or go to seminars is because of the time it's like, oh my gosh, I gotTa do this on my own. Now the program I'm in they send us the letters I sign them off and then I mail them out. But folks I mean Save the money you because I hate when people push you when they don't need to be pushed like programs out here I'm not GonNa name anybody because I don't want any lawsuits but this. Program is out here that it's like, Hey, sign up, it's two hundred dollars will cover this this and it's like and we got a fair price program, but you could do it on your own. But the biggest biggest thing folks should be doing right now is fighting those is like I had I had five hundred remove I've been in the program since May and it took me until a month ago to actually take the time and sign off my spe- letters mind you this. This is me this Asian all Push aid. Fix GotTA gets credit and it's like you know me months later actually when I did it, I had five items for move but it was nothing that they did special. It was nothing that I couldn't have done my own. It was just the time factor. So I think the best thing folks should do go to Google palach phone, your laptop tablet. What have you go to Google look up Sample credit dispute letters, type it up and get the mail to Experience Trans Union and Equifax you could google their addresses as well. Make sure you have a copy of your social security card and license for identification to send off and that's it, and then you wait now the only difference between programs that you know we got a team of attorneys that fight it if there's any dispute but. I didn't need an attorney. I didn't need any fancy schmancy company to back me up the only thing I had to do with sign-off, make a copy of my documents, send it out, and they had the five items remove. It took a couple of times for me to actually get the credit dispute letters out for the next you realize it but all in all it's it's something that you could do on your own don't need to pay the money for. So. There you go. A one two punch. So so someone went to stop the Stop the recording right now and wanted to reach out to you specifically just about credit. How can they reach out to you? Best Ways? The phone number open book two, six, seven, seven, zero, two, three, seven, five, six, you can call or text the number twenty, four seven. Now To am if you call the texts, my girl's GonNa kill you but. Leave a message and I'll respond in the morning. All right. So so switching switching topics I found out something very fascinating. Right you conducted over a hundred interviews since May this of this year two, thousand, twenty covering bakers, authors, fitness structures, repair specialists, credit repair specialists, lawyers, real estate investors have you been able to create so much content such little time I. have. Four twin brothers. Yes. No honestly I'll tell you actually how it all started and I gotTa Shout Black New Jersey for this. What had happened was black. Oh New Jersey was a facebook group a friend of mine that's been normies since I was probably seven years old reached out to me and said Hey I think you might be interested in this group opened up the African. American community. You could definitely grow with it I was like okay. So woman on there actually put up and said Hey I have a podcast if anybody would like to be a guest feel free to reach out so I'm thinking I'm like I got the stuff to do a podcast I would love to do a podcast. So yeah, let's make that happen orangey radio show you. It's nice to us. So I did it as a joke Jimmy. Lee. Joke. Listen when I went on there and I put up the pose a week later at over a thousand comments of people saying I want to be on the show. Are you sure it's free? It was like, yeah, I'm doing all the work I, just didn't know that our get this many. So yeah. Since then doubt just has been the big rush and then of course, people sharing and. All the like and just reaching out but. Typically. I'll hold the interviews like I said working during the day, but I do get some free time so. Typically, run interviews for me like fifteen to twenty minutes. After work hours for about an hour, and then maybe during my lunchtime But never ever during my work hours, I've never done interviews during my work hours right when put that splinter. So. So with all those kinds of interviews. I love to get into the minds of successful people and you. You've interviewed a lawyer and you've interviewed a baker right two totally different professions. Comes to mind set has there been any common thread amongst your guests. The drive there's levels to the drive yet, but I always always see the drive and people like a lot of the ads in Dr Exchange arrive. Sure. So the drivers that I'll give you an example with the baker. Now, the Baker unique Baker because she's selling unique items, they give you a unique a field. So. Leaving it that But her drive with that is that she's doing everything in her power to make sure that people see her products. She's doing everything in her power to make sure her name is out there. She's taking every advantage opportunity She's been out to food truck vending festival. She's been out to seminar. She's done interviews including mine so and even the same with the lawyer, the lawyer has done. The same thing in regards to push out there. Now I will say this and you know I love my fellow because all kings. But the ladies are really really stepping up their game I've seen. Bras but I've seen the ladies just out of the Ballpark when it comes to putting out there at somebody on my radio show when we started in June and she it's only like I'm going to be doing a cookbook and I'm like, all right we're looking forward to she just released a cookbook in addition she's having another cookbook released in the spring so. The lawyer that I had on the show she ahead. said that she had a couple books coming out she just released her book in addition and it's Like said, I fell just follow the ladies when you see delays door just copy and paste to your own routine. Awesome and so and so when when you get the guests on, is there are you seeing anything really spectacular about these folks or you're seeing these are just average people are hard working. They know what they want their goal setters and they go after it or is there something that completely sets them aside obviously everyone's unique. But you know what I mean that there's like Uber Talent and then there's just regular hardworking people who will do whatever it takes the it's crazy should mention that honestly the regular people but yet they do have some special about them. Absolutely they are taking the time to click on the. Link that I sent them filling out the form that have asked filled out putting down three questions that they woman asked during the interview in actually committing to be at the time. So with that alone I considered special because I've got a lot of people. Engaged I know you guys. What do you mean? You can't make it what do you mean? Would that cancelation? So and especially when it comes to free promotion I'm thinking at the end of the day. But McQueen told me like a listen folks don't want to be on the show. They don't want to be on the show they're missing out. So that honestly separates the ones who had that special talent compared to those who don't so. I think the special town is just staying committed and stay consistent and driving to get their name out there. Absolutely absolutely. you know there's a famous author motivational speaker used to be a passer, John Maxwell John C. Maxwell and he had a book. Title. Always. Revert back to it every once in a while order talents never enough we all gone to you know grew up kids who are ten times more talented than us and specific thing but don't necessarily do anything with I got a few right now. Yeah but then and then you have you know I would consider myself you know I wanNA came to ability Average grades average maybe above average on both of those things but nothing like spectacular. But then it's just the drive like you said, it's just day in and day out day in and day out persistent and consistent every single day and all of a sudden results start compounding and it looks like you're miles away You're really not but it feels that because you stay dedicated to. A specific goal or whatever it was So if you're out there listening. Every single one of our special in our own way. But don't feel like you have to have some wild you know talent of X.. Y. And Z. Just to make you can make it You put your mind to it and day in and day out like I say so in your experience, you know. How would you define success. The Q. Two words that Come to mind in defining success is being consistent. And Persistent. To with that a you know it doesn't matter what you're doing what mistakes that you're making and people get so frustrated because what they're doing is that they're saying, Oh, well, you know there's this person who's making a million dollars green card. Don't he's got three hundred million dollars in real estate I'll never get to that and it's just got a green card on Real Estate Book into the man not even exaggerating. Stacked which book did you get? It's literally titled. How to invest in real estate, the most basic thing I will literally. Text my wife in the meantime. Taylor. T semi pitcher of a book that just came into guaranteed Oh Louie and I'll get the title for you and then folks if you're listening if you go to thrift books, Dot Com and you find these books on here for motivation and you just spend five minutes per day that counts as you're being persistent and consistent. So people think that, oh, I need to spend two to three hours on this topic or I need to spend additional four hours in regards to making sure this works or I'm not going to have Tom, because my kids my family Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah, blah, and it's like The world the universe is not asking for that. You know the universe for what you want to do in your life is merely asking for five minutes a day because nobody. In a friend of mine told me this. If you go to the gym and just do one push up. Just do one push up you know, but you need to get started in doing something. So a lot of people think that it's like now when I go to the gym I need get a full two hour workout in I need to get this done. You know I need to get on the treadmill public law and it's like, no, just five minutes just do one push up see what happens after that one pushups. After you read their grant card, don't book for five minutes you know and doing their daily What is it after twenty one days? It becomes a habit. So by the time, he had ninety days Golden. A love. There's a The strangest secret by Earl Nightingale. Is An old school literally when I say so I mean old school it's very we're talking black and white folks. but it's free if you go on Youtube page. You. Here. This man's voice sounds like a lion or something if a had of could cancer that's literally telling she is. It's so funny But anyway. Just, really quick I don't want to reiterate what he said because I want to give everyone an opportunity to you. Be, blessed with his knowledge I should say. One of the things was he's like I. Bet you if you go anywhere in the world right now and ask you know. Whatever random twenty people are twenty men you know, why do they go to work? They won't have the answer at all and when he means, they don't have the answer. They don't have the real answer they just think, oh, everyone else is doing it. So I'm going to work I just got to go to work and once you find something outside of that somebody said it to a couple of weeks ago it was so simple there is no way God. Put us here on this earth to just go to a nine to five job and pay bills. Guys let me say that again you're here for more there is no way in the world you were placed here in this precious beautiful mother earth of ours, right? There's no way you're here to just get a nine to five job and pay bills let that sit on your brain and understand that you here for more figure that out, take your time talk to people find a mentor. It's not rushing and finding it, and then go you don't to be a maniac about it one day at a time and his Daniel. Sane. The five minutes of reading that it. That's it. Right there. I didn't technically ever have a real mentor, my entire life. Of looking up to my parents