35 Burst results for "PHD"

Consecutive Votes in Paxos

Data Skeptic

05:32 min | 4 d ago

Consecutive Votes in Paxos

"My name is. I'm currently a phd candidate at the university of michigan. My work has been mainly in distributed consensus and has been now shifting into applying formal verification two systems and building systems correctly specifically with a lens on distributed systems. I'm looking forward to talking both about paxos and formal verification. Because i think they're both interesting topics and i was unaware of much intersection. But maybe the kickoff. We've talked about packs on the show. Before so i would refer listeners. What deeper details to go back there. Would you mind giving people a high level on it. what is paxos. So paxos is a distributed consensus protocol. That's goal is to allow a group of computers or replicas to be able to reach consensus on a series of values or commands which will allow these computers or replicas consistent with one another and there's a lot of variants. Why do we have so many flavors of paxos. It's a good question. One reason is that it's an interesting problem that draws the attention of researchers and there's room for expansion as well as this problem that paxos aims to solve is by no means in its final state. And there's always more challenges and more problems to solve so many of the different flavors variants of taxes that we see being published year after year are aiming to improve upon existing solutions or solve new problems that come up with expanding technologies well. Let's talk a little bit about your specific. Contributions paxos is an old algorithm. What was left to be done. Yes so that's sort of a fund bit with this paper. The significance on consecutive ballots in paxos wall. It doesn't currently have that great of a practical implication for these families of paxos protocols the interesting aspect in my opinion is that even though this protocol has been around and studied immensely in the past twenty years there are still parts of it that weren't maybe discovered or published realized. And that's sort of what this paper is trying to highlight. Is that the original description of taxes in this sort of carries on too many of the different flavors as we mentioned just previously carries the assumption that the original and variants which are the promises or glue that hold the protocol together and provide. The guarantees of the protocol are the most simple or ease. Are the building blocks that are required to make paxos work while in fact we can point out that. That's not actually the case. And we can show that what those in various are are more conservative than they need to be and we can show that they are indeed can be weakened or expanded while still maintaining the same guarantees paxos originally set out to guarantee so that part was surprising to me. Usually when i see some improvement it's always a trade-off get something but i have to give something is it truly the case that we're not giving anything up with the shift in this specific case you're not giving anything up in a practical setting. Your may not be gaining much either. It's more of just a insight as to our understanding about how this protocol works. Paxos has throughout the years been noted to its subtlety which is why often it becomes. Hard to implement and developers may choose to rely on using other consensus protocols as opposed paxos because of the subtlety. So you're not necessarily giving anything up but you can certainly expand upon what you have without any consequences. Well let's get into the notion of the consensus khoram's that i think plays a key role in your work. What is this courtroom. And how is it useful so at its core. Paxos will always provide safety which means that. It will always provide consistency. While if it's not able to do that it won't be able to make progress at all and the way it's able to always ensure that it's able to give you a correct answer and remain safe relies on the fact that you always will have majority quorums of participants intersecting so every step taken paxos would typically require a majority of the participants computers or servers in this case to agree or send messages to continue with the protocol and this just ensures that if a single computer replica in our system has learned the value that at least one of those will participate in any future steps protocol takes because by having a majority quorum at least one of the past participants will be able to voice its current state in the current step of the protocol so by relying on the fact that paxos uses majority quorums. We're always able to guarantee safety. Because paxos says at its core to paraphrase says only a single value can be learned so it paxos if after executing the protocol all servers can agree upon one valued. So if you had for one case a value can only be learned assuming that a majority of our servers have agreed upon that value so it could be the case that some of our participants of the participating servers have not learned value. But if they try to take any future step in the protocol that would require a majority quorum of all of the existing server participants at least one of those in the majority quorum would be guaranteed to have learned or agreed upon that previous value. Which would bring the current server up to speed and it would be able to guarantee that any future steps maintains that single value.

University Of Michigan Khoram
What to expect from NOAA under the Biden administration

Climate Cast

03:50 min | Last week

What to expect from NOAA under the Biden administration

"Focus on weather. Forecasting and climate science is likely to be a high priority under president biden and it begins with staffing at the top washington post capital weather gangs. Andrew friedman wrote about the possible scenarios for noah. Hi andrew welcome to climate cast off. Let's talk about the biden cabinet appointments so far one thing that jumps out at me andrew. There are so many with climate expertise and focused john. Kerry as climates are on the national security council. pete buttigieg at transportation jennifer granholm at energy. What do you make of these leaders. Strong climate focus. It doesn't look like an accident to me. Yeah no really. The administration is approaching an all hands on deck strategy for climate change rather than putting that just in the hands of the epa administrator and maybe the energy secretary they're putting that everywhere so you heard their nominee janet yellen for treasury secretary mentioned climate change in her interest speech Also the national economic council chair of brian niece has a significant climate experience. This is really going to cross pollinate the government agencies foreign wide. Honey you think. The new noah leadership will be substantially different than it. Is today you know. The noah leadership under president trump has been competent jacobs who has a phd and is a meteorologist by background. Really knows that issue in really knows the agency warehouse but he was hamstrung and didn't even have the ability to send an all hands email without running it by political appointees at the department of commerce. He wasn't able to pick his top staff including chief-of-staff so really what you're going to see is a administration that thinks the real while. Okay we're going to have this person as administrator what do they need to support them. In these other several roles that are politically appointed. How will climate change science and communications. Be different. i think there's going to be a much greater role They're gonna put more of an emphasis on the national climate assessment which has been something that the trump administration tried to walk away from and then has tried to interfere with. So it's gonna be much more of noah in the lead when it comes to scientific integrity andrew. We all remember sharpie gate. When president trump doctored a hurricane map how will the biden administration sharpie proof noah they need to make some changes to the scientific integrity policy. Because what happened was that episode was judged to have violated their scientific integrity policy but they were absolutely no consequences for it because it doesn't apply to the department of commerce. It applies only to noah so the department of commerce leadership told no they had issued a statement disavowing. they're actually accurate forecast and They weren't punished or so they're going to have to make some changes also though i think whoever is brought in noah leadership is going to come and on day one knowing that they have some morale issues and knowing that the half to reassure people about the scientific integrity of the agency on the premium placed on sound science andrew friedman with washington post capital weather. Gang for sharing your perspective on climate casts. Today thank you for having me.

President Biden Biden Cabinet Pete Buttigieg Andrew Janet Yellen Andrew Friedman Brian Niece Jennifer Granholm National Security Council Department Of Commerce National Economic Council Washington Post National Climate Assessment Kerry EPA President Trump Treasury Biden Administration Donald Trump Jacobs
One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

Short Wave

09:46 min | Last week

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

Wikipedia Wick Wicky Sara Gilbert Sara Gilbert Kubat Gladys West Us Government Western Europe Silicon Valley National Institute Of Health North America Saratoga London Oxford WES UK Virginia BBC NBC
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia

Science Friction

04:44 min | Last week

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia

"Yes sir dra okay. All over the world spotted another one. Sorry wearies leash. She'll need gone. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seem to have reversed the regular order of nature and like avengers of kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the reader to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The gripe botanical artists have often been women but were many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The paintbrush deemed more appropriate tool for a lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always been an interesting one. Because i suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen as a bit more of a suitable pursuit for the women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it still also quite mild eliminated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in weight belt western. Australia defied the odds and changed. How the world sore australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listen to artists. So with laura skates of botanical scientist doing her phd on carnivorous plants. Right now i am taking you down a bush trial in pursuit of his story. Oh is that it. Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones. That i was just talking about so you sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of an embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. Menzies the i ultra ceramic grant though draw sarah makram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name sanju. It was a man. English naturalist biologist charles darwin n-i-l-l-a-s who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. Here's particularly interested in dresser. There's a european species coatdress harare folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example. He would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction. But if you put something like little piece of aig or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around. So what he basically showed is that these plants are reacting to substances that have not to general protein in them so so the plants i almost instantaneously they know not that'd be the descend concrete that Cheese like an eight that. Yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious. They instead wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost. Trajan i mean even in my phd. Thesis i go right back to dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas of things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for the foundation. Full kind of verse plant research but one american woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as darwin. I will give you my observations on draw surra which seemed to have escaped the notice of botanists and she's struck up a correspondence with darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential book on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of these pretty plants growing for window ornaments and soon saw the deal on. The folio was a fly trap of considerable power when it comes to congress plants. One of the women that i kind of came across in my studies was married trait and i came across her. Because he in allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little footnote. That talked about what mary trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and i thought wow. Who's mrs trait. I want to find out more about him.

Sir Dra Sarah Makram Australia Menzies Mary Charles Darwin Dahlan Laura Harare Bush AIG Trajan Darwin Mary Trait Congress Allen
MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

The Promised Podcast

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

"First we have a matter that we're following with alert interest. Great concern is part of an occasional series. We call the premise. Podcast ponders the politics of pentameter and the use of the bard to advance a canard last week. The chair of the knesset corona virus committee. He fought shasha beaten announced that she was leaving the likud to join the new right-wing. Hope party where she would become. Don't sars number to an announcement that right away added five seats to the tally. New hope was showing in early polls. Shasha beaten is a popular politician. Mostly because as the head of the corona committee she overturned government decisions to close pools and gyms and stores in schools and even though her decisions were themselves overturned right back again by the government people came to see her as a straight shooter and someone fighting for the people trying to get to work and pay their bills and maybe grab a little exercise if they can. And who doesn't like a truth to power rebel. Also most everything about josh abi tone is wonderful. She grew up in the development town of kiryat shmona the daughter of a nurse from morocco and moshe feed a guy born in iraq who built up a bus company. She had a phd before she was thirty was deputy mayor of kyoto before he was thirty five and was a college vice president forty. It's partly because shasha tone has so much going on that folks and the likud were furious mad when she announced that she was switching parties and they insisted that she resigned right away. Shasha beaten refused on the grounds that she had been elected in this term and she would serve out. There are practical issues in play each sitting. Mk gets government allocated campaign funds when they run for the successive knesset. So if on stays and she'll have one point seven million shekels to use for new hopes campaign but if she quits now she'll be replaced and some other likud member. We'll get that cash lee cooed transportation minister miri regev tweeted quote. You've thought shasha beaten if you have a drop of integrity left resign. Immediately from connecticut and return the mandate to the national camp which you took for a ride for your own benefit a disgrace and when shasha baton refused the likud petitions something called the knesset house committee basically a rules and procedures committee to declare shasha beaten a quote unquote deserter which status would allow them to strip her of her likud campaign funding at the very least anyway. The committee met a few days ago. And because by then blue and was on the outs with the likud they supported chechen tone and she remains in the knesset with her one point seven million shekels in election funding which is when this happened. Uzi they on a likud. Backbencher angry by the outcome of the committee meeting convinced that chechen beaten had not gotten the come up and she deserves asked to be recognized by the chair leaned into the microphone and said quote. I would like to give some free literary advice to get on the of shasha zones new party that it was for matters such as these that shakespeare wrote in fellow i believe and then diane went onto quote not on alternate translation. I think of rabbani ios warning at the end of act one in fellow look to her more if thou has is to see. She has deceived her father. And may the shot a mile invoked up via gumbo which couplet was met by pandemonium in the committee with shasha be tone saying the volume clement. Actually came on the la. I have heard low things. But i must say that. I have never heard things as low as this. At this point mikhail cutler launch a religious blue and white. Mk screened uzi. Why are you referring to shakespeare. Why not refer to the woman who strays and you'll at least be using our own sources. The woman who strays as a reference to the book of numbers by bar chapter five verses twelve through sixteen about what to do with a wife who acts on faithfully to which topic an entire track date of the tomlin. My second sota is devoted later. Uzi dayan said quote. Someone wrote me and said on your life man. What a sexist remark. if that's how it was perceived. I really apologize and quote. And i know what you're thinking. That's a lousy apology. If that's how it was perceived blah blah blah blah blah. But i'd like to think the best of who was married to my favorite zoologist environmentalists tamar. Diane i adore her and she's lately been. The person who by force of character and charm willed into existence. The amazing new natural history museum at tel aviv university which is among other things. A brilliant polemic for sustainability and there ain't no one more feminists then tomorrow diane uzi on also mostly diane's nephew and yours on geffen's cousin so there's that he thought shasha zone for her part. Classically accepted the apology. And the matter seem to be over but all week. I've been thinking that there was an opportunity. Missed here and i can't get it out of my mind. Would it have hurt chubby tone to respond rather than with. I have never heard things as low as this. By saying with catherine from the taming of the shrew my tongue will tell the anger of my heart or else my heart concealing it will break. Would it have hurt. Shasha beaten to insist with don john and much ado about nothing. Let me be that. I am and seek not to alter me. Would it have hurt. Shasha be tone to say with polonius in hamlet this above all to be true and it must follow as the night the day thou cancer not be false to any man. Am i asking too much from shasha tone. I think not because truly. Now is the winter of our discontent. Elections are nine but a week and a day after the ides of march. But i'll stop. I'll stop because who knows better than me. That truly brevity is the soul of wit and that this is a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury signifying nothing. This is how safe. Because i am that idiot today.

