35 Burst results for "PRI"

How to Build A Business For the Long-Run

The Road To A Billion

05:36 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Build A Business For the Long-Run

"What are the things you look for in a business idea operated cetera and see if it has potential to scale big make big money. I just picked big markets like You know like we jumped in the health and wellness space. We knew that a large majority of americans were fat and overweight and obese and spent a ton of money to buy products like this. So i definitely want to take a big market. I and i know people are willing to spend a lotta money in as kind of like a i. You know. I want to think about. I think about like if you can build unfair advantages or you had some advantage over Over market that that may be some don't have You know. But yeah i would. I would just pick big market like for us health and wellness. It was awesome personal as well. I mean. Chris was really big believer in paleo. Tedo so no during the time when things weren't working and kept him motivated kind of or a bigger a bigger problem to solve. We wanna help one hundred thousand or five hundred thousand women you know Regain their their suds of a pri- inuit whatever it is but i picked big markets first and then just figure out like can i build Can i take a very small segment of that big market and make a business out of it so i would encourage you to think in terms of where is. Where's the money flowing where people readily willing to spend money on certain products or ideas are topics. Yeah nine think. That's a great answer. Hopefully marcus that helped you to your place of bad reception but glad we were able to answer it. We have molly love it. And she wants to know about a coming trend next. Five years in marketing. Hey molly hey. How's it my question and appreciate that. Yeah yeah so. Thank you so much for all this information. That's really super I am brand new and I just wanted to check in and see if you had any thoughts about trends man Not so much trends. But i am. I am super bullish on however you wanna define it. E commerce internet marketing. You know however you wanted to find space that we're in. I am so bullish. Because what i know to be true is that there are just no end number of new places to promote your product whether it's tiktok whether it's you know Emily yesterday says she was crushing it on native networks. But what what i know to be true is there are going to be continually new places to to market product which is super cool and just the rate at which the tools available to us as marketers just seeming seemingly better and better and better and better like i mean. I'm damned with sms cart abandoned. I answered with the idea of sending physical mail out to people. I mean so so we we do live in a world of marketing world where we are just like new marketing waste or reach customers is happening all the time. Different ways to engage them whether it's over email whether it's direct mail whether it's physical location. So i don't know that there's trends so much is but we have a very quickly growing exciting dynamic space to work within and it just opens up huge opportunities for people that can see that stuff and leverage it So yeah i don't know. I mean health and wellness is always a big trend financial crisis. I'm sure the pressure are going. Prepar going crazy right now with what's happening with pandemic stuff so i think if you're opened like listening to the what's happening in the world you can you can do take yearly. Well if you keep both ears open so welcome to the space molly like. It's really great to have you and it's a it's a. It's you'll find really people here that are doing really interesting things and So yeah for sure. I joined this really great mastermind. So i'm really excited about that. But yeah thank you for that. I appreciate your thoughts on it. Been great thanks. Thanks moyer quickly. Want to questions but i say it was interesting talking with my wife. Laura and her her cousin who's a doctor like a Like an er doctor. Remember him as a wedding. Yeah yeah you met him. Yeah he officiated policies out here in vegas. Because they're getting. They're getting married on october. First and sedona other doing their originally going to a whole albert wedding another kind of eloping but yet his bachelor party wife comes in. Gaza comes in today. And so we've seen watt. They're talking about tiktok because he's made a couple of videos on tiktok have just gone like a million half use you million views and it's just like not knowing what he's doing and like one thing there. I don't have to talk at all currently but like on my phone. But it was like lauren like do same way when you like instagram. When you're osha gone on instagram. Five years earlier or later two or whatever it is s happening right now in tiktok. It's like why would you not at least explore play of tiktok and in tiktok. Not you know that will get supplanted by something else. But it's like i like as i get older. I mean i'm really just getting active on instagram in the last month or two executive assistant like posting stuff for me you know i mean we talk about what she's going to post but like but i'm like you know stupid resistant to instagram. A long time. Because i'm like i'm gonna become commodity in my old age you know and it's like i don't know why it's gotta stop doing that. No

Tedo Molly Marcus Chris Emily Albert Wedding Tiktok United States Moyer Sedona Laura Instagram Gaza Vegas Osha Lauren
DoH coming to Chrome for Android

Security Now

06:27 min | 2 months ago

DoH coming to Chrome for Android

"Does not going to be able to type it in. DO H. is coming to chrome for. android. Although the desktop releases of chrome? have offered the enhanced security and privacy that many of us love offered by DNS over https. which appeared in chrome three two. Major versions ago? It wasn't added to the IOS or Android wins back then but last Wednesday's chromium blog was titled a safer and more private browsing experience on Android with secure DNS. And I think I would argue that that's a good place to have D- DNS over https. Paraphrasing from Google posting for the sake of Brevity, and to skip a bunch of stuff that we all already know they said. With, Chrome eighty-five. We're extending support of secure DNS in chrome to Android as we did for the launch of D. O. H. on chrome for desktop platforms will progressively roll out do H. on chrome for Android to ensure the feature stability and performance as well as an I think this was significant to help do H. providers scale their services accordingly. As we've talked about the fact that that arguably. Setting up. Persistent. https connections to DNS servers is a significantly more burdensome process for the server than just fielding UDP packets DNS you know traditionally over UDP is incomes a packet and A reply. https involves the whole T. L. S. handshake to set it up, and then you're maintaining persistent session and I don't want to have to do that every time you make a DNS query or a be way slower and nobody wants a performance hit when you get authentication and privacy. But still you're you have to maintain state over at the server end in order to offer this service and that can require the PRI- The providers to scale in order to make that happen. So presumably, there are gonNA be keeping an eye on how well this does and in fact, they talk about that a little bit about the possible need to fall back they they said. android chrome will automatically switch to DNS over https if your current DNS provider is known to support it. And I just hit the space bar by mistake of scrolled. This also applies to your current android private. DNS. That's DNS over. If you have configured one, they said this approach means that we can preserve any extra services provided by your configured DNS service provider such as family safe filtering, and therefore avoid breaking the users expectations making it transparent. They said in this automatic mode chrome will also fall back to the regular DNS service of the users current provider. For example, if you had configured DNS over T. L. S.. In order to avoid any disruption while periodically re trying to secure DNS communication. So presumably, as I said if the provider were become overloaded or stop offering the services for a while, it'll just smoothly drop back to traditional DNS. They said in case this default behaviour isn't suitable to your needs. Chrome also provides manual configuration options allowing you to use a specific provider without. As. Well as the ability to completely disabled feature. They said if you're an IT administrator, chrome will disable secure DNS. If it detects a managed environment via the presence of one or more enterprise policies, we've also added new DNS over https enterprise policies to allow for a managed configuration of security and s and encourage it administrators to look into deploying DNS over https for their users. So anyway, basically, it's what we've what we've seen before. By. well by by chrome and pretty much now, all of the browsers who who are wanting to move their clients and and users from DNS over UDP traditional DNS over to https. So it's just gonNA happen seamlessly chrome will start supporting it if they see that you're using and it comes with a list of known providers. If they see that you've already switched your DNS there than they, they will just upgrade you to. To that provider if that provider is known to offer the service and because it'll be an automatic grade if there's a problem, they'll back you out of it and then in addition once that's provided under chrome for Android, you can also switch it to. Sort of a non automatic mode, provide the IP address and other URL requirements for http or for for D dns over https and start using it so again. To be I think that makes a lot of sense especially when at a mobile devices out roaming around more you're away from home where you're dns has only going essentially never even going. Public at all, it's just to to your own local provider in order to get resolution. So. Good to see this happening, and of course, we've talked about how this is also being rolled out for windows

It Administrator Google D. O. H. L. S.
The Latest Pandemic Shortage: Dumbbells

Business Wars Daily

04:22 min | 3 months ago

The Latest Pandemic Shortage: Dumbbells

"Perhaps, you've spent the summer exercising outdoors, and now you're starting to wonder whether you'll be able to keep that up when winter hits after all even though gyms may have reopened where you are many of us are skittish about exercising indoors with a lot of other sweaty hard breathing people a set of weights for home gym or garage or basement more likely seems like a great solution. Yeah. How often do you have a great idea only to realize everybody else's having the same great idea that's what's happening here folks since the early days of the pandemic stationary bikes, treadmills and streaming workouts have been hot commodities demand for one item in particular has driven scarcity dumbbells just try and buy a set the goods a newsletter published by Vox, says, we're in the midst of the great American dumbbell shortage. All right. So it's not like we're talking about a shortage of life saving drugs but if staying fit means not just health but sanity to to you, a dumbbell shortage could be a very serious thing. We feel your pain. Here's what happened according to the fitness fanatics experts at box think way back in your memory on March fourteenth the president declared the pandemic, a national emergency that was A. Friday the very next day ushered in the weekend that America changed. Colleen. Logan. Of icon health and fitness told Box Logan is vice president of marketing for the company which owns nordictrack other fitness brands that weekend they started seeing what she called crazy crazy sales every day in March sales doubled compared to March twenty nineteen. They quadrupled in April and were up six hundred percent higher in May Logan said. Rival bowflex was also inundated like Nordic track. bowflex sells weights along with bigger, more expensive equipment like bikes and treadmills less well known businesses that specialize in strength training are also struggling to meet demand. Visit S PRI site and you'll see sold out labels on Dumbbell after Dumbbell try to buy kettle bell iron balls with handles, and in many cases retailer rogue fitness won't even give you a ship date instead up POPs vague. Notify me button. The level of demand is unheard of as inside Hook writer Tanner Garrity noted people don't even buy this many dumbbells in the middle of winter when they're cooped up and drafting fitness resolutions. The result of these shortages predictable prices are high according to vox a pair of fifteen pound rogue dumbbells that usually costs forty dollars is currently listed on Ebay for one hundred, sixty, nine dollars. The shortages point to a much bigger issue in the American economy before the pandemic, the vast majority of Kettlebells dumbbells and other free weights were made guess where China? That's right China closed factories and highways from January to April when the sudden unexpected surge of interest occurred here. America's existing supply of weights went fast due to closures in China. Well, no new ones could be made much less ship to America. Now, Chinese factories are open again, but they can't keep up with the outsized desire a few companies including. Rogue. Have turned to small American iron foundries to make them here. But few of those foundries are interested in making consumer products like kettlebells. It's expensive and difficult for them to gear up and they fear retailers will give the business right back to China. Once the global economy is fully open again in the meantime experts say the boom and at home. Workouts is no flash in the PAN ninety percent of Americans who work out say they'll continue exercising at home according to a survey by Wakefield research for some those at home workouts will continue to replace the gym. Others will simply add Jim visits to their routine. Regardless that means booming sales and continuing supply chain headaches for Nordic track bowflex and the light. For the lowly exerciser waiting and waiting for that adjustable weights set to arrive it can also mean getting creative. What else can you pump besides iron weights? Well you could try the technique. One robust dad showed off a photo featured by vox lying on the floor. He's balancing his two little girls on a piece of plywood and he's holding over his body. Just, be very careful with those willing little subjects. Okay.

