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28 Burst results for "PROZAC"

CBs Baker, Dunbar wanted on robbery charges

Gallant at Night

00:42 sec | Last month

CBs Baker, Dunbar wanted on robbery charges

"Prozac arrest warrants have been issued for two NFL cornerbacks the giants de Andre Baker in the Seahawks Quinton Dunbar both are facing four counts of armed robbery and Baker is facing for additional charges of aggravated assault with a firearm Baker in Dunbar right a cookout Wednesday Miramar Florida an argument broke out at which point Baker is accused of brandishing a semi automatic firearm he then allegedly told three aw there's one of them done bar to start robbing the guest Baker and Dunbar accused of taking thousands of dollars in cash and other valuables the giants the statement say they are aware of the situation will have no further comment at this

NFL Quinton Dunbar Assault Miramar Florida Andre Baker Seahawks
"prozac" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

The Dr. Susan Block Show

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"prozac" Discussed on The Dr. Susan Block Show

"Believed her and I also now believe in Charlie and I always believe in sunshine Sunshine Sunshine. And you know all you people in Noblesville who are taking pictures and And people who are listening. Who are watching you all. Give me sexual energy. You give me that energy so I don't need to take PROZAC and so I don't kill my husband with all my needs because I have this exhibition stick orgiastic voyeuristic need that fulfilled by Lupercalia. And by all the other events that we have in Noblesville. It's a beautiful thing and it doesn't necessarily have to involve fucking although fucking is great but you know it can. It doesn't have to outer course can be just as sexy as intercourse as our cousins. Show us because they spend very little time on intercourse. They spend lots of time on stuff like we've been doing. You know playing it touching at massage logical like sexual plates fun you. I've actually had an orgasm with a man looking at me from across the kitchen. Like a man that I lo. Yeah he had. I came as he was looking at me from across the kitchen so awesome like why am I mean it might not sound as awesome but phone? Sex is a great thing and you do Webcam coming. You know I mean it might not be the real sane. But you can't always have the real thing you know. You can't always get what you want is sometimes you can get what you need and you get an orgasm and you could make contact with human being through. Our technology is about the energy the energy that's sometimes can come through the phone or the Webcam or even sexting although that's a little weird. I don't know it's not weird I I'm just to depend on the energy. The sexting yeah deciding whether you want to live in a world where you wanna live in a peaceful world in your own world and how you bring peace to others because right now what we have in. Washington is a bunch of.

Noblesville Charlie PROZAC Washington
Troubled Water: What's Wrong with What We Drink

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

07:54 min | 5 months ago

Troubled Water: What's Wrong with What We Drink

"Be Wary of water. Joining joining us now is set to seek all. He has authored activist. Member of the Council of Foreign Relations guest curators interactive brokers studios. He is the author of a new book. DOC troubled water. What's wrong with what we drink? I want to talk to you about the book at about the sort of larger concept here and and you said right before we went on air. I'm not here to scare anybody at yet what I was reading through your materials. It's a little bit unnerving to think that a lot of the water that people drink it's not just flint Michigan it's contaminated that's correct almost everywhere in America there are contaminants in our drinking water and this is probably the largest unspoken of public health threat or menace in the United States. There's a large number of different chemicals that get into our systems through our drinking water that are having unknown effects on our bodies on our endocrine systems as technical phrase that affects growth attention spans sexual interest for Tilleke as well as the possibility of cancer. Some of those things are already proven scientifically and some are now in the process of being investigated but I would argue that being investigated aggressively enough by the EPA an organization that whether it's a democratic or Republican president or Congress is unfortunately inactive who've were not active enough in pursuing what we need to have pursued to get the best health profile for all Americans all right so we don't have the best water what needs to change within the US to improve the quality of our water. Well first of all there aren't nearly there. Were about one hundred thousand chemicals that are in commerce in the United States. Maybe more and you would think that seventy eighty percent of them ninety percent of them would be under some type of investigational regulation by the EPA because some significant percentage of them get into our drinking water and some percentage of those have have a act on our health but of that hundred thousand chemicals that are in commerce. The United States. It sounds hard to believe this. But it's true. Only seventy seven zero are being regulated by the EPA for drinking water purposes and is shocking as that low number is even more shocking given how much chemicals used daily life in America even more shocking is the fact that the last S. time the EPA regulated any chemical whatsoever or any contaminant whatsoever was twenty three years ago they have been inactive for generation and longer and that is putting our health at risk. Is there any map of where we can and can't drink water. We'll tell me where you live and I'll let you know. Okay I'll give you my address after this Seriously I mean it's anyone tracking or tried to do this scientifically we'll actually. There's an organization called the environmental working group. We're on their website. You Can Punch in your zip code and and they can tell you under the federally filed documents but each utility what contaminants have been found in that ZIP codes water whether or not that's particular to your. We're particular TAP LISA. I can't say for sure but invite me over for lunch and I'll bring my test okay. Great all right so water filtration plants. I I thought that was the answer you would think so the problem the problem Paul is both on the wastewater side and on the water filtration. which the way they distribute the water order to our homes from on both sides using technologies that are about one hundred or more years old and although in the interim place have been rebuilt and they're pretty nice parking lots some beautiful reception areas? The truth is that the technology is being used never grew up along with the time that America became. We'll highly medical society where now one one of where seventy percent of all Americans twelve and overtake at least one pharmaceutical product today to people to people about twenty percent of Americans twelve and overtake take five or more prescription pills day and that all gets into our water stream on the inbound side. We still do. We did one hundred. Plus years ago to get rid of cholera and dysentery and typhoid Loyd. Fever we put a dot of chlorine or chlorine like product in it to to cleanse the water. But we don't do anything to remove from that water. These pharmaceutical pharmaceutical residues and other chemicals that have found their way into our water stream such that occupy one example of many that are in my book troubled water just one they scientists independent independent scientists with no axe to grind when ahead in the Great Lakes vast amount of water so be diluted like crazy with think she tested fish and all five of the Great Lakes and an all five live with a great lakes. She founded their brains and their organs and their muscle. She found residues of all kinds of psychiatric medicines like solo often SELECTA and fourteen other medications medications. Now if that's going there that water is then being sent back to our homes for us to drink and we are getting that dosages back in micro quantities and we're getting that magnified amounts also for eating the fish. I'm just trying I'm going through these scrap extrapolation getting increasingly concerned. I'm just wondering. How normal is this with other countries says well they're just sort of this problem globally or is the US particularly bad the more the more industrialized the more industrialized society is the more likely you are to have these problems now? There are some countries particularly Israel in Singapore that have very aggressive systems for purifying the water for reasons unrelated to Necessarily health reasons but it's really for water scarcity reasons. They have a reason to do this. And there are some parts the United States and I talk about in a Chapter Orange County California which has made a decision to basically cle- ignore the EPA guidelines. Go Way above it and they demonstrate the fact that using known technologies at very reasonable prices you can have the safest drinking water. Possibly the pure water you'd think that Zoloft PROZAC or something. Everybody happy a little bit happier. Exactly so seth so private versus public water utilities. Tell us that the compare and contrast there okay so this was a piece that I wrote the other day for the Wall Street Journal and I want to. I want to highlight something that is completely unknown. Fact in American life even when I talked to members of Congress and the senators they have no idea. There's the case you would think rationally speaking fifty states. Oh maybe every state should have at least one and what are you telling maybe two maybe three so maybe there should be three hundred four hundred maybe five hundred. What are you toys United States tops? Even though you could say that when you could cover several states we have in the United States over fifty thousand. What are utilities one county Los Angeles County has two hundred separate water utilities? These are very tiny. They have no ability to have the financial wherewithal in order to get the financing that they need to make sure that they can in higher up to date Up that they can buy up-to-date technologies hire the most advanced scientists and engineers and also fix their broken infrastructure. Is Crazy Risi just real quick here. Who has the interest of keeping all of these smaller utilities open for utilities? Okay so no one of the Public Lisa. Nobody in the public should the second thing that this is a good idea. And it isn't a good idea. That's why one of the main thrust of my book talking about Public Health. Water is to say four big takeaways from my book. One of which is we must consolidate our drinking water utilities and by the way I a second point that I made in the journal Article is that it turns out that about fifteen percent of American. Utilities are in private hands which is investor owned hands whether they're public companies or private companies remarkably digging deep into EPA A health data which a couple of professors have done. You learn something remarkable. which is that although you would think that public utilities have the public's interest in mind actually we there's a much higher incidence of contaminated water in public utilities? And the reason for that is because mayors want to keep the price low and therefore the don't get the Outcomes you want set Siegel. Thanks for joining fascinating. Discussion set Siegel activist author member of the Council foreign relations author troubled water. What's wrong with with what we drink? That's coming October. I also author of let there be water. Israel solution for water start starved world. I am very interested in that Tom. Freidman near Times op-ed today on that the topic using the work of seth very