and then I looked up to a couple of locals and that was an and I looked up to. Businessmen that I had zero relationship with though you know what? I'm saying and little by little you can find I do recommend having a mentor but. You got you have to start somewhere right and it kind of like you said with social media you know era that we're in the comparing game can kill dreams because someone will get started and like you said I know a couple people have youtube channels and they've been added for a year or two and just not seeing much movement and he compares well, this guy just started one six months ago and he has one hundred thousand dollars like, yeah. Well, he had a video on there that accidentally went viral. Saying the right person share down like that can happen to any of your videos overnight literally something simple heavy tried cats. And that's the other thing too people don't do the research on million Gabe I mean there's so much stuff out there on Youtube. There's so much stuff out on social media. It's like, Hey, if you're not getting hits in real estate, if you're not getting hits on credit, if you're not getting, it hits on Youtube channel their stuff that you can google or check out that shows you what you need to get done. You know they have it down to the simplest things of tags. I mean, I consider myself somewhat of a dinosaur because there's certain videos I go on and they're like from two thousand, ten, two, thousand eleven I'm like so right. Maybe maybe this has been around a while, but the opportunity is there. So and I to add back onto your point about the nine to five nobody becomes a millionaire working a nine five. So that's your goal right now to be a millionaire through whatever passion focus that you have in life please don't think that five job is GonNa get you there. And I'm glad I'm glad that was brought up with the you can learn anything because especially using youtube or whatever you know traveling any anywhere travel I don't listen listen maybe all around nighttime from traveling home like that and I want to wind down I'm listening to music. But when it comes to the morning Getting Ready Getting Ready in the morning, I have something low, very low because. Half. The people in my house are still all the people that my house was still sleeping So it's very law typically have in my back pocket or you know by the bathroom sink or something it's something motivational inspiring or you know like a preacher preaching or something like that but it starting to get my mind ready for the day. While I drive Vin I'm learning something whether it's real estate. Whether. It's investing in stocks what have you or could just be another mindset thing or biography, which you can learn a lot about through people's lives other people's lives. I didn't do I'm not. I'm getting ready and I'm listening to something and I'm driving into work and I'm listening something. I'm not even separating hall their time you got to understand that's the same time us at their groaning brushing your teeth groaning, brushing your hair groaning, putting your tile and groaning driving into work with the headache and blasted music and an and more junk talk radio when the whole time I'm enriching my brain. And then when someone is miles ahead of you, then you compare yourself to them and all of a sudden you're mad and now in now you give up. Right. But you gotta understand that it's those little baby steps I'm I'm using me as an example, but not as Jimmy Liam seeing me as a human if I did all those things and then you didn't do all those things but then you're comparing their best to your worst of course, you're frustrated. Of course, you're frustrated you got to put the work in you gotta get to work and you've got to put that work in This isn't you know not gonNa just come flying to you. But but talk a little bit about because a lot of that push comes from motivation and inspiration, and I define you know inspiration is the pool like inspiration pools you and so my kids they inspire me, that's a natural. I'm GonNa do it for them? No matter what I'm inspired from my family for my wife. Motivation is the push. It's going to push me right now but you know I'm listen something super high whether it's music or motivational talk I'm hype that's pushing me but it's it's. It's it's for a moment whether that moment could be our or it'd be ten minutes The motivation is temporary where inspiration can last a whole life. I can be inspired by someone or inspired by my kids my entire life right with motivation. Just like Deodorant and taking a shower you need it every day. Okay. But you it every day because why as it wears off and that's the importance people you get find some that inspires you it could be your wife it could be your best friend it could be your kids it could be anything it'd be art work or whatever it is. That's your inspiration now finds them. That's going to motivate you every single day to keep that gas go what's your motivation? My motivation is honestly my son, my queen and my mom, and honestly my last name nothing special with them just instead but I look at it as this in Green Card don't. Bring him back up again but green card don't actually put it down to one of his interviews. He's like, I want to see what the world is I have that book. That book. I told you I just got this book in Today I. Had my son read it over the summer 'cause you know school in education and. It was a program of his though that I that I purchased and was like this was a free book. I didn't buy the program? Flop. Came with this book and it came literally today how to create wealth investing in real estate grant cartoon. Told you that's from my wife. There you gotta hit me up. Once you get to the end of the book when you when he gets to the Ad, let me know what you read me. Okay. All right, and that's for everybody when you get to the end of grandcourt. Jones books, you gotta read it because there is the you talk about gaining the next step and wealth. It's right there right there on the last page. Way that's it, and it's like, yeah, that's it. That's it. You WanNa get to the next level. Read that last page a low. But For certain backwards. Chapter. No but the yeah with their motivation like I said, McQueen my son and my mom and my last in you know that was my why I needed a and that honestly took me a while to get to because I was trying to figure out what's going to be my wife because everybody says, what's your while I don't know why but when you have it in front of you and your wife going to change, you know sometimes you hate your kids sometimes you girls get on your nerves sometimes your mom is. Your mom. But at the end of the day, you know once you find that why once you keep that motivation going in that inspiration going, it will help you. But that goes back to those two key things being persistent and being consistent with the there's going to be those bad days. There's going to be those frustrating days where it's like, I don't feel like you know to bed I don't feel I, put it on spotify. Reading Greencard don't today I. Don't feel like listening to a podcast about how could become richer the next day you know those things are gonna come up but if you take the time and just do five minutes, you'll be A. Okay. I. Love that. And so on the other token inspiration. So it says here you're inspired by many social media influences such as Damon John. Michael Blank and Dan Lock House Oh. And what can you share? That has helped you most sure. Basic. radio. Question. Also explain elaborate. Totally, read off the paper. Know with all three of them. Honestly. These are the folks that feel that they can't find a mentor. Those three are my mentors and you have to look at it this way you might have people in your life right now that you're trying to get in contact with you can't get a car take with whether it's an ex whether it's a good friend of yours for whatever reason you just can't get in contact with them but I can guarantee you this. If you were to reach out to Damon John and follow his Social Media Dan Lock or even Michael Block you'll be inspired and you'll get something out of it and Lo. And behold somebody like Michael Block, we're actually connected on linked in. So if I needed to reach out to this guy now this guy runs multifamily commercials he's also has his own podcast I might get a delay in response but for the fact that I had that immediate connection where if I wanted to at this moment right now to be able to send a message and a notes going directly to him because we're connected that makes me feel good inside compared to me be going to a mentor or conical purchasing a mentor. So Those three in my life I look at and follow to help me in grow because, and it's not so much about beating the people I just to be able to sit down and have lunch and now by the man lunch. Absolutely. Absolutely, Hey man listen I just supportive one of my one of my friends growing. started a business called Tau up now and ordered one of his headbands apparently supposed to absorb you know sweat and stuff like that. So in support I ordered a headband and. On the headband it's as you versus you and I thought that was very appropriate especially if you're working out doing that but it goes back to what you're saying is. You know a lot of times people go back to that compare game and when you just zone in on yourself and love other people just zone and love yourself to that man listen doors. There's a period of time where I was mad at myself. I couldn't even explain really why and would it broke down to was. I had expectations that were. Would have never been met in the timeframe I expected them to be and it just leads to frustration. So I was mad at myself with I do wrong How could I have done better You know I didn't make the right connections and here I look back at what my goals were and it was like you know create ex mountains, Z. X. Amount of wealth in like a day you know what I'm saying it was not going to happen anyway you know what I mean. You hit the lottery that the check wasn't GonNa ride that night. into. This House we're going to get oh so we're moving next week. No no I just want to show you where. We're going. Near future we on the next. Next week. We're going to do it. I'm like. I like that I like that. That's hilarious. Listen Dream building dream buildings a big part of it. dream building is goal setting. It is putting out there, but it's the actual form It's there I remember know days I would go jogging around you know sections of the houses where we wanted to live at and without even realizing I ended up being in the houses that was jogging around it's like. Wow a manifested this. and. I knew I was doing and I was doing it with purpose. But after a while you kind of forget because you know you're caught up in life and I was caught up in a good way really stacking up. Jobs, we're getting married by an house paying off debt all at the same time, and so you get you get lost in the sauce. So to speak in a good way though and all of a sudden like Bang just paid off that student Loan Bang you just You just put an offer on this House Benny married boom US went to a beautiful island for your hunting unions like. On a six month timeframe. Right and if you go back, that was going back three three years you know work you know what? I'm saying just working at one goal working at the specific goal working at the specific goal. And then when it manifested, it was like it felt so good to walk into that right walk into that blessing. obviously with God's help you created it. Know it was it was you wanted. Free latest gentlemen absolutely. Well, it's all possible Yup right But anyway. So so keep keep talking about the mentorship, right because I didn't have like I had mentioned before a direct line. So to speak obviously I talked to my father, we ask specific things but there was guys there was I want to do different things with my life and so that was limited in the conversation and he's like you gotta you gotTa figure it out. You gotta read books and He guided me the best could but. When I started reading books if realize I gotTA start now connecting with it. We live in a different era as you mentioned about Lincoln you do have whatever how whether that access is very huge or small it. The fact is that you have access right and that's what social media has given us and the