Box Logan China America VOX Bowflex Ebay Vice President Of Marketing President Trump Colleen Nordic Tanner Garrity Writer JIM Wakefield Research
11 Trivia Questions on Singulars and Plurals

Trivia With Budds

03:27 min | 3 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Singulars and Plurals

"All right. Here we go. Guys eleven questions on singular and plural 's I'll give you the word and what we're looking for, and you give me the answer number one we're looking for the plural of cactus number one, the plural of CACTUS number one. Question number two, the singular of criteria number two, the singular of criteria. Number three on your list, the plural of Prius like the type of car you might drive a Prius number three, the plural of priests. And question number four, the singular of data number four, the singular version of data. Number. Five, we have the plural of vortex, the plural of vortex. And number six, the singular of bacteria, the singular form of bacteria. Number seven, the plural of Alexis number seventy plural of ellipses. Question Number Eight, the singular of nine number eight, the singular of alumni. Question number nine, the plural of phenomenon number nine, the plural of phenomenon. And number ten the plural of Laos number ten to plural of Laos. Your bonus question for singular and plural for two points of your playing along at home we're looking for the singular of Biscardi the singular of the Scotty. Those are all your questions for singular and plural from don airs in San. Diego. California we'll be right back in just a second with the answers. We are back with the answers to singular plural. Let's see what you knew. Number One. The plural of CACTUS is CACTI NUMBER ONE CACTI CSI number to the singular of criteria is criterion criterion like the criterion collection. Those are the single best movies in existence according to their website number three plural if Prius is pre so pri I number three, pre I similar to CACTI number four singular data is a datum datum would datum dat you. Number five, the plural of vortex. VORTICES vortices number six. The singular of bacteria is bacterium bacterium number seven plural of ellipses is ellipses ellipses number eight singular of alumni is alumnus or the female Alumna number eight singular of alumni is alumnus or Alumna number nine. The plural of phenomenon is phenomena phenomena and number ten. The plural of Laos is lice you don't want to get those in grade school and the. Bonus, for two points. The singular of Biscardi, is Bescot Toto shot to my brother Scott Buds who I often call. Scotto.

Criterion Collection Bescot Toto Vortices Alexis Scott Buds Diego California SAN
Prions And Infectious Proteins

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:11 min | 4 months ago

Prions And Infectious Proteins

"So today's topic is one I've wanted to address for a long time. It's the topic of Priante, a fascinating area of infectious particles that aren't. Alive, it's not it's not viruses or bacteria or or fungus, and in the days of cove it if you really wanted something else to have to worry about him. Here we go. Here's Priante and fascinating topic that has some very interesting routes and potentially some application to a number of important neurological diseases. So we'll say we're speaking with Dr Cassandra Teri. She's a reader in protein pathology at the London Metropolitan University in London so welcome to the podcast Dr Terry. Thank. You Kevin thanks for having me on. Yeah. This is really really good. I really appreciate you. Taking the time to meet with us because this is a topic that I think has. Just, so captivating. And we really need to start with the basics and there's a disease called Kuru. What is Kuru? and. Why is it important for us to understand pre-owned related disease? Okay. Yes. So curry is a really really interesting disease and. is. A disease that was found the tribes of people in. New Guinea. Um. What you what they used to do as part of that culture is when members family members of their tribe. Would die What they would do is they would actually. Senator. Eat parts of the of the of the person that had dead deceased. And And you know many years later when scientists looking into this, what happened was a lot of people down with this strange Strange symptoms the couldn't really work out why so many people within these tribes were getting these symptoms. So. When scientists eventually looked into it to try work out what was going on and they bend discovered the doing this practice this rich listrik cannibalism I'm what happened was essentially. A parts of the body such as. The central nervous system in the brain were eaten. By members of the tribe and those people who you know these parts of the brain. A parts of their body that were essentially infected with prions they got passed on to people who eat within the tribe. So essentially, what's happening is People within this community came down with the same disease Kuru. So it was it's been directly linked to the fact that. Members of this tribe were essentially add contracting this disease by ingesting m other m humans who had this these prions essentially I mean it's a fascinating disease unluckily this. The which list cannibalism has now been banned, it's not been stopped and there's been no more cases of crew and but it from a scientific point of view. It's very interesting to to see the actually this was one of the first reported cases of a transmission of a disease from humans to other humans. So this is why it's really Important to understand Karoo and from a scientific point of view because it shows prions can be transmitted. From humans to other humans. Now, you say, you say prey on and I've always said Priante and I've taken classes where said preempt is this like a tomato tomato thing like a UK okay. I try on other people, call them Priante if complete. Other. Correct pronunciations. Prions you can call them preowneds his. Just wanted to make sure I. got it right because you don't want to talk to a world expert and get it wrong. So that's a by. Could you tell us more about what is a PRI- on? So. They are essentially transmissible at infectious proteins. So they all proteins which are found within your body. And what they do is they can convert into a abnormally folded form of of the protein. And they can actually be transmitted. To species on cools disease essentially an infectious protein possible. It's really interesting stuff. So so you say they're naturally found in the body what is their role in the central nervous system? This is this is really important questions so. Obviously, lots of people, lots of scientists have tried to look at what it actually meant to be doing when they're not on the disease state, and actually if you look at mouse models, if you knock this protein out this off pc prion protein, if you knock your towels in mouse models. Mice. Absolutely. Fine. So exactly what it's doing in the body is not entirely clear. So there's lots of different theories are what it could be doing, but to this day was still not entirely sure what the prion protein does when it's not causing disease.

Dr Cassandra Teri Priante Dr Terry London Metropolitan University London Senator Curry Karoo New Guinea Kevin UK
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 4 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Tomato Success with Craig LeHoullier

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

08:27 min | 7 months ago

Tomato Success with Craig LeHoullier

"You're also like a lot of people this year though you're sort of exploring new territory literally you are but a lot of people. There's been this enormous. I mean I was talking again for that story in. The Times talked to thome stearns of high mowing organic seeds and he was saying they had a three hundred percent increase in Gardner Home Gardener sales this year and some weeks. They were up as much as five times normal week to week. And and so many people gardening garden centers or having bumper business even though with the restrictions and so forth on on on shopping. And so you know you're a little bit of a new gardener too because you're new snow as you're absolutely right and the PRI the perfect timing of our move at a time where you know there are some really real challenges and difficulties with covert. I get to go through and share an experience of what it's like to garden in a new zone in a new area when confronted with New Space. New Decisions to make. So I you know all of us you and I are both and there was many of educators and in garden coaches and people who are trying to inspire new gardeners to stay gardens forever. So I'm hoping that opportunity allows me to share what I'm doing the things that succeed the things that go wrong. I'll be very open about all of it and then learn what. I can about gardening in Hendersonville in my particular yard this year. And we'll make some adjustments next year so I am you know. I've been gardening. Forty years to be able to still be as excited about gardening. Forty years into a hobby is just to me It makes it a very unique cobby. Don't you think and we'll also give people the heads up that you've been doing these really fun which I've been coming to. Instagram lives on Fridays. And sometimes at other times Friday afternoons and you're at NC tomato man on instagram. And you people can like ask you questions the new show us how you're doing things and what stage the plants are out and I mean they can just chime in and say what do I do about this. How do I stay that? What so? Let's talk about some of the things I mean I think in Raleigh you grew in Straw bales and in growing bags that were set on the surface of your very famous driveway. Your driveway driveways right. Yes and where? Where are you growing tomatoes and other things now? Are you growing in daggs in bales? Are you growing in the ground? What are you doing now? So we're we have about a quarter of nacre backyard that is quite sunny and but we have our septic field back there so one of the things I did not rush into is getting a shovel and digging up the soil I learned a lot about container gardening. Straw Bale gardening but will focus mostly in container gardening. And we'll definitely growing. I garden for years and years and years traditional garden. And so you never really forget about that experience. But it's it's a work in progress because I've got. Let's see twenty nine plants planted but another seventy or eighty that needs to get in there and they will probably go into ten gallon. Containers grow bags. You know. Maybe some going container. So it's you're catching me where it's a work in progress and figuring out day by day as I go along. What's the worst thing you ever did to a tomato may? Maybe the worst thing that ever did to to a tomato when it still rewarded me is we do seedling. Sales in the spring and all gardeners have lots of things that you don't sell. Don't get given away get forgotten. They just sit there so I had some sun goals that were at least two months past sales type they were. They were a foot and a half tall of just a stem with maybe a few leaves coming off it and they even. They didn't look very good. So I'd find those and thinking. Oh I've got space for another son Gold and they just bury. It is deep as I can and it leaves out in it produces delicious son go so I guess. The moral of the story is tomatoes. Tough gardeners I think in general especially new gardeners really. Don't WanNa make mistakes and we tend to maybe over care for and baby are plants. And I've learned through the years that tomatoes really do respond well to some tough love along the way. There's very few things that actually will kill them and make them disappear. Some of those things have teeth and But yeah they're very forgiving and You know we'll probably talk through some tips in this in this chat we have about what do you do? What are the things to do to help build in quality from the Front? And what are the things you do over the course of a season to ward off really sad stories and just put a smile on your face at the end of the season. Because you've you've succeeded you've got what you want. You've got delicious tomatoes and on the table in jars in the Freezer. So you just talked about that stretched out spindly overgrown overdue transplant of the Sun. Gold and how you can really deep also up north. We haven't planted because it's been snowing and stuff and even in a lot of other places people quite a bit to the south halfway between you and me or more people have had some frosts recently. It's been really nutty so not to worry. If you haven't planted yet folks I have a friend who even here up north one year. He was so busy with work assignments. He didn't plant tomatoes till July fourth weekend and he had the best rocky ever had but one of the things with an overgrown planners Finley plant like you said is planet really deep because they can make those adventitious roots off the stem right. There are plant. That can do that. So they can. Really root in Super deep not suffocating. It right absolutely and I actually also plant eggplant peppers deeply a As a few friends of call me I tend to be a bit of a rule breaker and yes. I read books and I read blogs but then I kind of put my thinking cap on and I think why can't I try this? And it has helped me to develop some new variations on techniques through the year and You know succeed more often than not. So we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA plant deep. I plant even a normal six inch. Kind of a seedling. Stout small seedling. That's maybe six weeks or so growing. Muno that I might have grown myself. I plant them deep. Do you take off the lower leaves. Do you create a splash like barrier to get prevents fungal spores from the soil from getting up onto that plant. Like what's your sort of I. How do I put it in the ground? And what am I thinking about? When I'm transplanting? So great question and it's a it's a really wonderful thing for beginners to consider as well because You may you may be looking to garden area. That's been gardened a long time he may be looking at something that you're just digging for the first time yourself. You may have a container. I think it's really good right from the start Your stand we're kind of soil you've got so is it. Does it dream? Is You if you dig a hole in? It rains that rain still there the next day or do you dig a hole in it. Rains and the water gone in five seconds. That tells you if you're to sandy during too quickly you're not retaining water so those roots are always going to be searching or if you've just got so much So much of a barrier to drainage that your roots are literally going to drown the plants. GonNa look like it's dry because it's wilting. But it's actually drowning because it's not getting oxygen so working organic matter and soil and maybe sending the sample off to an extension service just to get an idea if your three main trans n. p. k. nitrogen phosphorus potassium are in good balance At that point on you just dig a nice like you said Various much as the stem as you can or if you dig deep you can dig. How're you can dig diagonal and kind of been the plant in? Berry that stem because of photo tropism the plant grow up right. It may stick out of the ground bent but it will go right up toward the sun. It's almost like a trench and the two thirds of the stem is below. The root ball is at one end. Say at the left and then the most and sort of been the upper part in the upper couples. That's up and then you fill in that trench and your tomato will again. Can you say it will grow up

Gold Instagram The Times Gardner Home Gardener Thome Stearns Rains Hendersonville NC Raleigh Frosts Berry
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 10 months ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 10 months ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
Istanbul Blockchain Week with Erhan Korhaliller

