35 Burst results for "PM"

Despite San Antonio Tragedy, the Border Will Remain Hellish

Mark Levin

01:13 min | 4 d ago

Despite San Antonio Tragedy, the Border Will Remain Hellish

"Hood said first responders were now being debriefed to help them process what they witnessed What they witness Authorities had received a call approximately 5 50 p.m. local time from a worker who had heard cries for help found the trailer with its doors partially open The worker found a number of dead bodies in the trailer Three people were in custody that we noted the authorities aren't certain they're connected to the situation It's not a federal investigation This will come in this will pass Nobody will be thinking about it or talking about it in three or four days The border will remain hellish people will continue to die They will continue to transport people to all parts of the country and release them on their own recognizance As the numbers add up as the death sat up as the increase in crime and various communities adds up

Hood
Legacy PM Investments' Charles Thorngren on the State of the Economy

The Trish Regan Show

01:02 min | Last week

Legacy PM Investments' Charles Thorngren on the State of the Economy

"Federal Reserve is kind of telling us that, yeah, they're going to continue this interest rate hike and there's a belief that they will be able to get inflation under control through these higher rates, you know, I guess I have to say that I can't imagine them saying no, it's spinning out of control. But what's your real honest to God sort of gut feeling on this? Where are we heading? And like you said, they can't come out and say, we're not in control of anything. There is no market left if they do that, right? So in some aspect, I'm glad they're giving people milk toast. Because not everyone can handle the truth, you know? Not to steal any movie lines here, but a lot of people can't. But the reality is they've never been in control of inflation. They haven't been for years now. Quantitative easing has gone on for so long, you can't say you're in control of your one job, if you freely print money and just pass it out. That's not what the job was.

Federal Reserve
The AP Interview: Estonian PM says don't play down Russia

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

The AP Interview: Estonian PM says don't play down Russia

"Estonia's prime minister caio Carlos has told The Associated Press the west shouldn't underestimate Russia's military capabilities in Ukraine saying Moscow's in it for the long haul as the war enters its 5th month In addition to commenting on Russia's military commitment Carlos says in the interview the only thing that president Vladimir Putin hears from the global response to his aggression is that he can do this because no punishment will follow Every time every next time will be more with more human suffering than the last one was So I think for us it is important to not make that mistake again like we did in Crimea Donbass Georgia Kalu says Europe should ensure that those committing war crimes and attempted genocide in Ukraine are prosecuted I'm Charles De

Caio Carlos Russia Estonia The Associated Press Ukraine Moscow Vladimir Putin Carlos Crimea Kalu Georgia Europe Charles De
We're in a Recession: New Data Just Proved It

The Trish Regan Show

01:25 min | 2 weeks ago

We're in a Recession: New Data Just Proved It

"We're brought to you in part today by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals. You know how much I like gold, then right now, given all this inflation, so go check them out. Legacy p.m. investments dot com. So the president is out saying, oh, no, a recession is not inevitable. Well, here's the deal. The Atlanta fed, which is one of those organizations that the Federal Reserve, like the main Federal Reserve, actually pretty closely tracks everybody pretty closely tracks. They just came out with a brand new number, predicting the growth that we would have or the lack thereof, I should say, in the second quarter, it turns out it's zero, big, fat,

Atlanta Fed Federal Reserve
Crew for Stephen Colbert's "Late Show" detained in congressional building

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Crew for Stephen Colbert's "Late Show" detained in congressional building

"7 people said to be affiliated with CBS Late Show with Stephen Colbert arrested at the U.S. capitol Thursday night for unlawful entry U.S. capitol police would only say they got a call about a disturbance in the longworth House office building around 8 30 p.m. and found the unauthorized people But a person familiar with the matter told the AP they identified themselves as being with Colbert's show CBS said in a statement the production team was there for authorized interviews and after recorded

U.S. Capitol Police Longworth House Office Buildin Late Show Stephen Colbert CBS U.S. AP Colbert
Pergram: 'The Late Show Stephen Colbert' Associates Arrested Last Night

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Pergram: 'The Late Show Stephen Colbert' Associates Arrested Last Night

"Chad pergram has tweeted the following Fox confirms that group of persons associated with the Late Show and Stephen Colbert were arrested last night In charge with a legal entry to the house office building after hours Fox is told the people were arrested in the longworth House office building The group was in the cannon House office building earlier in the day trying to get interviews around the time of the January 6th committee hearing Ever the United States Capitol police shoot them away because they did not have proper press credentials However the group surfaced later that night after the capital complex was closed to the public fox is told they took pictures and video around the offices of House minority leader Kevin McCarthy and Lauren bobert They were unescorted and arrested and charged with illegal entry They were arrested near boebert's office They were released overnight Fox has confirmed the arrests of these 9 persons through a senior house source Names and these are people at a high level associated with Colbert and his program Jake plunkett Alison Martinez Tyrone dean Steven Roman nicolette green Brenda Hurley Robert Schmidt nice Josh commerce and David Feldman Robert schmidel is known for being the voice of triumph the insult comic dog He also produced short cartoons for Saturday Night Live TV fun House The United States Capitol police have issued the following statement on June 1620 22 at approximately 8 30 p.m. U.S. capitol police received a call for a disturbance in the longworth House office building

Chad Pergram Persons Associated With The La U.S. Capitol Police House Office Longworth House Office Cannon House Office Building FOX Stephen Colbert Lauren Bobert Boebert Kevin Mccarthy Jake Plunkett Alison Martinez Tyrone Dean Steven Roman Nicolette Green Brenda Hurley Robert Schmidt David Feldman Robert Schmidel Colbert
Warning: Biden Threatens Venezuelan-Style Socialism

The Trish Regan Show

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Warning: Biden Threatens Venezuelan-Style Socialism

"That one plus one is two. Unbelievable hello, everyone, welcome to the Trish Regan show. We're going to talk about that today. Plus, we get to talk about the Federal Reserve and these rate hikes and what it's going to mean for the markets. What it's going to mean for the economy. I think Democrats have figured out meanwhile they can't run Joe. There's no way no how they can run Joe Biden because of the economic disaster that we are in. I also have a warning for you today because I believe we are already in recession. We're going to get to all of that a quick reminder portions of today's program were brought to you by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals than right now given all this inflation that's here and not going away no matter what the photo reserve does. So take a look at legacy p.m. investment dot com today. Again, that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. We'll talk a little bit more about gold and investing coming up. But first of all, this news from Joe Biden because this one takes the cake. I'm sorry, I get that yes, screw that. I get that Janet Yellen who frankly should have known better as your treasury secretary. She screwed up. And I get that Jerome Powell screwed up. I mean, it's sort of amazing given the so called training these people have in economics that they didn't see the handwriting on the wall. I mean, I've been sitting here telling you for almost two years now, we would see major, major inflation double digit inflation, which of course we've gotten wholesale prices again this week and 8.6%, 8.3% now in terms of consumer prices, it is outrageous. Well, his answer to it all is to effectively just take over the oil companies, right? That's what a good socialist does, I guess. Only it hasn't worked so well in the past. I mean,

Trish Regan Joe Biden Federal Reserve Janet Yellen Jerome Powell JOE Treasury
PM Trudeau Says Guns Are Only Made for Hunting

The Officer Tatum Show

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

PM Trudeau Says Guns Are Only Made for Hunting

"Why are the Democrats doing this? Because it's a slippery slope. They want to eventually take us to the place where Canada is currently at. Mister idiotic himself, Trudeau, the Canadian prime minister, came out and said the most ignorant thing that I've ever heard in my life, which is no different than what the Democrats are attempting to say they just haven't said it yet. But he believes, and I'm a quote him in an interview that he just had, he believed that I'm going to give the statement of what he believed in that I'm a reading. So he simply put, he believes that rifles or guns are only used for hunting. Right? And the only way a person needs a gun or the only person the only way a person needs to use a gun is through hunting, but no one should be able to use guns to protect themselves.

Trudeau Canada
What to Expect from Jan 6 Hearings

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

What to Expect from Jan 6 Hearings

"NBC and I parted ways after four years in December. And if I ever go back on, it will be to say, I told you so I told you so I told you so because yamiche saying it's a blockbuster set of hearings. Honest to goodness Jake, I was a junior in high school between junior and senior now between sophomore and junior year. I had to take American government in the summer of 1973 and I watched the Watergate hearing. You had no idea what was going to happen. I mean, you were edge of your seat. We watched that four hours a day for summer school, and it was the best summer school class I ever had. Because, you know, yeah, it really no idea what anyone's got Alexander Butterfield comes up and says, oh, there's a tape machine in The White House. You know, nobody, John dean got up there and lied. It just was wild, it was great. I don't think what do you think the rating? Do you think they'll get a one share for this thing? I have no idea what the ratings will be. I can just tell you from my reporting you my reporting is that they have a lot of stuff that we've never seen heard or knew before.