United States EPA America Great Lakes Congress Council Of Foreign Relations Seth Israel Interactive Brokers Siegel Wall Street Journal Typhoid Tilleke Michigan Public Lisa Singapore Los Angeles County Paul
"Prozac Nation" author Elizabeth Wurtzel dies at age 52

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

"Prozac Nation" author Elizabeth Wurtzel dies at age 52

"Author Elizabeth Wurtzel has died she had suffered from breast cancer her nineteen ninety four memoir Prozac nation young and depressed in America took the publishing world by storm and was a regular on best seller lists for years published when she was just twenty seven the book explored the hidden world of clinical depression and detail the authors drug use and sex life in gritty detail were to was

Elizabeth Wurtzel America
Elizabeth Wurtzel: Prozac Nation author dies aged 52

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

Elizabeth Wurtzel: Prozac Nation author dies aged 52

"Port today of the death of best selling author Elizabeth Wurtzel she passed away following a long battle with breast cancer at the age of just fifty two words will rose to fame in nineteen ninety four behind Prozac nation young and depressed in America the memoir which documented her struggles with depression and substance abuse garnered what a claim for sparking dialogue about

Elizabeth Wurtzel America Depression
"Prozac Nation" author Elizabeth Wurtzel dies at age 52

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

"Prozac Nation" author Elizabeth Wurtzel dies at age 52

"Best selling author Elizabeth Wurtzel has died she was fifty two when she passed away today in New York City hospital get cancer many may know her from Prozac nation her memoir true claim and a revision for its tell all tale of a difficult life complicated by depression it was written in a style that was praised for its self assurance were to went on to write for more books

Elizabeth Wurtzel Depression New York City
BrainStuff Classics: Are Plants Conscious?

BrainStuff

05:13 min | 8 months ago

BrainStuff Classics: Are Plants Conscious?

"Hey rain stuff. I'm more in Vogel bomb and this is another a classic episode from our former host This one deals with the question to which the answer may seem obvious but research has made more complicated. Our plants unconscious Abe rain stuff. It's Christian Sager. So there's this old episode of Star Trek called Wink of even I. You may have seen it. There's this race of aliens that live in hyper sped up acceleration so when the crew of the enterprise appears to meet up with with them they seem so slow that they're unable to move. Now imagine that scenario if you were the aliens wouldn't you assume humans humans were unhurt objects with no consciousness. Now let's take this and apply it to our relationship with plants. When we watched videos of plant life sped up we see their lively movement but even though plants move and respond to stimuli? They're not conscious right otherwise. Every time time we ate vegetables we'd be causing them pain. Wait wait a minute Kim. Plants feel pain. Well okay there is. This guy wants his name was Charles. Charles Darwin you might have heard of him and he wants proposed. Something called the root brain hypothesis. He proposed that the tip of a plant's root could act like a brain does in some animals receiving sensory input and directing movement in the years since Darwin made this proposal. There's been a growing movement in science called plant neurobiology and it debates the way we think about plants and consciousness justness other scientists hate this term but who cares because here some of the things we know about plants because of this really unusual research research. Let's start with plant senses. We know that plants have a variety of sense. Some that can actually act as analogues is to our sight smell touch taste and hearing in fact. There's evidence that when plants here the sound of a caterpillar chewing on a leaf life. They respond defensively by producing chemicals. Like mustard oil. This happens even if the sound is a recording and nothing is eating the plant creepy right. Plants can also communicate sometimes plant. Chemical production is like a method of communicating communicating with other plants. So here's an example that smell of freshly cut grass that we all know that's actually a distress call to warn other plants chance of danger. It's true in gardens. No one can hear you scream now. When this distress call reaches other plants they will also emit the chemicals to warn their neighbors as well and these calls can even work on different species of plant? For instance a sage plant can signal a tobacco acco plant to emit an odor that's noxious to animals. That are eating the sage all right. So you hear the term plant neurobiology and you say but plants plants. Don't have brains. Well one of the reasons why many scientists hate that term is because plants don't have neurons but they do produce neuro active chemicals that act like those in the human brain glutamate receptors form memories in humans and they're also also found in plants and some hormones are transported around plants similar to how neurotransmitters move through animal brains likewise some plants are vulnerable to drugs that disrupt neuro transmitters in the human brain like PROZAC or methamphetamines. Peta means they even produced their own ethylene which is possibly used as an anesthetic. When they're stressed out? Plants even have a kind of nervous system in that may allow information to travel around the plant via electrical signals. So if plants have sort of brains brain's do they remember stuff. Well yeah plants also have their own kind of memory. In fact there's a plant called the Mosa Deka plant in closes its leaflets immediately after their touched but because this requires energy. The plant won't do it if it's unnecessary. However when researchers dropped potted mimosas fifteen

Charles Darwin Vogel Bomb Christian Sager Mosa Deka KIM Prozac Peta
"prozac" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:38 min | 11 months ago

"prozac" Discussed on WWL

"The Chargers plus our Prozac's reproduce McAllister check in from LA with their observations with the same thing California's Steve Keller W. W. well sports and now the forecast weather Rexford WWL TV meteorologist Dave Nelson all up front is moved through it really has impacted our weather too much it'll be apart the cloudy hot and humid day today with a thirty percent chance responded storms mainly along in south of I ten high temperatures you climbed in ninety four and will feel like one or two to one oh seven for tonight partly cloudy and muggy with lows the mid upper seventies on Friday another partly cloudy days are front remains stalled along the coastline little to no rain expected just a twenty percent chance at high temperatures soar into the mid nineties at ninety five degrees will feel like one of three to one oh eight as we head to the weekend a front retreats back to the north bring back the muggy weather also the chance of rain goes up to forty percent on Saturday with a high of ninety four and fifty percent chance for storms on Sunday with highs in the lower to mid nineties other expert forecaster on W. W. well TV biologist Dave Nussbaum west wind three miles per hour humidity eighty eight percent eighty one degrees south of the lake seventy nine on the north shore check out WW well traffic from the W. B. over to the me medical traffic center Josh what else I ten from Canada to memory slowing down from oil to drive up to veterans and then you've got patchy congestion from clear view up through the six ten split into the downtown area traveling from the north shore looking good across the causeway bridge you're coming in from the west bank no problems in the Huey P. congestion approaching the connection is back around to stop Boulevard on the elevated expressway.

Chargers LA California Dave Nelson forecaster W. W. Josh Canada McAllister Steve Keller W. Dave Nussbaum eighty eight percent ninety five degrees eighty one degrees thirty percent twenty percent fifty percent forty percent
May Spotlight on Mental Health Month