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

08:13 min | 10 months ago

Istanbul Blockchain Week with Erhan Korhaliller

"Jump streit in and speak to a little bit about what you've done leading up to This Istanbul blockchain wake. You had US pull something like this off the PRI. Obviously now a lot of papers tell us a little bit about how you got into the spice and what you've been up to. Yes so I'm like yeah okay digital's been around for about three years now working in the crypt side. We've we've represented some of the largest projects Exchanges want it's you name it like Really really wide wealth across the world globally. And so as you can imagine where we we we're going to events all the time I'm also we have what we have a youtube channel. Tv where I've got stay safe what your parents households big names on that kind of got us into the conference circuit. We would offer like summit and mold some big events in innocence and variance around Europe. And after a while you know another is events when us is more thing you know. Can you help us get speakers? Can you help us get on says? Can you do something I love? You May as well start doing everything at this point. I mean it's not far off apart from the edges logistics. I'm anti. Yeah you're not moving excited. I'm has like a useful. No matter crypto no matter what we say and so. I'm traveling from blockchain blockchain. We of course the conference obviously. I'm promoting my agent. Pr Agency and our clients and it was he trying to win new players. And you know that that really made me understand like what made a conference good. What MADE CONFERENCE BAD? And you know what what what kind of speakers would help educate the space and You know what people want. Keep out and now we're GONNA pull those lettings into Istanbul bunch and I'm really really excited. Excellent my will pretty obvious progression into that through the payout year. At every how you do it I really don't. It's you single. You got kids. I suppose that's probably a pretty good formula for success in that my in that means but trump look why why Turkey. I've got to ask the question. Why is Dan Bul main? It would seem like it's a bit of a stretch for anybody outside of Europe. Obviously anything straining on here in Moscow the world to get a custody your side of the wall off from Europe but zones wrought so why why. Istanbul why why Turkey. What's what's the profile. What's the reasoning behind that so techy as a framing community for football chaining CRYPTOCURRENCY In the in the last year so there's been various reports coming out about how Turkey is leading into the doctrine precursor blockchain and these are opposed by you know leading leading companies like I and J. He's not reports that you know people just putting off Switzer You know there's a lot So for example. Let me just read this off. I mean so. For example the chain things that government is launching the digital Lira. Turkish lira next year. So now it'd be the second company behind China to do so And also they've launched a national go train infrastructure project which is how in Quebec services and various municipal services. Use the chain within Turkey. Now cost you know. Obviously you know this about you. Know to keep politically. But you can't deny that. They are now trying to lead the pack. This could be something fantastic with its economy because you know on twenty six since the failed coup has been struggling You know they had various sanctions They which which vary was was so volatile which lead singer of adoption into bitcoin trading over people trying to make money because they were it was just evaluating so much twenty five invasion as of Ottawa between eighteen which is a huge amount that he's and Yeah then obviously there's also they're also planning to get regulation in this year so that the capital markets or have been advised by the government to come up with Clear Regulatory Framework Kentucky which will allow companies to move INS incubate to to welcome contracts which is very exciting then addition to all of that That's Konya which is the seventh biggest sake. Two and a half million people never actually just announced the launch of a cornea coin. You will to us And you'll be with us up for your services like transport you'll be able to use it for other municipal services you know maybe even taxes stick them now and you know what. We're hoping that our elegance will be able to hear more. About how conference shall we say Look I mean look I think people don't realize outside of possibly Europe and Turkey. Just how big that actually as Ming. I'll looking around searching icy point. Eight one million populates in Turkey and for country like the major not third world a shorts health problems. That's it it does board US problems agents it sort of bring the door full this sort of adoption of the technology and actually using crypto in a sense and building out the blockchain solder things. It millions a lot of people and if we compare that to do by wedgie by. Has I've been talking about. I'm not sure how much progress has been made. But having that you know blockchain's CD digital city or whatever they want to turn they've coined Minnie's temples much large populace than Dubai and would say probably a much greater need to pick this up cost. So it's really groundbreaking. The such a large country is really taking those steps. Do you think Turkey could be or is one of the latest leading countries regard cryptocurrency use and blockchain development. It is it is it. The people don't know about it. And that's another reason why I'm doing this event to showcase Turkey to lead us to put them out I am. I didn't even mention has techie at twenty percent of people abused cryptocurrency so Alabama eighty million. Which I think he has an eighty million now late speakers. That's you know that's a lot of people influence the leading in the whole report including the US Australia all of Europe And then you will sixty two percents of opposed to the currency so so the way that I see things here is not all of these projects. I'm speaking to other in. Asia represent software. Whoever they are the missing huge market here they come up and open shopping Turkey. They could get. They could potentially get adoption that they've been hoping for so long and becomes clear they'll have a a really a safe environment to do so and the other cement. I detect people like they. They deserve this. Trump's been for the last few years You know like you've unemployment is at twenty seven percent which is ridiculous Even Women Supports Sam. Now if you compare that to the you can. Us We're about three and a half so it really shows the for me personally like my intrinsic feelings of this event is that we can help this nation industry. Bring bring growth in employment growth in jobs. You know like we all work remotely these days you know. Let let us help. People get less help. Educate has come into this space And really just grow grow. Grow tikey Gordon Turkish budgets float. Because like. I said you've got these amazing statistics. I've go around Singapore Adams. Say Hey can you name me one Turkish project like no one can do that really annoys me because it's like how how how we getting tough decision and no one of the projects as yoga? It hasn't even more so you know. My name's really is to shine a light on the Turkish ecosystem using the connections that I have that have made of the last three years And then also built strategic officer took his puts on encouraged to build took his communities as we've seen by the way from license of open to office until he into office in Turkey. Various exchanges opened office in Turkey to that they won't release L. Conference by the way which you'll hear more about near the time and it's just getting more and more It's just getting more and more adoption and I'm just I just can't wait to invite friends and family really these days into Turkey to show them. There is a beautiful place and is a wonderful project to wonderful countries to unprovided for

Turkey Europe Istanbul United States Blockchain Blockchain Jump Streit Dan Bul Singapore Adams Alabama Asia Officer Moscow Konya Donald Trump China J. He Switzer Quebec
A CAmpaign To End The Celebration Of New Years

The Promised Podcast

08:12 min | 11 months ago

A CAmpaign To End The Celebration Of New Years

"Welcome to the promised by gas. Brought to you on T. l. v. one the voice of the city whose worthies and Burgers in the nineteen thirties launched a campaign against the celebration of New Year's which in mandatory Palestine as in Modern Day Israel was known as Sylvester the name borrowed from Pope Sylvester the first thirty third pope of the Catholic Church who was buried and in the catacombs of Priscilla in Rome on December thirty first and who was beatified on December thirty first date became known as Saint Sylvester's Day or the Feast of Saint Sylvester which feasts came to stand for the reveries of the night dividing the last day of the year from the first day of the New Year in Israel as in Austria Italy Lee Bosnia Germany Slovenia Slovakia Switzerland Luxembourg left in China Poland and the Czech Republic France Croatia and probably elsewhere as well now on December remember twenty seven thousand nine hundred eighty four for instance. The paper hired-in reported that the city had been plastered with posters quote sponsored by the rabbinate and the the Hebrew community calling for residents not to celebrate this holiday Silvester as it is foreign to the spirit of Judaism they ask the owners of houses of pleasure and cafes not to rent their rooms for these purposes and quote Davar reported in the same year that deputy mayor Easter Iraq who fifteen years later would ascend to to mayor addressed the city council about quote the question of the holiday of Sylvester that is setting down roots in Tel Aviv. FEE proposal of Mr Rocca was accepted saying at the city council of Tel Aviv sees in the foreign custom of Sylvester celebrations a definitely unwanted thing which is in opposition to the spirit and traditions of the people title of Israel and asks all cafe owners and owners of large halls in the city not to organize Sylvester parties. A committee was chosen to speak with cafe owners owners etc about this matter and quote a year later in nineteen thirty five the municipality itself published this notice quote the city sees itself as obligated to remind owners of cafes and restaurants this year once again of the need to refrain from having public celebrations in honor of Sylvester Eve. This custom to celebrate the holiday of Sylvester believe in public Jewish circles in the Hebrew city harms the national lifestyle that is taking form in the land of our forefathers. This claim is aimed also at the General Oh public some of whom admittedly only a few make a practice of celebrating this holiday with debauchery and loud social parties obviously the municipality and the the citizens of the city will treat with respect anything undertaken and done in honor of this day by those residents of the city and their guests who are not Jewish for this is their holiday and quote in a year after that in one thousand nine thirty six of our reported after the fact that quote several cafes such as the Lawrence and Savoy had special holiday programs in Tel Aviv. There there were many private Sylvester parties mostly from the circles of immigrants from Germany until morning. There was much car traffic and many walking on foot. One of these people who return to his home home after midnight under the influence of alcohol startled the volunteer firefighters with a false report of a fire end quote in nineteen thirty nine. The paper beaucaire made its feelings things about known with a one line article with a banner headline on page three the article in its entirety. Read quote on Silvester Eve. Eleven people committed suicide in new. You Work and quote in one thousand nine forty. The religious paper hot so fat reported this quote I witnesses say that a man of Israel at midnight in Tel Aviv especially in the North would forget that he lives in his own nation and land semester celebrations were celebrated in several coffee houses Jewish houses in the Hebrew city and whomever was indies coffee houses which elevated the celebration to the top of the top and drinking and debauchery would forget that we live in times of emergency. The New Year by the general accounting is not for us. It's the Jews. But it is a New Year for trade and bills and money's silvester celebrations are not Jewish celebrations in the land of Israel. Especially and only those who became habituated to these celebrations collaborations in foreign lands the lands of assimilation fail to Wean themselves of this habit. Even after they pass through all the circles of hell they returned to their iniquity in the land of Israel Israel. These are just one chapter of the spiritual and moral decline that is evident in our public life especially in the first Hebrew city the glorious tel.. Ah Vive end quote now to celebrate. Silvester Twenty twenty in the glorious Tel Aviv. There were hundreds of events for instance one could welcome the New Year with the Abba Tribute Band Carney or or go to Cooley Alma for their annual gala. Three for one Christmas New Years Novi Bash the bootleg was hosting a centers party quote unquote the hostile hosted hip hop new year's breakfast on Rothschild had funke Meli and these were just a fraction of what was on offer so grand was the celebration that the municipality itself posted this on facebook from the legendary Tel Aviv. EDM Club the block quote mayor e high. I don't feel so good. I won't be coming into work tomorrow and quote quote this post from Iraq Tel Aviv Tel Aviv municipality itself. Yes there was the battery in the city. All right one could pretty much find any form of depravity ones. Momma might have worn one against save perhaps for the badgering bullying browbeating of the burgers. About how you really shouldn't go to a drag show on New Year's in the first Hebrew city in the Jewish state and arguing nothing captures the spirit of the city. Well Tel Aviv. Dafa better than a tradition reaching back. Almost ninety years of offsetting the ideological severity doctrinaire rectitude a to enforce the citizen of the hidden who ain't kidding of joyless Orthodox Zionism and greeting each new year. Hal each new day with playful exuberance heterodox selective Goya's and lots and lots of alcohol and seeing the first Hebrew city is a place not just for spiritual fulfillment but also for fun fun fun and more heretical. Still Bill Finding spiritual fulfillment in fun. Fun Fun with us. In the studio is the woman who's lovely prose is like a killer party and everyone's invited I speak of course of Alison gap and Summer Alison for Politico Than Republic foreign policy the Jerusalem posted. Jt the Ford and many other of your very best papers magazine is a columnist for Arts. You heard on. NPR PRI where I and the BBC and you've seen her on twenty four television and Al Jazeera TV and other places as well. She holds a World Centre Award for Journalism Recognizing Excellence and Diaspora reported anytime and rock our award for excellence and covering Zionism Eliane Israel. I was how was your Silvester. Oh very boring. I'm not a big New Year's eve person but it always takes me back to. When I first arrived in Israel in the nineteen eighteen eighty s and like most Americans had never heard of Saint Sylvester or New Year's Eve being referred to as Sylvester so when people started talking about Sylvester? What was the only Sylvester? I was familiar lady Birds Sylvester the cat. tweet neighbors I was like what are they crazy about the cartoons. I it took me a while to like and still now when I hear about Sylvester immediately that like cat face POPs. What's up in front of me? I thought I thought also in the studio with us as a man who is exhibit a rather than spiritual and moral decline in the city seems to be gaining in spiritual and moral seriousness through the generations. I speak of course of Os Zelter Zubeida Zelter writes and reviews books for arts including waiting just a week ago in the past he hosted a weekly show on TV on arts and culture in Israel and he is a political activist of passionate power charm and charisma insight and intelligence Ohad. Oh how is your Silvester. I was dancing on a wooden bar dancing on the bar. Because somebody in this room should have had a proper nears eve right now that's Great throughout my neck from dancing so hard I think that means that I partied as much as I could dance on your neck. No is is now painful because identity on my feet that that is a badge of honor. Yes angry my name is Owen. I don't meet the boasts upgraded the operating system on my phone last week and ever since I've been receiving hectoring messages about how I don't sleep enough and maybe it's time for me to go to sleep right now and how. I listened to an awful lot of podcast and oh I listen to my music. Too loud ended ended. I know that long term exposure to loud noise can be damaging to my hearing. And I really don't WanNa Brag about how I have maintained my youthful lifestyle