Yamiche NBC Alexander Butterfield American Government Jake John Dean White House
Jan 6 Hearings Could Be Damaging to Republicans

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Jan 6 Hearings Could Be Damaging to Republicans

"House Republican leadership. This is going to be a particularly difficult week for House GOP leaders, especially minority leader Kevin McCarthy. Jake, this is a great week for Kevin McCarthy because the one 6 committee is a joke. It brings Republicans together recognizing it's a joke. It overly politicizes an already desperate Democratic Party and they're not paying attention to what Americans care about. So I'm all for and when the ratings come in and I get more people on my forlorn MSNBC show than they get on Thursday night, game over, game set match Democrats blew it. Oh, I think they're going to get a lot of people. I'm just not, I'm not sure. Yeah, so I mean, that's a fine opinion to have. That's one way to look at it. I happen to disagree. I think I actually think and we're allowed to disagree on this. Of course. I actually think that this is going to be a quite damaged the argument that it's a sham is a fine argument to hold if you wanted, it's a fine argument to hold. But I actually think there's going to be a good deal of new information that comes out of this. Let me put it that way.

Kevin Mccarthy GOP Jake Democratic Party Msnbc House
Can John Fetterman Overcome Health Issues to Win Pa Senate Race

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Can John Fetterman Overcome Health Issues to Win Pa Senate Race

"Selena good morning, how are you? Good morning, sunshine. How are you? I'm great. I need an update on John fetterman. The democratic nominee for senator will be facing Doctor Oz. I have tried to decipher what the story is on his health. What do you know? What I know is that he was, he in 2017, his doctor had told him that not only did he need to lose weight, he was a 400 pounds, but he also had a heart condition, and he needed to be taking blood thinner. You know, I mean, it really compartmentalizing it, but that's basically what they told him. What he did do is lose the weight. It was sort of dramatic, very quickly, he lost it. But he didn't ever go back to the doctor. Never took the blood center. And that is why he fell ill, it was not why he had the stroke, but that is why he fell ill and had to have the pacemaker. And so he never sort of revealed this and now that's all caught up with him. And his doctor put out a statement the other day, say, you know, saying in effect, you know, this is what happened. He almost died and we now have him in a pacemaker and taking the blood thinner and he's on the road to recovery.

John Fetterman Selena Stroke
Fetterman’s Heart Issues Add Wild Card to Key Pennsylvania Senate Race

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Fetterman’s Heart Issues Add Wild Card to Key Pennsylvania Senate Race

"Big story in the post as well on John fetterman, the democratic nominee who will be facing Doctor Oz, John thought him is really sick, say a prayer for him, but he hasn't appeared since the election day when he had a stroke and he had a pacemaker put in and they have not been forthcoming. He's not been forthcoming his campaign staff sort of apologized yesterday over the weekend about his heart condition and his the damage done by the stroke, wish him a rapid recovery, but he really ought to step aside. It sounds like him like Connor lamb run, but he's not going to. He's going to count on, I don't know. He wasn't going to win anyway. He's off the left left.

John Fetterman John Connor Lamb
PM Boris Johnson Faces Vote of No-Confidence

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:03 min | 3 weeks ago

PM Boris Johnson Faces Vote of No-Confidence

"That's right, 54 members of the Tory party. Now the way it works in Great Britain, they're not going to an election just a bunch of the members of the Conservative Party have had it with Boris, and they send letters to something called the 1922 committee or the committee on 1922 or 1922 something or other. And the senior member of the party is the chair of that. And when he counts 15% of letters demanding a vote of no confidence, they have a vote of no confidence. And so Boris got hit with that this morning. The magic number of 54 was greeted. I think some Tory members of parliament were watching Boris get booed on his way into St Paul's Cathedral for the platinum celebrations yesterday and they said, you know, we're going to lose a couple of by elections this month and we're going to get crushed if Boris is the leader. So we better dump him now. We still have two plus years left and the majority we can get ourselves a new prime minister,

Tory Party Boris Conservative Party Great Britain St Paul's Cathedral Parliament
Nancy Pelosi's Husband Charged With DUI in California

Mark Levin

01:34 min | Last month

Nancy Pelosi's Husband Charged With DUI in California

"House speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband we call him Paul Pelosi Was arrested and charged with driving under the influence after being involved in a collision Saturday night law enforcement officials said Paul Pelosi 82 was arrested at 1144 p.m. Pacific time and charged with driving under the influence DUI And driving with a blood alcohol content of .08% or higher according to the Napa county criminal justice network's public booking report both charges are misdemeanors TMZ the first reported kind of wonder how they get on top of these things They're pretty quick Pelosi was attempting to cross SR 29 when his 2021 Porsche which clearly was not electric was hit by a 2014 Jeep traveling northbound on the road according to a collision report from the highway patrol Which doesn't identify either drivers being at fault in the crash troopers were called to the scene just before ten 30 p.m. the report said there were no injuries Reported in the crash in the Jeep's driver was not arrested Seen it has reached out to the highway patrol Napa county sheriff's office for additional details Belle was set as $5000 according to the booking report so he was taken in And records indicate Pelosi was released Sunday morning so he was taken in And he was kept in holding through the night Until the next morning so he must have been drunk big time ladies and gentlemen

Paul Pelosi Napa County Criminal Justice N Nancy Pelosi TMZ Pelosi Porsche Napa County Belle
Why Elon Musk Ultimately Has to Buy Twitter

The Trish Regan Show

01:48 min | Last month

Why Elon Musk Ultimately Has to Buy Twitter

"So if you're interested in this, I want you to call my Friends over at legacy p.m. investments like zip precious metals investments, legacy p.m. investments dot com as their website, their phone numbers 186-658-9056, zero, they can totally hook you up and

3 shot and killed in Milwaukee following night of violence

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

3 shot and killed in Milwaukee following night of violence

"Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee police police police police are are are are investigating investigating investigating investigating three three three three more more more more shootings shootings shootings shootings these these these these ones ones ones ones deadly deadly deadly deadly I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with the the the the latest latest latest latest the the the the shootings shootings shootings shootings took took took took place place place place late late late late Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday and and and and early early early early Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday and and and and they they they they followed followed followed followed a a a a night night night night of of of of violence violence violence violence Friday Friday Friday Friday in in in in which which which which twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one people people people people were were were were shot shot shot shot and and and and wounded wounded wounded wounded in in in in three three three three other other other other attacks attacks attacks attacks near near near near the the the the Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer form form form form in in in in downtown downtown downtown downtown Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee it's it's it's it's the the the the box box box box took took took took on on on on the the the the Boston Boston Boston Boston Celtics Celtics Celtics Celtics in in in in their their their their NBA NBA NBA NBA playoff playoff playoff playoff series series series series the the the the latest latest latest latest shooting shooting shooting shooting left left left left three three three three dead dead dead dead seventeen seventeen seventeen seventeen year year year year old old old old male male male male the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one year year year year old old old old man man man man and and and and a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty eight eight eight eight year year year year old old old old man man man man Friday Friday Friday Friday night's night's night's night's incidents incidents incidents incidents prompted prompted prompted prompted authorities authorities authorities authorities to to to to impose impose impose impose an an an an eleven eleven eleven eleven PM PM PM PM curfew curfew curfew curfew requiring requiring requiring requiring everyone everyone everyone everyone age age age age twenty twenty twenty twenty or or or or younger younger younger younger to to to to be be be be off off off off the the the the streets streets streets streets and and and and it it it it walks walks walks walks in in in in effect effect effect effect when when when when the the the the shootings shootings shootings shootings happened happened happened happened police police police police have have have have reported reported reported reported no no no no arrests arrests arrests arrests so so so so far far far far I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

Milwaukee Pfizer Pfizer Police Police Police Police Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas NBA Celtics Boston Boston Boston Boston Ce
Which Republican Candidate Is Best for Ohio, Pennsylvania?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Which Republican Candidate Is Best for Ohio, Pennsylvania?

"Okay, now let me switch over to politics. President Trump endorsed Doctor Oz in Pennsylvania. There's been blow back there coming up earlier in the surrogate on Jane timken yesterday I had on JD Vance after you, Matt Dolan also running for the Ohio Senate seat currently occupied by rob Portman will be coming on Matt Dolan from the Cleveland area. Have you gotten involved in either the Pennsylvania or the Ohio race center? I've knocked you. I've tended to get behind this cycle mostly young veterans running for the House where I think they can use the most help to get off on the right foot. It's usually their first time in the race and these large multi candidate primaries. I'm confident that the Republican voters in this state are going to pick someone who's not only suited to their state, but also can win in November. Now,

Matt Dolan President Trump Doctor Oz Jane Timken Jd Vance Pennsylvania Ohio Senate Rob Portman Cleveland Ohio House
How Long Can Ukraine Hold off the Russian Air Force?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

How Long Can Ukraine Hold off the Russian Air Force?