Shasha Knesset Corona Virus Committee Hope Party Corona Committee Josh Abi Shmona Moshe Feed Lee Cooed Miri Regev National Camp Shasha Baton Knesset House Committee Kiryat Mikhail Cutler Kyoto Morocco Shakespeare Uzi Dayan UZI
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

06:36 min | 2 weeks ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse and he said well you're in the early stages of alcoholism you know. He got my family history and He said just try for a month or two. Try having one or two drinks but stopping and see what happens. Well sure enough. I tried to do his experiment. And sometimes i have two drinks and stop just like a normal drinker. Other times i would have the two drinks and then it was third drink and fourth rank and pick up the stranger and do crazy things that no one could get me to leave and eventually it. I could see the pattern very clearly. That if i had even one drink i could not trust myself to do really dangerous things for myself and other people

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
Model-Based Offline Reinforcement Learning with Aravind Rajeswaran

The TWIML AI Podcast

06:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Model-Based Offline Reinforcement Learning with Aravind Rajeswaran

"All right. everyone. I am on the line with arvin. Roger swaran arvind is a phd student in machine learning and robotics at the university of washington. Arvin welcome to the tuomo podcasts. Thanks famine federal pleasure. I'm really looking forward to our conversation. Motto based offline reinforcement learning is the topic of research papers called morrell motto based off. Find me enforcement learning. That topic has come up quite a bit over the past year or so It's getting quite popular. And i'm really looking forward to digging into your take but before we do. Tell us about your journey and how you came to work in our l. and robotics chip pretty interesting question my undergraduate background. Actually in something completely different. I was mostly doing big statistic and lucrative like chemical engineering as my formal degrees and i took a machine learning class by professor of in back in india and that kind of transformed my perspective on things that essentially had matt very similar to what is used in statistical it so i was able to pick up on it pretty quickly by the obligations. Seemed like really really cool. So i wanted to maybe fever debate and focus more on machine learning. And so that's how i moved into the bronx field of ai and when it started out i had more of a theoretical inclination ben. I started working with my adviser. Professor shawn kakabadze. Who's like an expert in machine learning theory on be discussing like what might be interesting projects topics to work on or we felt was start matz. If the research decide in machine learning deep learning was largely explanative nature so deep learning was already working really well and the gresh any hard. We understand explain. Why deep learning working enforcement learning. What was interesting is that we actually didn't have very good algorithms things. Were actually not working that ball. And there was a very interesting scope to have like an interplay between teary analogous from both develop new algorithms to break very well and also tried to explain why it is working than gain a more fundamental understanding and that sort of been might be at the joining us electric to show board they. Competitively goodra sauce ended the same time having a theoretical bench to my work. Nice nice and as the large focus of your work been on model base are l. in particular or have you explored a wide variety of topics within the space. I see interesting in model based in fort learning relatively recently the i'm i think about my research at least in the last couple of years has been the central question of. How do we make a. How do we create agents that can solve a diverse set of tasks with a modest amount of expedience but each individual dos and this is of course a very broad question that the number of different fields including multi task learning micro. Learning offline learning. And so on that constitutes space of problems that have been thinking about what you think is really cool approach algorithm to make progress on these domains model based startled so i view model based on. That's providing the mic toolkit to make progress on questions related to multitask turning meta learning offline. Learning got got so maybe the best way to go through this is to start from the beginning And have you kind of explain the. I'm curious the way you explain. Model based rl. And if it's you know the extent to which it'll be different from other explanations we've heard here on the show so let's start there. Yes so. I guess maybe i could try to merge some of from model based on offline learning on. What got me working on this project. I'm hopefully doing that. There may be an explanation for what is model based donal on. If you think about firmament a moment blake questions and computer vision are be the questions. There tend to be much more ambitious and interesting than in traditional reinforcement. Learning for example. The questions to be still asking learning are how can we solve a particular tastic pickup. A particular object with the robot solve a particular game with. Ask me more samples as possible. This is very different. From how people phrase digressions and computer vision for example offs kennedy chanukah detector with ten samples can attain got victor with twenty points. That's just not an interesting question. The questions are the how can i identify. What is the object. An image of thousand categories much more broader in scope and much more ambitious daily. Use a lot of will get to make that happen. Mine goal was to try to emulate that in reinforcement joining us. Now if he start thinking about how can an agent which flows in a very complex A kitchen for example. There are so many things that it can do the cabinets they clean bans the setup dishes and so on the dishwasher on the speed of things that the robot can do so much more diverse than what that means is we need to be able to use the data to extract as much information about the world as possible and i believe models are the we accomplish doctor just given a particular state of the wall some either league and explicit stately things that particular joined configurations of the robot throughout the different objects in the armour richard descriptions such as images and video slater scans of assets points to any potential action that the robot can take how would the world evolving change on if you are able to learn such a model it modern sculptures many of the details that want about the world on on the basis of what we learn. We can then downstream from finding and reasoning in order to accomplish necas of interest. So in my mind to go back to your question what is a model. I believe it is. How would the world respond to any changes be made potentially making the former factions

Roger Swaran Arvind Shawn Kakabadze Arvin Morrell University Of Washington Matz Matt India Donal Fort United States Kennedy Richard Necas
Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

Impact Pricing

04:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

"On march diving to his allesandro. Monte here are three things you wanna know about allesandro before we start. He is a professor for corporate management and organization at cologne business school. He's done stints at both s. Kp and wolters kluwer two companies. That i truly respect in rural the pricing and he went to uc. Berkeley as did i. Welcome alessandro i'm mark. Thanks for having me on the show. It's to be here they. How'd you get into pricing in the first place. Yeah we all have Have a story That we can tell and it's always interesting to know how we kind of entered into this adventure now. The first touch boy was of course during studies microeconomics on the train. Sort of a communist. Of course you get the standard pricing approach the supply and demand things there but the real id say management world touch point with pricing. Ause my first job which was at a skippy. and since then this s- topic while yeah caught my attention and all in topic. So that's that's the that's the story. So why do you stay. You're all in but why it's I think prices. In general. They i once i think once read wasn't article into quote woes welded the central hinges of the economy so the price at the end of the day clears markets. Price is something that you feel as a consumer immediately. it's sometimes pain and sometimes pleasure. So it has the behavioral component and yet. That's i think that's. That's what makes prices annual dealing with. I sing quite fascinating for me. At least so. I'll buy into the fact that it touches almost everything so it's so powerful and yet i love the fact that so few people understand it and which means that when we can advise them we can have huge impacts in their lives and their businesses. So definitely i that nice. So you got a phd in business history. I have never heard of that before. And then you went to work for escapee. How did a phd in business history. Help you in escapee while it helps out first of all from the let's say methodological perspective you know learning the same more scientific tools and techniques. So it really does help in then tackling all those pressing questions. that of course should be tackled from. Let's say a more profound way. Okay so i always go the fundamental way when it comes to pricing so it helps you know to to have the tools and techniques sort of this research perspective had so definitely helped while just on a side note when when i talked to my escape you partners because i actually did the phd wild being escapees. So they kind of allowed me on sabbatical end. When when i talk project say while hd and has a history component. Yeah i I i saw some some question marks there say well how does that now. Kind of translate into our everyday business and dan. I think at the end. The research the businesses. Phd helps you to understand. Probably the president and also get sort of a a hint on what will come eventually in the future and so is it a quantitative phd when you do business history. you're still doing a bunch of stats and quantitative research and things like that. Yeah while you can do both ways. You can approach both waist. Now what i did actually is i. I went into historical archives. So i really dig deep into the documents from the. Let's say early seventeenth century and had to research him and had to read them and had to understand how much let's say executive spec at that time decided on pricing pricing strategies. Of course you can do to quantitative approach. You need to have the data said so you need to have some numbers eventually for that period in history. It's already like a jackpot. Having documents at all so the point here was really to understand the decision making at that time. So it's a more qualitative. Approach the

Allesandro Cologne Business School Wolters Alessandro Berkeley DAN
How Much of Your Life Do You Actually Control?

No Stupid Questions

05:47 min | 2 weeks ago

How Much of Your Life Do You Actually Control?

"This question arose. When i was reading maria kovas new book. The biggest bluff so maria like you has a phd in psychology. But she's not an academic she's a writer and this book is about her quest to become a professional poker player starting from scratch so we made a freakonomics radio episode about her book. That was called how to make your own luck and really what. Maria is wrestling with throughout. That book is the relationship between luck and skill. She's doing it in the context of poker but it's easy to extrapolate into our daily lives. So here's the passage that made me think of you. There's an idea in psychology. She writes. I introduced by julian. Wrote her in nineteen sixty. Six called the locus of control when something happens in the external environment is it due to our own actions in other words skill or some outside factor. Chance people who have an internal locus of control tend to think that they affect outcomes often more than they actually do whereas people who have an external cause of control think that what they do doesn't matter too much events will be what they will be. Typically an internal locus will lead to greater success. People who think they control events are mentally healthier and tend to take more control over their fate so to speak. Meanwhile people with an external locus or more prone to depression and when it comes to work a more lackadaisical attitude so angela. My question has two parts one. Is it indeed. Better to generally have an internal locus of control as maria. Kind of cova rights. And if so if. I am more inclined toward the external if i tend to feel life as more happening to me rather than me making it happen. How can i shift to have a more internal locus of control. It's a great passage from a great book from a great author. So i'm glad to be asked this question i'm gonna throw in a bonus answer here. You didn't ask me if i had. An internal control of control is probably. I haven't internal locus control. and yes. it is generally a good thing. It correlates positively with just about every life outcome you can think of you know income and wellbeing not going to jail it cetera. I guess my suspicion the counter would be that. It might also correlate with things like arrogance and nurses system in other words no characteristic that we think of is unabated. Good all the time obviously well. You're right that it can't be a complete recipe for a good human and there might be instances in which it could be bad. I am not aware of a lot of research. On the downsides of internal control in my data when i measure things that are conceptually siblings two locus of control like growth mindset or self efficacy or optimism. I don't find negative correlations with good things now. That might be. Because i'm studying teenagers. And maybe i'm not measuring all the right outcomes. So i would have imagined that your answer would be something along the lines of well. Of course you want to have an internal locus of control when you're talking about things that you actually can control. But it's really really important to acknowledge that despite your best efforts or maybe despite your worst actions that there's going to be a lot of countervailing activity from institutions or societies systemic things other people and so on that you can't control so that's i guess the answer i was expecting to hear but it sounds like you're saying that the more internal you have at least for teenagers who you've studied the better. It is yes. Yeah i mean you asked me a really straightforward question which is what's the correlation is it positive is it negative and the answer is also simple which is a positive but i think we should move onto the more interesting question more than thinking about. What's the downside. I do think we should think like. Is it a fully accurate view of the world to think that you can control what happens to you or are people who are very aware of all the things like luck and social inequality and racism and the list goes on. Is that a more accurate view of the world. The idea of look control goes all the way back as you said to rotor in the sixty s when he was developing this idea it was really on the heels of behaviorisms where the idea that you would even have any thoughts in your head expectations about the future. That didn't really matter because we are basically all just animals responding and very mechanical ways to stimuli punishments rewards etc is really true as recently as the nineteen sixties. You're saying that was the standard scoop thought. Well certainly the early twentieth century was definitely behavior ism and it was pretty dominant. And that's why when you have a psychologist like rotor. And then also like alexandra. Who is still with us. He's in his nineties and stanford he has a very similar idea. Called self efficacy. They wanted to make the point that people are not just lab rats responding to rewards and punishments. They are thinking and they're projecting into the future and wondering if i do this is going to pay off. And so it really was a conception of human nature which was much more genetic having agency and having free will and having an influence on your future as opposed to just when environment does this. I do that. That's not just like stimulus response.