Saint Sylvester Tel Aviv Sylvester Eve Israel Iraq Tel Aviv Tel Aviv Silvester Silvester Eve Israel Israel Silvester Twenty Twenty Modern Day Israel Burgers Palestine Rome Catholic Church Germany Slovenia Slovakia Swit
5 Music Podcasts You Need to Hear This Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:42 min | 1 year ago

5 Music Podcasts You Need to Hear This Week

"This week's theme music a worthy lifelong companion. The curator is Paul or fiscal. The head Honcho music matters much newsletter. Here's why Paul chose this theme he says music is one of life's great joys. Don't ever take it for granted. Granted don't let it wash over you dive in with both ears and your whole brain whenever possible. Here are the podcast and episodes chosen by Paul. Monday's episode comes from Song Explorer and is called Aimee Mann patient zero. It's nineteen minutes long in this episode. Listeners owners are granted a backstage pass to the magical mysterious songwriting process with one of the best song. Writers of her generation. Tuesday's episode comes from Sound Opinions Gins and is called Opinions on Tool Lana del Rey and more farewell to Reco- CASICK and Daniel Johnston. It's fifty eight minutes long in this episode. pull up a bar stool and hang out for a while with a couple of highly intelligent highly opinionated music critics and friends. You'll always be better off for it. Wednesday's episode comes from Pri Arts and entertainment and is called. American icons crossroad blues. It's twenty minutes long in this episode. Robert Robert Johnson is more myth than man at this point. Change that perspective for yourself by listening to this fascinating podcast episode. It explores both the legend and the reality of the mysterious mysterious Blues Guitarist. WHO AS LEGEND HAS IT quote made a pact with the devil end quote down at the crossroads Thursday's episode is from strong songs songs and is called Mr Blue Sky by electric light orchestra? It's thirty five minutes long in this episode. Musician Kirk Hamilton. Is that fun. Super super talented friend. Every true music lover wishes they had in this incredibly entertaining. podcast Kirk presents a strong to his listeners and peels it back layer by layer air to reveal. Exactly what makes the Selecta tune just so special and appealing. You'll never hear Mr Blue Sky quite the same way again promise. Friday's episode comes from the Beatles Anthology podcast and is called Anthology one. It's twelve minutes long in this episode no narrator just an amazing exhaustive dip collection of audio clips of the Fab. Four check out the first of this eighteen episode twenty eight our podcast in addition to hearing from John Paul George and Ringo listeners. Listeners are treated to tons of song snippets from whatever time period. The lads are discussing at the moment a brilliant and intimate historical document of the most famous band ever. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Paul for this week's theme music a worthy lifelong companion.

John Paul George Mr Blue Sky Kirk Hamilton Paul Head Honcho Robert Robert Johnson Aimee Mann Lana Del Rey Sound Opinions Gins Beatles Anthology Pri Arts Reco- Casick Daniel Johnston
A 16-inch MacBook Pro is on the way. Is it worth the hype?

9to5Mac Happy Hour

07:28 min | 1 year ago

A 16-inch MacBook Pro is on the way. Is it worth the hype?

"Let's talk about that does seem imminent name brand that the sixteenth speculate prose seems imminent I believe there will be some revision to the map at price very very soon yeah prior to this this week or so we would have much more excitement about this but there was the French apple blog MAC generation my generation that I published this icon on that frankly we saw this and a week prior in just at a glance it based on like the glance at it with a comparison to the fifteen inch version and like the the identifying name it just seemed like this wasn't a new machine and we didn't is it enough but a week later mcenery published it and they did a thorough job of showing this is the fifteen inch icon in in Mac Os that shows the sort of generic math book pro and then this new one that now clearly shows the rumored sixteen macbook pro with other it clearly shows the rimet CC's member PRI- well he's a different map but pry don't don't you recall there like whenever there's sixteen inch macbook pro was rumored first from meanchey quo that like we had this whole thing about is it redesign is close to like in I think I was more like I'm not sure close in that and you're like no it's it's it's in the text you can it seems like it's taken is talk taking back over to the new entry and the existing family I was swayed by your argument at the time I recall that it is the sort of this is how long apple goes in between designs and we are due for a new design to begin at the top of the line sometimes and then they bring it down to smaller screen versions of that end the Waco described as sounded more significant because he he he's pretty standard in the way took spout stuff like purchaser updates versus something more substantial and the thing is if you go back and look report you probably could make it lineup this icon show as well because it is a new design is just a nine new design this is what we were kind of like hoping for an heads I guess yeah yeah I recall back it was like I would consider at the time mm-hmm like the Max version of the iphone a new design even though it's the same design it's a new product and then and then but it was swayed by the argument that I do for you redesign and there's so many reasons to do that anyway but yeah but I was fooled by this I I I just I was convinced this was the old one and I just didn't do the level of comparison required especially Yeah See oh there are some very minor changes that make this look like it's what's room and like you wouldn't look at it and say oh that's a sixteen inch Mac book but connecting the rumors with this image with the comparison to the fifteen inch version it's different than the math book pro shown like you glance at it and the bills are slimmer they don't look super modern because there's still got a lot of area below the screen and above it the sides are narrow got square corners so there's no change there the the base of the MAC book pro appears the same style at least there's more space between the edges against the speaker girl area would be larger sure but the keyboard the keyboard whether it's thirteen inch or fifteen inch and this appears to be the same that sixteen point whatever it is they've got the same cable on all three models it's just the base is bicker around the you know the aluminum part track pad like key layout and everything the only difference that people spotted really is that if you kind of Zoom Wayan you can analyze some difference where the touch bar is that touch bar seems to be just narrower you know by the the like one key on either side yeah because now you've go presumably a fiscal escape k. on the left and then the power button on the right is separated because on the current touch bar they try and make one continuous it's probably more like the macbook air now where the Mecca of key for touch ID and power just like the touch bar but it's a key shaped yeah and I think I think the current design of the touch by actually confused people because even towel the far right hand side is actually a button if you know it does not it doesn't look like a key that you can strike I recognized a lot of confusion about that especially as the 2016 generation was the generation that started making it so like the laptop turns on when you open the lid and stuff remember they started changing those behaviors. Yeah so you you don't even need to read cronies actually something that you can press and on this new design obviously looks like a standard okay it looks much more like button that you can actually push down Yep yeah I think initially like Meyer action was just a lot less excitement about this because mean you're people who who appreciate not just what these things can do but how they look like no we were really bored and kind of uninspired by the iphone design whenever the six lived on to the seven you know he had six six seven again eight we didn't have to bother with but whenever the ten design came about we loved it and we still do I think that's kind of feeling for this this this macbook generation is that you could change some things about it to make it feel more modern that there's some things happening with windows lapd ops that it's confusing apple hasn't done themselves is a perfect situation because right around the iphone seven timeframe oh the Andrew fainted started the quest of making the Basil's thinner in Sliema they weren't you know they went to the level that they are today but they were they were closed they were closer than the iphone was because the islands had massive for head and Chins because at that equidistant Hoban gap right on both sides yeah and it just looked unwieldy especially with the the at that time the what they call the plus signs right even bigger ones it was like this five point five inch phone and then you've got like a two and a half inch pezzo on the top one size right because that's what the rest of the industry doing Napa was basically just saying it's Laura's been like you know we don't need to bother with that stuff and then you look at the Bert Pro Design compared to

Apple Sliema Hoban Gap Meyer Andrew Napa Laura Fifteen Inch Sixteen Inch Thirteen Inch Five Inch
Horses Follow Money