America Trends

08:01 min | 1 year ago

May Spotlight on Mental Health Month

"And may in fact is mental health awareness month. There are some very interesting facts about it too. I know that you probably realize recent decades they've been a spotlight on it in what was the nineties. These books came out about Prozac nation, and people really got honest about. Yes, we have these things you have a mental illness. It's like having a physical illness. Get it treated, you're not embarrassed speak out loud. We have superstars and celebrities who come out and speak freely about it. And maybe that helps us all sort of able to again, be honest. But another other interesting things about it. It's been since a night late nineteen forties. I just found out myself when the first national mental health awareness week was launched. So it's been that long since we've been trying. To put focus on it and Christmas, not a walk. Are we are lucky to have here weekly? She is with the mental health mental health news network. Make sure I got that. Right. Mental health News Radio network. Thank you. Mental health News Radio dot com. And this is a huge network of podcasters that that does include Kristen download our number one hundred seventy countries all around the world, and she just dedicates her life to this. And these are also always so interesting to hear some of these facts Kristen in the nineteen sixties. This campaign was extended to the entire month of may. So again in the sixties, we must have put focus on it again, and where courage to take responsibility for preventing mental illness by making positive lifestyle choices and thought and action and for heaven's sake. As you tell people all the time if necessary get some help or talk to someone and say, maybe talk therapy or meds might be right for you and your situation and -solutely. So. How long let's talk a little bit about you. How long have you been dealing with with this issue and trying to help people and what strives have you seen since then? Oh my gosh. That's a long discussion. Now. We have love to hear what you say. Kristen you do have such a great background. I think you so much and I'd say I'd like to be in this field. I've been working with mental health challenged people since I was probably eight or nine years old. My grandmother was called a foster grandparents, and she was actually an appointment by Nancy Reagan telemetry and she worked with kids down syndrome autism. And other mental health issues, and I was with her after school working with the kids, and I had no idea that was my first installment into the in tier volunteering, but it was and I kept that up throughout my entire life up until forty nine years old. That's pretty amazing Kristin. So this is your grandmother was written up Nancy Reagan's. What was let's get her grandma. Shut out. What was her name? I dream Vesa Audrey Besse, and she was a Nancy Reagan's book called to love child. Yes. Interesting. I'll mazing that. So. Barrett. Is right there. Thank you can throw aren't that? Good. Kristen fantastic. Was this book? Release published your member and guided seventies early eighties late seventies. Yeah. Sounds about. Right. That's precious boil boy to love child, Nancy Reagan, your grandmother, and that's just so prefix that that would be in your family and your legacy and with what you do. Now, you're all over the world where this grandma would be so proud. Yes, she really would be. And you know, it's interesting to hear the labels that are used we need the us labels to define thing. So that we can understand them. And then there's a part of not be labeled that comes with that. But at that time the words that were used to describe people that had down syndrome and other ailments. They were not very friendly. They certainly wouldn't be PC today. They're not worth repeating. But just the awareness of the kind of language we use when it comes to mental health related problems is fantastic. Compared to what it used to be well say there, and this might not be completely applicable both what you're saying now, but just in in media. And culture allowed and you think of movies in the past. You've got one flew over the course nest. Just little things like that. Just just that spark a recognition. This is how them for trade and not everyone who has mental health issues has is a huge spectrum. Ryan absolutely huge sector. It's not everyone needs medication. Some people need medication for a short time in their life to get them throw something and some people need medication for a lifetime and idea behind it. Is there this isn't anymore? Those other people that have these kinds of problems. It's all of us anyone that has taken zanex or an SRI or something like that has struggled with mental health challenge whether temporarily or an ongoing issue with make so much drives in the science and the public understanding when you talk about these people used to talk about. You know, the shock treatments people had to get and those were so severe, but they honestly did help some painful ramifications with those just as with anything and then back in the day. When people went to war, you came back with shell shock and people just left it alone didn't talk they leave him alone. He's got more issue's now after all the things we've been in the recent decades and all our struggles around the world, we have people coming home, and there's so much more of an understanding about it and ways to help that it doesn't have to be a silent thing, and we call it PTSD now more than more than shell shock or whatever else they used to call it. And that's just that's just that alone is a huge stride. Absolutely. Take a look at something like autism. That was that they are saying there's so many more people that are being diagnosed with autism. There's an epidemic unreality really is according to the researchers and doctors I've been with it's not that there's more going on. It's that people are just open to being getting. Diagnosed saying there somewhere on the spectrum. And you always wonder about that whether with autism and ask burgers and things like that. Or any condition if we're just better at going to seek help and the doctors knowing how to identify it and help or you know, you have people talking about back scenes, what's in our food. And what's in our water that could be causing more of this? But but you're right. We can think of we've known in the past even when we were little children who were just a bit different and not different special and had different abilities. And I think that's someone that might not have been diagnosed that could have been helped. And so what you say really does ring true. Yes, it's wonderful for people to have something tangible to hang onto when they're going through something with their mind on something that affects their entire physiology. It's a wonderful thing to know. That's what this is or to at least take on the challenge of trying to find out what's going on because there are so many treatments available and the issue has been largely in in this area of health stigma associated with it now that we're reducing the stigma people are more apt to they'll get health because they're not embarrassed to do. So absolutely. We have to remind people every single day down way. Because they're always people you've worked in this for decades. But there are always people who are just finding out. I might have a problem now, whether they're adults or children who haven't heard any of this message because their children and dealing with kids stuff. Then one day they realize I might have an issue, and they might hear someone like Christians not a Walker. Speaking of this and realizing there could be a solution to this. I should speak out and get some help. It's not. Something I have to deal with alone. Right. Exactly. Actually, that's the biggest piece to with reduced sigma or in a radical. Then people will talk to other people not just for fashionable and realize, oh, my neighbor is struggling or my colleague at work.

Kristen Nancy Reagan United States Vesa Kristin Syndrome Barrett Walker Audrey Besse Ryan Forty Nine Years Nine Years One Day
How our faces are helping create a new surveillance technology