Maria Kovas Maria Julian Wrestling Angela Depression Alexandra
A wild and whimsical world of flesh-eating plants

Science Friction

05:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A wild and whimsical world of flesh-eating plants

"Pretty much up ended all of our lives before covid nineteen. I got to travel to the perth hills in search of some beautiful flesh-eating beings so it's a warm dry day in calamander national park with bright blue sky above yellow worth crunchy underfoot the yellowish shrub. Whole yes we go. Yes laura and i are looking for something special in the bush it's tiny but shawnee and so it should catch season dawn. These the ninetieth be baltimore. Rare impression. s- potential specimens not. Oh that's a tremendous one. So this is Dresser a guy again tia and it's named because it's pretty giant. He's that's about fifty sixty centimeters high. Yeah and it's like a little mini. trae it is. Yeah like these are. Actually the leaves the plan. Yeah so the the flowers are up the very top here. Just in bad i think at the moment but the leaves are they do look like a flower bill. Little son to me and so it's a little pad that is surrounded by sticky hairs and what you'll notice it on some of them. The sticky has wrapped around into the center and now Can you see the little sort of bug remains in the middle there and then others are out ready to catch something new so hi. My name's lois gates. And i'm a botanist from western australia. And i'm doing my phd on plants but this young botanist has an alter-ego floor escapes. Yes so that's my twitter and instagram. Flora 'cause laura and i'm all about plants so more than that laura aka florus gates is all about plots that ate flesh. We always tend to kind of chris. Plante picked it up these sort of managing monsters aliens from outer space it. It goes out. If got dave the little shop of horrors that sort of thing or a new car and killed but it even goes back much earlier than that. It's not for the greater glory of science. I just want us to survive. Even a botanist said there was the story of a gemini explorer in the madagascan john. Google is it a plant coming across this atrocious cannibal tree central nervous system which had these serpent like branches which captured a woman and coiled. Its branches around and around. There is actually the atrocious kind of betray or if anyone's going to find it maybe that just not come back all that don't usually pull themselves out of the ground chase you. He sees the depiction of this atrocious tree. It looks so much like a dresser in the way that it's those separate like branches the sticky glands dresser and the way that they wrap around and coil around the pool. Woman is the same way that these dresser wrap around the insect pry. But yeah they. They always get painted as these vicious preaches. I do tend to notice that. A lot of the time the victims in these stories Women don't like that aspect. Yeah there's a whole gender story to be talked about here. I think definitely. And i mean often when we talk about verse plants. We often hear about charles. Darwin because dow indeed right the first scientific book all about kind of verse. Plants gave the first scientific evidence that they are actually able to capture and digest insect prey. But there's been a lot of amazing women who have also contributed to converse plant science and our understanding of ecology throughout history and. I'm really interested in their stories as well. And so am i this week. We are in wnba which incredibly is home to up to a third of the world's converse plant species. I wanna find out why that eason have. I've managed to survive in such an intense environment and knicks. Week got totally caught up in a saga full of twists and turns and tendrils about the life of just one congresswoman. We're gonna venture from hilltop home of an internationally renowned joola share. He wanted the all the glory for himself. I really can't go into the mind of charles gardner but he said he did. Not mother might lot very difficult for him. We'll head deep into the heart of a magnificent end museum for plants. So we're entering a quarantined area. Okay hidden on stays now.

Perth Hills Calamander National Park Lois Gates Laura Aka Florus Gates Laura Trae Dresser Plante Baltimore Instagram Western Australia Bush Dave Twitter Chris Google John Darwin DOW
Alex Padilla to become California's first Latino senator, replacing Harris

KCBS Radio Morning News

04:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Alex Padilla to become California's first Latino senator, replacing Harris

"Going. Secretary Alex Padilla now heads to Washington, D C. To replace Vice President elect Kamila Harris and become California's first Latino senator. Questions still remain over how Padilla will be received in D. C. And for more, we turn now to the KCBS Ring Central news Line and talk with Christopher. Cattle. Lago National political reporter at Political Good to have you with us, Christopher Nice to be here. Thank you. So, how much pressure do you think the governor was under to appoint a Latino to replace Kamila Harris? I think he was under huge pressure. Just generally. He he was replacing a multiracial woman, and Kamila Harris, a black woman. And there was a lot of groups out there who felt that not only should he replace Harris with a woman but a black woman in particular because she was the only black woman in the U. S Senate, and that number will not go from 1 to 0. But there was also tremendous pressure. Even before Harris ran, you'll remember in 20. 15 when she started her campaign to replace Barbara Boxer for the state to elect its first Latino senator, Um, back then, there were calls for folks like former L. A Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to run even the happier for Sarah, who by now nominated to be the Health and human services director to potentially run Kevin De Leone ended up running against Dianne Feinstein and 2018 and lost in the other Senate seat. So there was a lot of competing pressure for Gavin Newsom and what we saw yesterday. Clearly there was no accident in him almost packaging these two Thies two appointments together, which you saw for the U. S. Senate and Alex Padilla and then surely Weber. To replace Padilla as secretary of state, a state wide position. Surely Weber is chair of the Black caucus in the state and also Was a long time professor PhD from San Diego State who's done a lot of focus on police reform another racial justice issues in the state, so You know, do some. I know people talk for weeks and weeks about appointing Padilla. He was He was kind of the obvious pick someone who is allied with new some years ago, but he waited clearly so he could make these two um, appointments in tandem s so that people could see kind of the full context of both of them and not just look at one of the other. What? What about the comments from San Francisco Mayor London Braid. Initially she called this a real blow to the African American community. You think she was angry at video? She angry Governor Newsome. Yeah. Both. I think she speaks for folks both in the state and nationally who Who really did genuinely want to see that seat. Uh um, uh, C representation. Um, of Ah, Black woman like common. Harris continue in that Senate seat. There. Also a lot of people as I mentioned who wanted to see a woman in that seat. Um and I think She? It's complex. She does reflect some of the groups out there some of the people out there even some of the people who are praising kind of the tandem. Nature of these pics were disappointed, maybe not in such sharp terms of London Bridge, But groups and other folks out there were disappointed that Newsome did not appoint a black woman to serve in the Senate. Well, this all got announced and Harris is term expires in two years, and Padilla has already launched a Senate campaign account asking for donations. So it appears that He wants to stick around for a while, and he's already raising money. Yeah, The thing that we know about the Senate races these days and really any races, you have to capitalize on the 1st 2024 hours 48 hours first week when people are paying attention, the senior name in the news These races in California don't typically command a kind of TV time. And so he's trying to get a raise as much money as you can. And in the short period, the short window where folks are really tuning in. And we've seen comments. And I know you didn't mention this but from folks like Ro Khanna Progressive, who was the national co chaired for Bernie Sanders, who are expressing disappointment, not not in, uh in the in Padilla. On the fact that he's a Latino, which they celebrate, but in the fact that they think that his politics or to moderate and that's just that he's got to raise a lot of money because he could he could certainly face eh Progressive challenger in two years in the state, and you know he'll only have two years to really make his mark and get his name out there before before his challenge.

Kamila Harris Padilla Senate Secretary Alex Padilla Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Christopher Nice Harris Kevin De Leone Alex Padilla Weber Antonio Villaraigosa Barbara Boxer Governor Newsome Dianne Feinstein Gavin Newsom Christopher Health And Human Services U. California Washington
Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

Data Skeptic

03:57 min | 3 weeks ago

Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

"Everyone this is ted. I'm from cornell university. I'm finishing up my phd now my fifth year. I also worked part time at avalanches which is in our startup. i co-founded with adviser. Tell me a little bit about your phd work. What are your specific areas of interest. Yes so i think for the a democ- part you know as a phd. I mostly were distributed systems and that sounds like a very broad topic so more specifically within the systems i'm mostly focused on consensus and within the consensus topic. They are also different kinds of consensus protocol. I mostly focused on so called. Byzantine fault tolerant consensus protocols or t protocols. We are nowadays very hot topics. Pickus people are interested in blockchain technology and walk. Chang's need such kind of consensus in order to work. We'll definitely spend some time. Talking about blockchain byzantine fault. Tolerance is not as newest blockchain. So it's a i guess. An older theory. Could you help some of the listeners with the basics. What is bef t absolutely so. Yeah indeed. I think there has been like misconception. Many people think of b. f. Some kind of new stuff especially in that community even when we're talking about blockchain's but to me when i started my phd at cornell this of t kind of consensus as the coolest consensus at heard of at a time. And before actually dive into that world so what is not so byzantine fault. Tolerance has a weird name. So what is byzantine is. Sounds like the name of the old empire in l. a probably medieval or or some time period and the reason that this kind of protocol got his name as thanks to leslie lamport so may have heard of this research. His very well known ing Systems community clothing his works on taxes all sorts of consensus stuff. The also proposed the name for this new career of consoles protocols to be. Fd consists and beat byzantine just is part of the story if you read his paper about the whole consensus. So let's forget about the name of paying so what this protocol is usually about as maybe you are familiar with the phnom visiting kind of consensus or you know people usually call them crash fault tolerant protocols such as taxes or rafts so those protocols they work great and they're widely adopted by the current industry. Google uses passes as a core for cloud service and the reason that we need to another category of consensus protocol is because this kind of protocol a does not assume malicious behavior by the participating machines nose so that means than those can only crash build knows can only like human beings they can always say. Oh i die and then you just shut down or crashed without creating any noise into the channel into the network so then people begin to think about how we should handle the case where there some node. That could go crazy. Say i'm an node than when i don. I don't die peaceful eight. But i crave bunch of noises. The noise could be interfering the entire natural and even worse. I could be you know. Some zombie not controlled by the x. Turno attackers so i could exhibit arbitrary behaviour visit lab. I'm like a you know the insider send on by some other parties. So i'm like spying this system. So how do you handle this kind of situation in a protocol. While at the same time you still want to achieve the same goal as the noun byzantine one usually call them or crush full tolerant protocols we want to achieve the same goal but was different assumption

Blockchain Leslie Lamport Ing Systems Cornell University TED Chang Google
States of Innovation: In Depth With Sue Urahn, Pews President and CEO

After The Fact

04:22 min | Last month

States of Innovation: In Depth With Sue Urahn, Pews President and CEO

"Welcome to after the fact for the pew charitable. Trust's dan duke. At a time. When many of us feel is gridlocked. It's important to remember. There are places where real change is being made this season. we're looking at states of innovation examples of state governments. Who have creatively addressed problems with solutions. That are working as always we start with the data point for this episode. That number is sixty seven percent. Sixty seven percent or about two thirds of. Us adults are confident. In local elected officials according to the pew research center and those local officials are central to the innovation. We'll be covering ciaran. Got her start in state government working for the minnesota state legislature where she saw research translated into policies and laws that improved people's lives that led her joining pugh twenty five years ago where she eventually launched pews work with state governments around the we talked to sue about pews focus on evidence based policymaking and how it continues to make a difference. So you're an welcome nice to be here. It seems to have you joining us because your background is in state policy. And you're also the new president and ceo of pew so welcome. Congratulations thank you. I wanted to talk about your background. Because you started in state government before you came to pew. The reason i ended up in the legislature was fairly simple. I was finishing a phd in education. I loved doing research. But i had a fairly significant desire to also have an impact and not the basic research does not have an impact. But i wanted something a little bit more immediate. During the time i was in grad school i had an opportunity to work with the higher education coordinating board in minnesota which set education policy. And i just loved it was the to do research and then to see it. Translated into decisions and policies that had an immediate impact. And i was hooked right from the beginning. I have a deep deep fondness for my home state and the ability to be able to work on policy affected. The state mattered. A lot to me. So the end of the day. I stayed in minnesota and i went to the legislature an unparalleled opportunity to not only see the sausage getting made but to be part of the sausage making process so for me it was also an ability to continue to learn. I had in grad school. Obviously done a lot of research and a lot of presentations and a lot of conversations on that. But i had never been up front and involved in the policy process so during your tenure is the time to pew is really made its evolution into much more of a policy oriented organization as opposed to a grant making organization. You eventually became the director of the pew center on the states. Which gets us to our topic of this season. How did that come about. And what was the whole idea behind. Pugh getting involved in a center focused on the state's well. We had had a couple projects just before that one of the very first one. I did when i moved over to the program. Side was a pretty significant multi your investment to help states invest in preschool for kids and based on the very compelling research that was not widely known at that time that there was a very good economic return on investment. When states were able to do that it was at a time when states were very frustrated about their lack of progress on k. Twelve or form so. i think they view preschool. As a really great place to invest and we viewed it as a place that was ripe for progress at the state level so we moved that program forward and worked in several states. And as we did that it became very clear that the opportunity to engage in different kinds of policy areas at at the state level was something that you should really take a very close look at so launching. The pugh center on the states allowed us to bring together different kinds of policy whether it was education. Or how well states perform or sentencing and corrections and develop buck capacity at pugh that allowed us to work across different issue areas but bring some of the same approaches and thoughtful research to bear. That would help. State policy makers make better decisions.