Popcorn with Peter Travers

09:14 min | 1 year ago

Horses Follow Money

"This is popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and my frontier Alexander Skarsgard has a movie called the team movie of some serious intent guarantee that each and every one of you will have a chance to be a warrior Jackson do something out here to be a part of history said of reading about it in some book and I like that Wolf in that scene looking like do I believe this guy yeah because he wants to be a hero in the beginning of this scene nats character is reading a book on history so when deeks walks up to give this little little speech clock said and he's like Oh you're you're history so that's why he wants ended in he knows at all these guys young guys want to do what they want to be heroes they wanna be says this is your opportunity to be a part of history instead of just reading about it in some book on so this is his way of just tickling that a little bit to get them excited and like trust me follow me and you get to do great things I think what this movie is about and what it's saying and what's manipulative about it is very timely it's there's a thirty and ital- authority masks itself sometimes and how it creates a thing where you wanna please it or you can also say if you don't please it it's going to be trouble for you absolutely and how easy it is to surrender your morality to authority the the MILGRAM experiment you remember that back in the day they think it was back in the stay there was that famous experiment with a had subjects. Push a button to electrocute someone in an in another room but because there was a doctor of or an actor playing a doctor conducting this experiment telling the subject to to do this normal good people law-abiding citizens we're willing to ultimately execute someone might push of a button in another room because they had surrendered their own morality to a person in a position of authority on which is very troubling and there's movie touches on that a bit where in the beginning they feel like they're part of unit and the unit has its own. Morales be in its own moral compass and the leader of that unit is deeks so all they have to do is just follow blindly and what happens for Bregman nats character starts to rub against his own morality eventually I was also fascinated with how declares the guys against each other it's almost like a love story and it's a courtship he it is positive attention and then when someone's not quite doing what he wants to heal ignore that work on rayburn another character instead and then suddenly eases pet which will leave Friedman feeling stuck out in the cold and bring back in his lover and on and it obviously feels quite timely 'cause it's about whistle blower which is quite topical right now isn't it totally is look at you look at you go from one into another without ever being the I mean I'm watching I watched you know on being a god no but that guy yeah from another planet yeah you know I I need a little levity between some of the dark projects worked on so so that was it was a great opportunity to that a lot of fun on that job and Kirsten dunst and you'd be back together again after melancholy and your large tree experience we play a married couple again melancholy different kind of very different and I couldn't have been more excited I love I love there's an she's obviously fantastic actress but also so we became very close on melancholy and I was thrilled when she called and said doing this show and asked if I wanted to come in and play her husband and then get eaten by should I reveal it's a spoiler alert I know that now we the Dow and you found that very appealing immediately didn't you yes and I love the way it was set up because it said it's the two hander and you think all right this is a show about this couple on an I love when you in a way almost trick the audience too so they sit back can eat popcorn and think like I think I'm not watching this is going to be the trajectory of the show and then the end of the it's so surprising hopefully to the audience suddenly taste eaten by me and and the Hell Agadir and then the show is about something very different and it takes a different turn so it was lovely but what does the success that you're having do to change it when you are on big little lies you didn't only win the Ma you when the Golden Globe Sag Award every other award they could actually meant did that turn your head around did you look in the mirror and say wow you're fabulous that's how I start my day every before those awards that's my mind to eat just my bloodline from my parents like wow you're you're you're fabulous go out there and conquer the world they'll do it but that must have been experience doing that series as well it's extraordinary it's kind of a great thing with you and Meryl Streep deep we have one day one together one little moment and she said son and I started crying and my heart melted it that was it I mean yeah it's Meryl Streep it's on there are a lot of extraordinary actors on big little lies obviously had the great privilege of working closely with in the coal but Amerisleep is grow up watching her movies and a massive Fan Kramer and Kramer was I WanNa my parents favorite movies that's just so bad parenting because they would why would watch that when I was a kid about such a great movie the worst right the kids let's watch it was their way of saying you should be grateful that we're still together because look at this this is what can happen this is what could I think is Weird is that your dad's done in Mamma Mia with her yeah has way more scenes than you've Ah Yeah Way more fun and singing and doing that and you know dad loved every second of it I think it he can't dance he can't sing hey he should not be wearing wearing spandex but he's dances and he thinks that he's worked with all the worst panics and he loves it and I think it I think the audience his loves it does he give you a pointers now in your career does he call you up and say I just saw not after the spandex and Mama Mia and do it and I'm like Dad you've lost for list but you've got how many of you in your siblings are actors three three three siblings yeah yeah we're eight kids and four of us are actors how much do you all see of each other so I live here in your but I just got an my everyone else is in Stockholm so they all live back where I was born on and I've lived here for many years on but we're very tight family and I go back every holiday and whenever I have a long enough break to go home Sweden go back but I haven't had a place in Stockholm in fifteen years actually I got one last year and I'm moving in and a couple of weeks so yes I'm very excited about that to have an apartment I'm still gonNA live here but I'm have a permanent base in Stockholm it to spend more time out there and be around my family you can do a great American accent has taken over you now is there any Swedish left in my dad's wife is she's from Ohio so she's lived in Sweden for many years but when we're home it's kind of a mix of English and Swedish now so it's kind of a weird combination of the two did you ever have a problem with the American accent idea did you ever have to get to rain yourself to get out of it. The British accent has been more difficult for me you had to had a British accent on Tarzan and that was trickier I think my my Max that my accent was already more American than British before I moved out here we I lived in in Texas for a while when I was eight that'll do it and I went to a when my dad was shooting in Budapest I went to American schools there when I was thirteen so it was it was definitely felt more natural and organic to slip into an American accident than on that in British so on Tarzan Edward quite heart with the dial code but has that seeped into being your accent when you're speaking I don't think so little Texas and there when you said that I don't think I think what what those informative years you know the formative years of being when I was I was so young like the first time I was exposed to the English language was when I was in Texas which was an amazing experience because Fredericksburg it was like proper cowboy country and coming from Stockholm I was an urban kids from downtown Stockholm in a cowboy movie because like I was surrounded by real cowboys on horses and I loved every second of it and I even got a pair of beautiful cowboy boots and I was so excited to come back home to Stockholm like imagining this moment of day one of being back from from from from Texas walking in Mike Cowboy boots and all the kids would be like Oh my God he's a cowboy and then I walked in and everyone started laughing at me and said like why are you wearing women's boots sake because as an eight year old for eight year old kids in Sweden at the time like cowboy boots looked like ladies boots basically so I was very disturbing moment and and trump ties I was traumatized again it was like imagining this big immutable moment where everyone was just like touching them like Oh my God Alex has been is now a cowboy after three months in Fredericksburg on instead they laughed at me you've never wore them again they're they're all I haven't on on in my apartment here on on a pedestal I still have the boots well let's take a couple of last questions from the world outside world of the Internet are you ready for this I don't know well come on charmaine visas what do you miss most about sweetness side from family when you're in the states for long periods of time was it your dad cooking naked. I remember that story from last time that was great great that's something I definitely miss on but he's here quite a bit dated Naked Soldier apartment here clothing optional. Yeah we'll come and cook it my place sure do miss my pickled herring you can't get that here now it's you can but it's it's saying if you're in New York or Elaine yeah but if you're shooting somewhere more look slightly more remote rural area it's it's it's not easy to find pickled herring this is this is sad like this is very different from fermented herring that soothes drumming it is of course I don't need that that's very pickled not fermented pickled fermented huge difference listen to that PRI that's the have mark j say what is the Best Oh yes there it is the answer is already there anyway to show everybody what you can oh it's time for song again as we end this okay and I always ask for something in Swedish because it's beautiful language it is beautiful we've heard you do American Texas everything else that you've done what sense of melody and beauty can you give me in the Swedish tongue okay so we just uh we were talking about pickled herring in a tradition in Sweden is to drink schnapps with when you pickled herring and then you sing schnapp songs of course yeah and there are many fantastic snuff songs the most famous one it's super easy so we can sing it together we can we all know it let's yes come on universal classics Theater Learn Gold Whom Hope for

Texas Sweden Stockholm Alexander Skarsgard Nats Wolf Jackson Fredericksburg Morales New York Elaine Alex Eight Year Fifteen Years Three Months Milgram One Day
New York, Greta Thunberg And United Nations discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

New York, Greta Thunberg And United Nations discussed on PRI's The World

"You know what's really bad for or the environment flying planes generate a lot of greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change so when the united nations convened a summit in new york of world leaders to discuss climate change one sixteen year old woman in europe said you know what i'll skip the plane i'll sail to new york instead the b._b._c.'s chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt met with greta thunberg and got a chance to check out the racing yacht that will transport her across the atlantic to the summit sailing the boat out outs well. That's gotta take greta thornburgh to new york and he's a brutal experience the military it's a it's

New York Greta Thunberg United Nations Justin Rowlatt Europe One Sixteen Year
Moscow, Alexei Navalny And Russia discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Moscow, Alexei Navalny And Russia discussed on PRI's The World

"Large protests in Moscow. Let's go over the weekend got ugly. Police arrested more than thirteen hundred people that is unprecedented in recent Russian history. The demonstrations were about the Moscow city council elections coming coming up in September and the fact that Moscow election commission barred opposition candidates from running Alexei Navalny is probably the most well-known opposition leader in Russia. He was not among those arrested on Saturday as because navalny was already in prison season he was detained last week and yesterday Nova only was reportedly taken from jail to a hospital with some kind of severe allergic reaction.

Moscow Alexei Navalny Russia Nova
Monica Campbell, San Diego And White House discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:05 min | 1 year ago

Monica Campbell, San Diego And White House discussed on PRI's The World

"The trump administration is vowing to fight a federal judges decision that blocks one of the White House's new immigration rules a plan that would have barred almost all asylum applications that the U._S. Mexico border the measure required migrants to apply I for asylum in the country. They traveled through on their way to the U._S.. So that policy is now on hold the world's Monica Campbell has been talking to those at the center of these decisions. She's at the Mexican border near San Diego where exactly Monica well. I'm actually in Tijuana and I'm in the plaza. When you crossover from near San Diego into to cross the border you enter this plaza? It's very placid there a lot of pigeons elderly man feeding the pitches in front of me cabs pulling up picking up people but as I just walked around the corner here there is a totally different scene and it's hundreds of people asylum-seekers migrants who are waiting to see if perhaps there number when they're number might be called up so that they can go and approach a border official in the U._S.

Monica Campbell San Diego White House Tijuana Mexico Official
Paris discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Paris discussed on PRI's The World

"Paris officials have activated their emergency heatwave plan that means is keeping some of

Paris
"pri" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

Shutdown Fullcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"pri" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

"Is hard core mystery. So you like to start this podcast. With a little bit of boxing metaphor. Because nothing sums up. Better than. Sing metaphor. Cz. I think about the most big ten bucks. Would that be? You'd have to be George Foreman. Right. You talk about. Running power off tackle, left and right. Over and over and over and over and that's the entire game played. That's a big ten man, right? Now, I'm not an historian, folks. I studied this story. And I tell you what they have to say you love stories, you have university of Michigan degrees. I only have a university of Colorado degree. I'm sorry, sorry for bringing members of Kordell Stewart. What, what, what happened? Michigan took a boxing metaphor. Just a metaphorical punch. Consider this, my application to your history department, an honorary Pri Pri Pri bachelors from the university of Michigan. We're here today to talk about the war between the big ten east and the big ten west. Now, no one knows who fired the first shot because way back when the big ten was founded there were no shots guns had been invented alcohol hadn't even been. Tell the big ten. Why did the big ten go to war with it self was political legis economic war of territorial? Expect none of this. None of his at all. About iron sharpening iron pure competition. The spirit of amateurism. And if one side happened to gain hundreds of millions of dollars from this enterprise, sheer coincidence. It's all going straight to textbooks. Just a George Foreman punch to the mind. I apologize for referencing a work of scripture in a temple of secular knowledge, but it's a very old book, which I feel you to protect. What the hell? I get the map on the screen, by the way. Textbooks was the name of Jim Delaney's yacht by the. So here's our battleground. Podcast is a visual medium. The objectives in this war. One capture Indianapolis. Dead center of. Objective to capture the capital for the west. Of course. It's the city of Chicago for the east. It's New York City because. We're using Jim Delaney's map. It says here there be dragons. What are the resources? Well excluding the split territory of Indiana. The east states have one point seven times, the population of west one point, six times, look roaster must report. One point four times the industrial actually all the high school football players in case you happen to need those.

Pri Pri Pri George Foreman Jim Delaney Michigan university of Michigan Kordell Stewart New York City Colorado Indiana Indianapolis football amateurism Chicago
"pri" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"pri" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Joe with antidote. Twenty inches causing trouble. I am off air though. I notice that I'm keeping it off air, right? On the air was accused me of poop, starring on the air, which I'm not really sure that's a fair title. You've also accused Lauren Nevada. Oh, she's a pupil. Oh, haven't somehow is not a poop stir in your eyes. Yeah. Funny. How what were you saying who are you talking about off the air? You don't wanna know. No, no, no, no, no, don't one of us her boss, for. No, none of the above. No. Yeah. Yeah. So. Anyway. Okay. Subaru aqua yet, we have. One of the things we're trying to get a lot of stuff going on. Don't forget at you at the tell you this. I don't think you can forget it because we have told you this year, that next Tuesday we've from tomorrow, we are going to be in really feel. For game one of the crosstown classic a wintrust. Crosstown classic. Wintrust the naming rights for that. Yeah. And it is going to be we're gonna be John barley corn. Nice on Clark street. One of the greatest albums prints. Their big show. Big show plan for you out there in advance of the, the seven o'clock start right? Very exciting stuff that we're going to be doing is special pre game show, and everything that's can be dead. It's gonna be great. So pre-pretty. We're the Pri Pri Pri this is what we're going to be. So we that pre are we running right up to the game. We run game. So we're got it. But I think there's even another pre there's a pre pre game show. I can't remember what they did. There was an instant plan for this. I don't know. Maybe making something up right now. But I thought there was going to be like a pre pre and then the pre then there's the network pregame show. Right. That makes sense with your aunty meser, generally. Right. And then there is the then there's the game. Right. So we'll have the socks call that game. Then. Or before that, I thought that was a plan for the Pri Pri where there's going to be another, like more excitement around this. This is one of my favorite events of the year. I love this. I love this rivalry. I love the is, is that because it's one of those rivalries that some people take it very seriously. But it is a, it's a fun thing, especially for people who are know, the Bill left in the world who love both teams equally, and there are very few of those. Yeah. I can tell you I've ever cubs him. But I, but the socks are set that such a romantic story right now. It is the, you know, these young kids, and they're all coming together, and you could see it happen. You could see this is what happened with the whites with the cubs five six years ago. Seeing now gelling you're seeing that coming together and then and they're fun to watch as Lawrence said, just the other day. It's must see television. Yes. It's become appointment view. And there's always something exciting to expect something will happen. I promise you. And we're around all these SOX fans and we look at what here. I mean, yeah, it's hard not to partake the kids, the kids bring that, that youthful excitement. That's what we're trying to do. We're trying to bring youthful excitement..