FT News

15:23 min | 1 year ago

How our faces are helping create a new surveillance technology

"To be worth nine billion dollars by twenty twenty two thanks to rapid improvements in the speed. And accuracy of the software. Recent strides in machine learning using large data sets of images culled from the internet have made this possible. But how ethical is it and how affect our privacy never hawk discusses these issues with Madame me merger. Our European technology. Correspondent. Not an article for the deaf t- weekend magazine about facial recognition technology, which has been evolving quite quickly, but largely under the radar. So can you explain I what facial recognition technology is? And how it works. So facial recognition technology today walks as a system which scans people whether that's on a busy road or people at an event depends who you're looking for and the systems that run this can pick out people specifically that you may be looking for. So it depends what the application is for example, police might be using it to scan video feeds at an event looking for specific criminal or looking for somebody at the border looking for Tara suspect illegal immigrants or any sorts of suspects that they're trying to spot, and the technology is able to much these people's faces with a photo that it's been trained on to find the right person. So detects people automatically. There's no need for a human operator to sort of look. Through the images. Exactly. So it automatically identifies. People find them, and then can tell you who they are. So who owns this technology at the moment. The technology is owned by a whole bunch of different people. It's not single owner. So it's being developed for example, both in the public and private sector. There are companies ranging from Microsoft to Facebook IBM and many others who've go in house facial recognition systems and outgrow them. Amazon is another one that they've trained up themselves and are being used for commercial reasons, and then there's also public algorithm. So for example, the UK police is currently using facial recognition algorithms to solve crimes, for example, say public algorithms you mean being used by public bodies rather than that they're publicly available. Yes. Both actually there are some which are published widely and are open so people can pick them up and then use them for their own operations. And then there are also algorithms used by public bodies include. Law enforcement and homeland security and other police and government departments. So what would you say the positive and negative ways that we can use this technology? We often talk about the negative connotations of facial recognition. Because obviously, it's a surveillance technology and often, you know, facial recognition as the umbrella, Tom, but it's not just about recognizing people. But about tracking people through series of videos, for example, if we want to see where somebody has ended up or analyzing their faces for things like figuring out that emotions or maybe even to lip read what they're saying if you can't hear so this wider umbrella of Tom's Israeli about looking at the face and figuring out the behavior or what somebody is saying doing, and obviously that can be lots of negative uses for example, surveillance people who governments might find interesting to them and also finding suspected criminals, but the problem is that fatal wreck. Ignition technology isn't very accurate yet. It's better than it has a husband, but it still makes several mistakes and the danger is that people will be wrongly identified. And of course, if the fallout is that you might get arrested or detained than does a high bought at being accurate on the positive side. We such as talk about being able to diagnose diseases, for example by looking at signals from people's faces so things like diabetes Parkinson's. You might see very very early signs of this through people's facial expressions or other signals undock could help Ali diagnoses on hence early treatment. So there are other uses of it. But obviously the biggest market for these technologies has been in security, and surveillance or suppose if police forces are using the technologies in let's say, for example of relative went missing or something. Then what thing that you'd welcome those agencies having exactly and this is what law enforcement agencies have said that they also use them for. For example, to find missing children, and because that technology can motor what somebody might look like after a few years. It means that you can have an updated version of somebody's face who's gone missing. And that can be much more helpful in finding them, for example. So yes, there are useful applications for this technology as well. But there's also big potential for misuse or think there's some evidence of that misuse in western China isn't the in sin. John weather. I think he's been used to monitor the week population. There exactly. So in China. The state has been using these types of surveillance technologies for surveilling, the general population law enforcement uses it to Savell crowds and to prevent things like riots, but also specifically at has been used to identify and track minority populations in China, including the Muslim population both in west and China, but also in other parts of the country, and there are both private companies in China as. As well. As universities that have been developing and supplying these technologies so in where it's like, a classic example of Julius technology. That's called benign or malign -application. This is true of any emerging technology. But just specifically in the case of facial recognition. It's very personal and invasive, you're explain in your article, how the image data says that on vital to the development of the technology have been collected and widely shed can you tell us a bit more about that show? So the investigation that I did for this piece was walking with the research, a hoot collected about three hundred different data sets. And basically what these data sets are big collections of faces faces of people mostly from the west which have been scraped or picked up from the internet. So it could be from Google images or being could be from flicker where people have uploaded family photo albums. It could be from YouTube videos, where people have picked out stills from these videos, or it can be even more. More invasive where researchers have for example, setup surveillance cameras on university campuses in town squares in markets, and then use those images to create these data sets good concern for taking people's which is without. So surprisingly, not in a lot of the cases with the internet images. These were uploaded with what's called, a creative Commons license and the original intention for this license was to allow people to freely reuse or republish these photos without always having to ask for someone's permission or to pay copyright charges. But how it's ended up being used is that these faces have gone into building sats that then train facial recognition algorithms to spot and analyze faces better. So really all of these pictures of people that they've unwittingly put up or unwittingly walked through a campus. For example, have now ended up training algorithms in China that are. Used to study video surveillance, for example, in Israel and in Russia or even in the US and the UK where they're being used to study by metric profiles of people's faces. Hervey spoken to the researchers who've uploaded these images. Yeah, I managed to contact a few that were willing to talk to me one of the researchers. I spoke to was from the university of Colorado, Colorado Springs UCS, and he'd created a data set. The he calls unconstrained college students the clues in the name. Basically, he set up a surveillance camera. And he said that he filmed students walking around campus who were unaware that they were being filmed and the whole goal of this exercise was to create a really realistic data set of people's faces where they want to stunned portrayed Shorto. Anything liner yourself your party per no. This is just not true footage of people walking around their faces covered up looking down at their phones side profiles. Partially hidden, which is how things would be in the real world when you're trying to Savell people walking around and by creating the status at he was then able to override the heated share it with the federal government and many others, including researchers and companies who then use this data set to inform their own research understand some of these data sets have been used by the university of defense technology in China create surveillance technology ESO N, you DT's the National University of defense technology in China, and it's run by the Chinese military. So as very well established links with the PLA, the Chinese military and a lot of the work that they do in the area of or drones is used to inform and design and develop technologies for the military. And yes, I found a few papers which were written by entity DT, researchers that had used the data sets that we found and barren mind these. Data sets were created in the US or the UK or elsewhere extraordinary time when the US is anxious about the Johnny's getting hold of US technology. Exactly. And I found that this was actually a huge blind spot. So while there are discussions all of the world of whether there should be sanctions or export controls applied to sensitive technologies. Especially I for example, with China actually academic partnership seemed to be completely invisible in this entire discussion and they fly under the radar. So there are so many of these individual collaborations that I found with students from these universities in China over searchers who've been working with US, UK, and Australia and companies and universities and publishing work together. And that doesn't seem to be any framework all sort of training to question what's happening with these technologies where they're being applied who ultimately gets access to them. It just seen as sort of a. Free exchange of ideas, you'd have no sense than researchers have ethical scruples about taking people's faces of the internet and then applying them in these ways. Yeah. I mean, I think that the researchers who had created the data sets believed that they were doing a public good because they were advancing a technology that could be used in a variety of different ways. But they don't seem to have considered the effect of having a borderless internet, which means that faces can be essentially exported across the whole world and get into the hands of people who might not have the same ethical boundaries or ideas that they have. And so the ultimate use case could be really different from what they had imagined off aces could be training surveillance technologies that we a have no idea about and be might have huge ethical objection to do you foresee a negative uses of this technology in the west as well. Yes. So the technology is also been used. And by law enforcement and governments in the US and the UK, for example, here in the UK Prozac terrorists have been protesting the police as USA facial recognition technology, and the main objection hair is that it's not good enough considering it's being used by the police to catch criminals because it means that often mistakes are being made an input take your the error rate of full facial recognition of minorities is higher than it is for Caucasians, and this is partly because of the training data. So if these systems are trained on lots and lots of Caucasian faces it means they are better at recognising Caucasian faces and because they haven't had as much training data of all the racism minority faces. It means that they are less accurate in identifying them. So though ends up being a bias of misidentification when it comes to the police using this to catch criminals, researchers pursuing this tunnel as you could argue that by creating new movie realistic data says. They can overcome those sort of biases. Exactly. And that's the big debate. Here. Should we create more data sets and more diverse data set so that we improve Asia recognition or should we just stop digging into people's privacy by filming and photographing them as they go about their daily lives, and maybe put limitations and stops on the use of the technology at all. And these are the two sides of the coins. And there are privacy activists today who feel that we shouldn't really be using facial recognition at all. Because there are other ways to achieve the same things without being so invasive into people's lives and scraping images without on knowledge. Some technologies would argue that they solution to the shortcomings of data is get yet. More data. Exactly. And this is the rabbit hole that it seems this entire research community has gone down because they're looking for more data and. More unconstrained data and more natural data, a natural in the sense just means without consent because by definition, it means people shouldn't know that they're being filmed. So you know, we just seem to be going further and further down this whole is there any way to ensure the images used only for purposes of beneficial. Do you think I think like with any technology? You can't turn the clock back. So these faces already exist facial recognition is useful. It is cheaper than having loads and loads of human pace officers, for example, and it's quicker as well. You can comb through hours of footage rather than getting a single pass and sit down and watch it and spot people. So it's coming it's going to be used. So the question is can we put into place proper ethical training and also legal and public policy? Limitations on the technology or breaks that would force academics and corporations and governments. Everybody who uses and develops a sec. Analogy to really question how it could be used and to try and prevent that from happening. So for my story when I contacted a lot of these researchers the question, I asked was do you think about how your technology could ultimately be used? And if yes, what do you put into place to ensure it doesn't get into the wrong hands and often I found that they haven't even thought about that. So that really should be a fuss step where you maybe have ethics training for anybody working on sensitive AI topics like facial recognition to really educate them about how it is being used and how it could be used to get pressure from policymakers as well in this area. Well, exactly because at the moment, it seems that it's so new and emerging that the lowest still far behind and hasn't caught up. And so the only way for that to be any real restriction as for the public as well as lawmakers and companies themselves to come together to create a framework for how this is used. Thank you very much. Thank you.

China UK United States Savell Hawk Tara Twenty Twenty TOM Youtube Google AI PLA Microsoft Amazon Parkinson
FDA approves 'club drug' for depression

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

FDA approves 'club drug' for depression

"Over the FDA has approved a fast acting nasal spray depression treatment derived from an infamous club, drug ketamine has been used as a powerful sedative and has been used illegally in clubs going by the name special. K now a derivative of the drug could help millions of people with untreatable depression cleared by the FDA, the inhalable drug will be sold as spothero. It will be delivered as a nasal spray and be prescribed to patients who have failed to find relief with older antidepressants like Prozac, the maker says bravado takes effect almost immediately and patients will have it admits. By medical

FDA Ketamine
Ketamine, FDA And Depressive Disorder discussed on Nightside with Dan Rea

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Ketamine, FDA And Depressive Disorder discussed on Nightside with Dan Rea

"FDA okaying, the first new medication for severe, depression and years CBS's, Alison keys tells us it's related to the party drug ketamine, the drug is called s ketamine and the FDA. Okay. The nasal spray that can relieve severe depression hours instead of weeks it works differently than antidepressants like Prozac and doctors say it can help patients with major. Depressive disorder who have not improved on other drugs. But manufacturer Johnson and Johnson says those using the new drug will be closely tracked in high doses both ketamine and s ketamine can cause sedation an out of body

Ketamine FDA Depressive Disorder Johnson Alison Keys CBS
Ketamine nasal spray could help drug-resistant depression