"The Wall Street Journal story on the defense of the air that the Ukrainians mounted using a plaid quilt of machines and systems. Do you think they can hold off the Russian air force and maintain at least a fight in the skies senator? I have no doubt that they can hold off the Russian air force and the Russian army if we provide them with the weapons that they need, the administration typically has been behind the power curve on this behind Congress, even behind Europe. And that's not a good place to be. They continue to worry more about providing strategic up brands or improving Ukraine's position at the negotiating table. What we should be focused on is winning and victory in Ukraine. And that means Ukraine needs the weapons to fight their own war.

Russian Air Force The Wall Street Journal Russian Army Ukraine Congress Europe
"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

04:24 min | 5 months ago

"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"That's true. To check that one out, I don't know, I guess it depends on which we're talking about. And the last one, I don't if I've done this one before but came up on countdown recently and I just thought this is such a useful word and most of us didn't know there was a word for it. And it's a ferule, FEL ULA, and it's that ring around a pencil rubber that keeps the rubber in place. What's the steel tip at the top of an umbrella? And that is a ferrule, something made of iron originally, but used for all those kind of do fits what's it do for that kind of thing that actually have quite important functions. Do you have a trick for remembering these words? I know you as it were prepared for the podcast each week. But I often find when just chatting to you normally that you can come up with these words simply from your head. How do you remember them? How can we remember those words? I want a word like rizzle that you introduce us to earlier with that postprandial snooze and having little rizzle. How do I get that? Because I can see a week from now. I think she came up that very good word. Are there tricks? Are there ways of remembering words? For me, it's familiarity, obviously, because I'm exposed to words all the time and I write them down and then they will come up again and again in my head or in whatever I'm doing. So I'm much luckier than most because I encounter them all the time. I think for me and it would be different for everybody in terms of memory aids. It's writing them down. So have a little notebook. I've kept notebooks all through my life to words down the fascinating me and just write them down. And for me, that's the best way. Good. I find also actually writing it down not typing it makes the difference. It definitely does..

aids
"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

04:59 min | 5 months ago

"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"Excited because this is our 149th episode. And that means that next time it'll be a 150th Susie. And I want you to do some homework between now and then because I want to know what a 150th is. I know there's a silver jubilee is 25, and I think gold is 50, diamond is 60. We've discovered with the queen having had a reign of 70 years that that's platinum apparently. I wonder what a 150 years? Yeah, we'll come back to you. Let's before we get onto the correspondence if we got a couple of things for later afternoon or early evening. Well, yes. I mean, as I always say, if you want a good excuse that sounds very plausible for bunking off early from work. Because you're actually going to meet a friend down the pub. You can say you're off to a symposium because symposium going right back to ancient Greece was actually a drinking party albeit one where proper philosophical conversations took place. But it goes back to the Greek for drinking together. So symposium is the one you need. If it's quaff tied, you remember that quaff ties I do. Time for a drink. If, on the other hand, you have done enough work. You've done your fit of the clevers. You've left work and your rushing home, and all you want to do is collapse on the sofa. There is a brilliant word. She might have been one of my trios once upon a time, which is represents the sound of something hard falling onto something soft. And I like to think it's a body falling onto soft furnishings, and that's. Sauce. Sauce. Yes. So that would probably be me, just kind of collapsing onto the sofa. Tell me about your work routine when you're writing a book, I know you're writing another book you always are writing a book. If you've got a clear day, how do you divide up the time? Because there are different views on how long one can concentrate. Some people say, you know, actually, you really can't drive for 25 minutes. You should take a break every 25 minutes. I'm about to start another book project and I'm trying to work out what's going to be the most effective way of getting it done. What do you do? What's your day like? You're quite regimented about this. I am a bit of a..

Greece
"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

04:26 min | 5 months ago

"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"The very first thing he said, I mean, I don't indulge. I mean, I'm on the whole. I'm quite good at not being a gossipy type of person. I say that, but I do love reading old diaries. You know, famous diaries like the political dads of the 20th century, people like chips chairman, are Nicholson. I love those diaries, and in fact, but it is a sort of if you go back to pepys in a way, your gossiping about life in the 17th century. Yes. But I suppose it's as you said, it's kind of it's a safer world than the kind of contemporary kind, which is usually malicious, but we often talk, don't worry about how the dictionary loves a gossip because clearly it's so full of insults and it's so full of words that, you know, oh, look at them doing this that and the other. So clearly is enshrined both in English dialect and in the English dictionary. So clearly we've always been a nation of gos, I think. Is that a dictionary definition between afternoon tea and high tea? Oh. Because after you tea, I think of as being cucumber sandwiches, egg sandwiches may be tomatoes sandwiches, and cakes, scones, that's afternoon tea. High tea, I think of us as having your Welsh rabbit. Okay. Something cool. And do they all precede supper? Yes, they do. I think high tea might be as it were, would you have in the afternoon if it's going to be a late supper? If you're going to a dance, a bold you might have high tea at about 5 o'clock. Okay. And you get change. You got for the dance, then you'd have supper late at night, but of course some people I think had dinner first before supper. But I just wonder if the dictionary gives us a definition for high tea. Yeah, I'm looking at now in the OED. So the first reference is that it has his 1787, and it says in British Australian and New Zealand English, it is a meal eaten in the late afternoon or early evening. Typically consisting of a cooked dish, bread and butter and tea. And then there's a little note underneath saying if a male meal in the evening more commonly called just tea. So that makes sense. There are quite a few quotes here as one, for example, in the girl's own magazine, 1884, for people who are not in the habit of giving dinner parties high tea is a capital institution. Very good. So yeah, I mean, I love this kind of very rare, wonderful tease where you go to somewhere very posh remember taking my mom to the Ritz. And then we went to the Savoy fatigue and we did all the cakes and everything and that was a real treat. It is a treat. Tell me about the word tiffin. What's even is from Indian English, really, and I think was brought back as a part of the empire. So tiffin is, I mean, I think nowadays, it just means a sort of small snack really, doesn't it? Whereas if you took Tiffany in the olden days, I think you took lunch. It was a light midday meal. Oh, oh, fun. I thought it was like high tea. I thought it was an afternoon thing. Oh, no, I think but it comes from the tiff, which was to take a little drink or a sip, which is definitely Anglo Indian usage. I mean, today, tiffin carrier is somebody who transports meals it works so hard and transport hundreds and hundreds of meals to offices, et cetera..

Nicholson New Zealand tiffin Tiffany
"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"And I'm liking that and I'm trying not to I might have one cup of tea after lunch but I'm trying to stop because I haven't been sleeping at night and I'm thinking oh wow I'm not sleeping at night. Maybe I'm having too much liquid in the afternoon in the evening and just stop taking the tea. So I love to you though. I do. Well, you can get decaf tea. It's not quite the same and also I think it does still have a bit of caffeine in it because I've made that mistake before, but I'm ridiculously sensitive to caffeine. So if I have anything after midday, that's it. That's me gone. Okay, well, I'm going to give you some examples. Apparently, drowning the Miller was one way. Of saying, let's drown the Miller was let's have a cup of tea. We have definitely mentioned before that you give me once the origin of drowning them. No one knows. You know, maybe the idea is of sort of things that are ground down like tea leaves. And so if you're drowning them, you're pouring the water on top. That's my best guess. But who knows, but it definitely there in several dictionaries. So drowning the Miller and also bitching the pot. Do you remember people used to say whose mother who's playing mother? In other words, he's going to have the world just serving the tea. And the kind of Victorian alternative to that, which I love is bitching the pot. So usually the woman, but to bitch the pot was much more than serving tea, I think it also was to sit down and have a good gossip and of course tea and gossip go together and you will find a lot of references to tee drinking as quite damning judgments on the tittle tattle that was predominantly associated with women. And their tendency to gossip. So if you remember the classical dictionary of the vulgar tongue, which was compiled by Francis gross, who lived at the same time as Samuel Johnson, but if you remember collected, words from the sort of lower echelons of society, if you like..

Miller Francis gross Samuel Johnson
"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

04:12 min | 5 months ago

"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"Lunch? Only when I'm on holiday in a really hot country and it's just far too hot to go out and you've probably had a late night and then it is just gloriously. But the fan on and just I've never won this very time. I tell you the big mistake of having a glass of wine at lunchtime. Oh, yes, that's it. That forces arisen on you, doesn't it? Yeah, I can't really do glasses of wine at much time actually. Can you? No, but when I started out in journalism in the late 1960s, and I worked first for the Manchester evening news and then at different London papers, they drank in the office in the morning, but then you go for lunch and there would be a big liquid lunch. These journalists, they would literally be having whisky, no wine. I didn't have solid whisky and then maybe beer. They drink heavily, they'd smoke. I mean, it was amazing, how they functional. Well, of course they're all dead now. So we know how they function to kill them. But that sort of thing used to go on. I mean, now I think understandably, frowned on, drinking at lunchtime. Absolutely. And it might make you cause the webs, which is a really curious expression, which again, a lot of the words that I'm going to mention today come from old dialect dictionaries. But to be causing webs means to neglect your work and as defined in the dictionary to be too long on the street. In other words, you go out for lunch and you don't come back for a long time to be cozy webs. Cozy webs. How do you spell it? Yeah. So essie and I think that used to mean a kind of conversation, so maybe the idea is that you were just out there gossiping with other people. And then webs. As in the French phrase Kosovo, like a conversation that's the same origins it's cozy webs..