beauty in that is that you can find people like a Daniel Lock. Right? Dan Dan that's right. submitted him because Dan. The. Billionaire Man I'm connected with him on. Lincoln. And when I got his message because I connected with the MONCTON crazy story connected with them on leak Dan and I was like, oh my gosh does the opinion I was like Nah. This guy's worth two billion dollars. He's got these mastermind meetings where we got paid like twenty thousand dollars to. Twenty seven yeah, I was like there's no way that this is Sam. So I reached out just on a whim I was like Hey dan, just following you. Really inspired by you. This man sent me this long paragraph tax and he was like listen this is you one time shot go do what you need to do you follow me enough that you know where you need to be analyzed. I don't even care what the thing was copy and paste. It by INBOX. Dare put. Any Ed actually put down on they're saying that you know this is you know Damn I. Don't have staff or anything like that. Reading my comments just wanted to reach out to you. I'll let you know but please don't abuses privileges like she I just WanNa have. And that's a so but with the mentor ship, you know people people always find an excuse. You know that people always find excuse you know whether they can't come to rotate abuse. Whatever reason whether they can't for whatever reason tag you forget to take you after they purchased tonight and Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah but it really goes down to that hey, there's always going to be a solution for your excuse. So if you don't have a mentor okay fine somebody online that you really like and start following them there was a gentleman sterling white was following grand card dome and bring a Greencard. Donald. Spreads. He's not listening on the mental as a regular grand card. Don't because he interviewed him he interviewed him on his show and all he did was he reached out to him. He did a couple of real estate deals and he's like, Hey, we'll love to have you on my show to talk further did hour long session and pretty much the most times grant was pretty much bragging about what he does but. Saying like you probably couldn't believe that you got me here what you write sterling and it's like. Wow. This is going in a different direction. What at the end of the day, you know sterling white a gentleman who is human just like the rest of us pumping blood just like the rest of us ordinary man he just took that drive and took that extra step. So if you got an excuse in your life, why don't you go your excuse I can't find a mentor what do I do? Where can I find a mentor? Fights Great. That's grind. Somebody that there's no reason why you cannot be at six figures by this time next year if you're listening to this podcast ten, twenty, one, two, thousand, twenty, one if you're not and. If you're not at a million dollars at least speakers by this time next year from what we just talked about then. Google, your excuse so he can find your solution. That is fantastic. Say One more time your excuse so you can find your solution. Put up their post later on. I'm one thousand percents deal that. We're. All right. So let's change gears. She So one of the things that you really do well is resume writing. Yes. So explain a little bit about what that process is for you. How in the world did you get started in that and how do you help people? Sure Fun Story YOU'RE GONNA love this two, thousand, seven, two, thousand, eight, I was working at a nonprofit a gentleman I was working with, and this is not knocking anybody with a college degree but if you habit that's great needs to be some personal for you and you alone, that's my disclaimer. So menas, Guy we both went to Penn together. He didn't quite finish Penn state, but he was finishing up his degree now it's some experience but my degree. So, I'm boasting any here at this now profit and he was mind you this is back in two, thousand, seven, two, thousand and eight, and he was saying was like Oh man, the Va is Higher Department of veteran affairs like they're starting to like sixty thousand could you out the resume heard? You do really good stuff and also I mean, I, do okay but. I'm fine and he's like well, can you tweak it for me? Sure like I was like, Hey, if they're har, what are the requirements like making thirty five K now Twenty Five K. increase will be. The. For. Single man in his mid twenties. Yes. So it was like, yeah sure. All on. You could apply all right I'll put it in. So my resumes good. You know 'cause I might agree on there. Of course I made his resume, look like Superman and Batman. Came together in Rhode it. Super Friends Meeting and sure enough within a week. He got the job and he's been there ever since long. So since then I put in the work to it. Of Creating resumes helping people out with resumes I honestly never started charging people until a couple of years ago. But I've been doing it for over ten years because I just got a joy out of somebody just saying, wow, you do marvelous work like I was literally filling like Picasso. Paintings give it to them, and then they're showing an employer like I can't say you countless stories that have had people said I didn't even need to do an interview Danial they just army off the resume. So putting a price on that there was no way possible and my quick him in my life she's like, no, you need start tribespeople. That's awesome. So But yeah four four that if somebody in my process is simple with the resume writing, you know if you got a question and you got an issue, I don't charge everybody some people just need to change some things. Some people just need to edit at some bullet points and call it today, and that's that I recruit for I mention those companies that recruit. For Bank of America CVS. Healthcare. Group. A. Bunch of others for my day job. So I definitely know what these top companies are looking for and sorry to say they're really not looking for a whole lot. They just need a decent format resume and somebody's enthusiastic and can put on a smile during these interviews. So that's the secret folks about getting a job. So. If someone wanted to reach out for your services particularly for the resume, how can they reach you for that Short? It's still the same number number, two, six, seven, seven, zero, two, three, seven, five, six. If you want to call, they can text me as well. I'd be more than happy to assist but I'm like I said I'm not gonNA charge everybody something's May. Need to be a couple of tweaks in call it a day in the now just let me know of your success I will ask for recommendation if I don't charge you or if I do charge I, will ask for recommendation on the page, but that's it. That's awesome. So so explain the importance you know we weren't even GonNa go on this topic, but you mentioned it and You know I talked a lot of people day in and day out about how you carry yourself professionally The importance of that. And so one of the things I I love the talk about enthusiasm and you mentioned being enthusiastic during an interview but. Forget the interview for second. Explain why? Almost like the psychology behind why is Being enthusiastic is important. it will get you to places. You have never even thought of I'm going to bring up somebody's name and everybody's GonNa hate me for but trump is worth three point six, billion dollars because he was enthusiastic and every single real estate transaction deal. He made eighty five million dollars off of a hotel that he should never even been inside of not even so much his name not so much as background but for the fact that he was enthusiastic and communicate as well towards every single person and partner in their relationship, which brought him in eighty, five million dollars and that's off one transaction. So if I know it's like, oh Really moving again. But at the end of the day, you know you need to be enthusiastic about what you do because the same energy that you bring off or put off to people it's going to come back to you. So if you're enthusiastic guess what people are going to be enthusiastic about what you have. But if you say like if you got came to you and said, yeah, got these headbands that you know you've versus you. If you run a lot and you like sweat, it'll take it off of you but if he's coming issue like Joe to a gay, I got these great hair bands you've versus you they're going to give you that extra superpower that you need. So there's soon as you get into the gym, you're feeling like a super friends you're feeling like Batman wonder woman. Going in there, I honestly just did a mile on the treadmill for ten minutes straight. I've never done it before. But as soon as I put on this at band you've versus you may me what I am. So there's a difference absolutely. So Big Dif- big difference big difference. That's a that's what sometimes it call it a slight edge, but that's what massive edged. down. Play too many times. One hundred percent listen I interview people myself and? I will tell you when a personnel you can totally change You know the situation, it could probably change the lead time of your interviews. Well, absolutely. No actually and if you have to be enthusiastic about it, right I mean a quick plug you guys came in Theresa asked about the the the hat and boom I went in there was no like you know here's the website. Here's my email address. Here's my business card. It's no boomy jumped action. I. Was GonNa Bring that stuff in a rented a truck brought the stuff in explain it. This is the highest quality Hoodie but when I start going into it, I didn't say like it's kind of I already started comparing it to my my competitors when you wash it once it's GonNa Shrink on there. And they just keep going right and it's it's totally different where if I would just like yeah check it out the. three SSD DOT COM. Thanks, I appreciate the support. Get back in story told you that my dad had pancreatic cancer and passed away from it. This is why we have purple gave everything right in such a short amount of time. Now Obviously, we've mastered that because we've been doing it for several years now. But it's funny that you said it because I'm doing it now not even realizing I'm doing that. It's truly passionate about so when you say enthusiastic passionate. Have some level of excitement about life I mean. Or. Just short passion. To be your passion you now. If you're selling t shirts somebody else because everybody I've had people on my show and I could definitely tell you if you go back and look at the people who are selling clothing items, you could see the ones who really really love what they're doing compared to the ones who are like. This, you definitely for rent this week. That's fine wouldn't you just want to buy a building with the money that you make? and. That's the other thing too I hate I I'm sorry I'm frustrated about but I hate when people limit themselves, you know people think that it's like, Oh, well, if I just make a thousand dollars, I'll be okay or just make five thousand dollars throughout the whole year I'll be fine. Because is where my family my friends told me no hustle your behind off and make five grand in the next hour possible that you could do that. You know and you end the whole thing behind it is being enthusiastic you know people. One Great Mentor that folks can follow all the time and you could probably get in touch with him in the next couple of weeks. No matter how big is is Gary V. This man is do with every single thing that he does to motivational speak when it comes to put up a snippets and everything like that, and it just drives people more and more and more. He's not selling anything I've actually seen him be more excited about his motivation motivation in helping people. Then he is about as one I completely forgot that he's got a one business or one company, but for the fact and him helping people. At twenty, four, seven. So I love that I love that. Game and find something that you know you know sparks up smarts. In your soul. Well Listen I. DO believe that you have to find something figure out what the passionate is and then figure out how you can turn it into. You know income if that if that's what you want because sometimes people were just chasing the money. I and YOU'RE GONNA get burnt out doing that oh? Yeah and then you're GonNa and destroy something you loved right because of money what I'm