Dan Duke Minnesota State Legislature PEW Pew Research Center Ciaran Legislature Pugh Minnesota Pew Center On The States Grad School United States Pugh Center
Why You DON'T Need to Wait 3-5 Days Between New Foods with Carina Venter, PhD, RD

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

05:56 min | Last month

Why You DON'T Need to Wait 3-5 Days Between New Foods with Carina Venter, PhD, RD

"Here is karina ventner talking about why you do not need to wait three to five days between new foods all right. Hi karina welcome to the podcast. Thank you bain vegetation. Will i cannot tell you excited i am. I have been a huge fan of your work for awhile. Now and i had the big smile face. I heard you on the recent fair webinar saying that. We don't need to be telling parents to wait three to five days between introducing new foods and everyone on my team. We were watching simultaneously. All shaking your heads and yes yes. Finally someone has the courage to say this. So i'm wondering if we could talk just a little bit about the infamous and confusing guidance. That parents here to this day all the time. it's usually from their pediatrician. They think they need to wait three to five days between trying new foods with their babies. Where did this come from. is it true. What are your thoughts on that statement. So the interesting thing is i work very closely with dr gupta. Who recently published a paper on this indicating that up to about fifty percent of pediatricians to vice families to follow this advice. Am i e waiting three to five days a week trying new foods and so when the wind back and tried to find ways this originate from we cannot actually find regional data but it is clearly the advice that is currently displayed and available on the american academy of pediatrics website. And also on the same for disease control websites over the embassy. Dc still stylized patterns to wake up to five days between introducing new foods and and we are hoping that they will be reviewing this advice. Certain okay what would be like the reality of that actually happening. Like i know how. Some of these bodies work. I think for example like twenty years ago when i was studying to be a dietitian we were taught. Wait until age one to introduce egg white and now whom you look at the data we know that the earlier deduction of the allergenic foods helps prevent food allergy. I think back like well. Why were we learning that and being taught that there was no evidence to support that just like seemed like a good idea. And i kinda get the same vibe with the three to five day recommendation. Like it's out there but it's not cited it's not referenced is not based on any evidence and yet it's become the the day facto recommendation. That parents are still hearing. How can we change this. If there is no research to support that yes you know. I wonder if it will go this way as the early alison advice said. We're not started my phd in two thousand one. The advice in the united kingdom at the time was not to give peanuts in hydro infants up to about age although the exact Fans from hottest families may wish nor to introduce peanuts up to three years of age and they need was actually the data from my phd sharing that. Hang on you know. Perhaps that's not the right advice. It was an observational study. At the time. They didn't have to go to change the guidance. From saying don't wait to give but they did actually change the guidance to say we're not really sure if we should wait with introducing peanut allergens actually took a very well conducted are not and the trial introducing peanuts and early life in the first year of life and in hydro infants to actively change the guidance to say now we do want to introduce peanuts actively in the first year of life and so i'm not sure if the street you five days waiting advice would go the same way. Hopefully we can have some day and perhaps we will talk about the diversity data later on. Perhaps that's good enough observational data to say well. Perhaps you know we could just say we're not shooting reshoot weights three to five days and then i wonder if it will take an our cd which will be difficult to conduct but to get us to actively jank the guidance say we can do one new food everyday and to discuss observational data about at least food preferences when we don't wait three to five days and if you would be interested in that yeah and i think my audience there maybe familiar with peanut guidelines in the leap. Study that she's mentioning. You guys is the learning earlier about peanut allergy. And it's this landmark study. That really just changed the way. We look at the introduction of foods. But i'm just curious carina is there anything underway. I mean are you and your team. Would you ever consider doing a randomized control trial about the waiting three to five days because as far as i know having done this anecdotally with tens of thousands of families there's never any adverse reactions that occur from introducing low risk foods one per day. Yes we built in that observation pad for the allergenic foods but as far as introducing the low risk foods one per day. Do you recommend that as well. Because wouldn't you see the majority of the indicators of an allergic reaction in the minutes and hours following the ingestion of the food not days and weeks later are not aware of anybody doing an archie really focusing on the three to five days introduction. I would love to do a study like back but we still have more work to do in the food allergy wealth and so i am involved in a trial that will start. 'em eddie next yet. Nate by dr chicago from chicago way. We will actively be introducing major allergens in the first year of life compared to control group. I'm working with you very wonderful. Dietitians on the study as well and we will be monitoring how long the parents way between introduction of foods in the active drought baby will be advising to just do one new food today and versus the control group which will hopefully still wait three to five days so that we do have do not competitive groups and hopefully that will give us enough information to go back to the cdc and the ma ap and also that national institutes of health and site while perhaps this is good enough data to now withdraw that guidance.

Karina Ventner Dr Gupta Alison Advice Karina American Academy Of Pediatrics Allergy United Kingdom Carina Dr Chicago Archie Nate Eddie Chicago Ma Ap CDC National Institutes Of Health
Farming like Indigenous people did could bolster Hawaiis food supply

Climate Connections

01:12 min | Last month

Farming like Indigenous people did could bolster Hawaiis food supply

"Hawaii imports more than eighty five percent of its food. So extreme weather disrupt shipping. It could have serious consequences for the state. You just kinda grow up knowing that we only have like a week of food on the shelves and if the barge doesn't come wearing in big trouble that's natalie courage shema while a phd student. At the university of hawaii. She studied whether indigenous farming methods could help reduce this food insecurity especially as the climate changes. I always wondering how can we learn from our iki. Kupuna extra knowledge to address of i-it's sustainability issues. Today she says before colonization indigenous farmers grew crops in areas. That people today would not they. Farmed terraced land that had to be flooded during cultivation and grew roof. Ish ables under banana and coconut trees. Those methods were productive. She studies suggest that they could have produced enough food for eighty six percent of hawaii's current population. So if implemented today indigenous farming methods could make hawaii's food system more resilient to extreme weather and help the state sustain itself in the future as it did in the past.

Hawaii University Of Hawaii Natalie
Kryptonite for the Inner Critic With Kristin Neff

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:30 min | Last month

Kryptonite for the Inner Critic With Kristin Neff

"Nice to sue they you for doing this. I've been wanting to talk to you for a while. Actually because i've actually writing a book about kindness right now and i wanna do a chapter about self compassion. So you are the you are the leading experts so before we get to sell compassion. Though i wanna. I wanna hear how you got interested in meditation in the first place right so It was my last year graduate school. I was finishing up my phd at berkeley and basically my life was a mess. I'd gotten out of a divorce. It was a very messy divorce. I was feeling a lot of shame. I'm and i was also feeling a lot of stress not so much about what i finish my phd. But more after seven years of my life. When i get a job the job market was really tight. And so i thought you know. Well i've heard that meditation is is good for stress in berkeley. So right down. The street from me was a meditation group. I was lucky every right down every street. Yeah in berkeley so that you know on every corner but luckily the one. I chose to go to The woman leaving the group it was actually a tick not han sanga reason. It's important is because some meditation teachers. Mindfulness bennett teachers wouldn't necessarily talk about self compassion tic time one thing that's unique about him. He's really emphasizes heart qualities of practice. Vietnamese zen master doesn't talk a lot about compassion. Full stop is but he does in particular right and so i started in his tradition And the very the very first night. I went the woman talked about having compassion for yourself the needed to actively cultivate compassion for yourself as well as others and so i was also learning mindfulness but because my life was such a mess because i was such a mess you know almost immediately i saw the difference it made when i turn myself with this kind of kind. Warm supportive attitude. I just saw my own experience really made a difference. So and then i started practicing more in the insight meditation tradition. I think because. I am a scientists it. It was a little more compatible with my Way of approaching things. But with people like jack cornfield the path with heart. Sharon salzberg loving kindness. So i was always i was always really drawn to the integration of you might say the spaciousness of mindfulness with the heart opening qualities of compassion and i was fortunate because it was their practice from the very beginning and that was about twenty years ago. Let me just jump in and define terms for people. Yes i i just never know. We have a lot of experienced meditators who listen for new folks who are coming every week in once you start to meditate. There are lots of ways to lots away within buddhism. There are. I would say at least two big skills. We're trying to teach. One is mindfulness which is put simply the ability not to be around by your emotions. The other is compassion. Or if you're if you're afraid as. I am of gooey words. You can just re translate that into friendliness. Just exactly cooler. Calmer nicer attitude toward external and internal phenomena can replace would cooler with warmer sure. I mean i know jimmy but fair enough so it sounds like you pivoted from the initial zen tradition into what's known as the insight tradition which is just another form of buddhist meditation. It's actually the school. I've trained in and right stumbled upon teachers like jack cornfield. Sharon salzberg both of whom have written a lot about yes. Mindfulness again just being able to be non-judgmental aware of stuff compassion which is adding in the notch just non-judgmental aware but having a certain element of warmth in the awareness and so so the mindfulness is aimed holding experience in a non judgmental manner so the compassion is aimed holding the experience in a friendly manner and so they have slightly different targets and so both need to be practiced that can actually almost appear to conflict. Sometimes because you accept your experience as it is including the fact that it's painful at the same time that you wishing yourself well and you want to help. And so it almost forms a bit of a paradox. Actually one of the scenes we like to say is we give ourselves compassion not to feel better but because we feel bad so you have to allow the experience to be as it is at the same time as toward the experience. Because you're friendly because you care you do what you can to help. So one paradox is since sara restate that and i'm also thinking that there may be yet. Another paradox probably won paradox. Is you in mindfulness meditation. We are not trying to control anything. We're just trying to see things as they are right. See clearly insight. The clear seeing of whatever's happening so that it doesn't own us right but in this case All when you add in the compassion layer you're trying to Notice that they're suffering there and you're not trying to alleviate it per se you're just sending warmth toward the suffering as it is trying to manipulate your experience because if you use compassion to try to make the pain go away. It's actually just another form of resistance so you have to fully accept the fact that this was painful this hurt. You know mess the mindfulness validating accepting the fact that this is really painful right now

Berkeley Jack Cornfield Sharon Salzberg Han Sanga Mindfulness Bennett Jimmy Sara
Three tribal leaders vote as Arizona Presidential Electors

Native America Calling

03:43 min | Last month

Three tribal leaders vote as Arizona Presidential Electors

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. Three tribal leaders cast their ballot as arizona. Presidential electors monday for democrats joe biden and kamala harris governor steven rayle lewis of the. He'll river indian community chairman ned. Norris of the autumn nation and president jonathan nez of the navajo nation. Arizona's eleven presidential electors met in phoenix. After taking an oath of office signed the official certificate. A vote for president and vice president governor lewis in a video message expressed his pride taking part in what he called a historic event reflecting on the election amid the pandemic saying native people made their voices known with voter turnout and tribal communities across the st louis added. He's excited to work. With the biden harris administration biden and harris committed to native americans having a seat at the table during a meeting in october with tribal leaders in phoenix. The new vice president of the oglala sioux tribe is getting right to work leash. Musso was recently sworn into office with president. Kevin killer the lead. The south dakota tribe for the next two years. Richard to bowls has more. Dr alicia musso edged out former oglala sioux tribe president and founder of lakota nation invitational. Brian brewer for the vice presidency shall serve the tribes almost forty seven thousand members across two point. One million acres of land that consists of the pine ridge indian reservation. Musso grew up in porcupine and earned her. Phd in clinical psychology from the university of wyoming. She ran on the platform of promoting science technology engineering arts and math. We know the importance of that. We know we have that those roots in our culture and community but we need places for those people who want those careers to land. And i'm also research for myself. And i've navigated navigate that here know the difficulty season. How amazing it would be if we had our own research and training center where we were leading our own research and we were clambering with outside entities. And i think that's a possibility. During the pandemic musso says she has used her education to help native americans not only in pine ridge but natives across the country to address the myriad of social and health inequities they struggle with another goal as vice. President is to not only continue that work but to also find new ways to utilize her office for what the needs of the people are advice. President position has been a sleeping giant of a position. Right there's a lot that can happen from this office. I know the constitution. We have our constitution. And i have my duties there. But there's a lot we can do. You know and i'm a team player so i'm excited to see what we can do and especially by platform pieces iran on iran on those. Because i knew you can do things with this office. And that would be helpful for the entire tribe. Musso says she appreciates the support and is excited to find solutions for the tribe to handle the current pandemic situation that will serve well into the future in rapid city. I'm richard till's the indian health service started initial distributions of cove. Nineteen vaccines monday. Ihs facilities two of the largest tribes in the united states received first doses of the pfizer vaccine the cherokee nation and oklahoma and the navajo nation in the four corners region and minnesota healthcare workers the cass lake hospital on the leech lake reservation where among some of the first to receive the vaccine in the state the bemidji pioneer reports ten workers at the hospital were vaccinated tribal programs in urban centers have the option of receiving the vaccine from the indian health service or states the initial distribution is prioritizing health care workers and residents of long term care facilities.