Manchester London essie Kosovo
"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

05:27 min | 5 months ago

"pm" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"Suzy dent. Are you there, Suzie? I am, and don't accept that lovely title, but thank you for it anyway. How are you doing? I'm in very happy form and you know we've got this new feature, word of the week, or words of the week words in the news, really, because I find I still read an old fashioned newspaper. Actually, I get read several newspapers, which I handle with my own hair. Do you read newspapers, physical newspapers? Not the physical kind. I used to love it because you know I used to live in Soho and I would pop out to the news agents and I'd pick up the observer and the times and I don't know probably a tabloid as well. And I would just spend the entire morning in bed eating croissant going through them and I absolutely loved it. But I just don't do that anymore. I don't seem to have time to do it anymore. So it's online news sites for me now. Well, I still get newspapers delivered to the front door and they come at about 7 in the morning, which is brilliant. And I also often go into an ITV program called this morning and there they have all the newspapers. So it usually most days I see most newspapers and it's fascinating to me how often language pops up in the news. And the other day I was intrigued to see a big story saying children name anxiety as their word of the year. Oh no. Really? Anxiety has been chosen by children as their word of the year, according to your old colleagues at the Oxford University press. The children's dictionary surveyed more than 8000 pupils age between 7 and 14, they were asked to select a short list of ten words, the one they would use when talking about well-being in health in 2021. It was drawn up from I think you call it the corpus, don't you? I don't know what that means. What is corpus me? Well, corpus means body, that's from the Latin for body, so we have Corpus Christi, of course. But corpus in lexicographical terms is a body of knowledge or information. So these are the vast databases that we consult to track the evolution of language. Well, they have a children's corpus, which is a database of material from stories and poems written by children as well as books written by children's authors. Anyway, they selected the following ten words to be sent to schools across the country, anxiety, challenging, isolate, well-being, resilience, bubble, kindness, remote, canceled, and empathy. So they then discussed the words with their teachers and fed back as it were, the words that seemed to sort of resonate most with them. And 21% of them chose the word anxiety as their number one word. Followed by, I think this is interesting by challenging. 19%. Isolate on 14%. So these obviously are words that have cropped up in this past year and have been used more than more than others. I suppose, actually, language reflects the era, doesn't it? Of course it does, yes, it's just perfect distillation over time. I mean, we talk about bottling history..

Suzy dent Suzie Soho ITV Oxford University Corpus Christi
"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

PM Mood

03:36 min | 10 months ago

"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

"Your girl danielle moody recording live from posturing studios in times square folks. It has been a couple of weeks now. Since the united states has withdrew from afghanistan in their role of trying to secure democracy in an area that they really had no business in for the last twenty years they have left in many ways afghanistan more unstable than it was when they arrived in two thousand. And one there's an interesting article. Though that i want to draw our attention to which is really just using afghanistan as a hook so much as understanding the politics of nations that have anti women agendas. And it's really interesting because i have to say this. I tweeted yesterday that some days. I think about hillary clinton probably more than you know most people where it's i think about her walking around. You know her home or wherever listening to the news and being absolutely and thoroughly disgusted by the things that are on folding that she warned the country of a decade ago right or more hillary clinton had been talking about women and girls issues when it wasn't popular when there was no hashtag when you know she was being lambasted for being a first lady. Who said yeah. I don't wanna fuck bake your pies right. We can applaud that now but then an entire group of women came for her and it would be that same group of women that would upset her ability to clench the highest office in the land in two thousand sixteen. When fifty three percent of white women decided to vote against their own and instead vote for a traitorous treasonous misogynist islamophobic homophobic transphobic racist piece of shit donald trump. So what is really interesting to me. Is that the economist who out an article and this was the tweet that they sent out. And if i were hillary clinton. I think that i would have gone out in my backyard on my balcony. Wherever the where we're whatever state she is at and scream so loud that like it would alarm everyone in the towns nearby. This is what it read. There is growing evidence that hillary clinton was onto something a decade ago. When she said the subjugation of women is a threat to the common security of our world. Now you read this article and hillary clinton because she is better than me said in a responding to the economists. Thanks for noticing because all you can do right now if you are. Hillary clinton is throw an incredible amount of shade at the fuck. Ary that has maybe haas ably. And i guess we will see with the midterm elections wholly and completely gutted our democracy but the title of the article is this in the economist. Sex and geopolitics. Why nations fail women fail. I think that it's incredibly important. And i said this last week you know..

hillary clinton afghanistan danielle moody times square united states donald trump haas
"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

PM Mood

02:09 min | 10 months ago

"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

"Are actually open now for our next arena academy in september and we would love anyone in everyone who is interested about finding their way into politics as a profession to fill out that application form. Join us for five days and start their political during. I love it lauren. Thank you so much for making the time to join okay f. and i hope that you will come back to us in the fall. With some of your some of your folks some of your new cohort on to discuss what they are learning and how we're preparing to head into midterms. I would love nothing more. Thank you so much for having me. This episode is brought to you by hp plus in a world full of smart devices. Shouldn't your printer be smart to it is with hp plus these printers. No when they're running low so you always get the inky meat delivered right when you needed. Plus you save up to fifty percent on inc so you can print whatever you want as much as you want anytime you want. That is pretty smart. Get six three months of instant inc when you choose. Hp plus conditions apply visit. Hp dot com slash. Smart for details. That is it for today's woke a f- daily podcast to hear more from me including five full hour long shows every single week exclusive guests interviews and more support me on patriotic at patriotic dot com slash woke af to the people and to all the people power get woke and stay. 'cause fuck remmy. Martin joins with international music star. Usher in team up for excellence. The film exploring the history of music culture koniak from blues to hip up. Swing dancing to break dancing. Usher and ready. Martin traveled through the decades in france in the us honoring cultural figures both rooted in shared philosophy of aiming for the stars. See the film at team up for excellence. Dot com remmy. Martin koniak forty percent alcohol by volume imported by remy-cointreau usa. New york new york please drink responsibly..

"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

PM Mood

05:32 min | 11 months ago

"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

"I don't know how to tell you this but things are not getting any better. They're actually getting worse as it pertains to the pandemic and now there's this mean going around and it says on one side Let's say on the left hand side. It says my fall plans and on the right hand side is the delta variants and we are seeing a myriad of them. Break out all over Instagram and twitter. And just think of you know. game of thrones or this is us and like the father and the crock pot. Essentially all of these memes signify one thing. Which is that the majority of us while we're trying to make light of the disaster that is headed our way everyone recognizes that the delta plus variant that is now rampant around this country and is ravaging the hot spot virus areas and hotspots. Not because they needed to be but because they have governors that. Just don't give a fuck about their constituents and they have because they have governors that just don't give a fuck about their constituents. They have very low vaccination rates and what do low vaccination rates mean. They mean that you're going to have high hospitalization rates with the delta plus variant. That is way more contagious than the alpha. And what is frustrating is this is that all you have to do. Folks is adapt with the knowledge that we are getting in okay. This is not a static situation and yet you have these republican governors acting like it is or pretty much doing what they did in two thousand twenty which is believing it's a hoax and it doesn't matter if you look at the cover of every paper right now. They are talking about two states in particular they are talking about texas and they are talking about florida. Why because those are our hot fucking epi centers and you know the other day i had somebody tell me that they were fucking going to disneyworld. And i'm like what is wrong with you. Like of all the fucking places to visit right now. Florida and texas ain't fucking it. Okay and i don't care if you were vaccinated or not because what i talked about on yesterday show is that i believe that breakthrough cases are higher..