KCBS Radio Morning News

03:16 min | 1 year ago

Ketamine nasal spray could help drug-resistant depression

"Susan. The FDA is expected to approve the first new class of depression. Medication in decades. It's a nasal spray version of the drug ketamine, which is used in anesthesia in its powder form. The drug is also a party drug called special. K CBS is Dr Jon lapook reports. More than sixteen million American adults suffer from major depressive disorder about thirty percent of them are treatment resistant. They live in pain that can be unbearable summer, so desperate. They may actually self medicate with opiates or even turn to suicide. Now a medication that's been around for fifty years. Years could give hope to patients who could not find relief from current antidepressants. Kayla. Snyder is getting ready for an upcoming visit with her family, but less than a year ago. She couldn't even leave her apartment every three to six months. I seem to have a severe depressive episode which includes not getting out of bed for a week to two weeks. Not showering not eating her childhood in New Jersey appeared to be happy. But things began to fall apart when Kayla left home for college. I didn't know what I was doing in life. What my purpose was. I thought something was wrong with me anti depressants didn't help much and over the next five years Kayla got so desperate. She tried to kill herself three times. Then she started regular intravenous ketamine infusions at this New York City clinic, which connected us to Kayla. I didn't have suicidal thoughts every day which I used to have. And I just felt like a weight was lifted off my shoulders traditional antidepressants work on neuro transmitters such as serotonin. Europe Ephron that helped nerves in the brain communicate ketamine targets, a different one called glutamate and works much faster than drugs like Prozac, symbolic data or Zoloft. What we've heard from patients have gotten ketamine is that. Wow. This is what it feels like to be normal. And that they never thought they were gonna feel that way again. So it's very dramatic. Dr Dennis Charney was one of the first to study ketamine, infusion therapy and would get a share of any profits from the spray version ketamine has been abused on the street where it's called special. K how does it make people feel there what the individual is looking for when they take special k is a feeling of highness a out of body experience. And this in general is not a major issue when you take the lower doses that are needed to feel better from depression each of Kayla's current ketamine treatments costs four hundred seventy five dollars, and they are not reimbursed by insurance if the FDA approves the. Nasal spray version, it will likely be covered for Kayla. That's reason enough to see if it works just as well as the infusions it really helps your entire life. Not just a let's get high for an hour and then go back to depressing life. It's more. It changes your life in a positive way. This newest ketamine spray called Rivaldo has to be administered under a doctor's supervision, and is only for those who have failed at least two antidepressants. Dr Charney says if antidepressants are working for you stick

Ketamine Kayla Dr Dennis Charney Snyder FDA New Jersey Susan. Europe Ephron CBS New York City Clinic Rivaldo Four Hundred Seventy Five Doll Thirty Percent Fifty Years Five Years Six Months Two Weeks
"prozac" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

105.3 The Fan

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"prozac" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

"Now, they all Prozac Martin with a handshake and Kristi scales year getting a little too familiar with these carts and ambulance three out at the last four games. Brad. We've done injury reports from the sideline where Cowboys players have gone to the hospital. The card is getting ready to head up the tunnel. The ambulances waiting for him. But that game Indianapolis, it was left guard Xavi or sewer fellow who got poked in the eye, and even though he was visited by the opthamologist there on site at Lucas oil stadium. They went ahead and took them to an Indianapolis hospital. And he got a good report was back with teammates by post game and flew home. With teammates from Indianapolis to Dallas. And then you mentioned two weeks ago with Tyrone Crawford with the neck injury. And he was taken to the local hospital sell the worst thing for on reporter as to talk about the car, which is he can hear the the racing from the crowd. Alan her is. This. Most name to the crowd to that's the big response that you're hearing. But now the part is approaching the tunnel. And the ambulance is about thirty yards up the tunnel and they're gonna load, man. And that's Greg Gaither the athletic trainer that is going to accompany Allen to the hospital that left leg is in an air Hearns holding it that hand up in a fist and babe. You always talk about now, they gotta just say, okay. That never happened. Let's go play football. Right. I remember it happened to Tyrone Crawford and Tampa Bay took a deep shot and hit it over the top of Byron Jones Cowboys I intended their own forty play action fake Prescott. Throws it out right underneath the Elliott. Forty starts. Right. That's left. That's up to around the forty four yard line. A gain of four stopped by Puna Ford. The former Longhorn. Really come on. I I'm telling you. He was on drafted. And I know he's he's not like, I'm such a prize. He's not the best to look at. But he he is a load now, and he really has come on. He was inactive the first game against Dallas. But he's a big part of the rotation now for Seattle Austin goes in the left slot with Cooper wide second down and a good six and a hand off. The Elliott starts left. Tries to slide up the middle body Wagner's. There got him after maybe four more yards, and it should be third down and about two and obviously grad Seattle likes him because he's playing well. And he was a free agent this year as you mentioned out of the university of Texas, you know, who really likes Antoine woods because he finally found a defense tackle shorter than himself then towards at six feet tall Puna four five eleven. All right. They made a third and fourteen. I mean, a third and seven now they gotta make a third and two three nothing. Dallas. Just inside six minutes left first quarter and on third down and long to Prescott in a gun Elliott to his right? Beasley left slot. Gallup split right man on his nose Prescott. Looks that way. Throws incomplete. Never even close. He checked everything they're going to have to put it away. He looked to the left side. Was there anything over there? Now, he had Beasley singled up over on the left side. But I don't know if that was just look off and try to get the fate up the right side line to Gallup never really.

Puna Ford Tyrone Crawford Indianapolis hospital Elliott Dallas Indianapolis Lucas oil stadium Cowboys Brad Kristi Xavi Beasley Cooper Gallup Prescott Greg Gaither Seattle Alan her tall Puna
"prozac" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"prozac" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Alexa, teen flow ocsta- teen the active ingredient in Prozac. Tom Brokaw say that drug fall axles. NBC news, LOL, LOL quantities of FOX with in. The fish given higher doses showed more frequent, Coppula Tori behavior. There's a big word. I've never said the word Coppula Tori before and spent more time pursuing females. Mr. Bertram wrote in science trends in one on one mating trials, males in the high flaw of treatment performed more frequent Coppula Tori behavior towards females than did males in the unexposed treatment. Wow, that is fantastic. I don't know why Prozac would act that way in fish. What obviously they have different. Yeah, so that's weird. Doesn't do that cells in their body for us by the way, Menashe university doesn't have a team nickname, just letting you know that thank you for that. But of course this this, this is something that has been dealt with by our friends, putting chemicals in the water that turn the frigging frogs gay. I'm not sure that's the problem though. In this case, the other thing, the suicide of fish, but the fish are straight now. So the male female here? Yeah, but it causes the frogs. That'd be gay. I'm so confused, Alex. Okay. Well, I'm looking for the other. I'm looking for the shrimp situation because the shrimp situation was different from the Prozac was that I think it was okay. It was. But I've got so many Jones. It might be this, no, this is the fish, the fish, which is another stunning problem that we don't deal with enough. We do not, but maybe the folks that Mona city, it's, this is the problem that he that he brought up a longtime ago and in major prestigious reports, government studies study find that shrimp are just swimming right up to birds being eaten there. Overconfident, they've had there. Governors were moved well, man, they've had their compulsions remove. They've had their fear level. This is what the study's when they approve Prozac and eighty. One had shown. That's why it's now on the drug insert. Then most time you're going to be having a great time. It's listen. Jetson tropic. Tropic category, but some days if you get angry right? Are you don't take the right amount of the medication, or are you try to go off of it? Then? We're mix it with other things. Then you will break go in and kill twenty people at a school, or you'll chop your.