Oglala Sioux Tribe Musso Antonio Gonzales Steven Rayle Lewis Jonathan Nez Governor Lewis Biden Harris Dr Alicia Musso Lakota Nation Invitational Brian Brewer Kamala Harris Phoenix Joe Biden Norris St Louis Biden University Of Wyoming Arizona
Powerhouse Marketer Ana Valdz on Using Media to Create Change

Latina to Latina

03:20 min | Last month

Powerhouse Marketer Ana Valdz on Using Media to Create Change

"I speak with a lot of latinos who emigrated to the united states as children are in their teens. You're thirty when you came to the us and you were single. It's a big leap. It is a huge leap. You know in a lot of different ways. Mexico became small in the sense that when we opened up i realized that there was so much more so my masters took me to spain. My phd took me to the united states. And it allowed me to myself. It allowed me to be exactly who. I wanted the way i wanted another thing. That was very crucial. And i didn't mention it. Before was the latino movement in mexico philanthropy and social movements are not easy to happen and over here. I just saw immediately. What was happening. I saw people at the white house at very high levels that in countries like my original country mexico could have never had that upward mobility. I saw literally the american dream and being here for the first six months. Change the perspective of my life. You worked at the white house. Office of presidential personnel received a presidential appointment from president clinton to act as a special assistant for latin america at the us department of energy. How do you go from that world to building your own production company so my husband comes in there. I need my husband at the hispanic heritage awards when vice president gore was a special guest. And that's you know in politics. I worked there. I'm latino letting van. You wanna come. So i actually went to the event and my husband right now was the emcee. Ob vent and so there was an after party. I met him. We started dating long distance. And we also realize that what i wanted to do politics. He wanted to do in media which is bringing all the latino amazing element into mainstream in mikey's mainstream politics and in his case mainstream media additionally he was exactly what i wanted to do which is used media to create change. At that point. I was using politics to create change but the truth is media was mice expertise so two years later we get married. I leave my job. It was really hard by the way but leave my job and moved to california and then we started working together with my concepts in washington. Dc and all his production company that already existed when i got married and do shows and other things what actually went in to building that production company walk us through it first of all the passion you know the passion of knowing that there was a treasure than was a blind spot for america. That was waiting to happen. And that could make so much money for all this corporations and studios and competent producers that were in the business to make money. We could make money by transforming the community and transforming the way the community looked in the united states.

Mexico America Office Of Presidential Personn Us Department Of Energy White House Hispanic Heritage Awards President Clinton Spain Latin America Gore Mikey VAN California Washington
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Well, I was talking a lot about networking in this in this episode. So let's Network. So I'll be disappointed. If I don't get any new invitations only 10 after this. I just feel like I didn't really my pedagogic skills were very low if I didn't get any invitations. So guys, like if you want to connect with me just to it. I'll be very happy to get new contacts and not get to meet you and I can confirm that Natalia is very responsive. So, so if you if some some of what Natalia shared during this interview resonated with you. Raised questions just hit you know hit her up. She's going to respond and and you know, and and she's she's really fun to talk to Natalya. Thank you so much for having accepted an invitation for having been on on poppy seeds. It's been really great pleasure. Thank you so much. Thank you so much again and always pleasure to talk to you and I hope we meet soon found some other occasion. Actually Papa PhD was also a guest at the welcome Solutions Channel recently. So if you actually curious so I can see that he's not very wage vocal about his own story here at this podcast. So if you curious about his career, and he's very interesting career path so far then please take a look at our YouTube channel and take a look at this episode. Very interesting one so I can totally recommend checking that that is true. But Natalia on Papa p h c it's all about you, but Well, thanks. Thanks for the shout-out in dimension. And and yeah, if you're curious about my story, I had a great conversation with Natalia on on her channel. So just just look for my face and how long you'll be able to hear it. So yeah, thanks again and and all the best for your projects. Thank you so much. And now for the weekly podcast Discovery segment, I present you with trailers from two shows. You might find interesting jolly green scientists and curiosity cake. Give them a listen and say hi for me roll the tape. Hi, my name is are van with Texas A&M agrilife extension and I'm they're grown with Texas Tech University, and we are the jolly green scientists bringing you information from scientific literature and popular science articles related to the green industry straight into your ear. Dome each week will take one or two papers that we found interesting and shared with each other and we'll discuss them in terms that anyone can understand and even though we'll do it every week wage only going to share with you bi-weekly. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I was always one of those curious kids. I had the chemistry set a microscope or telescope. I would take my toys apart to see how they worked. And now that I'm a grown up. I still have that huge sense out of curiosity. If you too are an adult who was a curious kid, then curiosity. Kick is made for you. I'm your host immediately any join me as I talked to the best Minds from Academia and elsewhere may bring you accessible and engage in conversations across a wide range of topics with no prior knowledge required..

Natalia Papa PhD YouTube Texas Texas Tech University Natalya
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And once you take the plunge into the job market wage, what factors end up determining where you end up? These are the types of questions. This week's guest Natalia Belichick is interested in and likes to reflect upon In our conversation, we talked about her academic journey and discuss this whole question of navigating the job market as a PhD. Don't try to think about jobs for phds as a separate category of jobs job market is one like oh system in an in this ecosystem. Every one of us has some role to play. It's a bit like a loss of Faith. There are certain rules that govern why certain salaries are higher than others, which is all based on how your value and value of your work is perceived by the rest of the society. I'm just trying to understand how the job market shapes how it evolved. What are the rules and I think this is a more actually the problem of navigation in the job market is a more General problem is not only a problem of phds. Welcome to Papa PhD with David Mendez the podcast where we explore careers and life after grad school with guests who have walked The Road Less Traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules. Get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of pop a PhD. Welcome to this week's episode of Papa PhD this week. I'm really happy to have with me in Italia Belichick. Natalia is an entrepreneur researcher author and philanthropists home. She graduated from the College of inter faculty individual studies in mathematics and Natural Sciences at the University of Warsaw Poland with a Triple M S Title in physics mathematics and psychology wage there after she obtained a PhD in computational neuroscience at the doctor's Institute for brain cognition and behavior in name. Again, the Netherlands in 2018. She launched a public Foundation stick thing. So low is under joke and on trickling aiming to help early career researchers find new careers in Industry. She also owns welcome Solutions a company developing new tools and practices to help Professionals in navigating on the job market and finding or creating their dream jobs..

Natalia Belichick Papa PhD welcome Solutions Natalia the Netherlands David Mendez College of inter doctor's Institute University of Warsaw Poland Natural Sciences
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:18 min | 3 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"If you want. Medical Writer. Clearly. Listener out. There is looking for medical writer also, I didn't think of that. Vera. We're almost at the end of the interview. and. One of the things that I still wanted to talk about although it does not have to do with your career per se but it's something that you're doing. Now you're putting energy into and annoying and created putting content content out there for for PhD's is you have a youtube channel can you talk a little bit about it? What it's called and what type of? A feeling of reflection lead you to start that to start on that mission. Thank you for letting me talk about my youtube channel. Yes. So the I fiqh PhD student on Youtube because I felt like. The most on this opinion about a PhD. Study can is hard to come from the real actual he student because of time we're learning by doing and I mean, even people put fluoxetine stuff. But like you know if you want to the most honest experience and help full ones, you have to ask from someone who has struggled and seen everything in reach And talk about how my previous career could be like a voice ex-boyfriend and people some people don't like to talk about ex-boyfriend. Talking about your past and knowing what you have done and how far are you have come from there it gives you the consolidation to move onto the next chapter and I also am a big fan of put paying it forward because I mean all by mentors and everyone who helped me he s g they don't need anything from me most of the time I think it would be a word to them if I can help. Other people that are coming along later in the journey to to be successful scientists. So that was my mission and I forgot to say the Channel Name, his PhD coffee time that was inspired by the French poetry of coffee. Breaks. Because we had to is mandated breaks. Enough that it's like a very. Religious at eighty in France, they are not religious anymore like the the French coffee break is everyone's religion in a day like the. So, yes. So I felt like if we could highness this type of social activity PhD because I felt incredibly helpless and isolated when I time I really along when I was doing postal PhD and I wonder if they better way because I mean sometimes I, it's not that I don't have friends but I know if I talked to a friend, it took another two hours and I have problems stopping from conversation. So I wonder if there is a way to have a virtual social feeling that people feel like they have someone to talk to. They also learn something you know that's how the best coffee place like people give you a the two cents and to is the two cents for is valuable advice and maybe solving a whole week of problems so. That was the. Intention is. I want to pay it forward and I wanted to make better use of my time during this seemingly harsh and unproductive time of. Career is a career break and recruit can look down on a why can you explain why you have nothing and no employer wants you I feel like instead look blaming the system and how visas can hold me back from getting the job. I am I'm in control on every aspect that I can't control which I mean nobody can stop me from putting a video on Youtube. And helping other people and I am a strong believer that if you are willing to put yourself out there and help the others I think naturally the universe with do something back and help you as well and I think also it helps me to know that I'm helpful like if makes sense. Totally makes sense basically the reason why I started. The same. I might be hd was done years ago and I had the same feeling I want to give back to that community and to I want to help you help you know a handful of people not fall into the same mistakes that I did. It'll be mission accomplished for me and I think I think you probably have the same feeling? Yeah Yeah and I think a lot of. Alumni, they only vocal when they made it to professors like. Don't make it to become a professor. They become this pilot. Themselves may be feeling like I failed in mission of trying to be professor and I have nothing valuable to share but that's really not because they those other nineteen ninety percent of the population that is out there and there are ninety nine percent of all of these PhD that doesn't lend on. Professor job that once that advice maybe before they become depressed or having issues and I felt like having being okay to talk about unemployment and like why I'm showing up to date I, it's not like I I have you know I am I am not embarrassed about by unemployment I mean I'm a little embarrassed but like his I think I also. Of let me rephrase that it's not like I am not embarrassed about being unemployed but I felt like it is more important to have someone opened talking about an employment during this time is then hiding it nukes which by the way depending on when the listener you're listening are listening to this episode this is being recorded. Just you know we're Cova distill around and it's impacting hiring left and right and so there's there's. Many. Other reasons and I I agree with you. You shouldn't. You shouldn't feel bad about that and you're definitely taking action towards not staying in that situation for too long. So so Kudos to you for that Vero, we've reached the end of the interview. Thing I'd ask you is to share to tell the listeners how and where they can. They can find you online and and maybe yet shared the the your your Youtube Channel You are l., or your twitter handle twitter handle. WHICHEVER PLATFORMS, Iran So my PhD copy time Youtube is just by YouTube dot com slash PhD coffee Italian. I'm also on Instagram at coffee time apparently a Lotta PhD student now. Love Instagram. So I have to get back on that I'm also on twitter on person no name Vera s Chen. So, you could find me there on twitter. So unlinked in swell if your recruiter and interested in hiring marine science transitioning medical writer. Thank you. Excellent. You mentioned Lincoln Yam. Linked in is also VP as Chen. I. Didn't realize what be as means until I come to America and that's my initial. So I couldn't change so. Well. No. No you started watching your videos the know you're not vera. Thank you so much for having come to to. This zoom interview. Thank you so much for sharing all these. Experiences that you've had in what you're going through right now then I'm like I said I, you're taking all the right actions to eventually land a job that you like that will fulfill you and. Let's keep. Let's keep talking and and maybe we'll have an update interview sometime. So thank you so much for for being you to the young pope. Peachy. Thank you. It means a word to be on this show and.