Instagram twitter texas florida Florida
"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

PM Mood

03:51 min | 11 months ago

"pm" Discussed on PM Mood

"There is an alarming trend. That is taking place now across the country and no. I'm not just talking about kobe. Nineteen and the pandemic. but i'm talking about the reaction and response to doctors and health officials scientists. That are taking part in meetings at school. Board's right in order to decide whether or not schools across the country should have a mask mandate. Now we know. We've been talking about this for quite some time ron to satan's response to that is that he's going to find superintendents. He's going to dock pay of teachers and they can see other financial retribution. That he wants to have against them for trying to protect children in the classroom. The thing that i want folks to understand too right now is this rhonda santa's just like donald. Fucking trump is not a goddamn doctor. He is not a medical professional at all and so the idea that we are in this place where his state is a hot zone where republicans are totally okay that there is currently right now. An increase of somewhere of twenty percent of infections of children and that is before the school year. Actually kicks off that we are having more and more conversations about how sick kids are getting how young they are when they are getting sick. How prolonged the sicknesses is that essentially. Republicans have said to the american people that your children are expendable when i find laughable right now is how when we were talking about same sex marriage. Let's say back. In two thousand fifteen when a passed and cleared the supreme court everything with republicans and white evangelical christians was about what about the kids. And we can't talk about this in the schools. And what about the kids right but when it comes to you actually keeping your kids safe from illness prolonged illness or potential death. They're like rip the mass off. Liberate your children your socialist. So here's the thing this is. What is really troubling. Me right now and i want to bring to your attention because it is a story that i said i had to read twice and it is out of Media i and it's this pitcher folks. When i tell you if you look at this it is video of angry. Parents harassing doctors and nurses that were taking part in a school board meeting in tennessee. And this is what media reports. The school district of franklin tennessee was a site of major tension on tuesday. When anti mass demonstrators concluded a day of protests by sending an ominous message to medical professionals encouraging mask mandates the williamson county. School board held a four hour meeting with doctors and parents to discuss the implementation of a requirement for students staff and visitors to wear masks inside the elementary school buildings and on buses. So folks i want to start with this first of all the fact that the media has decided that this is a two sided debate when it should not be. It's either you don't want to die and you don't your children to die or you do right. And what is frustrating to me about the same logic that these people these anti massacres anti vaxxers are imposing on. The rest of us is that. Here's the thing. These are the same type of tactics and bullshit and threatening and harassing that. These people have had against abortion providers. Accept here's the thing. My choice to get an abortion does not affect my neighbor my choice not to get a vaccine for a incredibly contagious virus..

rhonda santa kobe satan ron donald tennessee supreme court williamson county franklin
"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

10:47 min | 2 years ago

"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

"Tom Welcome to one hundred. PM The show where we're interviewing one hundred expert product product managers around the globe to bring you all the actionable advice. You need to succeed in product. I'm your host Susannah product coach and founder of the Development Factory. And today you're listening to how to find your product strategy and exclusive multi episode series featuring Gabe give diddle former VP of product for net flicks. Today's episode is a product strategy for each swindling. How added to find the strategies proxy metrics and projects for each pod so far I have focused on defining the overall product strategy for a company? Happening it's essential however that each product leader within an organization also articulate their pod strategy op provide an example from the personalization nation team at Netflix Circa. Two thousand six at the time. Todd Yellen was the product leader of a group of engineers designers and data analysts focused on personalization. Todd understood that the goal for the product team was to improve retention and I bought the size that personalized site experience would help to accomplish hostess. His top line proxy metric was the percentage of new members who rate at least fifty movies in their first six weeks with the service service. The theory was that if members were willing to rate lots of movies it meant they valued the results of their rating personalized movie choices. Here's a simplified version. taught strategy along with proxy metrics and Projects Taht had three high level strategy the I was explicit explicit data that's encouraging rating the proxy metric was the percentage of new members who rate at least fifty movies in their first six weeks and projects are tactics against explicit data strategy. Lots of ways to get ratings as well as other data like demographics. Implicit data was the second strategy in this area. The proxy was the percentage of members who add at least six titles to their cue. Each month they theory it was if we look carefully at what titles they added the cue that would give a signal of the kinds of movies that they like this implicit strategy in an the era of streaming. It's easier to understand if you watch a movie for ten minutes in that quit. There's an implicit signal that you don't enjoy that kind of movie. So an example apple project for implicit data would be to inform the personal sation efforts with knowledge of what titles. You've chosen at your cue or some of this behavior around quitting as you begin to stream the third strategy in the personalization area once you understood the movie taste of your customers and the data around movies the job was matching algorithms to magically connect customers with the movies that they will love our proxy metric for this is called. RMC or root mean squared error. It's basically the difference between what you expected. Acted the member to rate and their actual rating. And this is one of those things were the closer to get two zero two better some projects that we engaged into improve our matching algorithms. We did collaborative filtering the most successful early algorithm but we also launched the Netflix prize to get from one engineer to essentially five thousand engineers. And then we created a new algorithm called category interests and these were projects against it's our matching algorithm strategy. I'll give you a little bit more sense about the thinking of the time. We believe that netflix would gather lots of taste. Data from its members Either through explicit ratings for implicit behavior titles they hovered over might be another example. The team would gather lots of data about each movie genre genre actors directors what it was a feel good late. Leave your brains at the door. Comedy and other detailed attributes of each film and then given an an in depth knowledge of members movie tastes data about each movie matching algorithms would connect members with personalized movie choices over Time Net flicks move the proxy metrics and on the long-term proved that a highly personalized experienced improve retention. Today I described the personalization effort. Netflix is a tenure leap of faith. It took more than a decade to prove that personalization improve retention a steady improvement on the proxy metrics however however provided a strong signal that we would eventually succeed in two thousand five. I had a product focused on each of the following areas. personalization new member acquisition social our friends experience. DVD merchandising helping account use news DVD sales and advertising each product later assigned to one of these seven different areas worked with a dedicated team of engineers designers and data analysts and each could articulate their own high level metric along with the key strategies proxy metrics projects for their area. Here's product strategy exercise number nine for each swim lane. Inner Product Organization identify the proxy metric. Each product leader will move their northstar metric for their pod along with strategies proxy Roxie Metrics and projects. Ideally this work is done by the product leader. Reach Swim Lane in the next essay will in put your high level level hypotheses in projects into a four quarter rolling roadmap to demonstrate how all this stuff fits together. So I'm following hello. I'm doing my homework in the assignments. And then you throw me this curve ball in this essay. which is how the proxy walks he metric essentially splinters apart across the squad themselves and if I understand correctly what it reminds me of a little bit is okay ours and this idea that you know the top you've got the biggest objective and the two or three key results that that give that dimensionality and then each each sort of executive or department leader below that grabs achey result and that becomes their objective? And so on. Is this really. What's happening here that the product addicts strategy if it touches multiple teams or multiple squads as it might accompany like net flicks was did? Does that then mean that. Each of those product leaders needs to take that proxy metric and smash it apart with a sledgehammer and come up with yet another smaller But more appropriately measurable subtypes is what I'm trying to say imagined you are the Company got a lot of work to do and say hey hey create your overall strategy you know with your high level. Metrics proxies the projects tactics but recognize. Recognize that each of the folks that works for you owns a swim lane and you could ask them to defy do all that same work for their swiftly so it's a level now what I'm trying to do is give a ton of ownership to those product leaders swim lane and get them to think like the overall product later and they love love it. Encouraging them to think strategically I'm encouraging them to think long-term and I'm hoping that they will move their her high level metric. And if they do we'll give them more resources so I'm trying to also de-politicize things and frankly these are the kinds of assessments assessments. That I make these courtly PROC strategy meetings at all talk about a little bit later. The tricky part here is precise people they want they want this all fit into tight puzzle pieces and I never can quite do that. One thing that people notice is I tend to organize a swim homeland against each strategy and true. I never noticed that but that seemed like a reasonable way to organize people men. Of course there's tons of anomalies But that was helpful to me. There's no right answer in organizations like anything you have to sort of experiment whatever the weakness of it you have to make up somewhere else. Well it sounds like the the key takeaway on this is ownership. And so you know that's great one way that you can do it as you suggest us to say. Look let's not have competing. Competing product strategy is. Let's have our different squads. have their own strategies within their areas of influence but more than anything else or if you have a strategy that cuts across Ross. Just it's that boulder to rock to pebble approach to say somebody bites a piece of every central very consistent with model. And then what is it. You'll kill them if they're wrong so he's going to regret tele we all routes I now think of it as sort of radical job clarity. If if you have a metric that defines your job you know how to evaluate your work and then you're just asking the question. Okay how do I move that metric and you can be maniacally focused on that thing. That's Kinda how I operated but honestly I am not a hard ask. The teams were supportive of each other et Cetera. I was just trying China making sure that everybody had a perspective and understood what their job was. But it's like a joke that hasn't died for me because I keep telling it. What am I thinking? Give thank thank you so much for being here. Can you tell our listeners. How they can reach you learn more stay in touch I am? WWW Gibson biddle. Dot Dot Com. I'm also Gipson biddle on medium. All right you've been listening to one hundred PM with give. Thanks so much for being thanks a ton Suzanne for having me. It's I'm great. Thank you for listening to one hundred. PM official PODCAST FOR ONE HUNDRED PRODUCT MANAGERS DOT com. If you enjoyed the show please subscribe live in the apple store at Google. Play or on stitcher or leave us a great review so others can help find us if you want to get in touch directly email Suzanne at one hundred product managers dot com or. visit us on the web thank you..

netflix Inner Product Organization Todd Yellen Gibson biddle Suzanne Tom Welcome Gabe Susannah Development Factory Time Net apple Google China
"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