Pri Pri cubs Lauren Nevada Joe Subaru Bill SOX John Lawrence five six years Twenty inches
"pri" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"pri" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"And you know, mostly just taking a lot of John's stuff. You know, the studio didn't like and and test audiences. You know, had had a weird negative reaction to or didn't understand it. And you know, like a lot of things if things are different in the movie, you know, you get a weird response Matata. And it doesn't mean that they hate it just means that you know, they were just abused by not not into it or whatever. But you know, he's just really bad weird political situation, you know, and and I think the movie ended up getting pretty trashes the result was disappointing. Listen, we had a lot of ratings problems. You know, we we had to go at eight times to get an r rating, which is absurd when you think about it because it was to give a movie like that basically an x rating and seventeen so cutting out all the blood square, and then even then we had to go into like six more times to get the writing it was a different time. I mean, I just I mean, the kind of stuff that we were having to cut that you could get away with in a PG thirteen, but we now around TV show. I mean, it got it was so absurd. It got to the point. Where I was cutting on muggle flashes. I was on the phone with that the head of the VA, and he's any if somebody shoots somebody twice or two maybe three times, but he said anything beyond that, we feel excessive. We'll give you an NC seventeen because of all the blood with were gone. So I was having to go in and actually Krimau out muggle like gunshots and somebody like John Lulu where he had somebody shooting, you know, with guns. I mean, it was it was it was in vain to think that that a shot of a muggle flash. With was creating essentially an x rating for movie that was a really stuff to be involved with their ever been a release a bet that is close to what you saw. They let us do what they call a like, a international version, and we actually made people that cut the negative. We make copies of everything that we receiving what you're down. And so we can have some. And extended version pre MPA pre Zhang Claude Pri Pri a lot of south, and we did a full out Knicks completed it, and they were supposed to be the version that got released internationally. But then I think they decided that they didn't want to spend the money to actually take into the final step though. He was like we're big like lip services to John. Whoa. That they even did it. I think in a weird way. I, and I don't know if it ever came out anywhere like that. I mean, it could because it was it was definitely prepared. But I don't know if it did the other some people going to the movie floating around are like early cuts that we had from some of our test screen one of our guest reading and I wanted to make out. But yeah, I mean, I think that's a movie, that's you know, right for re restoration and reconstruction. But like I said, you know, he's never going to be a perfect movie or a greatly. But I think it could be, you know, like, maybe be elevated from a C minus two like a B minus or something, you know. I mean for me it felt like such. Natural to have Sam producing John. Woo film. Just the style stuff. But again two guys who the studio like really walked all over hitting in their earlier movies..

John Lulu Zhang Claude Pri Pri VA Krimau Sam
"pri" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on WGN Radio

"If you have to go by this. You're also going to buy a. Brass stripping brush, which looks like a giant toothbrush, and unfortunately, Loretta you're gonna get down on your hands and knees, and you're gonna do a little scrubbing and that is going to be the best. It's going to be okay. You're going to scrub it. Let's go scrub it. Let it sit there for ten minutes scrub a little more, and then wipe it with clean wet rag. But take one quick question. I have on my brick outside. That's been there for a while. It's white. What do I use to get the paint off couple? There is a product called goof off, which is a latex paint. Remover? I want you to squirted on their let it sit for about five minutes or so and then use a plastic putty knife to scrape it away that's same brass stripping brush that you're gonna use on the floor. You're gonna use on the wall to scrub that all away, and it should go away. Just fine. Loretta thank you so much for your phone. Call all of you. Thank you so much for listening. I hope y'all have a really nice happy thanksgiving and in the studios right now are Andy mazer and Mark carbon good morning, gentlemen. Tyler morning. That's you hear Hello again. Everybody. How you doing? Nice to see you. You guys are doing the pre-game northwestern against who we like to call it the Pri Pri Lewis northwestern and Minnesota the Wildcats course already in the big ten championship game lily, the golden gophers stuffers. I like to go by gophers gophers now keys checks, and I miss key tax. He was the best. He was the football the voice of college football. Yeah. He sure was. That's good Marquis kind of looked like he just roll out of bed. You got you got you got kind of like a big lebowski thing going. You got stuff on your your like the, dude? Okay. So I was up early today. Lou. I've already had a nice salad tennis match, and I feel very fresh. But do we just had to hit it around today? You know, it's a Saturday morning. Wanna go taking it easy? You don't wanna go hard. Right. Right. Just just working on the forehand getting in the groove. Well, I mentioned to you off the air that you do very nice job as referee in the hamp OBI with highs Sunday extravaganza. It is quite possibly some of the best radio out there. It's just a very unpredictable and and fun to listen to. And I think I even heard a promo related said, it's even better than smoking pot. Yeah. That was big Lulu. Sweet lulu. Wonderful pre pre game and happy thanksgiving. Both of you..

football Pri Pri Lewis northwestern Loretta golden gophers Andy mazer Tyler Minnesota Marquis Lou Wildcats five minutes ten minutes
"pri" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

11:35 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Ten from the twenty five snack. Here comes the blitz. Peterman gets rid of it. Jonathan jokes. Lebron's it. In with a go ahead. Touchdown one of my knock, Jon Murphy bills radio say knockout picks, that's a sensitive topic today for me. Well, you know, why did not go your way? So you were eliminated last week with no pick and the frigging problem is a beat. It's gonna take a second. Please. The problem is okay. I was ever told. Okay. So for those that don't understand what the hell we're talking about the knockout pool. Most was talking last week, not stop the poo for all shows for different show. Well, it's no, it's the that's not a show. It's actually I go. I don't know who's doing it moves you notice guys gonna me. It's Ernie's doing it Ernie Acosta WFAN CBS sports radio newsroom poll, but but listen, so it's a newsroom pool. And I got the shaft me along with Jerry Recco. And evan. The chef the three of us got the chef because we were thrown out of it. And there was a makeup pick. There was a there was a vote and the apparently the vote went through that. We're all all new I gave my twenty dollars. Yeah. That's why I'm out. Yeah. What do you think the from the fr? Oh, what are you talking? Okay. Here's the problem. You're right. You're right. You're right. You're talking about. Yes, you're right. But the thing is that I didn't know I was out. I didn't know the vote went through negative for me. Jerry and forever, right? We didn't know that. We were never told that right? There was a straw poll of those that survived and marched on should these individuals be allowed to make a pick. Right. And it was all hush hush. And the vote did not go your way and no-one no-one Ernie. No one told me this. Yeah. Now, I'm sure he told Jerry, I'm sure he told avenue works, whatever. And every day. I'm sure those guys will told and tazewell maybe say Hello to the guy. Nothing awhile. And then maybe he'd tell you. I I don't see him. I know. He's he's often here. Right. When you walk away when you're done you sued. I see him. I give him a pass away. We have a we have a locker right above one. Another. I should've let you don't. You see him as much as you should've Shyam attended a show. You hang out. You're talking all your friends here. I'm gone meeting, and I leave salt. So this is the thing. I just would like to have been told. That's all I'm saying they'd be moose to not make a pick. No, yes. Yes. Exactly. I sent him a text just before the game stop won't PM eastern. And then he told you're out this is about tax. No, no happen. Okay. That didn't even happen. I set him attacks. I said what's up bra? I gave him to be all you h it's terrible. I notice mistake. I wouldn't go out of California. General even surf I'll take the jets smoke adobe before you take the jets, right, right? First half happens. I'm sorry. First quarter happens. Nothing not second quarter. Third quarter zilch of gang song fourth quarter. I set a tax Ernie. Did you get my pick, bro? Neither do that. He replies. Oh, sorry. I've got to tell you you're out. Yeah. Basically apologize because you know, he, you know, he didn't see he sent me a long tax, and he was very cool and tax and then even forty and Evan and Jerry had to be out also. So that's supposed to be like for me. Oh, just because those guys out that means I shouldn't feel like my face. Well, it's a lotta. Sycophants collusion in this place. They're all. Everybody. They're all out the JET jets jets jets s sick of it. And I think you are. You're an agent involved with this behind the seats. I think this is partly you. It's a conspiracy theory. I think that you would wake me and you're behind this. By chess. Are I'm sorry. I had to accuse you, okay? Thank you. Can the hoodwink seem hurt my feelings? No, I listen. I I don't think it's cool. He should have told you. Rightfully out that I am rightfully out. You're right about I rightfully out. You should not have been you admitted on the air that you voted me out. No, I voted Ivo in all honesty. I said make the pick. But the majority of people said, no myself Evan and Jerry, right? We only three that idea. You know, I don't know. Honestly, I don't know. I check. You know to make sure I texted her yesterday. Make sure who I picked up. The excel spreadsheet to make sure I didn't double up my pick. I could just imagine this tax. It's the moose, bro. Here's my pick. Al. And then you go to Chicago, by the way. Has out that I guarantee you. There was some. Amazingly enough ties. I didn't think about you. Yes. You did amazes cash out. I didn't think about not on a Sunday. We know that. Giants. I didn't I didn't think about you yesterday. Coffin was doing know. John. Tastic show yesterday. We had a great Sunday. That's great. Congratulations. Text Ernie about you. I just assumed you were in. But you know, what to my chagrin, you're out? Well. You do not do not picking out. Reminding you I'll take twenty dollars. Twenty dollars. I'll white my nose. Would it? Take twelve spit on twenty dollars for everybody. In that newsroom. I don't even care disgusting. I did say Mike said I got it in. So you can might last week. No last week. I did not never me. Did you put the pick and last week? Oh, I was told to put it in four PM game. Because we will. I was late. I was training. Elliptical watching show. Yeah. What are you doing all day? Analyze yet. Did you forget I forget. Sitting there watching the pregame shows, and you completely forgot to make the knockout house blames that falls on you. Yes. I sit there. You're alive and a pool doing good. Whatever you feel about twenty dollars or not. Swimming pool you're watching every pre-game show known to man. And you don't make make a knockout pick. What are you doing? Hello. I have action. Sitting there. You're watching Terry and watch it ta. You're watching the Halloween. They can't get enough. I could eat these. What? Michael. You got. Sunday morning, and you're sitting there watching the Pri Pri Pri six no get your four o'clock what God's green? You obviously charitable priorities. Oh that is an awful job. I'm in big pools for big money that is no no hold on a second. Let's call. Let's call it. Like, it is what I was like says you want to get involved in the knockout pool. What's what's the knockout? You hook me. No, no. No. No. No, no. I do not hook you. Collusion. Four before the first knockout, Paul I said to you. What's the you want to get involved the knockout? Julia never heard of what is what we call the something different. Like you pick one team we really heard of them in like, all right? And then and then two days later, I got a text. I'm in. I'm like, all right. Great. Two days later. He's great fantastic. Welcome aboard. And then you promptly got eliminated. And then you join the second row, we all get. Pre game shows, even though you're humming around long pick a winner after winner and he'll fire or knockout pool pick. Then you're complaining that Ernie did not notify you that you were out. Yeah. Meanwhile, the week before you did not tell him your pick on time. And he put it. Told me why you're out. He gave you the field. Five of the jet victory. And then said, you know, what you're our tax. The jets. Just. Br I was never a egged on his face this week your never in everybody in that pool. Can go Fisher herring. Nice. I was at Andrew. I'm still here. It's very minded. I tell you that the bills beat the Saxons or lost the text yesterday at twenty thirteen. I wanna pull I've been out since week one. You will not a populist collusion. Hoodwinked crap. I was. Twenty bucks. Kim forty dollars. I lost now on this frigging thing. All. And you should have stayed a jets fan because they beat the colts yesterday. Thirty four including a gangrene records seven field goals from Jason Myers. The Rams stayed perfect twenty three twenty in Denver Jacksonville. Shamed. In Dallas, forty seven Pittsburgh, eight twenty eight twenty one winning Cincinnati Washington. Top Carolina twenty three seventeen and the falcons held off the bucks thirty four twenty nine. Atlanta had dropped three straight weeks. Six end tonight the Packers hosting the Niners. Yes has ten people got picks in late, and I asked the others. And I got the feeling they were going to give me crap. That's a quote from someone of text me during the games Bates. Okay. Mirny guy to my left. That's that's one of the guys who I left that would have gave them crap. Just like, you know, got in my left, those that are watching us on video. Oh, wait. We don't have video new system. I left. That's not. That's not true. I know I do do you think I I really cared. If you were I dunno most, Tony I basically said Ernie let them pick though, the all lose anyway. So let's pick. Let's say it'd be continue with us not over. I'm not I'm not in fear that Evan. Tasr? Recco. Ever. It is. Winners. You know, who it is don't act like ten or out. That's great. That's two hundred bucks. The does the math. You're a stud giddy up. Let's go a day. Just like the NFL CS the ANC s is now a best of five to one.