Youtube twitter Medical Writer professor PhD Vera s Chen fluoxetine France Lincoln Yam Vero America VP Iran
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:33 min | 3 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"About conversion rates. Videos and I know exactly. Thousand. People Click on the video maybe only ten of them subscribe. Always, a conversion rate in life and yeah and I think to be making to make normalize and celebrated success. I think is the most important in this journey who so? I. DON'T WANNA GET Too much of a clean break here and I do WanNa talk about your Youtube Channel and we will talk about it soon. But. We started talking about Lincoln. Talking about skills and skills that you were trying. To tally up what you had accrued throughout your journey but. Excuse me. But. What I what I was wanting to ask now is. So, once you did this introspection once you looked at, okay. What can I put on linked in this this this this. I imagine you found gaps what what did you do What were what what initiates initiatives that you take to then fill out some gaps that you found that you that you thought okay. You know this I can I can get this extra skill I can. Do this extra networking etcetera etcetera. What and I imagine that you. In the middle of this process. Now, right that that you're looking for a position and again thinking about listeners and listens to who might be in the same situation, what strategies have been winning strategies for you. Well. I was a winning strategy could be overstatement since I come I myself. I got the job yet but I do have a strategy is i. Read People's Profile. And other times I analyzed how they structure the words and Watson those they use and it may be a right. The Iran might may not be anything right to wrong but I I would be. Giving a score in my head like where does it reads? Maybe some people use like coffee symbol or some people use like an Arrow Ha I need to change my actually but like the ongoing process and there's no one and done do for in. But I think keep breathing what people put their and knowing this gives the valued like maybe that that specific species name that I have worked on not it's rather than thinking. Maybe they value the skews of like searching for genes on NCBI platform and blast know like those could be the key word and you never know so I think taking good time backward to look at what you have and don't lie about what you don't overstate it. But like also to see what how people frame it, and what are these people especially those who has already you know they probably have a lane profile that's working so. Dot to take note and learn. And about. 'CAUSE here we're talking about how to kind of format and and we're talking. About creating a nice. Nice Very well tailored profile link in. But what about you know in in day-to-day life? Skills that you that you. That you. Feel that you were lacking in. In these last few months. What have you been doing kind of to fill up those gaps in black I'm glad you asked this question because I did. Take a lot of initiatives during my free time when I am officially unemployed well, I would tell my previous boss. I was do writing a manuscript for her like it's ongoing. But like I also had taken a lot of self improvement time first of all I started. Thinking that you know I can't have this negative moment of my life be a training woman and I need some food for by praying that is nutritious for me to do meaningful things. I turned to books that are helpful like the like Basically Shea Book Rich Dad Poor Dad. But I think is really good rate because it talks about being rich and being poor is the state that what is decided or what what you do it right now decide whether you're rich poor is not whether your bank has money or not and I. think that means a word to me at this moment because I understood that if I m taking myself as a leader and if I am training and improving myself as if I were working in that big pharmaceutical company and what I would do as their employees in the future, maybe I will end up in one you know. It's important to to make that I commitment to to be a rich mind person and I I mean financially. But like I think maybe financial come a long after. So and also Walk Rich Dad Poor Dad has taught me Tako message was we may be one skill away from the job. Being very successful, and in my case, I think it resonates with PhD we are trained and tunnel vision to one particular. Discipline. One tool but sometime, we may just need one skills like law accounting but computer coding like for me. I have taken a few online courses on Pizon and a little bit of machine learning I also took have taken clinical research pharmacology classes. Those two were offered by Nih and I did the certification after that. So updated those on my lenten profile and also was. Both enough to write a post about it. So people saw that I I was committing my time to improve and got the skills and knowledge of clinical research because I'm a biologist which I say basic science research. But I was surprised by how similar we are. Because by statistics like it's The p value is the same meta-analysis, the same like hypothesis testing. I use her US human. Difference and I think that's that's an important thing to convey, and if I haven't learned and heaven taken a look from the other perspective through those courses because I felt like you can't invent your skills from nothing, you have to take a perspective from the other and then creates that list of what is desirable. So after that car, I actually got the phone calls from recruiters. Ask about my background. because. So you building something and then you're you're leveraging your Lincoln profile to kind of show what you're what you're doing, and again show that you're open for business A. Blueprint and I just just tell you the all the people. I know that are working in regulatory or medical writing beach freelance or or not they all come they. The they studied birds the studied And now they're they're working in Pharma. So I totally agree that the so many transferable skills and that it's you know. Once, you acquired these specific skills that you are that you've been talking that you talked about let's say from the. H.. You become a really really great candidate and I think again, listeners out there great blueprint follow. Comment.

Youtube Lincoln Nih NCBI Watson Iran Dot US PhD
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to another episode of Papa Peachy. This week on the show we're going to talk about uncertainty. Particular employment uncertainty in academia and outside of it in the current pandemic context. Now in between jobs after her third post doc. My guest will share her journey up to today and we'll talk about how confinement led her to take on new projects, teach herself new skills and double down on her investment in networking. And Remember, I have to new podcast discovery trailers share with you this week. So be sure to stick around with US until the end. Last year I have doubled to my linked in connection. I think in the past I had the mental barrier thinking I shouldn't ask anyone who I've never met. My lengthy profile should be statement like facebook page friendship like only know this people in real life and I only connect with these people and I have taken a long way to break that mental barrier that I could. Make friends with pimple that I haven't met yet in real life. But guess what these people ended up like maybe I would say five to ten percent of them had actually given a phone call and tell me about the stories become relationships that you're. Welcome, to Papa PhD with David Mundus the podcast where we explore careers and life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules..

US Papa Peachy Papa PhD facebook Grad school David Mundus
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:51 min | 3 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Know and and all places in and outside of the academy. So pretty much they have three main functions. They have a recruitment function. So we recruit from these four for our clients. And we also do in-house research on PhD competencies. So we've developed our own competency framework of competencies that you would expect to be helped during the doctoral program. And lastly. We also do workshops. So we use that research to inform workshops on how to develop specific skills or how to approach your career Pursuits and I came across this job actually because it's an important piece of advice through my network. So it was a friend who had started working with them who was taking a mentor Navy leave that said. Hey, this is perfect for you because you already do things like this. So I'd want to just call it. Look there's a part of it that also, you know, it's it's always the advice like this morning. We had a transatlantic webinar a series that we usually host once a month and we give you know, it's a little tips and advice and open it up for questions and I talked about networking this morning that consistently in the research that we do and I mean, I see it study and study again wage that most phds are finding their jobs through their Network. So this is is really important and this is actually how I came in contact with that Doug. So not just making your network but helping them understand what it is that you do what you can bring what you're interested in. So my friend reached out to me on this because she knew I was already writing about professional development and grad school for blogs at Mcgill and things like that. Hm. Yeah, so it has to do with the conversations. You have to write it's it's not only the person who who's your next your next desk neighbor, but it's also the net that kind of craving Network that the people who you exchange with and and with who you talked about with whom you talk about your plans or your ideas for sure. So you heard about this position wage this imagine you sent your CV and were called in for for interviews. Was it the classic experience? It was pretty classic. So I sent a resume as opposed to a CV here in I find sometimes the language gets a bit mixed up. But I'm you know for if you're applying for positions that are not academic you you want to cut your CV down into a resume. That's no more than two pages long. So I had sent out and I had interviewed with them and that was was I mean that was more just of a conversation of me explaining what I like to do and obviously I was very interested in what they were doing. So that was a very a nice kind of process for me at that at that. So you did your research on what they were and what they were doing a few you went on the internet. Yeah, cuz that's that's what they forget is. If you are in an interview and know the company or or the organization quite well, people will feel that and it'll it'll make a difference in your interview to walk. I'll sure I mean I didn't even think to say that but yeah, I mean anytime I go into an interview even an informational interview because I know we talked about this in part one. I don't just ask somebody I look at them who they are what they're doing where they work. What sector do they work in? What kind of challenges are that? Is that sector facing like what can I bring to the table that's going to meet their needs a bath. So, yeah for sure before you interview anywhere you want to definitely read up on what you know, what the company does who works there what they're working on what their backgrounds are be a researcher. Yeah. Exactly. And again, that's something that that we do research find information understand it and and make sense out of it. And in this case prepared then, you know interact or exchange. Someone showing that hey I've done my homework. I'm generally interested and and we can have a really interesting conversation because there's a you know, there's a basis upon which we're going to work on. I'm just going to I'm not going to start asking you questions from scratch. Like who are you? What do you do? Right. That's it's it's a loss of your time and if there's two in often these people are busy. So it's it's even just a signal sign of respect to to to have taken the time to do that homework and in my point of view, of course, so yeah, the next question then is what was this position. Did you remember the well, is it still the same title that that that you that you have today? The one that the one that way when you got hired? Yes, so it's only been since September I've been with that dog. And that's a contract actually. So what specifically I can tell you what what I've done in the past almost year. I've worked on their page detectives project which is a a national study that the adult can walk across Canada phds and looking at their skills that they develop during the doctor their doctoral research as well as their employment outcomes, you know, so we look at life like where do they work? They work in R&D do they work outside of R&D? You know, what's their salary like or they happy things like this? But the thing that I really love about what I ducked off in their research is that they also talk to employers so they really are A bridge between the academic and the and the non-academic and there's so much, you know value that that brings into entering that conversation because you know, we see so much and not just in Canada, but I'll speak to that because we're in Canada right now, you know, even at the government level they're looking at home trying to connect phds with meaningful employment that can contribute back into the economy and The Innovation and you know things that that we want to do and just with the academy it's doesn't really work that easily, you know, it's not a one-way street. So I love it. You know, we engage with employers we do research with employers also employers who hire phds what is their experience like, you know, what are their strengths? What can they work on our and you know, where where can we take this? It's it's really interesting and last December. I was in Palm. Let invited by my alma mater and talk to talk about careers to the current students in my Ph.D program. And one of the things talking with the professors wage that they had difficulty was finding this bridge because it's there to kind of hermetically sealed world's Academia and Industry and it's really interesting to have this entity that really dead is in conversation with both sides and can make a bridge with the two. I totally totally agree. It's so important because there are misperceptions on both sides and Thursday we do this work. From both sides to try and alleviate some of those misperceptions and make that connection easier. I remember one person who was there who who gave a.