09:57 min | 3 years ago

"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

"You're listening to one hundred pm at leading the product Australia's premier product management conference episodes six. One hundred pm is the fastest growing resource for learning to take and do like an expert product manager, visit us on the web and be sure to subscribe to our show searching one hundred pm on itunes or Google play. For more information about today's episode head over to one hundred product managers dot com slash leading the product. Today's guest is Nicole Roland. Let's dive right in and say Hello to Nicole. Hi, I'm Nicole Brolin. And I'm the product director physique. Okay. So in North America. I've never heard of seek is that to be expected. Yes. He's absolutely to be expected. But it's a big global company. Correct. Kris not in North America. Yeah. The actual sake. Brand itself is only in Israel New Zealand. But then the company have bought other employment marketplaces in Asia, Brazil, Mexico, but they all have different brands or so what is seek then says is essentially an employment marketplace. So it's essentially way higher is can post opportunities with I can proactively go and look for candidates and candidates apply. So the jobs market place in set, for example in the United States. That's a very fragmented market. Whereas Australia sake is actually being the clear number one for many many years God. So you're leading the recruitment frontier. Basically, correct. What is seek doing to sort of chain. Change the way that people find and get jobs and making that process, innovative. Yeah. Look for us a lot of it. Now is around how we use. We have massive amounts of data because we been around for twenty years. So what we understand about candidates and about roles nobody else in a stray Elliott has out dip the knowledge. And so really what we're doing? Now is how we can build algorithms how we can use machine learning to pretty much power as much of the experiences. We can so we're trying to create efficiencies throughout the whole process. So an example, a practical example would be way have an algorithm that can predict whether you will potentially bay in the top ten percent of applicants for particular role. So we can actually on the candidate side, we can encourage you as a candidate that we believe you should apply for the row because you would have a good shop and then on the higher side when you actually get all of your applicants, we can actually tell you which ones to look at first. Okay. So we got to come back in dive into this because. Getting the job is a really big fiend that we explore on the show. I think there's a great opportunity to hear directly from the recruitment. Marketplace about how you can do that affectively and maybe not. But I wanna I wanna talk a little bit more about you. You've spent most of your career at seek so yours story of coming into product management is one of what I would say like pivoting from adjacent role to adjacent role to adjacent roll into product. And then up to director. Can you kind of take us through that story? Arc a little. Yeah. Absolutely. So I have been at seic full close to fourteen years fourteen year, fourteen years, it's crazy. It's crazy. I was fi- younger-looking when I started, and I actually started in customer service, and I actually had other job opportunities at the time. But I was really looking for an organization that I thought I was going to be able to move up the ranks and beyond alone and develop having no idea it would take me where it's taken me. So started out in customer service. Moved into a sales support role, and it was actually in that role where products dotted to catch my attention. And at that time, I think we had two product manages might be three, but they were working on things for the sought that involved my area, and I just loved the problems. I was so Ving how they would trying to go about it. That blend of needing to understand what the business is trying to do overlaid. With is this actually going to work with customers is what customers won't so decided then that was the journey at the time because we only had like two or three product manages. There was no associate programs. There was no entry pathways in. So is actually really tough. So on I spoke to a lot of product manages and actually decided to do a degree because I hadn't actually studied outside of high school. So I do do gray walls working, and it was about a year into the degree that I moved into a kind of product launch market role. And that was about nine months, and then I became an associate product manager from the front of that moved up all. All of the ranks. And I've been product directive for just over you. What would you say is the biggest challenge that you face in a director role as opposed to sort of being in the trenches of just day to day product management? I think when you're in the trenches and essentially somebody like me on highly highly outcome driven and highly motivated, and so when you're in the trenches the saw much of it that you can drive through yourself. There is so much that you can really aren't. And you know, you motivate the tame, but it's so much in terms of getting what customers want ending getting teams to do it? You can really aren't in drive that I think as a director, and I have a team of one hundred ten made up of product manager. That's one hundred hundred ten cruzi hundred ten the challenges that you very quickly work out that you one person. And actually the best way you are going to deliver value and solve problems is you have to inspire motivate and lift the capability of old. Hundred and ten and so how do you do that? At scale is definitely a big challenge to listen a little bit about how how the teams are structured, and is there one product that you're sort of owning at the highest level or the kind of multiple. And then you have folks below you Minhaj knows. Yeah. Essentially, we split up into pots of the experience. So I own the entire experience across by horizon candidates and also the experience, and then we basically have been eighth mayo. I've got a head of candidates aren't all of the candidate experience. I've got a head of search. And then I've got to heads of higher because higher is really really big portfolio. And obviously, you'll have tames and product manages been a thin so pretty much responsible for everything that's being worked on. However, we have focus areas that we understand strategically important to the business high value and today, the ones that you spend more time on to try and make sure they set up in the right way, we moving at the right kites that sort of thing. So these sort of three. Three heads of product, if you will within these areas of interest, and then how many kind of designers, and developers are they in pods that are dedicated to those same leaders. Yes, they're essentially we've got teams at a basically working on almost every part of the experience. So you know, we'll have a team that looks at notifications. We have two teams that look at the bible apps. And so within those teams, we have a dedicated you ex design dedicated product manager, and then obviously engineers, and then I have shared resources in digital analysts and visual designers. Gotcha. Gotcha. No, this topic of marketplace. In how to divide ownership comes up over and over again, you nodding because wondering if you've gone through some organ reorder, you're thinking about that. So on one hand yet. It seems super logical. We have candidates, and we have recruiters, and you own this pile in you on this pile, but naturally there so. So deeply enmeshed. So can you speak a little bit about that delineation? I mean, these two people working very very collaborative Lee together. Yeah. So I think again, this is the beauty of having worked sake as long as I have. I've got the history. I think one of the it's absolutely a challenge. And I do having thought about this a lot. I don't think there's an ideal structure, I think every structure comes with kind of benefits, but trade offs the problem that I have seen historically is wave got product teams and heads of product that they wanna solely are in this space. And I want to just be able to go off and do what they wanna do. And that was at sake we did have that for a little while the tames went collaborating as much and so the risk with that. What actually happened is in some cases, you can go through the user experience, and you can Konosuke one team started in another one stopped. And so, and it also then means that, you know, something really important on the candidate side that's being worked on that. Ultimately delivers. Value when it's being exposed to hire his, you know, it doesn't necessarily get prioritized on the heart higher Assad and see wind up his we'd willed way. One teams Wigan something super important, but it's not being reflected with another tame. I think I think how I've been tackling this is a sync we're world where we all have to collectively earned the experience. And that actually may what we don't often we are in anything like we kind of wick historians of it. But we have to collaborate and we have to shift. So we've been focusing a lot on pulling together full kind of coal potsy experience. So an example would give is the candidate par fall. So candidate create support fall. And then there's all these different things wagered deliver value off the back of that part fall. So the candidate team has to focus on getting that profile information in keeping it fresh and keeping up today and also communicating to the candidate Wadi serve eligible in the benefits and then on the higher Assad waiting to actually then realize those benefits. And so for me what I've. I'm really focusing on his forming working groups with everyone's actually coming together. I'm we starting to map out the problems which on sold is racer that needs to be done. What's the discovery? And actually joining opposites joint Hiver representation in candidate representation. And what's interesting

product manager director product director North America Australia associate product manager Nicole Brolin Nicole Roland Nicole Assad United States New Zealand Asia Google Kris itunes Elliott Israel Ving Minhaj
"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