saying there. There's a tricky balance there All right. So let's talk real estate. How can What is your basic advice? Right? Because there's a lot of people who know that they probably should. Put some pennies away or Read a couple of books for to invest in the future maybe right now into real estate. Again they just don't know where to start what's your recommendation because there's a lot of places you can start but what's your recommendation I'm going to give everybody a free action plan right now. Two minutes and they could do it on their own. You're going to go to Zillow realtor red fin find a listing that has been on the market or expired or has been on the market for maybe more than six months you're going to skip trees but. How do I skipped trace? You'RE GONNA GO TO REI SKIP DOT COM you're going to register an account. You're going to go for the lowest plan possible which I think is twenty five cents per lead. So focus, you just spend five minutes on zillow looking at properties and it's basic stuff. You just do Philadelphia PA where every RAP BRISTOL PA and you literally search for homes that. have been on the market for six months or more once you do that and you skip trace by going rex dot com phone numbers are gonNA come up now there's plenty of opportunities out here you can do batch leads where you can text folks go on slide broadcast job voicemails, one-two-three approach first step zillow second step skip she's third step you call them and you say hi This is where you gotta live folks. This is where you gotta lie because technically you are buyer technically are a buyer. But this is where he got gotta lie and say, Hi I'm an investor looking to invest in the Philadelphia market or wherever marketed is and I am interested in person your home for cash and they say whatever they need to say or they say that they're not interested they say they're not interested kiss what you just took your first step into doing real estate now. If they're interested and they say, yes, I'm interested in doing a cash offer. You wait for them to say how much and as soon as they say, how much that they're looking to sell for you tell them I will get back to you within twenty four hours with some numbers and results if you put a post on facebook social media that says, Hey, I, got. Interested in looking to sell their house for this amount, I need help people will flood you people will reach out to you. I put up a post the other day. And I stole it I got an email about this one point two, million dollar complex out in northeast Philadelphia and if you just saw the blank. Stolen. Yeah I told. The woman at emailed me and said. Please do not share this information without my permission I'm like you say, don't share the address and nothing about. So I pretty much put out there. I pretty much put out there. One point two million. Twelve unit complex. The net operating income was eighty six gay sears enquiries only, and I put it up in three different places couple of facebook groups for real estate and I put it on my page I got about twelve to fifteen people who are interested but the biggest thing that I got out of that was three connections with three buyers who said that hey, if you got anything else like this, feel free to reach out to me directly Oh. Great. Because that was my whole purpose. Well, that was my whole purpose. Oh folks because people will say like Oh, you need to get a buyer's Lewis I. Oh no, you need to get the deal i. know this is what you need to do. You need to go to Zillow I skipped trace and call people you know now if you want to text, you could text I'm old school as people heard graduating no five don't want to say when. I was around the Y. Two, K. Scare Futurama and all that jazz. No folks you know you got to take action steps, stop reading books on it. You read read books after you meet with Damon John, Rebus Edgy, me with some of these real estate groups read books after you land your I deal you got and I say this because there's eighteen and nineteen year olds out here making six figures doing the same exact thing that I just said and the other thing about it is these gentlemen. If you're in a market, let's say you're out in. In Pennsylvania because folks know that there is a thing called, and of course, Pennsylvania those near Lancaster but if you need to research of babies there. Needed research. Other places you could do this. A Memphis Tennessee do Phoenix Arizona you can do this in Los Angeles. California. All you're doing is making that connection with how do you become the middleman though making a call? How does how does how do you become part of that transaction? I? Guess is my question. Well, once you become part of the transient here, here's the thing with the tips with the tips are definitely feel free to reach out to me if you if folks are listening and they want me to be the first point of contact and saying like Hey Dan, what do I do now charged for this question? Because I want point people in the right direction I. Literally, I had a gentleman who reached out to me and he's like Hey Dan, I got somebody who's looking to buy a house they got preapproved but I wanted to see how the referral deals work and I was I. Listen I just got to pay my rent you everything else you know and it was six percent on one hundred, Fifty K. house. So I'm like if people want to do the math. And it's like we you only want a thousand from an yeah. I might get the full check but I just need it thousand folks because there's thing I want you to keep coming back again and again and again, and again because my whole philosophy making a million millionaires and say it on my show is that the whole scheme behind is that if I have a million millionaires and we're doing a deal that only one percent of its ten thousand times a million. Trillion range. So that's all I'm looking for folks but in the meanwhile I want you to make money because the source comes back to me. It's like, Oh, Dan dopey mixed six figures. Dan helped me make a million dollars. So That's why I want folks to get in contact with me two, six, seven, seven, zero, two, three, seven, five, six, caller tex but. Yet to because there's going to be so there's so many added steps and that's why folks need to. Rico's it's like well, you need to clear the title you need to make sure that there's no liens on it, but people get so caught up in hung up with that they're like, well, I don't know what to do or I'm I I did that I did it for two months I was sitting on deals and or not reaching out to because I was like would if I could hear what a tax lien would if I got a Clear title do worry about that when the time comes right now it's just those three steps go on zillow check out some old listings, skip traits that property, and here's a bonus to it as well. If they're not interested Hey, do you have anybody else? That's willing to sell their house for cash right now we do offer a referral service. Yeah. Sure and then you just work it out. Yeah. I love it. I love it. Love it. Hey, there's there's something huge about when you become a, you know when you're teaching is there's a skill in complex thing simple exemplifying complex things but you know, and obviously, if anyone wants to reach out Daniel, you could obviously tell he can break things down into much bite sized items instead of getting overwhelmed. And looking at the big picture that sense So wrapping things down closing it out here, explain how you're currently marketing the Robert Nathaniel Group. Sure. So right now that's pretty much strictly the show because I have so much going on with the mini mini hats that I wear. My main goal is to get guests on the show. So if a folks first or foremost, you need to get rotated views podcasts I yes. So if you can interview with me, you can interview with rotated podcasts I. So do that I guess and then after you do it like Mansuri of oil money to the Moon then definitely feel free to reach out to me but yeah, I- I founded. By, growing myself, I needed to grow others. So that's that's honestly what it came down to, and that's the reason why I have one hundred plus people that have interviewed. On the radio show right now because my main goal is to help others the moment that folks become a success than I become a success I love it I. Love It. All right. Last Question I. Love to ask our guests. How do you manage work life balance right. What Should be. This be. Honestly before she came into my life I was up to like two am in the morning. One a working on stuff sticking that I needed to do every single thing. But my queen came my life and she honestly said give yourself time so. Again learned this from. Greg Card Dome, this man goes to bed at ten o'clock. Every knows like there's no way to. Like every night. But what he does is he goes to bed at ten o'clock but he at six am so I. Think Right now create your schedule and I had to tell myself this. You had to create a work schedule that's going to work for you and treated like a brand new job. You know folks think that it's like well, I'll have enough time of the day where do you? Not have enough time in the day. Well, what are you doing at six? Am while I'm sleep will why can't you get up well I got things to do and I'm going to lose so much sleep. So you can't sacrifice a year or maybe six months working on your goal by waking up early and getting what you need to get done, and then moving forward throughout your day. So I. Think folks need to do that I. so how I do it is is scheduled myself now I'm human. So do I plan? Do I wake up every single day at seventy m with a smile on my face and greet my green and say, hi, honey I'm ought to start my day spotify please open to the next rough money-making park. No not at all I wake up you know a groaning. grunting with the toothbrush and then a couple of hours later in the day and it's like art I need to get motivated. But the balance comes by remembering while you're there and remembering where you WANNA be at in the next year because once you do that, then everything will flow and just be prepared. Be Prepared I've asked God I've talked to God you know in regards to when it comes to. Make myself wealthy and in addition even leaving my full time job next year and God doesn't play around you ask for something he's GonNa hit you right in the face. Oh. Oh, you trying to leave because I tell you. He'll give leave. He'll give you all the tools that you need in pleased up looking at the dollar bill as that life savings that needs to go. If you got money in your pocket right now it's you might as well have matches in your pocket. All doing is just burning sitting there. So if your money's not being put to use if your time is Not being put to use. Then you know you start. So finding their work life balance, you know make sure that your family is purse. Now if you got a good family, make sure I if you don't have a good family, then you need to comfort you know but I mean we'll also got first and then yourself and then of course your family and others but. You know with their work life balance just put yourself I in making sure that at the end of the day that you've accomplished said one thing that's getting closer to the next day. Bam. Daniel. Thank you for joining us man we appreciate it you. We like the close things out with quotes in the first one is by Walt Disney if you can dream it. You can do it. Second One by Pablo Picasso. Only put off until tomorrow what you're willing to die having. Left. Undone. Ouch the Robert Nathaniel Group. In this episode, the crew welcome Special Guest Daniel. Olmstead. We cover topics that range from radio shows credit repair, real estate, resume, writing, motivation, and much more wrapped the episode up with quotes from. Walt. Disney and Pablo Picasso. Awesome guys. Thanks again for joining US rotated podcast was produced for self pelvic purposes. Huge. Shout out to our sponsors. This episode is brought to you by the lifestyle brand that is beat L. Three S. S. E. DOT COM. Also sponsored by the motivation files unleashed this motivational mix tape be your fuel for success available on all platforms. Guys don't forget the visit the website Jimmy, leave dot com, follow us on facebook and Instagram at rotated views. If you have any inquiries questions, email us at Info at Jimmy Livas Dot Com on behalf of myself in the rest of the crew we wish you massive success. Stay blessed.