Coppula Tori Tom Brokaw Alexa NBC Menashe university Mr. Bertram FOX Alex Jones Jetson
"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"I know you don't know anything about project and drama watch your house i know nothing but it sounds cool and i'm happy to hear you guys talk about it no they don't tell you this actually we've been talking about this a lot on windows weekly for some time it's a mysterious surface device microsoft's been working on for at least two years it is now appeared at patents in operating system references multiple times tool display design and the verge tom warren who's really good on this stuff got an internal document that said it's going to be pocketful and even more interesting when you open it up the screen flexible screen will stretch over the hinge so it will be you know the size of a phone but the screen will be the size of a tablet ten inch screen may be right take my money i know microsoft course has nothing to say about it's being worked on secretly you never know remember the surface many which was actually manufactured in warehouses when such adela said now and yeah the courier busy it looks like the currier a little bit right except smaller yeah how big was the courier i think yeah i think the career was like a note tap pad rose van even will be interesting and i don't remember it was a career gonna have like one lcd screen in one e ink screen i know they were to address yeah and you could write on it and had like the handwriting recognition and it had like a lot of the the pinch to zoom stuff that you saw on the ipad is this is the if i'm remembering correctly the courier was before the ipad but yeah it was it was an amazing conference thing i think you're just the age that probably about middle school you started using aol instant messenger yes i know it you'll be glad to know aim is back aol shut down the service in december but there's a new project called aim phoenix which is glitzy xactly like hey they didn't even update the ui because it's the style gic right it's software it is the original software oh so download it set up a server and then you you essentially report the client at there can you relay that's smart right two go ahead they don't make a mac version available at their site you have to kind of go and find an old back version but the windows there are several windows versions they have for download their case you can't find one.

microsoft tom warren adela aol two years ten inch
"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Personal information including google and facebook will be just like with gdp are required disclose the type of data they collect and allow you to opt out of having their data sold so unless unless they you know water it down at some point in the future it's not going to happen immediately to give companies time just like gdp are the companies will have a couple of years it won't be fully in effect until january first twenty twenty how closely does attract gdp are said have some of the features of jd pr it's similar i haven't seen a point by point comparison because a lot of companies already there because you're right nobly companies like at and t and amazon what a surprise poured millions of dollars into opposition marketing shocking when a shock what is shock however the legislature decided well at least if we pass it we can change it if it's a if it wins in the in the polls in november we're in deep doo doo so watch with watch with interest to see what's going on so good news and i i suspect gdp are really changed everybody if california has a bill like that that means everybody operating in the us is going to have to hear to the so it's well at the very least but you'll see because you have had a couple of instances of various sites that are refusing to to serve contents in europe because pr and fine but they're not going to be able to not serve california yes precisely yeah although there's i just saw study that said a lot of companies are y kind of they're not really doing the opt in stuff with gdp are just going to wait and see they're not you're supposed to require people to agree if you're going to collect data about them and then just going to wait and see let's see what happens let's see how aggressively this this gets pursued by these cheap it's like these companies are realizing that the people in europe are litigious about things and and don't mind going through the courts and that that that's i mean that seems like a bad a bad wager i guess you know thing to take i wouldn't i wouldn't make that bet myself let's take a break and then i'm gonna put christina on the spot all right stay tuned but i i'm already thinking about dinner in fact he's almost dinner time i know you guys is probably is dinner time and if i were in austin and houston right now i'd be doing barbecue but because i'm here in california i'm gonna be cooking so blue apron alum abreu i have three blue apron's waiting i might to a seared steak there's a chicken with tahini that looks awfully good we subscribe to blue apron we get our your blue apron box on wednesday and it's really fun everything you need to make three different meals you choose the meals ahead of time you go to the blue apron.

google facebook
"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Lowest and notebook could ever earned at that point finally at the andy says you should really look at some dell or hp laptops making some very good stuff that's repairable kyle's always been you know an advocate for consumers and the ability to repair that no no he hasn't he's been really kind of leading the whole unite to repair acts up and all of those things and and obviously their guides i mean i think we all love them from the gadget porn perspective of seeing you know that how how they're taking apart when it's made up is also really good for for consumers and and as you're putting out earlier your friend in mexico who makes it very difficult to get to an official apple repair place like it's not just people wanting to be cheaper doing it themselves it's that apple doesn't have service centers that are accessible everywhere and if you've got something like keyboard that's a real problem a jury on wednesday found that dr trae jimmy i evine both of whom became apple employs when apple bought beats and beats electric's oh former partner twenty five point two million dollars in royalties stephen lamar and his company jibe audio the suit said that lamar came to dr dre in two thousand six the idea for celebrity endorsed headphones he got royalties but only for the first pete's headphone but now the jury says none oh you you owe him a little more you low you oh he said i want one hundred thirty million dollars but the the jury said well twenty five million now and as sales continue you'll get some of that as well so apple did not respond but you know apple can afford twenty five million interesting about this is that when i when i saw the headline i'd assume that it was with the monster guys also sued them and and that i think they try to or something like that although i think what happened there it was it was just pretty bad businesses decisions all the way around but that's what had assumed that it was it was with the you know launcher made that i be headphone beats headphones yeah no they they did a lot of the design that some of the other things somebody that they hired i guess anyway that the design and then drain beats our drain i've seen had an ownership stake than htc bought an ownership stake than i've bought it back and then they ended up buying all of monster out basically and so then when the company sold to apple you know obviously noli was very very upset there was a there's like a great classic gizmodo story from a sam can think of las adl biddle yes sam biddle wrote like before the apple thing happened about the whole saga which is fascinating but that's what i assumed is about so i forgot that there was another company before they approach monster yeah monsters lawsuit failed by the way against beats yeah yeah again again i think that that was because i think what happened is it was just like there was it was bad contract all of us whoever monsters lawyers were just you know it was just bad business pose a sadie headline too because this is not dr dre specifically is the right the previous entity not specifically yeah trey was the celebrity endorser also an owner so i think the reason he and i being money because they it was the first rap billionaire i think i think he tweeted that right he says yeah i mean yeah that's probably accurate i mean i don't know if you know if you look at all of jay z's stuff if that would have you know with with with a def jam and whatnot but yeah definitely i never thought we'd be debating who was the first rap billionaire on twit but it's tech it's tech apple breaking ground foxconn rather breaking ground on a plant in wisconsin remember they had pledged was thirty billion dollars to president trump this is a ten billion dollar factory they say will create thousands of jobs it'll manufacturer lcd screen panels for tv's yeah ironically not for iphones but for sharp which which foxconn owns and they also own a significant stake video and that's where the panels will go can i can i just go off on this just wants to say so first of all the the was this the state gave them three billion dollars to do this in tax breaks and tax breaks and then at the signings at the.

dell hp one hundred thirty million dol thirty billion dollars three billion dollars two million dollars ten billion dollar
"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Artificial but just mashes down on the same thing with the keyboards they do these to see how long it'll go before meantime the failure the tests all this and so i don't see how they did not pick this up in testing way before the public did only thing i can gather is that they just you know when they were doing their testing their labs or whatever you know they don't have dust they don't have right even if it's not cookies you know which like even just regular stuff i mean just in the course of using it that it can happen and it's one of those things i've talked to people who are ridiculously anal retentive with their devices who've had the issue i've talked to people who you know don't care and haven't had the issue i mean so it seems to kind of be willy nilly but the back that you know speck of dust can can do it the fact that i mean what was so funny to me in his case johnson who really you know made the story what it is the outline but when she pointed that help documents that apple has where they like show how you can take a can of compressed air and like spray and like you know like a z formation on show goal and a special yeah when i saw that i was like okay i'm an apple stan i'm somebody who will carry water and like we'll defend the company a lot even though i don't work for them any ernie of that but i'm looking at that like rolling is mike are you serious at that's in your help docs that's when you actually have to put in your documentation that's a problem that to me is acknowledged of designed problem if you've gone to actually really and wesley year right i mean we may actually learn that apple new because there's three class action lawsuits and really the kind of the critical key to the suits is did apple know about this before they released it because that's when they really could be there could be some serious damages if they knew about this ahead of time so i'm sure that's one of the things that are going to be a big issue in discovery yeah my guess is they did but they figured it was too late to change the design and so they like we can't miss the ship date so we have to go someone's someone's higher up said let's ship it to shiva although although as christina said that's not how they test keyboards they don't test keyboards with dirt and grim on an airplane with with with a little robot that goes up and down up and down up and down and that's their test for it and cookies in it in a bag crumpled up and see what happens yeah there's enough like transitioning from i worked at this company that i worked at this way now into apple that symond would change those practices i'm guessing they have enough of that cross pollination that they would know what would be the best practices for testing this thing yeah i fix it kyle wiens the founder of i fix it who also sponsor vars and i and we love kyle says it's designed anorexia he said making a product slimmer and slimmer at the cost of usefulness functional ality serviceability in the environment is just not right they did they they really did some stuff they took a key cap they injected a grain of sand and they showed how even a tiny little grain of sand can block the action of the key how it's impossible even with compressed air to get it out it wedges under the butterfly lever preventing it from depressing and with the space bar particularly there's no way to remove the key cap without breaking it you have it will the space bar will break and oh and here's the worst part when they designed it this way they glued a the battery to the keyboard that when they designed the retina macbook pro the sorry the mac book they the battery is glued to the keyboard so you can't just replace the keyboard you have to replace a big chunk of that that's why it's so expensive and they knew about it he says you know we knew as mmediately when we tested it we downgraded apple from a seven out of ten repairability score to a to which is in fact the subsequent update went down to a one out of ten the.