Canada R&D Navy Mcgill Doug Palm researcher
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:43 min | 3 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Today on Papa PhD we have Rebecca. Mammen, Rebecca joined a doctor talent management in 2019 as a research officer and recruitment consultant where she contributes to in-house research projects focused on the skills of phds and how they can foster Innovation within and outside the academy. She also provides skills and career development workshops for phds and acts as a recruitment Consultants to help Innovative companies find highly qualified talent that matches their needs Rebecca holds a PhD in educational psychology from McGill University Montreal over the past ten years. She has developed and contributed to projects in graduate skills wage and employment stress and social support during transition periods motivation engagement and human behavior. Welcome to Papa Pete's see, Rebecca. Thank you so much and thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to talk with you today. Well, it's my pleasure and I'm really really happy to have you here on Papa PhD found well, as always we're going to start with your story. But what you do today is really really interesting to me. And I think it's going to be really interesting to the the listeners out there who are thinking about careers after graduate school. And so yeah, really excited to hear your story and to hear what you have to share. So to start by the beginning as always I would like to ask you to just talk a little bit about your journey and and your academic Journey how you you came to do a PhD, you know, maybe don't go back to high school. But how how you had you know, you you got into this journey how maybe you chose to your you decided to do a PhD and then log Actually in part to we'll talk about what came after but yeah to begin. What was your journey like sure well, so to start I am I think I can start that. I had a break after my bachelor's and I was living and working in the United States and I was working in a social services position that I did not enjoy it very much but there was quite challenging if I can say so I had that moment where I was like I need to go back to school. Hm. I really like school. I was always good at it and thought I think my career aspirations just I wanted to do more so I had moved to Montreal to do my Master's and PhD at McGill University. And at that point that was there was kind of an understanding where you know, if you enter the master's program you're going to continue to do a PhD And as much as my advice to everyone is always to please think about what you're going to do with the Ph.D. Before you start it. You know, I hadn't really had a clear path. I knew that I liked to learn I was passionate about education and I wanted to eventually be in a leadership position. And you know, I just thought that that was the way to get there. So I'm about halfway through my Ph.D. I was realizing I don't think I want to continue with an academic career. I know that I have options out there. I just need to I need to figure out what those are, you know, and I had just started taking the time to to explore and you know, eventually that led me to worry I'm now but I did do a number of years of research in motivation and Social Psychology research and research in stress and social support and helping people within the higher education Community make Transitions and support them. Being mhm. And so you can transfer real and it's through here. It does the system of starting a master's and then kind of transitioning into a PhD. I think that's what you were you were gaining too. But my question to you is so when you started your Masters, did you imagine or were you for seeing that you eventually you'd be a professor was that was that kind of the that's typically that that's typically the you know, what what people imagine and I think also it's it's it's easy to project yourself in something that you're very used to wear familiar with right. So when we spend years in the academy, it's it's quite easy to project yourself at in that position. So young originally I was thinking like I love education. I like teaching. I like research this I could do that, but then, you know as the years pass and you kind of see what that's worth. Like sometimes I like to call like not call it but say that doing a PhD is like the longest informational interview ever being a professor and off, you know, so it gives you a chance to learn really about what that what that profession is like and the pros and cons. So for me, I just started realizing early on that. I wanted to go a different route. And so clearly this was this was this was evident or this was clear to you within your own self within your planning within you know, your your mind, but what about the environment? How was did you talk to someone about it? Once this idea of or this concept? Thought I'm going to do something outside Academia started burgeoning. What conversations did you have? And with whom and how did that go and I'm thinking of maybe your your supervisor UTC supervisor, maybe family maybe colleagues was that some authors easy step to take to kind of, you know fully fully decide that okay. I'm going to finish this but and then going to do something else but I mean just speaking for myself. I was fortunate to have the support. So, you know something about the Ph.D is is that it's a very varied experience. It can really depend a lot on who you're working with and where and and so on so, you know for sure I talked with colleagues friends in my program about it because there was actually a number of people who are feeling the same way. So there's a group of friends. I have a worry about four women and we need every few weeks and we're friends but we also talked I mean most of the talk is professional and you know, we still need to talk about those things and you know doing that job None of us really helpful and sharing resources and talking to each other before job interviews and and things like that. So I was lucky to have built kind of that have that that Network at the pure level, you know, when I brought it up to my adviser. I don't think it was very surprised. Okay. I think I I I was hesitant to bring it up in the beginning God because I wasn't really sure what the expectations were and I kind of knew that there were more generally expectations around continuing than academic path, you know at the agency level so long I did bring it up later. But my personal experience was that I had a lot of support for that at that level and also at the University level there were a lot of workshops and things offered. When Rebecca mentioned having a support group that discussed professional progression in shared resources. My ears perked up here is one of the most healthy and helpful strategies can try and Implement in graduate school a.

Rebecca Papa PhD Papa Pete Social Psychology professor McGill University Montreal Montreal recruitment Consultants United States McGill University research officer Mammen Academia supervisor consultant
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to another great episode of Papa PhD this week. I'm bringing you a conversation with someone who has recently made the transition from her PhD to the non-academic job market has done so into the PHD Career Development and recruitment domain during our conversation Rebecca mammen, not only recounted her experience exploring career Avenues during her PhD and not getting that transition, but she also shared valuable insights based on her research and on her recruiting experience working in an organization that focuses exclusively on phds off and remember stay tuned until the end for the podcast Discovery segment where I'll be presenting you to new podcasts play anthropology and dear grad student. Enjoy the show off. Really, you know the interview is just to find out about you, right? They already see your skills on your CV. So I am in the habit of preparing about four or five different Source stories and just making notes of what those stories are and my notebook before I start the interview and sometimes the question might be different. It might be like a challenge or they might say like, you know, what is a time when you had a disagreement like the question might change but usually the themes are pretty similar so they want to know the way that you act in certain situations. So having you know, I prepare those ahead of time and they're super helpful and interviews. Welcome to Papa.

Papa PhD PHD Career Development Rebecca mammen
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:35 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Sometimes also we rent. You can read our stuff on plants and pets dot com also for plants and for pets in your favorite podcast. APP. Floods of events, we talked plant science. Working in research trained to do the best science you can. You A team leader, a Research Assistant Post Doc, PhD student, or any other type of scientists are you looking for a place where you can sit relax and listen to inspiring people? Well. We have good news for you. You've just found what you're looking. Hi Everybody May name is GonNa Pool and I am Jonathan. Whites? Welcome to the. Helping scientists..

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:48 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Find interesting in the conscious I've had a at universities is i. feel that even universities now are. Getting the message that that. They need to prepare the students for this reality of not everyone can become a professor and it's it's as simple as that not not everyone apart from not everyone just a small percentage of people have and I think even now with with all this, the the the problem with covert and and with the pandemic, the closing up of of universities all of that is even getting more access to those positions is getting even more more difficult. At this time. Yes. So I mean, typically the UK something. Like fifty percent if PhD's Austin academia three and a half years after they graduate and so yeah. With a bit of a split of. some some deeper obviously doing research work still. Stuck some people are doing teaching lecturing, but probably half of will pay. Something, somewhere in administrative positions. Awful pasties will be working outside of academia. When you tell that to especially like first and second year Steve's they, they can't believe it. It's mind blowing and. Even even when I talk to people about. People and they introduce myself southbound PhD or something, and they say, what? What are you working Oxford Cambridge you've got to pay. That must be what you should help in doing and it's it's. It's it's interesting this powerful expectation, but it's trying to educate people really about. coolest. Sometimes, like career consciousness developing conscious beyond just just wha- who's around you. But actually this whiter this way to picture when you tell people the statistics I think. That that is real sort of netter them. Because the important thing and. Busting the time but is this doesn't mean? Stop. And go do something else doing up she is something that's going to this to a lot of value to your to you as a person. To you as a contributor to society later on just don't. Just expect that. It's not a given that you're going to end up being professor but like you said, you can say India all act college, right? The alternative academic career paths that are out there. There's a lot of things you can do in around the university but then. The. The job market out there needs sometimes the in I. It's funny. I'd love I'd love to have your input on that maybe another conversation. Industry doesn't know they need pc's but they do and when the interview these people they're like okay. Oh, this is actually a very good candidate I'm going to take them. GonNa take them in. It is interesting because PhD's like we need. We need like a branding agency got something. Totally. I think in some ways, what I've been trying to do with jobs on taste really is elevate is like how do you? How do you rebrand the PhD? Some the? Different to the people who are doing it, and so people outside I think it's very hard. It's very hard. Job Employers it's kind of it's going to. It's kind of impossible but I think we have done a good job and I say things in the media now, which I would never have seen about about as being light multi skilled and flexible knowledge workers who can kind of what we were saying they switch from project to project. What we are capabilities very much fit the kind of. The the job market of today I think as long as we can. We've. PhD's can make the. League employers can also drop center that prejudice is a as well definitely the the. Love imaginative leap because. You picture yourself in that position, allow yourself to picture yourself in that position and then go talk to the people. The things you said he didn't didn't do per se but but go go. Find people around you who know someone who does that job that interests you they'll be happy to and know especially if they have a PhD to, it'll be happy to take time to take coffee to have lunch with you share their story and maybe point point you towards something that might interest you. Chris Yeah, we really have reached the end of our time. If. People want to want to reach out to you want to You know a C-, whatever you you've been writing lately. How where can I reach you? Why can they reach you online? What's the best way to to be up to date with the with with what you've? Up to The faces to go to jobs on toast DOT COM. Nastase. My my website were probably published an article every every two months but Yeah you can say I'm on twitter so that's just Job On toast So yeah, I'm. Trying, keep up a putting out content on twitter by sharing content, but it was sharing some of the best. Stuff. RAPE HD careers. As well, so yeah, there's places where you can where you can find the excellent Chris. Thank you so much for for having a to come to the microphone and chat with me a definitely I would have talked. A full other our. Because this we know there's so much talk about. Who knows if we can if you can have another conversation maybe on a specific theme I, I'd love to but thank you I i. it's really an inspiring path the to the to have a an inspiring journey that you've had and to me it's especially inspiring that you you take time. To apart from your professional life family life, keep trying to bring this message to people in graduate school out there that there's A. Whole Universe of things out there that they can do after graduating and that they will be fulfilled at doing and and you intellectually stimulated and part of. A productive part of society and? I think that's very precious and it's very noble. My statement weren't enjoyed talking to you. Thanks for inviting me on. High again. I, hope you enjoyed the conversation and that you took at least one take home message from it. If you did make sure to subscribe on your podcast APP and to share Papa Peachy with your friends. I'm sure they are asking themselves the same questions in that they will enjoy it too. Before, ending the road, let me introduce you to podcasts that you might also enjoy. Plants by pets a podcast about plants in about the research around them. And the lonely pipette. Sounds like we have a team going this week. The brand podcast aiming to help scientists do better science and roll the tape. Delay Plan. Like really really likes them. Do you wish you could get a glimpse at how they work on the inside, how a growth flower avoid problems like rotting meat and how they defend themselves against the tax. Too. That's why we applied to pets explore the fascinating to know workings of Balaji in our podcast and on our blog. Know that bumblebees can control the flowering time of by gently watching on them or that soap bubbles are grateful plant pollination. We are Teagan and your to plant scientists with allowed bring you the hot near reset without all the scientific jog. Lost, we talk about topics, diversity and equality academic system. And Brings Fun Science Bachelor last week, and we talk about cuts and.

PhD Chris Yeah professor twitter UK Austin Oxford Cambridge Steve Balaji RAPE pc Papa Peachy India
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:46 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"University I never really knew much about it but you a change as Kinda cliche changes the constant now but when you look at rate of change the pace of change in our society. And who is who is the he was with the people managing those changes that project managers, and it could be like the could be the Olympics or it could be. Election candidate or it could be the upgrade on your phone every time something changes or was a big event or something project managers have to sit down with a blank sheet of paper and work out and it's it's it's really to me to feel part of that that community. Project managers and see I guess eventually that's how my professional identity is solidified whereas it was originally. So it's like a research. Will maybe he know what kind of? Education learning specialists have been tech companies but really might. Might federal agencies solidified around and project manager or even now it called sort of chain manages because is becoming less the case. Okay. Change Managers Yeah because the case that. There's a distinction between light run run the bank change the bank is you can talk about with banks. So in the old days, banks mainly run the bank most of the banking was the same, and then maybe some department introduced some new thing every so often but the now the. Road is still important power what banks do obviously running day to day operations but. There's so much change any time you know anything about banking on your phone. And all these sorts of services that th the changed the bank functions is become much bigger. It's not an occasional thing happens every so often, but it's a constant. Yeah. All the time you know and you you you can't stop like we think about your phone you can you com- you can't stop having updates. which my phone would just stand still willingness doesn't it? It keeps it keeps changing and that's really what's exciting to me is when is When is how do you manage continuous? How do you manage continuous change? Yeah. It's interesting and it's really we notice it on on your phone banking is definitely one of them and now imagine with crypto currencies getting more and more importance I. Anyway. I don't think we're going to go into that but. I find it very interesting from what from what you said, the used the term solidify my my professional identity solidified around this this activity that I developed but. What one thing I find interesting interesting is don't be afraid of. Not Knowing what you're going to become when you when you leave because that's going to materialize with time and again because you you probably want, you may be lucky and have very good networking and start right away with the job that you adore and that you're going to stick. With life, but it's not it's not a given. So I think that's that's a very, very interesting interesting thing and he goes what I said before. Give yourself time to slowly get to where you WANNA get right. But yeah. One thing. We're reaching the end I am kind of annoyed that. We're we're my time is almost ending for this. For the interview but so. Along with all of the at a certain point, you decided in two thousand twelve to start something to give back to the community you had come from in a way, the students the PGA soon as the Masters Students, which is jobs on toast and. You know you've spent all these years kind of. The mission that I have kind of taken for myself of helping people out there who are doing their master's were doing their PC or post stock. And who are in doubt about what is my future? What's my professional future? Let's just like to talk a couple of minutes about jobs on those about what your experience has been maybe changes you've seen in the in the in the in the latest years because things are changing. The. Ender. Maybe finish by sharing two or three pieces of advice for people out there who may be anxious about not really knowing what they're professional future will look like if or when they. Ended up leaving academia. Yeah I mean I guess. Is Interesting John came about like. Deputies. Way. I was invited by my dissertation advisor to go up to your thousand nine to give it a little seminar on the on the topic I was invited. It was like how to market yourself careers outside of academia pick and. Jeremy asked to go up and could you dislike took on this subject for narrow so we'd be pleased to how you never really thought about it. So I went to do that and gave that talk and. You know it was just really it without sort of blame trumpet as such. The impact it made on the people here in not room and the change in. Demeanor and how these spoke to me and they spoke afterwards was. It just like it just showed to me that there was there was a need I never really thought of our densify that this information was really helpful beyond in the room. But so I just thought, well, how could this information get to a wider audience because really at that time it was not anything else and I, think that's toll PhD may have being around and. So but then I really determined how could I get some of this information what I've just said? The Internet, you know if I could just make a website disseminates it. and. Maybe. Go Talk other universities so that's when I It took me a long time because it took me until two thousand twelve actually to figure out blogging and how to make a website and I was busy with my job and my family and everything. was always a project. Yeah. But I Lord Scienc- thousand twelve and just really kind of built up tried to have an ambition of light. Once every two months rising something. Going trying to give talks and then reflecting on my experiences of that and writing about that so. Yes in the beginning it was really trying to find the way and it was linking up with some other people as well like like Jenn poke I'm from from Canada and the other days from PhD to life just trying to find other people Hainkel from cheeky scientists on the same kind of mission and so yeah that's like in different countries but it was but he was very, it was very early days but. I mean it's interesting now because I, kind of feel like their staff loss of people who who joined in from different countries. Yeah. Like yourself David just really it's really exciting to me that. What will I started over a couple of started off is really great into a bit more of a movement and. Also to see the impact on universities that is not son. Often thought you know really that, hey, maybe one year we should think about talking to the PhD's about other careers but actually some universities a building into their actual graduate training careers, advice and careers outside of academia. That's what excites me is that. In ten years, we've actually built with into A. INTO THAT It is a, it is changing and. Some. A lot of the people you mentioned are still. There in in helping a lot of people the things that have changed lately. In terms of. Spreading the message our twitter. Social, in general podcasting for sure is is is something that that has brought a different. Reach. Andrea but but. What.