Google Jimmy Liam Daniel Philadelphia Dan Dan Youtube facebook Damon John Robert Nathaniel group Zillow Walt Disney Robert My New Jersey Pablo Picasso Earl Nightingale Philadelphia
GSMC Weird News Podcast Episode 203: Weird Animal Facts

GSMC Weird News Podcast

1:02:47 hr | 1 year ago

GSMC Weird News Podcast Episode 203: Weird Animal Facts

"Is Odd strange or just plain. Bizarre is really Your Cup then. The golden state media concepts accepts weird. News podcast will give you. That can't believe it will listen for yourself. We delivered his strangest news. You'd definitely Oh you won't find on CNN. Or it's the golden state media concepts weird news. podcasts the hello and welcome welcome to the GMC Weird News podcast brought to you by the GMC podcast network on your host calling. And let's just get into some weird stuff so I've talked about a lot of kind of more morbid things and just really kinda strange things in the past few episodes episode so I thought we make it a little lighter in this one. So let's talk about some weird animal facts this time so these are a bunch of weird animal facts that I found that I didn't know except for like one or two that I did know and I thought were really interesting and that you guys should know so. Let's start off with pigeons. Now you see pigeons everywhere you go. They are everywhere. They're just I don't know I think. My husband calls him skyrockets but ah pigeons like a trained pigeon can actually tell the difference between the paintings of Pablo Picasso also and Claude Monet so pigeons or smart. I also read somewhere that they can Do Math kind of like you can teach dogs to do stuff like that where you put out things and then they count. I don't know it's really strange but let's move on so this is an animal that I've seen before or the cutest things ever but actually a lot of people don't know that this animal exists and I'm probably going to butcher the name but Bear with me the Chevro- tame Chevrotain. I think is what it's called. Looks like tiny deer with things. These are some the cutest animals. I've ever seen indefinitely GONNA post a picture on the at GMC underscore weird news twitter and then the GMC the weird news facebook. I'm GONNA posted a picture of him there because you guys need to see this animal. It is the cutest animal I've ever seen in my life like a one hundred percent. So let's move on to something a little different. How about dragonflies so dragonflies when they mate they've got those really long kind of tales but when they mate with other dragonflies they make a heart shape with their tail all definitely post a photo of that too because this is one of the coolest things I've seen? I didn't know they did this. I don't know a lot about dragonflies but I do know that and will there gorgeous first off and you don't want to get one in your hair. I've got one in my hair before and it's terrifying getting any sort of flying creature in your hair because they just fly around and you're panicking and they're panicking and this whole thing but this is I didn't know this about dragonflies and it's just it's really beautiful like in photos that were taken. I understand that they are meeting. But it is one of the coolest things also crocodiles okay. Crocodiles are terrifying. They're probably one of the scariest animals out there. At least to me. I Love Them. Don't get me wrong like I love a good scary animal. But they'll they'll kill you like these. Things are serious and apparently at one point there was a there was a crocodile. KC that could gallop like a horse and that's like scary times a million. I could not imagine a crocodile that was actually Galloping Ping the no no thank you. That's a no for me but also looking into this apparently crocodiles KC like way back when galloped. It wasn't just one. It was multiple but at least there was one on record but they say that older. Crocodiles did Gallup now if you heard me our second to go in true fashion of an animal facts video so I actually have some of my little animals hanging out with me while I'm doing this podcast so I doubt they'll be anymore. Sounds but I'm letting you know all all put a picture up on the edge. EMC underscore weird news. So you can see the adorable babies but anyway. Let's move onto to the next one which is prairie dogs now where I live. There are prairie dogs everywhere. There are literally prairie dogs at like every stops upside like every time on the corner of somewhere where it's a little bit more dirt. You can see the holes and most of the Times you can see the prairie dogs so I didn't know this and it is. He's The cutest thing I've never seen this but apparently prairie dogs say hello by kissing. That is the cutest thing I've ever heard. I mean come on. That is so adorable. Why have I never seen his like for Real I? I've seen so many prairie dogs in my lifetime. I've lived here my entire life and I've seen so many prairie dogs even prairie dogs like really up close close and I've never seen them kiss and I really want to. It's probably because they know each other already. I assume that the prairie dogs we see our products that kind kind of are always together kind of thing so unfortunately I've never seen this but this is the cutest thing I've ever heard. Now this one is kind of more creepy and we'll have to find like a diagram photo to show you guys if this because this is unnerving but also the coolest thing so moray. EELS have a second set of jaws that extend from their throats. Now I I saw a diagram and I'm really gonNA try and find it and post it for you guys But they extend from their throats and then helped push push outwards like the jaw farther. It's really cool. I didn't know that they had that. I didn't know eels had that at all or or anything like that. I've seen eels at aquariums and stuff like that and I didn't know this is a fact that is really cool now. Let's talk about my favorite animal so my favorite animal is a bet or just bats in general. I think they are adorable. There are so many different kinds there just so cool and they really big. I'm talking really big. But this specifically specifically is about fruit that and forbids kind of have some of the cutest little dog faces but anyway fruit bat actually have an exit excellent that sense of sight and smell unlike other bats do so unlike some bats like the vampire bat and other bats they actually have a really really excellent sense of sight and smell which I thought was really cool. Because that's not something you think of when you think you think that they're blind and it's all the echo location and stuff like that but this is not this is not that they actually are great. Have a great site so I thought that was really really cool fact that I found now. I'm surprised I didn't know this before because I love bats and I've done when I was younger I did all sorts of what's it called projects like school projects on bats and stuff like that. I've got bats tattooed on my arm. Because because they're so cute and just everything and I'm really surprised that I'd never heard this fact specifically about that either that or I'm just not looking being in the right places like I really not looking in the right right places. I think something I'd really love to do is go to one of those. They're like bat. Oh what is it called where they take care of all the bats and then they release that conservatory. I'm not sure I'm going to have to think of the name. That's going to bother me for a million years until I figure it out but I really love to go to one of those and see and help oh bout with baths like at least for a little bit. I think that would be one of the coolest things you could do. Like I said Bass come in all shapes and sizes houses and they are all cute. I know some people are not a fan of their little squished up noses sometimes and sometimes their faces but I think every single single bad is absolutely adorable and he hit huge. Trust me they get huge. They can be very very itty bitty small but they can also have like a wingspan. That's like your arms fan. It's ridiculous and I don't I don't know I'll have to find a a picture to of a really like large bat and put it on the at GMC underscore we're news twitter and the GMC Z.. Weird News facebook page. So you guys can see exactly what I'm talking about now before I keep just rambling talking about bats and making this podcast podcast. Let's take a quick break and when I come back we'll talk some more weird animal facts. Hey I'm andy if you don't know me it's probably because I'm not famous but I did start a men's grooming company called Harry's the idea for Harry's came out of a frustrating experience I had had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over designed and out of touch. At Harry's our approach is simple. Here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell album it honest prices for as low as two dollars each we care about quality so much that we do some crazy. Things like buyer world-class German Blade Factory. Obsessing over every detail means we're confident but in an offering one hundred percent quality guarantee millions of guys have already made the switch to Harry's so thank you if you're one of them and if you're not we hope you give us a try with this special offer get Harry Starter. Set with a five blade. Razor Waited Handle Shave Gel and a travel cover offered just three bucks plus free shipping. Just go to Harrys DOT DOT COM and enter five thousand checkout. That's Harrys Dot com code. Five thousand. Enjoy shakeout this show built around the women of from the UFC. To the extreme case fighting we got the fights. Cover the golden state media concepts. Women's emanate podcast. The latest news of upcoming discussions previous maps killing us as we talk to about the biggest names in women's mixed martial arts past present and future when it's the women's the game you know where to listen to the golden state media concepts with Vince. MMA podcasts the welcome back back to the GMC Weird News podcast now before the break we were talking weird animal facts and we are going to continue on that train of weird animal facts tax now. Let's talk a something that I read and I was just like this actually happened. So apparently in one thousand nine hundred twenty four. A Labrador retriever was sentenced to life without parole at eastern state penitentiary for killing. The governor's cat now. Whoever this governor was was a terrible man like absolutely terrible? Who could do that to a dog? Like four real. I understand I understand. Your cat might be the best thing ever but also this is just dumb. I I heard this was like there's no way this really happened but I did some research and this really happened. It's very sad and very weird But speaking of cats I found this fact and I was really kind of surprised I had no idea but I guess kind of make sense so apparently cats don't have sweet taste buds so they can't taste sweet things which I didn't think about but if you think about anything that you give an give a cat as is a treat it's not sweet plus my cats love cheese. Thanks to my old roommate John. Who when they were tiny little babies used to feed them little pieces of his MAC and cheese while he aches he thought it was cute? Another obsessed with cheese. My Little Muffin Kitty. When she she was just a little kitten took an entire slice of pizza off of somebody's plate and ran around the house with it which was ridiculous because she she was so small and this piece of pizza was so big but anyway? Let's move onto birds so I I. I don't know this one's interesting. Birds are actually immune it to the heat of Chili peppers. which is mind boggling to me but also so cool? I wish I was immune to the heat of Chili peppers. I really do but I also wish I was a bird so maybe be a bird. I don't know but apparently they are immune to the heat of Chili peppers. which is awesome? Like I said I wish I was immune because every so where I'm from. The big thing is green. Chili Green Chili is everywhere. You can get green chilly at McDonald's or Burger King or you know that kind of stuff you can get Green Chili. Every and I like green chilly. Don't get me wrong. I'm just is not good with spicy foods. I just want foods that are like if it's spicy to be flavorful spicy and not burning my mouth south off into liquid magma spicy like I don't know that's just that's just what I want a good tasty spice. I don't WANNA I can't breathe it so hot spice. Yeah not about that. But let's move on to puff huffins. Now this was just like effect. I found that I actually just like super cute. It's not so much like a well. I guess it is a fact. I didn't know this. But baby puff ins are called puff links. How cute? I am going to forever. Every time I see a baby puffing I'm going to be like that's a buff. Lean how cute. I don't know this is going to be the cutest podcast ever because polling. I mean so so cute now. Speaking of names for things. Let's talk about a group group of ferrets. A group of ferrets is called a business. That's so cute. I used to have a ferret. Unfortunately really he passed away early. Twenty nineteen He was very old so he passed from old age. And that's fine. He was sweet but if I had a group group of them I would have been like. This is my business. This is my business. Look it might be. I mean I don't know I love it when there are names for things like a a group of crows is a murderer like it's so cute. It's like Oh look it's a murder I oh I don't know maybe I'm just weird like that and I like things like that. I'm not sure now. Let's move onto another animal that I absolutely love love. This is about sharks now. I love every type of shark just if I had money to just throw into to