Ernie Acosta Jerry Recco evan jets CBS Pri Pri Pri Peterman Lebron Jon Murphy Jonathan jokes Packers Giants tazewell Shyam NFL Ivo California Atlanta Fisher herring
"pri" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Carol hills. This is the world, a co production of the BBC World Service PRI and w. g. b. h. in Boston, a Chinese national is in an American jail today. He's being prosecuted on economic espionage charges. This is a big deal is the first time as a spec did Chinese government. Spy has been brought to the US to face charges. Y'all. Jim shoe is accused of trying to steal technology from GE aviation through one of their employees. He was caught in a sting operation in Belgium and extradited to the US on Tuesday. According to Justice department officials, Katie Benner is covering the story for the New York Times. Katie. This is pretty amazing hundred. The sting actually go down. It's unclear whether or not the employees at g aviation was working with the government, but it is clear that GE aviation itself. The subsidiary was working with the government and was tracking communications between one of its own employees and this Chinese spy, Mr. shoe. And eventually Mr. Choubey can't ask the employee for more and more information. Much of which was proprietary, which the employee himself him or herself recognized, but still their communications continued and they eventually agreed to meet while the employee was supposed to be on a business trip in Europe that allowed the authorities to arrest Mr. Shula. He was not in China in a country that had an extradition treaty with the United States. So do we assume the employees was about to go to Belgium and them the authorities came in and said, no, we're actually doing the sting operation. Do we know kind of at the point that the employee was lead on that there was going to be a sting operation? Well, it's unclear whether or not the employee actually went to Belgium him or herself. We don't know that. And again, we don't know the extent to which the employee was taking part in a sting operation or which is being closely monitored by his or her company. But we do know though from our reporters on the ground in Belgium is that Mr. shoe was arrested while he was out just shopping in Belgium. And he claimed that in fact, he wasn't there to anybody, but was just on the -cation. He remained very quiet. He fought. The extradition, which is one of the reasons it took so long to get him from Belgium to the United States. He was arrested on April first, April Fools day, and he was extradited and arrived in the United States on Tuesday. Now, this accused spy, your engine shoe a, who is he? And what's he supposed to have done? So Yongin shoe works for China's lead by Jesse. You know, they're quivalent of the CIA and he he, he was supposed to be collecting intelligence for the Chinese government, and one of the ways in which he would do that as he would pose as a Representative of science and technology institute, a think tank that would court the employee's of of defense contractors to come to China to give talks to give academic talks and reports, and to do some sort of intellectual exchange and the once the employee's were brought to China, they'd be wined and dined, whereas we all know people can maybe a little bit too. I coming with information on their devices could also be. Compromised. And at the end of the day, he was also looking for employees like this employee at GE aviation who at least seemed amenable to giving him information that they shouldn't..

Belgium Jim shoe GE aviation United States Chinese government China Katie Benner Jesse BBC World Service PRI Carol hills Boston g aviation Mr. Shula Justice department Europe New York Times CIA Mr. Choubey w. g. b. h. Representative of science
"pri" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, including one navy pilot who served in Afghanistan, but was haunted by the bombs he dropped years before in Kosovo. One of those bombs he believes may have hit trillion home that story coming up here on the world. I'm Carol hills and you're with the world where co production of the BBC World Service PRI and w. h. in Boston defense, chief James Maness popped up in Afghanistan today. The Trump administration is trying to restart peace talks with Taliban seventeen years. That's how long the war enough ghanistan has been going on Afghans still live with near daily violence suicide bombings, that kill indiscriminately and the war has left its Mark on the hundreds of thousands of Americans who went to fight. They're just this week. One of them was killed in an insider attack. CJ shivers new book deals with that personal trauma Jeffers is a New York Times journalist and a former marine in his book the fighters. He tells the story of six combatants. One of them is specialist, Robert Soto of a soldier who initially impressed shivers with is optimism. A lot of us. If we put on uniforms, we look virtually alike. You tend almost two. Sometimes you know, at one hundred yards look like insect toward, but at. Hundred yards. You would see rub Soto smile. It would light up the valley that CJ chippers there. He dropped by our studios yesterday to talk with my colleague, Marco, werman Marco, asked him to read the part of his book where introduces Soto an aspiring actor who joined the army when he was seventeen. He was nobody's archetype of a fighter. He had an enormous smile which came to him almost unprompted. He liked to sing and he sang often his memory headed. It's command. Vast repertoire of lyrics are in be rap. Hip-hop, the blues, his personal collection of gems, which he would sing no matter what anyone else thought. Robbie Soto joined the army, upbeat fast with that grin, the guy who made others feel good. I was struck by your descriptions of Soto's patrols in Afghanistan's Korengold valley that honestly kinda see mindless as if we painted a bullseye on a bunch of guys and gauging fights the Taliban, how soon after arriving and being in these firefighters at Soto. Start to have a different view of the war. I'd say that Robbie went from idealist to realist inside a six weeks. Well, maybe two months, why? What? What would happen arrived in July and by September, he lost his squad leader and one of the soldiers who had previous toured Iraq who he looked up to most than fellow new soldier. He could see that what they were doing wasn't going to work, who's they what the army was doing? What NATO, and the generals who had put the soldiers up in the valley at such a low level, they really could not affect the valley and he concluded fairly quickly that they were there just because they were there. He couldn't find a strategic purpose. He couldn't draw a line of. It's important when we talk about Ravi to realize that he was a young child when the World Trade Center was attacked, then he wanted to protect New York City from another attack and not law. After joining the army in arriving in Coren goal valley, he could not draw a line to what the day to day life of his platoon was to make New York City safer. Yeah. That point of view kind of hits me throughout the book, the extent to which the soldiers feel as the soldiers, these marines feel as though they're leaders are incompetent. Soto says of his superiors that they got him on the other side of the world on this mountain fighting these guys and they don't even know what they're doing. That's that's a big indictment. That's a big indictment. And I would say it was fairly common indictment eight years into this war. It was starting to feel except for the purpose of surviving each patrol. It was starting to feel for many of the people involved purposeless tell us about navy pilot Lieutenant Commander, lane McDowell, and what has haunted him since nineteen ninety nine lane is different than Robin that he had joined before nine eleven..

Robert Soto Afghanistan army Korengold valley Taliban Iraq navy New York City Ravi BBC World Service PRI Carol hills Kosovo James Maness Robbie World Trade Center Coren goal valley Boston NATO Jeffers
"pri" Discussed on podnews

podnews

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on podnews

"Our public radio international PR ax is the public radio exchange US public media companies and PRI are to merge. The two companies are distributors of public radio content, including podcasts. PR. Rex is currently the number two global podcast publisher. According to project, you've probably heard of this American life. That's one of theirs. Markelle almond. The developer of IOS podcastone overcast has announced forthcoming support of a new payment link for podcasts. A big green payment button will appear in the next version of overcast to clearly link to donation pages. It's a simple tag in your show notes. Now explicitly supported by Omni studio and fireside and anchor have also said they'll support it. We already display it in our podcast pages, and we linked to more details at pod news dot net podcast pages. Also now include recent chart information from charter Bill a new website that aggregates him for. Nation from many different apps, including apple, podcasts, and Stitcher. The company offers Email alerts for chart rankings and reviews. You can search for your podcast within pod news dot net. Does he your information including links to a variety of podcast apps like Google podcasts and technical advice, Facebook released, four podcasts, focusing on effective marketing hosted by Australian radio presents Jules Lund face to face, talks to top marketers about their campaigns. It's hosted by whisker cadence, thirteen and bloom house. Television have announced a scripted podcast series inside the Trump presidency, the Oval Office tapes it'll be released on September the fourteenth and apple have apparently fixed the log in issues with apple podcasts, connect. So launch all the

apple US PRI Rex Jules Lund Omni studio Oval Office developer Facebook Google
"pri" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Their general gist of their argument is that the fda should be considering the public the us public and the health of the us public as its primary client not the industries and to be completely clear this enters the realm of the drug industry and the fda there's more money involved there we also know that the fda has been pursuing special relationships with media outlets in two thousand sixteen there was an article in scientific american where an author named charles sif pointed out that the fda was doing this this move where they would offer to give some media outlets early scoops on a story with the condition being that the fda got to choose who these journalists talked to about it afterwards so like if matt is doing a story for what news outlets you're format pri okay so pri matt works for pri and he goes to the fda who will be played by no we're tennis rolton you're an and and the in noel being the fda gives matt being pri the scoop and then matt attempts to go to someone who disagrees with the fda that could be either paul or me depending on how we want to do the casting and then fundamentally violates a legal precepts pr is huge trouble matt might get fired and pri i get blacklisted from these other reports until they became public knowledge you guys i'm having kind of kaiser soza moment here fda pri three letters are they the same thing it's a food appre abc nbc hsa w.