08:19 min | 3 years ago

"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

"You're listening to one hundred pm at leading the product Australia's premier product management conference episode eight. One hundred PM is the fastest growing resource learning to thinkin do like an expert product miniature visit us on the web and be sure to subscribe to our show by searching one hundred pm on itunes or Google play. For more information about today's episode head over to one hundred product managers dot com slash leading product. Today's guest Jason, Shannon. Let's dive right in and say Hello to Jason. Hi, my name is Jason Shannon that co founder and CEO of headlight and on demand platform for evaluation of technical candidates to it sounds like you've said that once or twice. That's what happens when you're a co founder and CEO you have to just get that pitched him. What what's headlight? Well, we focus on helping companies scale the first round technical screen for positions like product managers, engineers and data. Scientists what's the problem that you're essentially solving and who are the customers. So there's two problems. I think we're really solving the first is around fidelity. So it is this idea that you hire people because they're good at their job. Whether it's product management being at great data. Scientists are building great products with software that doesn't mean that they're great interviewers and great evaluators of talent. And that's not necessarily something. They enjoy doing. That's not something they are incentivized to be good at. And so when you're fast growing company, you actually are creating some interesting sort of. Senses for yourself. When you put a lot of these folks a whip pull them away from what they wanted to be doing and make them. Do this other thing that they aren't necessarily great at and then you wonder about the quality of the outcomes from that process. So what we do is. We put a consistent system in place for that. First technical screen. We're not saying you're never gonna meet these people, and we do everything for you or saying the noisiest part of the process is one that's going to be more structured more systematic. And and based on data that we have from valuing a lot of people. So that leads the second part, which is the problem solving is time. Right. Everyone's wondering how can we get more out of our team? How can we build things faster? And when you have to interrupt your engineers again, and again because you're focused. You're trying to get them in these text greens which half the time the person turns out to be not what you're looking for. That's a lot of interruptions. That's a lot of distractions, and that's not helping the team performance their best. So by taking away that noisy heart of the process. We are helping teams accelerate yet recruitment is an ongoing investment in time for sure is the company then a technology platform, or it's a professional services layer, or it's both of those things. Yeah. It's definitely a bit of both right because we have built technology that makes the take home assignment process of more pleasant experience when say it's necessarily enjoyable since you do have to work hard as a candidate. And no amount of product is going to change that. But we do create ways for the brand to express itself to make candidates feel at ease and our stand what they're they're doing make that process smooth. So I think that that's something that a company would otherwise have to invest in themselves. But it's also about our network of experts who are professional software engineers product managers in their own. Right. And the fact that you're benefiting from their experience reviewing dozens hundreds of these kinds of submissions, and that's something that you wouldn't necessarily have in your own company. Your background is interesting. This is one hundred PM we talked to product managers you've worked as a product manager. You perfectly were at sea. But you've also got all of this business stuff. It's like you're in business. You were starting businesses. You you've worked in customer acquisition. What's your identity? Jason. Do you suffer from an identity? No, you're going real deep here. Just I'm ready. I saw pushing. Well, that's what product images do we look for paying? Absolutely. So for me to define myself as is very hard because like entrepreneurs, and like product managers would come from interdisciplinary multidisciplinary backgrounds, and it's not just like, oh, I was an engineer. And then I saw practice being exciting. And then I moved into product that's relatively simple. Transition. I've done a little bit of a lot. But I think what unifies a lot of it is the idea of enabling others to perform at their best. I think that to me unifies a lot of the things that I've done whether it's in marketing being the product team communicate their value as best as possible to the customer or whether it's speaking and writing we're I'm sharing what I'm learning to help my audience expand their abilities or whether here with this business. It's really I think about unlocking, but also just helping surface. The Layton abilities of those around us and giving them a chance to shine. And you know, so we can have great things within us. But we don't always have a great way to make that scene for others. And so what? I hope I'm doing with headlight is enabling people to show their potential. It's interesting because we spend a lot of time on this show exploring ways that people can kind of break into product management or make those pivots like you describe going from engineering into product or from user experience design into product one that we talk about less, but I think that you can offer some great perspective on is. So you wanna go bigger than product. Right. It's so product takes up all of these disciplines and there's ownership in the role, but it's very different from being a CEO and building a company so at love to hear from you about what are some of the challenges that you've encountered in sort of growing out of a product specific role to a true owner role that would be part one and part two will probably be something along the line. Of lake hiding, you do it. Sure. So I think that my background has helped me understand the responsibility of being a leader owner from a early on my first job out of school is actually running the business side of my college newspaper, which while it sounds may be small potatoes was a situation where? It's seven figure revenue business where you're reporting to board of directors. You have monthly meetings. I had to report on the financials of the business. It was during the great recession. So the numbers are looking terrible. And I had to stand up to the board and taught report on that. And talk about what we were doing to address that. And I think that was a really important experienced have in and helped me think like an owner. I've also done a lot of side projects. And I think that side projects are a secret weapon for an ambitious person who wants get into product or who wants to become an entrepreneur is because a side project is a chance to have complete ownership. You decide what your products going to be called, you decide how you're going to reach out to people you decide how you want to support them and serve them who you'll take money. From who you'll reject how you deal with complaints.

product manager Jason Shannon engineer CEO Australia co founder itunes Google Layton professional services
"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

06:01 min | 3 years ago

"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

"You're listening to one hundred pm at leading the product Australia's premier product management conference episode five. One hundred PM is the fastest growing resource for learning to Incan do make an expert product miniature visit us on the web and be sure to subscribe to our show searching one hundred PM on itunes or Google play. For more information about today's episode head over to one hundred product managers dot com slash leading the product. Today's guest is Inga lathe. Let's dive right in and say Hello to Inga. Ingraham CPO site minder. Also, I'm just like all enthralled about sitting here with you. I was looking at your resume, which is like one hundred years of senior product leadership. Maybe not I'm not that old. No, you don't certainly don't look like you have one hundred years of product management experience. But asked you've been doing this a long time about eleven years. I think how did you get into product management as set it up by journalists actually working on dive, style, magazines, but the future you won't before me. And I thought I definitely didn't wanna wicked cosmopolitan. So I got involved in online Pepe shake, and I was hooked straight away, and is pretty much a path from that to our my content strategy to user experience and offer about six years doing that. I got a little bit resentful about. People tend to me that was a nice idea. But I didn't really understand the commercials. So that make the roadmap decisions. And I thought I think I can have a crack at this thing called product management, which then was an emergent discipline. So I was lucky enough to get a job working for your who is a product development manager, which is what they called them back then in London apple out. Really learn how it's done here will not so much, but I loved being able to work with the business on the strategy mixing commercials sweaters using needs which have rode with me from my experience in you X as pretty much hooked from then on. So when when you say, you did you actually work as a designer as well know, my father often asked me before he passed what exactly I did? Because he couldn't stand it. And my answer was always basically bussey. And he's with that. I am stacks your mom's the same. And at say what I'm really good at. His structure and planning and pretty good at connecting the dots. So why did I ran you ex team? I wasn't a designer. I was more taking the brief figuring out the experienced strategy pot of that at putting together a team who could execute on it. How would you say managing a team of designers is different from managing the whole cross functional team. How long do you have will go? We just got started. So so I actually just came out of a roll with for five years, I managed a hundred percent creative team of designers. Researchers and say creatives just a lot more work as human being. They often struggle with a commercial context, and you really have to take them on a journey. It's a cell for creatives. Now have to believe in what you're doing product people from the moment sooner they'll make that Kohl a full themselves of four you think getting product design designers integrated across functional team. So for people trying to stand the value in for them to understand everyone else's. That's a challenge when you lead a creative team there will enough natural planners. So it'll take as long as takes and some of them tend to think that create ought to find will be able to tick you date for them the compromise between a perfect experience and a practical commercial outcome. And so so you less rule you said you were managing mostly designers. Have you shifted in this? How long have you been with site? Minder six months. This is. Fresh six months today. Six months today other university in Q. So what prompted the shift is this your first chief product role. What's different? It is my chief product was actually the shift was in my dog. Joe I've been managing product teams for about seven years in London. And I go to col- from head-hunter about a role for Bank here in a straight year. And when I got the Colo I've never gonna wear for back. Let's be clear about that. But I had a couple of conversations with him. I spoke with chief marketing officer who digital in the Bank reported into. And I was pretty intrigue because they've arrived at the beginning of the journey that we're creating a digital team the head no concept of product because products in the Bank, give people who run mortgages and transaction accounts and all that kind of stuff and they wanted to build something from the ground up, which I'm always ready motivated by at motivated by coming to live in the sun up to fourteen years in London. So after a little bit of back and forth and visits yet. I thought well I could do it for two years, but could build something great. And then we can decide for years later five years five years lay said I left but be since you built a team. I thought it was twelve decided with ninety eight when I left the digital team had grown from one hundred sixty two thousand so it was a great period of transformation putting structure in place as well. Well, as getting real business come a thousand people in the digital team. If what does a structure look like at that scale. We ran forty

London Bank product development Inga lathe Australia Ingraham itunes Google Pepe bussey chief marketing officer Kohl Joe I five years one hundred years six months hundred percent fourteen years eleven years seven years
"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

"You're listening to one hundred pm at leading the product Australia's premier product management conference episode nine. One hundred pm is the fastest growing resource learning to thinkin do like an expert product miniature visit us on the web and be sure to subscribe to our show by searching one hundred pm on itunes or Google play. For more information about today's episode head over to one hundred product managers dot com slash leading the product. Today's guest is Sarah. Would let's dive right in and say Hello to Sarah. My name is Sarah would and I lead product management at farfetched. Now to see that you lead product management is a bit of a humble statement. Because I think your title is something way more impressively global VP of product is that accurate? Yes. It is. I report directly to the CEO Josie Nevis, and I started about a year ago. The product development organization is comprised of product managers analytics design research cetera, and we partner very closely with the engineering org, and that's infrastructure. Engineers data scientists at cetera. Do you have a alone career in a long career in leadership, which I'm going to want to crack into is this role, the most senior big responsibility role that you've ever had or is it religious context? Changing. But responsibility, staying consistent. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's interesting. I've not had any tools the same. I've had bigger titles smaller titles larger companies smaller companies, but what I do typically is the same. I helped develop product strategy. I partner with the executives to understand how to bring that to life and take it to market, and then I managed people in order to execute against that vision, I've worked in everything from very small seed stage companies one of which one crunch disrupt all the way through to fortune five hundred companies where I did exactly the same role that I'm doing now. So how did you find your way into product to begin with, you know, you'll have to time travel? Answer that. Yeah, I started this along time ago, and what attracted me to the industry was really the creativity. I moved to San Francisco in the first dot com, boom, and the challenges there were less about revenue models and community and things that we talk a lot about today and more about what is this forum do for us as a creative community. What can we do? In terms of our writing our arts, distributing information and knowledge around the world, I got into it before though, I got into it just after grad school when I was doing research in Washington DC as a policy analyst, and I used a lot of the precursors to HTML to research things like patents drug prices around the world thinks like intellectual property law. And so from there, I parlayed that into a career in the industry was it pro. Product management, then or you know, because there's this debate about product management is new or it's really not new but everyone suddenly talking about it in. Everyone's Secondly wanting to be in product, what was the landscape in the definition of that rollback then? Yeah, it's a great question. And I I always talk about what I do what I do is the same frankly from twenty five years ago when I started, however, the title product management did not exist for the first half of my career, really what a product manager is. And it depends on the size of the company and the tech that you're going after in the community in the users at cetera. What your job is not to companies are the same. And when I started I was definitely not calling myself a product manager, but I was doing things like defining releases and writing content, in some cases, I was writing CGI scripts and Perl code to get things out the door at the time. It was really considered kind of jack-of-all-trades. Role, but it wasn't called product management. In fact, I don't even know what I called myself. I was in web development more than anything. And and really again, inspired by the creativity of the new format. Did you study coding or computer science, formerly or you were just like this is the thing we're doing here's how you do it go. Yeah. I didn't I my undergrad degree is in English literature and my master's degree is in business when I left business school. I moved to DC as I mentioned, and there are a lot of really interesting technologies emerging the internet was it was h Tim O one dot O at the time. I just a lot of gopher, but what I was most attracted to as G I S which Google maps effectively made obsolete, but at least for the layman like myself, so really just learned on the job and trying to figure out how to put together snippets of code in order to either collect data to communicate with people on the other side of the world or to put information out in the world through my research. Each. Do you recall? What was the first product leadership