charity. Foundations part of that into one charity would be for sharks because they are being thinned and it is really bad it all for shark fin soup. And there's A. There's a wonderful netflix documentary about it. I'll have to find the name name and put it on the at GMC underscore weird news twitter and GMC Weird News facebook page. Because it's really good and it really early shows the dark side of finning. But let's move onto this fact so The annual number of worldwide Shark Bites is ten in times less than the number of people bitten by other people in New York City. This is insane. That's a that's that's ill. I mean I know that the actual number of shark bites on humans like annually around the world is actually not as large as everybody thinks it is. I know that people are terrified of sharks because they think they're going to get eaten or bitten Or something along those lines. But you're actually really not likely to be bitten by a shark. Work is your chances of actually going out and being bitten by a shark are very low actually a lot lower than most people think so. I don't know I think that's why people are not fans of sharks because they think they're gonNA die. You know movies jaws all that kind of stuff. Yeah Yeah I don't know I love them and I think really we should take the time to appreciate every animal on this planet. I love aquatic animals a lot because they're so strange in different and not like animals on land and they're amazing. I really think you should take the time. If you're not a fan. Sharks works to do some research into sharks watch them. I don't know documentaries about sharks. Really Kinda get to know them. I don't know I love shorts. I I actually have a dream of swimming with will sharks and also with hammerhead sharks hammerhead. Sharks Migrate Shark but but there are so many different species of shark that are really crazy and cool are also a lot of species of shark like the whale shark. That aren't going to eat you or bite you. I mean you can be sucked into will shark's mouth because they are huge. But the possibility ability of that is like miniscule. It's the smallest little possibility that you would die via a whale shark I don't know people swim with sharks at the time. And they're not your typical shark for more like a whale than a shark. I guess if that makes sense but also like I said there's so many different species of sharks stuff that were not. We don't appreciate because we don't talk about and really don't appreciate sharks as much as we should as much as we should because they are really you know they're vital to our environment just like almost every animal. I'm not a big fan of bugs. They are vital to our environment and so I leave them be Except for I can't stand those but you know they're all oh every animal every living being is vital to our planet and we should really take the time to respect every single one of if them no matter if you think they're gross or creepy or whatever that's my psa let's let's take a quick break and when we come back. I'm going to stop preaching about sharks and talk about some more weird animal facts. This is your ultimate stopper. Everything sports golden state media concepts sports podcast. Should I say more from from the NFL MLB the NBA MMA. It's all in here. Golden state media concepts sports podcast. Listen Listen Welcome back to the GMC MM sea weird news podcast now before the break we were talking weird animal fax and I also did a little shark conversation with you guys is now. Let's move on to some more weird animal facts in stray away from the sharks. So let's talk about another aquatic creature. The the colossal squid. Now like I had said earlier on in this podcast. I love aquatic animals and just creatures. Because they're so strange so different. Now I WANNA talk the colossal squid now obviously by the name colossal squid. They are huge coach. But you don't really think about how big they can get. But apparently the colossal squid can grow to the size of a bus. That's insane that a huge squid. That's like I don't know like a whale size squid almost this insane mm-hmm. Let's move on to our canine companions. I have said earlier in this podcast that I had some animal friends friends with me while I am recording this today which I thought would be appropriate for this weird facts of animals. PODCAST and I've got two little dog os or not so little dog. OES that are sleeping with me today. Well I do this and there goes and let's talk dog goes so Dogs actually have fewer taste buds than humans. Now I kind of knew you this only for the fact that I knew that they don't really have the same taste in the fact that like they eat garbage and gross stuff and and this is also due to the fact that they just go for things that have a strong smell now. Animals are just gonNa eat something that has a strong smell so they're always interested in your food food because usually it's got pretty strong smell because it's been cooked and also because you're eating it but they're really kind of in for the strong smells. I guess that works with the fewer tastebuds thing as. They're not so much tasting everything that they're eating they're just going for stuff. That smells really strong. That they think is is going to be good. so that's why they eat trash and nasty things now we talked about crocodiles etc earlier in this podcast. But let's talk about alligators alligator. Don't actually hit their full size. So they continue growing until they're around thirty three now the now most of them apparently hit their full-size around thirty. Three that's been recorded but they do. Just keep growing and don't stop for a very long time. They're not like humans where we kind of stopped growing around our teenage years. No they stopped growing around the thirties. Which is insane thirty years of just constant instant growing? I don't know I've seen I've seen alligators before. They're huge huge and insane. I remember a few years back with my sister. In South Carolina got a lot of family from South Carolina. And we were coming back from somewhere At night with my cousins and while we were driving we look out an across. The road. Is this huge alligator to sit in there with his mouth open. It was the craziest thing I've ever seen and I've seen a bunch of alligators but that was probably the biggest alligator I've ever seen. I doubt thirty three but man he was hugh h now. We also talked about how a group of ferrets is. It's called a business which is so fantastic. Now I've got a few more groups of animals and what they're called so a group of Rhinos. Snow's is called a crash so if you're at the the zoo or something and you see a group of rhinos you could be like man. That's a serious crash I I know okay. Sorry that was a really bad show. But let's move over so a group of owls is called a Parliament Harlem it I think that so like I don't know fitting because they're so royal the way that they hold themselves he see a group of ours. You like man. That's a serious serious parliament. If you had a group of owls and a group of ferrets you'd be like look at that business but there's parliament. Okay I got to stop with these jokes. I'm I apologize for us now. We talked to cows. And I want to bring you back to cow's so oh cows apparently have best friends. I think this is adorable. So cows apparently have best friends. So I mean I guess it makes sense always hanging out with each other and you know sometimes you see like two cows that are kind of hanging out with each other. It's either like Mama and the baby or I guess it's best friends that's really cool. Aw I don't know best friends are cool now. Let's talk to rafts now. There's something that goes around. All the time about drafts on the Internet. They're like what sound does a giraffe make now. Some people will speculate that drafts make this like screaming. Sound or deep guttural. Sound or something like that well. Nobody's ever captured the sound of a draft. And and this is why it's because drafts don't have vocal cords dress own vocal gourds. That's just it so they don't make sound sound. They don't make a sound. So that's why drafts have never been caught on camera or audio or anything like that making sound. Because they don't they just don't make sound that's the thing also with drafts drafts. With darker spots are actually more dominant than the drafts with the lighter spots so the more dominant draft is always the one with the letter spots. That's just the darker spots. Excuse me that's just how it goes. I thought this was really interesting because I never thought about you. Know the more dominant draft. That's not really the GIRAFFE. You're thinking you're just thinking about giraffe but I never thought about the most dominant draft having those darker spots in that. That's what I thought was pretty cool. Also they don't make a sound terrestrial because I don't know it's it's something about though that always cracked me up and I remember having this conversation with a friend of mine and we're like talking about what sound is derived a draft Graf make and we were going through the Internet and just researching trying to figure out what sounded draft makes and nobody knew and we couldn't find anything about it and then while I was doing research for this I found. Oh wait never mind drafts. Just don't make sound. They just don't so. I thought that that was really cool. I don't know it's weird on. Let's move along from giraffes real quick and talk about horned lizards now. Horned lizards are everywhere. We used to get a lot of Horny. Toads there definitely really endangered now into you see already towed. Don't pick it up. Don't bring it home. They're super endangered I used to find him all the a time when I was a kid. But let's talk just horned lizards now horned lizards. Apparently squirt blood from there is. This is so cool I mean come on. I think it's a defense mechanism is what it is and they squirt blood from there is is the defense from predators. Or what have you I think that's really cool. I I don't know I'm weird and I really like the weirder aspect of things and I saw this and I was like oh I gotta put this in the in the podcast. Because it's so so weird. It's just so weird. They just like scored blood out. There is like nasty little creature. I don't know I looked horned lizards I love Lizard. I just love the animals like honestly animals are the greatest thing in the world. I think that's what it really comes down to. Is I just love. Animals can't help it. They're all great even bugs. I hate bugs. I'm not a big fan of a lot of bugs. But they are really cool. Creature is I don't know we should all just love the animals that that's what we should do. We should all just love the animals now. Let's take a quick break and when I come back we'll talk some more weird animal facts. Shakeout this show built around the women from the INVICTA the seat Belt Tour Championship. We got the fights cover. It's the golden state media concepts women's MMA podcast the latest news incoming flights discussions previous matches. Join us as we talked to in about the biggest names in women's mixed martial arts past past present and future when it's the women's fight game you know to listen to the golden state media. Concept's women's emanate podcast DOC welcome back to the GMC Weird News podcast now before the break we were talking about weird animal facts now. Let's continue on that train and head on over over to some hygiene affects so apparently it's hard to differentiate male and female hyenas and the reason for this is because because Female Hyenas Female Hyenas. I feel like I said that weird a female hyenas actually have genitalia. That's very leave very similar to the genitalia of the male Hyena. I thought this was really interesting because once again. This isn't something you think about. And they're so close to kind of like dogs in a way that you'd think that they're more you know the same. They're almost the same but they're obviously not now. Let's talk about let's tick bill. Let's talk about good. Lord where am I today. Let's talk about some ancient ancestors stors so agent ancestors of Wales used to walk on land. That's insane so they. They used to walk on land and actually had hose and webbed hind legs. That's insane and they were. The size is like a wolf or a Fox like kind of around that size so they were very small. They had hooves and webbed hind legs. And now they're huge and purely aquatic. I mean they do breathe air but mainly aquatic like. That's insane they can't walk on land now and if they did that would be terrifying because they are huge. Not a small edible. Let Me Anibal animal. Let let me tell you so. Let's keep it on with the aquatic animals here and let's go deep deep deep down in to our oceans and talk about the humpback anglerfish. Now I knew about anglerfish but I guess I didn't know anything the thing about Humpback anglerfish but apparently they reproduce by having the male bite onto the female and that fertilizes their eggs. That's kind of cool is just a I. I guess there's just a love bite a love bite to help out your baby's okay okay. Let's move on to Koalas now. Koalas have fingerprints that are extremely stream really extremely similar to humans. I mean to the point where it's almost impossible possible to tell the difference which this actually is an issue because there have been crime scenes where there have been Koala fingerprints and human finger fingerprints and they basically is so hard to differentiate that this causes a good problem. I didn't know this was a thing at all. And it's like the last animal that you would think would be similar in free fingerprints to humans but I guess they are and they need to stay away from crime scenes. 