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"The head room this keyboard would say back room somewhere look i don't mind this mac papa can you get me a a model m keyboard you must have won somewhere right yeah well i haven't started yet but i bet i knew a guy from now support thing frank sure you have make sure you have all of our email address so do i you remember i mean these these were nineteen ninetyone it would have been you know the pc came out in eighty four it would have been you know i don't know an an at or something but these yeah yes and and you know a he used to make a really good loud clicky keyboard was compaq here and i had been to their factory they showed me how they did the testing on it and and i like there because there's was actually like a little louder than the ibm i like that i don't you know my wife has i have the previous generation design mac book pro and i love it my wife has the newest one and she likes the keyboard but i think there's this constant anxiety because is it going to happen now you know is is it going to go out now we have a friend who lives in mexico who bought the phone in the first versions of the mac book that had it and almost immediately her space spar had this problem issue is is a problem and the issue is like on the model could priof the key caps you could blow into and all that stuff right these keyboards were not really designed to be repaired at all and in many cases apple just actually swaps out the whole top part of the computer that's why it said yeah but she had to come back to the states to get it done that's poor design to it in mexico that's i just feel like that's bad designed design something that really can't be fixed that especially something like the keyboard and and to be clear the earlier models were not the easiest to repair so if you go back like i guess to like the like the twenty ten macbook pros and the ones earlier than that those you could kind remove the keys from if you needed to although it was very easy to break but the ones kind of like the the twenty thirteen twenty twelve onward you can definitely like the mac book airs you can definitely break that if you are trying to replace a key cap yourself but it's not going to require what the new ones do and and to me i mean like the the you know athletic for thinness and wanting to have you know the solid piece of aluminium and all that but as you say leo like it you do have to question the design because this isn't something that is never going to need repairing this is a keyboard it's one of the most probably i would think most that in the in the in the screen and maybe some of the internal components are probably the top three things that are that get repaired on a mac book you know most people who are bringing it in i would say the keyboard regardless of what year you have is probably one of the more common issues people have with with any laptop and so to make it so that you can't even do it in store you literally have to ship it off that that's what's particulars to me all companies all pc manufacturers they do this durability testing where like if you're making chairs you have the.

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Finds the money bay and stuff takes him apart reassembles cleans them i'll let you know when it comes i i couldn't i just had to not that it'll charge for it oh you don't even wanna know you don't even it depends for one thing it's getting harder to find him so the prices starting to go up the one i got was i going one of mid two hundred dollars but it's not it will never wear out right i mean this keyboard is is give you a dong no yes no because it's a ps two keyboards you have to buy a ps two usb he sells them sixteen bucks he does go as low as he's having a sale on some model homes from ninety one but they don't have cable so that's kind of not good that's one hundred sixty five dollars but i mean the guy actually i feel like it's a good price because he's got a by the keyboard he literally takes it apart cleans it he replaced screws thing i mean there were rivets he puts screws in instead he puts a lot of work in this so it's kind of a labor of love this is the one yeah this is the one hundred dollars is a lot but if you look at the market for mechanical keyboards right now which is so hot yeah there's a brand new one hundred sixty five bucks and it's not the buckling key right yeah i was going to say exactly usually aren't the buckling ones and and but yeah i have a number of friends and coworkers who are really into mechanical keyboards and it is an expensive hobby you'll see me come in you'll hear me coming so i didn't realize this but i always knew the name buckling he buckling spring but there is actually like a regular spring and when you press the thing down i you know how this spring goes like this this this and they've got deforms and that's when it clicks and makes the contact so you're deforming a spring every time you're typing key kind of crazy but this is how this is why can't you mac book pro 'cause you're like you're like on this is this is not enough travel i don't mind the keys to be honest i just obviously there's some sort of design issue stubbing my fingers so many people hate the keyboard so many people i mean like when i was first reviewing the the knack book within two thousand fifteen and twenty sixteen i thought it was a little shell when i didn't love it on the macbook pro at the touch i actually felt like it anyway i think it's just a you know a an illusion but it feels like you have a little more travel and i like that fine do i prefer the older chick lit macbook keyboards yes but i didn't have an issue with it what i have an issue with is is you know the the not working and an piece of dust being able to for someone to have to be without the computer for a week because the entire bottom portion has to be replaced which is just insane but here's a a jif let's see this is where i found out about these keys here's at jiffy buckling it literally the spring actually buckles yeah no wonder it's loud it looks loud junk newsroom yeah click cloudy newsroom yeah as remember we're gonna took a typing class when i was like ten years old those were the types of keys keyboards that we all you know typed on wesley rocket your i presume you go in and you're going to have a desk and they're going to have like a brand new laptop on the desk and all that stuff right they kind of you start.

one hundred sixty five dollars one hundred dollars two hundred dollars ten years
"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"The question i forgot tech burger radio show that's yeah so so the radio show kind of ended on its own the guy who started at jay lee decided out he had been doing it for more than twenty five years i believe and he he decided he'd have enough wick occasionally we have a a reunion we get together and have a party with all of our favorite that's more accurate there we get hit and have a party with our with our listeners our top listeners and we've you know we discussed occasionally like going taking over the radio station where we used to be for an hour every now on the was on huge living on public radio right yeah yeah it was on kpfk the pacific station here how fun twentyfive years that's nothing what a lightweight doing this you know i started in radio in nineteen seventy six are you doing the are you do you have any form of the original show you started the first is tech guy kind of that no tech is only since two thousand four my first call in tech show was in ninety two with divorce act and i think somewhere somehow i gotta find a tape of divorce on computers i do have a little i have some snippets that i've found i should play them of john gang i write i write columns all the time but i don't know if i have a whole show somewhere i'll have to find that but i've been doing radios for long to twenty five years absolutely i remember when i started radio i thought i saw jobs and say must have three to five years experience i'll never have that much wow that much experience chris christine christina warren is also here she's filmed girl the senior cloud dev advocate microsoft he could see your on channel nine microsoft's great video channel it's always a pleasure to have you christina and your giant microphone giant microphone yeah no it looks it looks bigger it looks bigger than it is yes something about i guess this positioning is i'm at my office nice perspective it is yes i'm at i'm at my microsoft office and not my home office so i'm using a blue yeti rather than what i usually use which is the he'll that you sent me a number of years ago ice yeah yes good good a lot of people use yetis that's probably the most popular yeah that's a good one i mean it's one hundred dollars you know you can get it cheaper and and it's it's a good you know usb mike i'm actually i'm giving a workshop on podcasting women's tech conference in august and that i'd have a whole i'm trying to put together a list of recommendation stuff things won't break the bank and that's definitely going to be number one on the list just like the easy way to do it by yeti zach could be open to the public or you want to well no i think people can register now so it's called right speak code and it's a it's kind of a it's an organization that focuses on on helping women in tech focus on those three areas writing speaking you know an encoding and i i'm going to be joined like i said a workshop on podcasting i don't know if it will be recorded i will have the slides online that anybody can look after the fact but yeah that's right speak code dot com if you wanna know how cool is that and of course we're great to have wesley faulkner on the on the eve of his brand new job doing developer relations for ibm they know you're going to be there on monday right they know you're coming in i'll ask security this is the first public announcement of it so that's exciting congratulations that's wonderful thank you thank you so much i showed it a brought to you by moog soft we love moog sophos on the line with the mook soft guys i think thursday or friday i was talking to them and i what i love about it is moot soft is all about empowering the it professional making you the.