product manager Sarah product development partner Australia Google itunes VP San Francisco Josie Nevis CEO Washington DC policy analyst Tim O twenty five years
"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

"You're listening to one hundred pm at leading the product Australia's premier product management conference episode seven. One hundred PM is the fastest growing resource for learning to think and do like an expert product miniature visit us on the web and be sure to subscribe to our show by searching one hundred pm on itunes or Google play. For more information about today's episode head over to one hundred product managers dot com slash leading the product. Today's guest is saieed con, let's dive right in and say Hello to site. My name is Saed con I'm worked for transmission labs. It's a company that I founded, and we help companies with their product outcomes and product teams, generally, help them improve their product organizations, and you and I have something in common, which is from Canada where to Canadians in Australia rate. That's right. We're far away from your experience been like so far. It's been great. Actually, I landed in Brisbane we went to Melbourne. We had the conference. They're in there. We're in Sydney. The only thing I'll say is that it hasn't been sunny as I was promised. It's been rather rainy while I've been here. But you're in Toronto. Yes. I think it snowing there is there was there there's stress, but that, you know, threats of snow are fine. It's true. It's true. It rained a lot of Melbourne. I noticed. Yeah. In Brisbane was three solid days of rain will Sydney's been Sydney's been gorgeous. Let's never leave city. Now, we know Sidney feels like Toronto I'll just say that. So I. I felt very comfortable here. Now, you were always in Canada, you left Canada to go into the Silicon Valley thing it's so mysterious sounding I think for people who've never been to the valley. But then if you go to the valley, you're like, oh, it's like a weird suffered with strip. Yeah. You know? It's funny. I had traveled a lot to the bay area from candidate for work. And then we back before the dot com bust. We decided to move down there. And it's funny. It's sort of like the reality versus the fictions of the fiction was this is an amazing place and everything is so different than everyone. So smart, and I got there, and we literally landed in March of two thousand which is when the NASDAQ Pete and then started going down. And then all of a sudden, I looked there and good. Wow. It's just like home. But as you said strip malls. And it's there's you know, the shininess I expected wasn't there. It's still it's a bizarre place. It superstar place all I did very geeky touristy things. Like, I went to one infinite loop, which is the address of Apple's had off. And they had a picture taken. I don't know why. But it's just you know, the coolest address at the time. Was that a good move for your career leaving Canada being part of the the US Texan, would you recommend that for someone saw answer the first part for which is I think for me was really good. The technology ecosystem in Toronto at the times as the late nineties was very small. I had had a number of friends who would move down there. And you know, lots of good stories, and then I got to do things and meet people that I could never have done in Canada. So taking their experience back was great things have changed a lot since then since November twenty seven. Approximately. Well, I moved back in two thousand six. Yeah. So I think if I was younger I would consider it again. But I would I would have probably approach it differently. I would really look at it more strategically where do I want to get to we kind of went down and got a job in the start up. And that was you know. Wow. I got to chop them to start up. But I probably should have been a little more deliver about which startup in what kind of start up. I was looking at. And so on that's interesting to tell us about that. Like, if we could go back in time and shirt your career with more rigor with you. What would you do? What would you tell young say not to do? No. That's a great question. So one of the things I've learned over the last twenty years in product management, and I would apply it to myself back then his play the long game. So really have a clear vision of where do you wanna be five ten years from now? And then make those choices very deliberately, you know, one one thing that I didn't do and they probably should I looked for interesting work, which you know, at the time was what could I never do in Canada? But I made some I took some risks with some companies, and it didn't work out as expected, and so I would have made a little more deliver choice and maybe set. Okay. Here's the path they want and maybe a job from now to jobs for now. I'll get to that really great place, and it's always risky, but but you know, people respect name. So you know, there's all these people in Lincoln and say ex Google Facebook Twitter at insist and somehow people think that makes them much better. Maybe they did great work. Maybe they didn't. But I think I would have picked a couple of name-brand companies before taking risks

Canada Toronto Brisbane Sydney Melbourne Google Australia itunes Apple Sidney US Lincoln five ten years twenty years
"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"pm" Discussed on 100 PM

"You're listening to one hundred pm at leading the product Australia's premier product management conference episode three. One hundred PM is the fastest growing resource for learning to thinking do like an expert product manager, visit us on the web and be sure to subscribe to our show by searching one hundred pm on itunes or Google play. For more information about today's episode head over to one hundred product managers dot com slash leading the product. Today's guest is Kirsten man, let's dive right in and say Hello to Kirsten. Hi, I'm customer, and I'm the VP of product experience at cool construction and global business Yunus, actually, I think that's don't right action digit era global zoo. Also that game you don't even have. That's a mouthful of way. What's your what's your slang version of your title? So it's VP of product experience boo, which is construction engineer global business unit. This your at oracle because the company that you are at for some number of years was acquired correct. Yes. I I worked at I connection. I was senior vice president of product and experience, and we required. This amazingly one point six billion dollars and became part of the oracle family. Got welcome to Oregon. How are you enjoying your time? So far, it was it's one of those things right? You'd never really know. What's going to happen as a mind sitting product, we always have to be open to change. So I just took that bond scented go with this and see what happens and people gripe people there as well. So it's actually being a really interesting transition. But I think we're at a really positive Stein and just realizing the sheep potential of what we have behind us. Now, they're pretty big company. Big deal. What was next in economics was the world's largest platform for the building construction into strain. So we would then to basically change the way that teams work together on construction projects so platform, we found out of Melbourne by two guys who had the idea of regardless squash. And they managed to take the business globally. So overnight success story of seventeen years. Article had watched them for a while. And kind of courted them number years ago when we went we went to PO bet three's going and so once you've done that you're anybody's guy. Right. So are cooled in putting into them in December and acquired us officially in much cut. It is it uncommon for stralia based companies to splash out into the world. The even the way you sort of said, they went global. There was almost like a glint of surprise in your. Yes. Annoy in the sense cruise industry, you have to be more scrappy or anyway, you know, we were all the other side of the world we're in our dog. So when you thinking we know to really capture market, you've got to go global, but you think of you itself, right? Like, oh, we're able company you really ought to the US. And that's I kinda you tins homes a size. So you can get away with that. So it is unusual. It's they aren't a in success story. This really owning kind of three household names. Atlassian is never. One of them I connects and they were one of the primary one. So what's being fantastic to seen as it's really given the Holstein up community and investment community about because people like all my gone like, hey, they're great take companies here. Let's reinvents. And so I've just noticed the investment that's happened in stroller since then is fantastic. Like, it's really gone through the roof, are you active in the product community here or have you been I am tells you a little bit about what it looks like in feels like so it's very similar to having done similar made up since and Fran and other areas run world, stra suppose, the differences because we aren't smaller. It's actually more connected. And so we do have a lot of read up events. But people very engaged they go into him. They go and involved, and it's very sharing communities. So typically, if you've got a problem or you want to bounce things off straight away, if everyone can think of like six people, I can just ping and say, hey, how are you? Doing this and people shame. So I think that's it's kind of a common trade in product newsra experience. We'd typically shares and wanting to help others, but it's probably a more amplified in a strategy because you can get two people so easily so you can go and book in a coffee go and see them, and it's not considered unusual, and that's a huge. Plus, I think it would be more isolating in other areas. Is

Kirsten man VP product manager senior vice president of produ Kirsten Australia oracle Yunus Atlassian US Google Oregon itunes Melbourne Stein Holstein engineer Fran six billion dollars seventeen years