'cause they're messing some stuff up now thinking of speaking of of crimes. Let's talk about the assassin bug. They also look like giant ants. And I've heard them called the assassin ants but took their found in east Africa in Malaysia. And they carry the bodies of dead ants on their body to camouflage flush themselves okay. That's disgusting. I'm not a fan okay. First off I'm not a fan of and I don't know if I've talked about this before on the podcast but when I was younger I had a dream that I was covered in ants and was screaming and I ran down the stairs and I was just brushing off and screaming I woke up downstairs covered in amps. No joke so I guess it wasn't a dream and it was. Oh my gosh yeah. I can't do ants. I hate them. I hate them so much. Watch even just the thought of a makes me WANNA kinda vomit in my mouth. But that's this assassin bug. Tom Or aunt kills the and wears them on his body. I guess I did the same thing but they weren't dead. Okay let's move away from ant and talk talk about the Eagle the. US's most prized animal. So the Eagle the strike of an eagle can be two times stronger than a rifle shot. This is insane. That is a huge amount of force that is a huge amount of force that an eagle kin produce in in a strike. This is not. This is a lot of things when it comes to animals. Animals are cute but animals are dangerous and eagles are majestic nick amazing but they are very very dangerous and this is why this is exactly why because their strike can be two times stronger than a rifle shot. How crazy is that? Let's talk about our feline friends now. Maybe everyone that you heard in the beginning of this podcast. But let's talk about cats so I think I've talked. What about this before? When I was talking about the fact that cats meow they will they say that cats only meow at humans like they me out humans to kind of mimic the sound of humans? But I talked about that they can make so many sounds and now I saw this fact and I did a little bit more digging because the fact is that cats can actually bark. Now I I was kind of doing some digging because I said that they made a lot of sounds but it didn't know how many sounds cat actually can make. And so while I was digging I found the number will. It's not an exact number because apparently cats can make more than a hundred sounds more than hundred sounds that's in sane and I kind of notice it having cats. I have three little babies one that you might have heard earlier since she came up to the microphone and just went marrow. Yeah she's nuts but casts can make more than one hundred sounds and I. I can see that because I've heard my cats make so many different sounds the meow they growl. I don't think I've ever heard bark bark. But they his and I've heard them CHIRP A lot. They can't make this chirping noise and also two of my cats have really really loud allowed meows and one of them is probably the cutest cat ever but she has the grossest sounding meow now it is not like most other cats that you hear is like Mao Kinda like that. Yeah that's a weird sound. And she makes that sound and I can understand how they can make so many sounds. Because I've heard so many sounds come out of cats. I've heard so many different sounds come out of cats. Let's and I doubt I've heard hundred different. Sounds but I guess they can make more than one hundred different. Sounds which is insane and I guess. It's just their vocal chords when I was looking at. It seemed like it was their vocal chords. They could make so many different. Sounds and there are different than other animals roles and human vocal cords. So I thought that was pretty interesting because Jeez like that's not something you wouldn't think that they make over one hundred. Sounds like maybe they make like twenty sound. No they make over a hundred pounds for some reason. I thought the number was like thirty five. Save but boy was high wrong. Now let's take a quick break and when we come back we'll talk some more weird animal facts. Are you tired of the same news or are you sick of the seemingly endless political spin and negatively the Diaz. MCI With the Americas still beautiful. podcast is a weekly news. podcast covering all the top positive and uplifting news stories. We cover stories. That will inspire uplift and remind Donnie. Love the good in the world tune into the golden state media concepts America's still beautiful podcast to get all the great and positive news stories of today. Download the GS empty. America's dill beautiful podcast on. ITUNES stitcher soundcloud Google. Play or any podcast just tight GS MC in the a search bar they come back to the GMC weird news podcast now before the break we were talking about weird and more excuse me apparently was about to die weird animal facts now. We talked about cats right at the end. Now let's bring it back around kind of cats so apparently cats an horses are highly susceptible to black widow venom whereas dogs are relatively resistant and sheep. Sheep and rabbits are completely immune. That's crazy. I remember somebody had told me that. Dogs were actually highly susceptible the ball to venom to black widow venom but apparently that is false and cats are more susceptible to black widow venom than dogs are. Dogs are relatively resistant. Obviously not one hundred percent resistance will always be careful With black widows around your house animals because you don't know what they can can withstand but apparently if you have rabbits or sheep they are immune and that's crazy. I actually didn't think about any animal that would be purely immune to their venom. But I guess rabbits and cats are or excuse me rabbits and sheep bar and cats are not in either or horses. uh-huh interesting now. Let's talk about squirrels. This is just a little fact and I found it kind of filariases and just just a little strange so apparently squirrels can't burp or vomit. I guess that makes sense. 'cause they just shove things in their mouth else and then they just can't vomit. I don't know I just thought that was kind of weird. Let's move to our goals. Now I found a lot of weird facts acts about als but I found this one to be the strangest now apparently. All's don't have eyeballs. They have I to who the kind of like along gated and they're held in place by excuse me I'm going to butcher this word but scholar Sclerotic Sclerotic rings or just bony structures in the skull. So we'll just say bony structures pictures in the skull and because of this hour also can't really move or roll their eyeballs. which kind kind of makes sense why? They're neck has so much mobility so their neck has so much mobility to be able to move their eyeballs without out moving their eyeballs because they don't have eyeballs they have it tubes. How weird is that? I mean come on a weird weird weird okay. I need to stop saying weird but like tube eyeballs which is is really interesting mind you but also very strange range now. Let's move on to something that is old. Let's talk about extinct Colossus Penguins now. Apparently extinct colossus penguins stood as tall as Lebron James so I was like okay. They stood his toes. Lebron James we'll how tall is Lebron. James He is six foot nine inches so these penguins stood. You'd six feet nine inches. How crazy could you imagine? Seeing Penguin that huge I've seen penguins in in. You know zoos. That's the word. I'm looking for zoos. I've seen them in zoos. And actually we recently. We got a penguin exhibit that they've been working on for a few years at our local zoo which is really cool. I haven't gone to see them yet right but I've seen them in other zoos like larger zoos but they're not told they're not that big. I mean they're bigger than you kind of think they are. But they're not that large George and could you imagine if causes penguins were not extinct. They would be huge. I am five foot tall tall. I'm a very short lady and me standing next to a six foot. Nine inch penguin would be ridiculous now. Let's move along to another another group naming now feel they could make an entire podcast about the group names of animals. And I'M GONNA make a bad joke. I'm letting you know now I'm GonNa make another bad joke about this. So let's talk about a group of parrots now. A group of parents is known as a pandemonium. The End Modiim could you could you. Could you bet you walk into a group of Penghu. Excuse me parrots and you're like who this is a pandemonium Rhodium okay. That was my bad joke. I'm so sorry or moving. I can't help but make a bad joke about groups oops of animals because it's so funny at least to me. It's so funny to you guys. You're probably like Oh man. She needs to stop. This is so bad but I think it's hilarious and I really hope there are people out there who think this is hilarious. A let's talk about reindeer now. I love reindeer. I think they are adorable creatures and pretty much all the ornaments for my Christmas tree. I realized that this year While I was putting up a Christmas decorations I guess it was just last Christmas. We'll just say last Christmas but I realized what it was putting up Christmas decorations on my tree that every single one of my ornaments were ranked here except for like maybe two but anyway. Let's get into rain this reindeer perfect so reindeers eyeballs turn blue in the winter and this is to help them see in lower light. Now I think this is so cool. I've seen a lot of photographs of reindeer in the winter and they have some really beautiful blue eyes all put a picture on the at GMC underscore weird news twitter and the GMC Weird News. Facebook page you guys can see what I'm talking about but I honestly just thought that their eyeballs all year round were blue because the the majority of the photos you see of reindeer are in the wintertime And I just thought that's what they were but I guess they're not always blue but they're blue who in winter to help them see lower light so this is really cool. This is a fact that I found extremely interesting now. Let's move on onto an animal that I've actually seen pretty often which are buffalo. Now I have not seen African buffalo often. I've seen buffalo often because there's there's an area by where I reside that has a bunch of buffalo that Rome in this giant area. And it's it's really fun to to see but let's talk about. African buffalo now. Apparently hurts African. Buffalo herds display voting behavior in which the the individuals register their travel preferences by standing up looking in one direction I guess the direction they would like to go and then laying laying down. I thought this was really cool. But also apparently only the female African buffaloes can vote wrote A. Let me rephrase that only the adult female African Buffalo can vote. We should've taken him mm-hmm the advice of the African African buffalo herds along time ago but anyway other than that. I thought this was so cool. I really didn't know I don't. I don't know much about Buffalo. I see them often but I don't know much about them. So this fact was really kind of mind blowing to me. Because I had no idea that they displayed voting behavior at all. This is one of the coolest things. I don't think that any animal really kind of displays any sort of voting behavior. I don't know this is one of the coolest Louis Packs that I found it very weird and definitely not something. I knew now I really want a lot of these facts to for. Are you take from this. podcast these facts and take them to your friends or if you're trying to start a conversation these are really good conversation. Starters orders all around all of these are really good conversation starters. Now let's take a quick break and when we come back we'll talk some more weird animal facts the GS live in happiness. podcast takes you on a journey of exploration exploration. We'll discuss try to methods alongside the latest trends of how to live your life to its fullest and happiest from psychology to meditation. Science is to sell books the Genus Mc live in happiness podcast. We'll help you to discover what makes you happy and how you can live live being the best possible download the GSM SNC life and happiness. podcast on Itunes stitcher down cloud. Who Play or anywhere you find podcasts just tie? GMC in the search bar art the hello and welcome back to the GMC. We're news podcast now before the break. We're talking some weird animal facts and and now I wanNA talk a few more weird animal facts but I also WanNa talk about a few weird human facts. I thought that would be fun to throw in here. Now I'm GonNa talk to more ant related facts. I hate ants. We just talked about this. Blessed move on and get through this so a super colony of invasive Argentine gene ants known as the California large covers about five hundred sixty miles of the US the US is west the coast it is. It is currently engaged in a turf war with a nearby super colony in Mexico. I thought this was really strange. Range to suber colonies that are in a turf war with each other. Yeah not about ants the creep me out. Let's talk another one so actually this is not so much an aunt fact. Fact as it is a a wall SP- fact so the recently discovered a bone house appropriately named bone house. Wasp stuffs stuffs the walls of its nest with the bodies of dead aunt. So yeah kind of like the assassin bug that we talked about about earlier now. I guess they're very very appropriately named bone house wasp. Let but let's let's move on. Let's move away from ants for a little bit and move back to my favorite animal. The bet so apparently by eating pests and insects bats save the US the US agriculture in a at agriculture industry well was that a tongue twister. Was that just me. I I think it was just me but that save the. US