jay lee twenty five years one hundred dollars twentyfive years five years
"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"It's just for amazon employees right now they have all they were applying for pharmacy licenses all around the country about a year or two ago now they don't need to because they've got pill pack they're going to get a ton of information from this acquisition because they'll get insights of what the negotiated rates for all the insurers are on drugs which is going to form their play they're going to get a more accurate count of households because like if my grandmother lives with me and i get the medication sent here they'll know who because you know the names are tied to the medications even for kids even for people who are older they'll get all that information and also pill pack doesn't just two prescriptions they do vitamins and over the counters rise so they'll be able to get a scrape off all that with their leveraged buying power and be able to make even more money you're so smart because you know you tempt to look at tempted to look at any acquisition as just simply a business acquisition but for amazon data is everything yeah and if you think about it too i mean so cbs at deal right like that that that's a big one and that was seen in some ways as kind of anticipation amazon getting more into both prescriptions in healthcare and you know not all drugs can have you know online or by mail prescriptions but increasingly that's becoming an option and in fact some insurers will even penalize you if you don't do a by mail prescription if you actually go to a pharmacy ended the when i was with a united healthcare they had i had to like opt into a thing to be able to use an actual pharmacy they really wanted me to to send stuff in the mail and so you know you can see amazon's audit insurer yet but you can see them probably getting the sata like wesley saying like being able to get have all that that accurate information than make direct deals with the insurers and and other things an awesome start to intimidate you know if they're ever able to to cohabitate like you know where your your prime now stuff is you can just imagine you know in in a few years being able to do a prime now to get your your prescription delivered to you chat room says he can't wait for the prozac dash button seriously i need some quick zanex i need it's interesting walgreens appear i'm not walgreens walmart apparently was bidding for pill pack as well which is why the price got so high which makes little sense because walmart has been one of the biggest pharmacies and biggest parts kind of the drug industry for a really long time and so you know they are actively through through jet dot com and bonobo's and some other other things trying to take on amazon in online sphere of granite they're coming out a little bit late so that's that's interesting that they they didn't bid more that amazon was willing to to go above it's really interesting when you combine rite aid walgreens and cvs health three big pharmacies they lost twelve point eight billion dollars in market value the day this was announced hugh yeah the market immediately saw what amazon was up to and said they may they may have they may have one pill pack is awesome we use it for quite a while and it's it but although oh i noticed that in a in a analyst call the guy from walgreens said well the pharmacy world's much more complex than the delivery of packages.

amazon eight billion dollars
"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Other one yeah yeah but but you know we have i mean every radio station san francisco after that you know severely improved security we have an armed guard at our door you can't if you're media you know that there are risks definitely remember when charlie hebdo happens you know so nashville is in the same building as a gizmodo media group which was then gawker and the intercept and i believe all three publications published the charlie hebdo chronic the cartoons out after that terrible attack and there were there were number of bomb threats against that building and so i it was one of those things because we're all on the same building i felt i felt bad for mastercard and capital one and some of the other tenants who were kind of like what did we you know what did we get into but it becomes like a real thing like you don't think about it until you know you're talking about leo you're the three ucla thing or you see something that happened with the with the the cassette was just terrible and or something else happens and you have to kind of assess ago oh this is actually dangerous because i think a lot of us when we get into it especially if we're not doing hard news for not you know in war zones you don't necessarily think that you're doing something where your life could be at risk yeah that's and i always figured tech journalism is probably fairly safe knock on knock on wood yeah no i don't think we we ruffle feathers that that much in tech journalism thank goodness couple big stories this week not it wasn't a huge newsweek but apple and samsung buried the hatchet that's kind of a surprising story after good lord seven years started in twenty eleven it kind of following this is a twisted tale all by itself initially apple got a billion dollar ruling than a series of appeals pushed the dispute to the supreme court it turned out lower courts had validated samsung's patent i mean apple's patents so wasn't about the patents it ended up being what the damages would be it went back there were a number of design batons number utility patents eventually the verdict was whittled down to five hundred thirty nine million dollars for apple samsung appealed on that they reached an agreement before could be litigated again that judge lucy cohen that last court case in you to get together and work this thing out and while we don't know.

san francisco charlie hebdo newsweek apple samsung lucy cohen nashville gizmodo gawker ucla five hundred thirty nine milli billion dollar seven years
"prozac" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Know how to find peace with this do you know how to find peace with trouble that took place for your wedding do you do you know how to find peace with trouble at your wedding then later when i come down i asked my older sister and my useless brotherinlaw which sort of is an oxymoron useless brotherinlaw why didn't you take the kid out why did my mother have to take the kid out the answer was horrific the answer was so horrific that i tremble to this day because if we if if his father had taken him out it would have been worse what it seems that if his father had taken him out he would have thrown a bigger tantrum he would have caused more trouble and my sister was in the wedding party so she couldn't leave apparently this was a technicality i forgot but that's where the trouble started then later my sisterinlaw who's been a torturous event human being the rest of my life my sisterinlaw the maid of honor she was the younger sister my wife's younger sister and when it came to helping or put on the dress or get organized or manage things she she folded she was too anxious to nervous because this was her older sister and she had always played the role of the younger sister and now she had to be big and she just couldn't handle it she was just too much you know where's the prozac where's the prozac good eight eight eight six eight a w a l t i want you to tell me about your wedding traumas things that happened to your wedding that you remember to this day now i could use some advice because this is sixteen years on now it is time for me to forgive and hopefully forget if you have these sort of trouble so your wedding i'd love to know how you managed to forgive and forget have you managed to reconcile this i cannot by numbers eight.

prozac sixteen years
"prozac" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"And how our friends and our relatives behave at a wedding is something that we live with the rest of our lives and we torture each other with the rest of our lives i do not know how to find peace with this do you know how to find peace with trouble that took place at your wedding do you do you know how to find peace with trouble at your wedding then later when i calmed down i asked my older sister and my useless brotherinlaw which sort of is an oxymoron useless brotherinlaw why didn't you take the kid out why did my mother have to take the kid out the answer was horrific the answer was so horrific that i tremble to this day because if we if his father had taken him out it would have been worse what it seems that if his father had taken him out he would have thrown a bigger tantrum he would have caused more trouble and my sister was in the wedding party so she couldn't leave apparently this was a technicality i forgot but that's where the trouble started then later my sisterinlaw who's been a torturous event human being the rest of my life my sisterinlaw the maid of honor she was the younger sister my wife's younger sister and when it came to helping or put on the dress or get organized or manage things she she folded she was too anxious to nervous because this was her older sister and she had always played the role of the younger sister and now she had to be big and she just couldn't handle it she was just too much you know where's the prozac where's the prozac michael eight eight eight six eight a w a l t i want you to tell me about your wedding traumas things that happen to your wedding that you remember to this day now i could use some advice because this is sixteen years on now it is time for me to forgive and hopefully forget if you had these sort of troubles at your wedding i'd love to know how you managed to forgive and forget have you managed to reconcile this i cannot by numbers eight.

prozac sixteen years
"prozac" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"For a shot never got through prozac hick really pin ties lake edwards hit it over time slovenia kept back with a threetwo win over team usa who will that way slovakia who upset olympic athletes from russia three two two sean white made us winter olympics history first male athlete to win gold in three games he won comfortably behind in the halfpipe but this updating 28 the olympics i'm jon stashower westwood one sports diabetes high blood pressure hang zaidi meds everyone's on them if you're fifty year old male maybe you've been beefy or even with type 2 diabetes a million dollars of term insurance may only cost you about two hundred bucks a month affordable term life insurance is out there called term provider and speak with big liu at eight hundred four eight one fourteen fifty eight eight hundred four eight one fourteen fifty eight or visit big lou dot com remember big lose like you he's on meds to napa know right now you can get a twenty dollars prepaid visa gift card by male with the purchase of a napa legend premium battery it superior durability capacity power back at the obvious choice for people who hit getting stranded by a dead car battery so pretty much the napa legend premium battery and twenty dollars back quality parts couple people that's napa know how no that participating up autoparts doors proper institute 2018 if you are not spending every waking moment checking us out online all you'd better.

slovenia slovakia russia napa lake edwards sean white jon stashower twenty dollars million dollars fifty year
"prozac" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"prozac" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"For his fundraising efforts in the wake of hurricane harvey in houston unfortunately uh as far as the performance on the field today it did not go the same way as the texans lost to the jaguars twenty nine two seven and a game that was never even close and uh walk talked about all that his team got went through today not good gorilla prozac soliloquy vergara football game obviously we can do more than enough to win that's a short weeks prove or so much was a downer after the excitement of the pregame obviously you didn't perform where warranty fall of so for anybody when once it through that touchdown baz y'all lead in a big stop on defense and they scored how big was there what do you think capital that series we didn't stop any pretty playing some fuller we didn't do devil dance was it more a case of them being good or bad the football team came in hearing the digging get a solid win would you think about for net obviously the letter for another one hundred yards in his first nfl game and a touchdown on twenty six gary so just under four yards per carry but jiji watt obviously a very short and very terse in his postgame comments as the texans get mauled by the jaguars today by a score.

hurricane harvey jaguars houston vergara football nfl gary one hundred yards four yards