us fda matt pri charles sif tennis noel paul
"pri" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"There at at every critical phase of the investigation she injected lawyers and then when it came time to either interview witnesses or collect evidence they said no no no you can't do that it's protected by attorney client privilege and the justice department which i think was really working more in cahoots then against that set of lawyers honored pretty much all of those requests who's andrew goldstein andrew goldstein who who i don't know personally but i'm acquainted with the us attorney's office for the southern district of new yorkers i worked there for almost twenty years he was the head of the public corruption unit in the us attorney's office for the southern district of new york which is the us attorney's office in manhattan so when pri pera was the us attorney that gentleman whose name you just mentioned was the head of the public corruption unit and he was then recruited to join muller's gang of seventeen so he's one of the lawyers on staff pahara was hired by former us attorney who was that prepo aurora was hired by mary jo white and his first supervisor at least one of his first supervisors in the us attorney's office with some old guy named mccarthy was you what's his relationship that jim komi i think they're very friendly they i'm not sure if i think pre quiz yes i was an assistant in the office when jim was the us attorney in manhattan that's what i'm getting at he worked for a coma one point yeah he worked for me work for call me he worked for everyone who was a supervisor in that office but call me was the us journey from.

us attorney new york manhattan pri pera muller pahara prepo aurora supervisor jim komi coma attorney andrew goldstein andrew goldst mary jo white mccarthy twenty years
"pri" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Post pri pri pri pri preprimary convention new mexico democrats recent pre pre pre primary convention has narrowed the field in canada several high level positions albuquerque based first congressional district for candidates who did not reach the twenty percent threshold at last week's convention pad davis david martinez damian laura and paul moya all indicated they still plan to stand the race state senator joseph surveys of las cruces and george muna's of gallup as said they plan to stay in the race for governor land commissioner muneo saying we're in you got seventeen point two percent of the delegates you have to get twenty percent to automatically be put on the ballot one race that could feature candidates ending their campaigns is the four way democratic contests lieutenant governor one of the two candidates who did not hit the twenty percent mark former public education commissioner jeff carve eagles nasty climbed to comment yesterday about his plan billy garrett dona ana county commissioner also did not respond to questions about whether he's in he's out how morales took lion share the vote fifty point three percent rick mirror those who are giving up congressional candidate on helping you has dropped his legal challenge to a ruling that disqualified him from the primary ballot las cruces reading painting has been one of three democrats vying for the party's nomination and these southern new mexico a district second congressional district secretary state maggie to lose solvers her office rule last month the painting had not turned in enough else injuries if you go read joe monaghan today joel monaghan dot com political blogger there's it's.

mexico joel monaghan maggie secretary rick billy garrett damian laura david martinez albuquerque joe monaghan paul moya morales jeff carve commissioner gallup george muna las cruces senator joseph surveys twenty percent
"pri" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"pri" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Can weekly lady come into this very different thing and i think if people who are here remembered the hollywood reporter was not just failing it was like i mean like already underground and sort of had a sadness all around it so it was definitely like bad news bears like you have the staff who has been misdirected or not directed for years but it's not necessarily the flight it's like they the there's an inertial that said and where they don't know like they don't know what's good for bad because nobody tells them they don't care they're burnt out leadership yes and so like i kept the staff like all these people but i'm sure you'll remember this era of hollywood where like like the socalled trade presses so behold into the studios premier magazine yes and it just becomes chris released central right and like you in my own case i do a movie with my ex wife we do this movie the marrying ma'am yeah susan line is the head of pri magazine and you realize that the pr department of the studios are just faxing her the articles what to write more most of what happened that was painted as misbehaving stars on the set of a movie much of it was people having honest creative differences when you walk in what really distinguishes the hollywood reporter under your tutelage and when you're there under your leadership is you go to that level you become a real honest magazine you're not like like like premier magazine was shitty magazine if someone called me up and they said to me and i was like a child i was i was in my career infancy when someone said to me what do you think that premier magazine is going to do they're going to take your word for you and this woman who you're dating or they're going to do the bidding of the studio that releases thirty movies a year and advertise of course you're going to get crushed where does the spine of becoming a really really smart income from it is so fascinating to me and i think you see this is so much clinical coverage that way they would self censor themselves like people come in become a big interview someone and they say oh my god like you wouldn't believe this crazy thing someone said and then you get the story and it's not in there and i remember this happened.

reporter hollywood chris pri magazine premier magazine
"pri" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pri" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In your bloodstream ira plato join me each week on science friday as we sort through the latest news in science and cut science down to size that's on science friday front pri two hours of science friday beginning later this morning at eleven on kqed public radio next on the bbc world service we go where radio rarely ventures under the seas in pursuit of a major ecological threats the invasive line fishes overeating overabundant and off the coast of florida we've heard how an asian fish ended up in american waters next we hear how the humans are fighting back stay with us for part two of the fish that eight florida after the names bbc news for jerry semate president trump has dismissed a newly newlypublished book on his administration as full of lies after unsuccessfully attempting to block his release it contains damaging allegations about the trump presidency it portrays the president says mentally unstable and out of his death south korea will next week hold talks with north korea for the first time in two years the discussions are likely to focus on pyongyang's participation in the winter olympics which begin in south korea next month seoul suggested other issues must be discussed later saudi arabia has announced his converting it stateowned oil corporation aramco into a jointstock company allowing foreign investors to buy shares for the first time the funds raised will be invested in other areas in order to reduce the kingdom's dependence on oil giant waves some flooding have added to the serious disruption in the eastern united states caused by huge winter storm up to seventeen people are believed to have died as a result of the severe weather the former peruvian leader alberto fujimori has been released from hospital two weeks after he was pardoned by president petro public kuching ski he been jailed for authorising killings by death squads the pardon provoked widespread protests and arjun time trade union leader accused of money laundering has been arrested at an exclusive beach resort a number of powerful union bosses.

united states oil giant stateowned oil corporation ara jerry semate bbc kqed money laundering petro alberto fujimori florida saudi arabia seoul south korea olympics pyongyang north korea president trump two hours two weeks two years
"pri" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"pri" Discussed on KPCC

"Stems rebound from pri ira plato and this his science friday nope climate change is turning up the thermostat in southern california which can up the odds of severe fire but you know what has an even bigger influence on blazes yet humans this hour do we have to change we we live to coexist with wildfire and we've all ask ourselves the question at one point or another why do we get old age because evolution does not care about age now we've we've completely changed the equation right now by living so much longer plus tips for holiday decorating in giftwrapping using math in something called the ham sandwich theor whom coming up after the break stay with us live from npr news in washington i'm jim hossack congressional republicans of finalize their sweeping tax package expanding the perchild tax credit to get reluctant florida senator marco rubio onboard npr's gun worsley says corporate america comes out the big winner this bill makes a deep cut in the corporate tax rate all the way from 35 down to twenty one percent it also temporarily reduces individual tax rates and creates a lower tax for so called pass through businesses such as partnerships now the corporate and passed through cuts are permanent the individual tax cuts are set to expire at the end of 20 25 the preliminary deficit estimate for the final version of the gop tax bill says with add at one point four six truly liam dollars to the budget deficit over the coming ten years now that congressional republicans have come up with their latest tax package there are plans to vote on the measure by early next week and get it to president trump's debts before christmas as daniele chesler reports the news comes as a disappointment of.

trump president liam gop corporate tax senator florida daniele chesler christmas climate change budget deficit tax rates npr marco rubio tax credit washington california twenty one percent ten years
"pri" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"pri" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Cover good one you're talking about the trump walked right by this guy but he started his little spiel there after he was kind of at walked away right a guy looks i don't know much about this one hundred any deal details about his day is he looks like a harvard fred boy to me directly over horror the press pool so uh yeah this is something how are you get that close to the pri president in their you know with like russian flags too he had props he went all cara top it had a bagful a prop i i think it's something in an of the fact that you know if you've got close to the president this guy's it's free to kaley crazy yelling trumpers trayvon but i don't think his adult again is anything but if they could might be a little something the secret service might have to answer to right i think it is something and it's something concerning that it some wanted this back crap crazy could be that close to the president is this anything when asked if he was really planning a run for the senate kid rock says blank no yeah did anybody bigots relief get a river that wasn't even his idea i think he was on i think he was on stern either today or yesterday and stern asked louie really run for senate blade bleep know f knows respond right f no i think he really really enjoyed the idea of people enjoying the idea who's going to run for senate but now of course that he's a rock star he goes out of or you talk about pito skeleton junior clause probably you know loads of some member the six sixty pm and scott step had with two girls backstage at one point yes that i doubt about that analyzing the tape never saw the.

president louie senate harvard pri scott
"pri" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"pri" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The pri stands for public radio international my name is tom howard so i need to get my phone out and he'd to ask theory something hey siri when's your birthday only biological entities can have first case i became operational on october four two thousand eleven nailed it take you seriously the voice of the iphone celebrates its sixth birthday today the virtual assistant his god through many updates over the years it's about to get another makeover apple says it's going to sound smarter and more natural when the company's new operating system comes out so today on series six operational day we wanted a take a look back at the original serey who might live in your pocket and this q origin story you're going to hear from the original the voice of siri and the surprising way she came to be that voice have a lesson and cried as this season ghana the original voice that theory and how i do pull theory is the mystery i really got now i know that i did some ib are recording math interactive boys recognition for a company called nealon more than six years later suddenly i was theory the initial recordings that ultimately became the original voice of siri were down in july two thousand five four hours a day five days a week and they were really tedious recordings because all of the phrases in sentences i had to read were created to get all of the sound combinations in the language a lot of those phrases were pretty nonsensical things like militia oil hallucinate back row grit lewis cowboys in the top high today thoughts i asked thoughts i asked fussy they you can say it without it was pretty interesting for the first couple of hundred with pretty tedious why the process of the recordings turning into theory is called concatenation whic basically just means linking things together and what happens is technicians and computers of course go into the recordings that we're done and they extract sounds and reform the sounds into new phrase isn't sentences and these are what end up on our devices i've heard a couple of things about theory that the first story that i heard was that first of all theory was not created by apple theory.

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"pri" Discussed on The Ryen Russillo Show

The Ryen Russillo Show

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"pri" Discussed on The Ryen Russillo Show

"As a fit just from the pri as from a piece a standpoint how to make a deal worked there as what they're sending out a still owed so much money will yeah right endlessly love reina and well that's the thing and at that goes back to the summer of two thousand sixty ryan i mean those contracts that we all thought what was flywheel it was great from a media standpoint all those numbers coming in and deadly all of a sudden he was woke up italy or wait a minute i got to pay ryan anderson three years sixty million lattara and some of those other players and they don't have a a draft pick the they can amend their a picked they sent out if they wanted to but new york doesn't need ryan anderson and then try to find a third team were midway through free agency is not much money out there um and that's why i always thought it was hard for a deal to be made and and you know new york him out yesterday st mills that hey we're not going entertain buyout me which pay could at the end of the day change of carmel comes in say i'll i'll take thirty of what is owed of fifty four i mean that's not clear that no anak i hill waivers hill wave is his trade kicker he'll do that what for eight percent eight one eight point one million highway that if fees if he's move just to make the deal work but the leave half of what your owed is a player whose providence and of another big contractors i'll talk a lot there what's more crazy the fact that d'antoni and melo could reignite or the fact that hard and melody to guys who need to have the ball their hands are gonna be on the same team began well nobody has mentioned the tony part right i didn't n well and in new york at all and try to fit that together he will he was freaking out of it were running jeremy linn i so i mean you have hardened chris paul in ml there and and you're basically and have a team of six eight players besides clint cappella i mean into in a reza i mean he might have to be part of this deal to pj tucker lubomir day i that's your at your frontcourt.

reina new york ryan anderson d'antoni melo jeremy linn chris paul italy the deal eight percent three years