agriculture industry an estimated. Three billion dollars per year when when they're because they're eating pests and insects which is another great reason to absolutely love that now. Let's talk about about frogs. So fourteen new species of dancing frogs were discovered in twenty fourteen. Which is actually relatively recently raising the global number of known dancing frog species to twenty four? Now when I heard this fact all I could think about was that dancing cartoon frog His name is actually Michigan J frog and and he would sing in Vaudeville style. Like hello my baby. Hello Darling Hello Murray Gal like that. That's all I can think of when I think about these dancing frogs kind of cracks me up now. Let's Talk About Sea Lions Ado legacy line but see line is actually the first I non human mammal with a proven ability to keep a beat. That's so cool. So they're kind of like these dancing frogs I guess the first and Non Human Mammal with proven ability to keep a beat. I think that's pretty cool. I think Michigan J frog would appreciate that. Now let's move on from our animal facts to some human facts so let's talk about the human body now. The human body contains enough fat to make seven bars of soap. That's a lot of soap soap that we can make with our fat also between between birth and death. The human body goes from Having three hundred bones to just two hundred and six bones. I didn't think I just don't think about losing bones or degenerating bones but that's the thing also astronauts it can grow up to two inches taller in space. That's really cool. I guess when you're in space you can grow two inches taller. Maybe if I went to space I wouldn't wouldn't be five foot. I'd be five to maybe now while listening to music your heartbeat actually syncs up with the rhythm. That's so crazy to me. I mean I guess if I'm listening to some serious death metal my heart I'll do do do do do I guess i. I don't know though. But that's crazy that's crazy fact Kinda something to think about like if you're listening to music maybe like put your hand on your heart and see we're your heartbeats at but that's kind of cool. Okay let's talk about kidneys so you're left. Kidney is actually higher up in your body than your right kidney. I never thought about it that I really thought that they were like symmetrical in a way. Now in extreme cases of starvation the brain will actually begin to eat itself. So make sure you're eating well make sure you're eating some good food like for real eat. Don't stop yourself eat now. Let's let's move on again. There are more than a hundred thousand miles of blood vessels in your body. I saw this cool picture of it and I'll see if I can find it input on that at GMC underscore weird news twitter and the GMC Weird News facebook page now. I'm going to kind kind of go quickly through a few of these just to get them all out there so your ears and nose never stop growing. I don't believe days I don't believe this at all. It's probably true but I don't WanNa believe this because I don't want my nose to get any bigger than our kids or my ears news for that matter. Humans shed about six hundred thousand particles of skin every hour now. I was kind of curious about this because I was wondering if maybe if you had drier skin if you actually shed more particles of skin every hour maybe maybe not. I don't know but also you carry an average of four pounds of bacteria in your body like constantly which is fine. There's not all bacteria is bad bacteria. We gotta remember that. It's not all bad also. Humans can't digest grass. So I know that there are health nuts in fanatics who claim that wheat grass actually AIDS AIDS in digestion. But it doesn't you would actually need several stomachs to to digest grass just like cows have. Ah I believe three stomachs and that's how they can digest grass. I think about one more human weird fact for you. So the scientific name for stomach growl so there is a scientific name for. Are The little growl sound. Your stomach makes you hungry or just when you're not I don't know whenever your stomach growls this is is the scientific name for it and I'm going to butcher this and probably saved a few times but I will spell it for you. Bore Borey Demus Borey Ori. Gama's Bob Organise Bob Organised. I don't know it's a funny word in general but it is spelled B. O. R. B. O. R. ARE Y G M. US If any of you guys can pronounce it like let me know on the axiom. See underscore weird news twitter order or the GMC news facebook page. Because I'm always on those and I really want to know how you pronounce this word. Because it's such a silly word in general but also stomach growls kind of silly anyway usually when my stomach growls. I'm like Oh we got a feed the beast because Yeah I. I don't know I like to eat too. Don't starve yourself because your brain leave itself just want to put that in there and seriously guys. I WanNa thank you guys so so so so so so much for tuning in and listening to me every I dunno twice a week every twice a week just nonsense in weird facts and I seriously seriously you see one. Thank you guys for dealing with my really bad jokes today and all these weird facts are really fun to bring to to a party or if you're trying to get to know someone this is the fun way to kind of you know. Just start a conversation. These are great conversation. Starters in I'm great things to just talk about with people you know in great facts to throw around and once again guys. I really would like you guys to communicate with with me I'm always on the at. GMC underscore weird news twitter and the GMC Weird News facebook page so communicate with me. Reach out to me. Let me know some weird animal animal or human facts that you know that I didn't talk about in this or if you learned anything from this let me know like for real hit me up also once again again seriously guys thank you thank you thank you so much for listening to the GMC Weird News podcast brought to you by the GMC. PODCAST CAST network. I'm your host colleen and I will talk to you in the next one. You've been listening to the golden state media concepts we're news podcast. Part of the Golden State media concepts podcast network you can find this show and others like it at www dot ah Jesus MC podcast dot com download our podcast on itunes stitcher sound clock and Google play and just type in Jesus Mc Z.. To find all the shows from the golden state media concepts podcast networks from movies to music throw sports entertainment and Stephen. We are news. You can also follow us on twitter and on facebook. Thank you and we hope you have enjoyed today's program.

GMC twitter EELS America CNN Google Facebook Harry Starter Pablo Picasso Michigan Bear Gallup EMC moray UFC netflix
7 Minutes On Why ClubHouse is Worth Your Time

The GaryVee Audio Experience

07:08 min | 2 months ago

7 Minutes On Why ClubHouse is Worth Your Time

"This is gary v audio experience. Clubhouses wildly wildly underrated. Because most people don't know about the app yet. And the voice for madame very fond of clubhouse. The app replicates real life. What if like twenty people got together eight people seven people got together at a dinner table and just shot the shit and everybody got to listen to it. It makes sense why it's working. I loved the audio platform. They think a year from today a lot lot lot more people will be on it. Have you jumped into clubhouse yet. Yeah i have you know. I'm still trying to figure clubhouse out this. Are you mainly listening at this point or have you contribute. I'm totally listing frank. You have so much to say pushing the friend. Go contribute to one room. You need to taste all sides of it to really figure it out right figuring it out figuring oysters by looking at it or talking about it. The real way to figure out is by slurping it you need to jump in and taste it. I'm gonna wind because your sector hosting some of those rooms for black rock will end up becoming something real in the next eighteen months. I'm gonna circle back to the. I'm jumping this weekend and and i'll tell you how it goes honestly of the w i'm going to hold you to that say is the algorithm here added senior year Know what your opinion was on smokehouse. Some obsessed i think. It's a remarkable. And i'm devastated that i'm so so busy like one. Funny thing about me jesse is. I'm such a prolific content producer. But it's because. I built a strategy seven years ago. Builth out a team. That allowed me to do it brother. I am literally in meetings twelve hours a day. So i don't have the time or capacity to do what i did in two thousand seven to eleven which was live on twitter. But i'm telling you right now. I would spend every minute. I on clubhouse right now building community yes i see it exactly that way for the people that have something to say and are gonna communicating voice pointer correct distribution platform this platform to actually engage. And right this second. I'm challenged for time. I was aware of it in march. I did a couple of things. I enjoyed it but i was just too deep fixing my company because we were going through kobe. I had a lot of responsibilities and family stuff. I just couldn't get there but to your point. We were seeing as me. Not being able to live my thesis because the land grab of attention here is extraordinary. I'm all about. I just have to put in the reps and me finding the time right. I was extremely challenging. But you should be living here as much as you possibly can. And so should all two thousand people that are just to expand on this because so many people are asking me about clubhouse to me you go and you build community just kind of like you went anywhere you go in there. You join rooms. Raise your hand. Your two cents. People start falling. You can start your own room. You create a conversation that you wanna talk about. It's just a really incredible platform around voice passive listening. The reason people are enjoying it so much recently like podcasts. They can listen while they're cooking can listen while they're working out. Humans like lack of friction. The same reason you love amazon prime and the reason you love were eats convenience convenience convenience convenience audio consumption is a convenience of learning for so many you can multitask clubhouse and things like it matter. Clubhouse people are like well. it's not recorded. This people have had conversations at dinner tables in hallways of conference rooms around a campfire. Thirty person micro events within macro events aka those. Cas dinners dinners at south by south west and that's just the business world right. There's a million versions of that. At the grammys and the super bowl and had macro conversations of the industry or this that and the other thing. There's classrooms that are having conversation. This is real life like these social platforms that really do well crete scale around real life right like twitter is a town square and you know a lot of people in your town. Don't think the same way as you do. We're talking about different things. Like c diff clubhouse is replicating dinner tables at scale and a lot of dinner tables have fortified people that dominate the conversation. The other twenty-five listen. I've been in many dinner tables in the wine and social media and marketing worlds. Where i was a young buck and i would listen to the four. Oh jeez or the accomplished most of the dinner. Maybe add a sentence or two. I've been the g. at the table. This is replication my friends and things that replicate well reality win. That's why clubhouse has such spark you'd mentioned clubhouse so i'm curious as a as a visual creator what should i what should i put my energy into to stand out on clubhouse and grow it and you're i actually think he was very good audio communicator. I've caught like for podcasts. You've been on so you know you're not going to be able to visualize there so you're gonna talk about it so it's no different than an incredible. You know back in the daily pablo picasso when he gave a fuck in interview. You need to articulate. What's in his brain. So it's an audio place. It's no different than sitting with a bunch of friends over dinner. You build a little community here right and like a little meet up and twelve. Whom came over cuba. Shit like you know. i think. I think it's a. It's a audio communication platform. But by the way you could be doing this right now we'd lose the value of the video part but i'd talking and we'd be having the audio aspect of it so i think it's a police the share. I think it's a great place to learn. You know like. I really think that it's a place to go into different rooms and just expand your thoughts. A lot in there I think you need to know when to shut up and you know went to talk. I think one thing you got to spend a lot of time with cancer you knew. I talked a lot. But i always put into rooms stages meetings where what we were talking about was what we were talking about was things i knew things. I understood on the flip side The reality is that i would think quiet. If i didn't know was talking about. I think talking when you know and not being scared to say something and staying quiet are the real keys the clubhouse episodes over please leave a review and subscribe on apple. It would be a lot to me. Thank you very much. Hey podcast joe. From team gary here. Today's highlighted review as you are mazing t go h three ever. Since i found out who you are. I have always consumed your content. I love the valley. You bring to this world. I actually got to see you on. Stage was super awesome. Keep those views coming. We could highlight yours next.

Builth twitter jesse frank kobe south west amazon super bowl pablo picasso cuba cancer apple gary joe