PhD project manager Olympics twitter Masters Students Andrea advisor Lord Scienc Jeremy John David Jenn Canada Hainkel
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:19 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Really happy to have you here <hes> especially given the years of experience you have helping people with masters and Ph ds like just mentioned finding their path and I think a word. . That I think is really important is in the abundant number of career opportunities that are out there I think this one key thing that that people are going to. . Wealth people need to understand to kind of break this this feeling that they may be failing at life or at least at the their professional life if the. . End Up leaving academia after after graduate. . School. . Yeah it is. . It is. . So hard to describe when you see the light bulb come on somebody's head in new. . People people just say. . It. . Yeah. . And it. . It is. . What always of joys me on like just when somebody says down they felt or how lost or how they didn't know what to do, , and then they say that you I when you're okay now I just. . Found the way forward or hope or something you know you just why would why would have stopped? ? Doing what I'm doing I mean because that's the greatest thing you can do. . Even if you change one person's mind or sometimes I talk to one hundred people you know I think if I could. . Difference that many people but not like yourself day job what you're doing on your the more that can do it that more intense. . We can have and we can reach more people in our own countries or in different languages. . <hes> or different backgrounds. So . yeah, it's , it's cool to fail that there's more there's more of us than. . Doing this doing this thing. . You don't just listen think about being a PhD that just you just have this unique. . Bonding Experience With With with anybody else like I just met you but you know it just. . It's strange. . We everyone knows what they went through, , and then just you can just click with people and. . It's powerful as powerful stuff. . So as I mentioned, , we talked before about Chris's PhD and you can find our full one hour and a half conversation on the Papaya she youtube channel. . We eventually also talked about what led up to his post doc. . Chris. . Was Now considering after his post doc <hes>, , and after the his after applying to some lecturing positions and not having the materialize thinking. . Okay. . What am I going to do an end looking at the non-academic landscape and seeing where he was going to fit? ? How did you go about that? ? Were there appears around you who were also having that reflection. . How. . Was that process? ? How easy was that process or not easy? ? I was that that. . Exploration. Let's . say. . He is kind of mixed because I think on the one hand. . As I kept getting rejections from the academic jobs, , Kinda go to feeling of. . Like feeling of running out of time or this is this isn't going well. . If I could just get academic job everything would be. . Okay. . So that was like a downside to it but on the other hand you know. . I was really excited by the things that I was saying around me like like the Internet was something that was just really taking off in the late ninety s and I was just fascinated by the internet and this whole and. . I mean I. . I say Democratic Dissemination of information which is. . Not. . <hes> Disney triple the time easily, , but the way. . To access to information or study or learning the United. . States can be quite elitist or privileged or and causal money and time, , but just like the idea that. . The anybody can just access any type of information videos and things as well. . It was coming along time and could learn anything. . They had the Internet connection did just Exchange. . My view of the world and so excited me as an educator and as a scholar, , this potential and always really enthused by that and could see this trans transformative potential of it and so that's when I kind of thought. . Well, , this could be an area where. . You I would be happy and excited to work in, , and then I had to try and figure out. . Well, , how do I get to that from medieval studies? ? kind of like the opposite. . Of this new of this new techy technological thing. . But then I figured out. . There was this area of e e learning with a training where people were taking courses that which <unk>. . Clause three more even vote on a CD. . You know we're not making it to the web and I just thought is dies <unk>. . That's what I'm GONNA do. . I really had to look. . For jobs and companies. . looked. . Learning companies read white papers and things are. . Looking googling jobs, , you know learning jobs based training and I saw that they were these jobs out Aaron. . Didn't necessarily know how to do them. . I felt confident that if I applied job I reckon I could I could do that and so that was my plan B. Really that. . Stuff didn't work out then come at the end of my funding. . This was going to be. .

Chris Papa PhD UK Kris Humphry David University of Southampton Bob University of York Disney Guardian Mendez project manager Huchon DOT UK youtube program manager Austin
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:15 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And who will be recounting how he navigated his transition and how he got to the position. He's in today. But before we go into the interview I, want to quickly share with you what new features you'll be noticing starting today on Papa PhD. The first big change is that the interviews are now going to be shorter around forty minutes and they'll will be published as a single episode on Thursdays. Second you see that I'll be spending more time discussing what my guests do today and what advice they have for you and you'll see. The more we go into the interview, the more value find. So be sure to stick around till the end. And finally, every episode I will have short section at the end where I'll be sharing trails of podcasts I. Think you'll enjoy and that are friends of the show. I hope you enjoy the new format. So without further ADO, here's episode one of the Second Season of Papa. Peachy. Took in the UK. Fifty percent of PhD's Austin and academia three and a half years after they graduate. Busy doing research woke still post some people are doing teaching lecturing and some some are in positions awful. Pitch Dis will be working outside of academia. When you tell that especially like first and second year PhD's they couldn't believe it. It's like mind blowing. You know even when I talk to people and they introduce myself have got PhD and they say. Working oxford-cambridge paged that must be what should have been doing. Welcome to Papa PhD with David. Mendez the podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad, school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in world of constantly evolving rules. Get ready to go off the beaten path and Huchon for an exciting new episode of the PhD. So today on Bob. Peachy I, have with me. Dr, Kris, Humphry. Kris Humphry is a project manager and careers consultant and the founder of the popular careers website jobs on toast. He holds a B A in English studies and an MA in culture and social change both from the University of Southampton. He completed his PhD in Medieval Studies at the University of York in Nineteen Ninety seven and held a postdoctoral fellowship until two thousand. Since, leaving academia Chris has worked as a project and program manager in the private sector specializing in technology transport, financial services, and sustainability. Today he works as a team leader and project manager for a leading European, sustainable. Bank. Chris is passionate about helping people with their careers and Personal Development He has given numerous career stocks at universities in the UK, Ireland Australia and the US. and has taken part in life. Events on the Guardian's website and for jobs dot CO DOT UK amongst numerous other contributions. In Twenty, twelve, Chris founded the website jobs on toast as a way to help masters, students, doctoral graduates, access the abundant opportunities available outside of. Higher. Education. In our long conversation Chris shared his academic journey all the way to the Post Doc. In today's episode I'm sharing with you what came after how and why he started his career outside academia. Welcome to Peachy Chris. Well thank you. David, for inviting me for having me on. I'm really happy to have you here especially given the years of experience you have helping people with masters and Ph ds like just mentioned finding their path and I think a word. That I think is really important is in the abundant number of career opportunities that are out there I think this one key thing that that people are going to. Wealth people need to understand to kind of break this this feeling that they may be failing at life or at least at the their professional life if the. End Up leaving academia after after graduate. School. Yeah it is. It is. So hard to describe when you see the light bulb come on somebody's head in new. People people just say. It. Yeah. And it. It is. What always of joys me on like just when somebody says down they felt or how lost or how they didn't know what to do, and then they say that you I when you're okay now I just. Found the way forward or hope or something you know you just why would why would have stopped? Doing what I'm doing I mean because that's the greatest thing you can do. Even if you change one person's mind or sometimes I talk to one hundred people you know I think if I could. Difference that many people but not like yourself day job what you're doing on your the more that can do it that more intense. We can have and we can reach more people in our own countries or in different languages. or different backgrounds. So yeah, it's it's cool to fail that there's more there's more of us than. Doing this doing this thing. You don't just listen think about being a PhD that just you just have this unique. Bonding Experience With With with anybody else like I just met you but you know it just. It's strange. We everyone knows what they went through, and then just you can just click with people and. It's powerful as powerful stuff. So as I mentioned, we talked before about Chris's PhD and you can find our full one hour and a half conversation on the Papaya she youtube channel. We eventually also talked about what led up to his post doc. Chris. Was Now considering after his post doc and after the his after applying to some lecturing positions and not having the materialize thinking. Okay. What am I going to do an end looking at the non-academic landscape and seeing where he was going to fit? How did you go about that? Were there appears around you who were also having that reflection. How. Was that process? How easy was that process or not easy? I was that that. Exploration. Let's say. He is kind of mixed because I think on the one hand. As I kept getting rejections from the academic jobs, Kinda go to feeling of. Like feeling of running out of time or this is this isn't going well. If I could just get academic job everything would be. Okay. So that was like a downside to it but on the other hand you know. I was really excited by the things that I was saying around me like like the Internet was something that was just really taking off in the late ninety s and I was just fascinated by the internet and this whole and. I mean I. I say Democratic Dissemination of information which is. Not. Disney triple the time easily, but the way. To access to information or study or learning the United. States can be quite elitist or privileged or and causal money and time, but just like the idea that. The anybody can just access any type of information videos and things as well. It was coming along time and could learn anything. They had the Internet connection did just Exchange. My view of the world and so excited me as an educator and as a scholar, this potential and always really enthused by that and could see this trans transformative potential of it and so that's when I kind of thought. Well, this could be an area where. You I would be happy and excited to work in, and then I had to try and figure out. Well, how do I get to that from medieval studies? kind of like the opposite. Of this new of this new techy technological thing..

Chris Papa PhD UK Kris Humphry David University of Southampton Bob University of York Disney Guardian Mendez project manager Huchon DOT UK youtube program manager Austin
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:02 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"The University of Haifa. The second part than his talks about her life outside her research. During this conversation, we had a great exchange about working versus volunteering and about the importance of non research activities in terms of networking for your academic and professional life. I in a way learns that academia is about rejection you will have to face rejection, but the thing about its end, what I learned about it is that that's okay. You just need to find a way for yourself to deal with stats do not stay off that personally like you're not getting a scholarship you getting into conference or your article being dismissed doesn't mean that you're failure it doesn't mean anything about you as a person and that's what we're saying beats the is a lifestyle, but it isn't the only thing in your life you need to find these other things that are important to you. Welcome to Papa PhD with David Mendez The podcast where we explore careers and life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules. Get. Ready to go off the beaten path and hop on an exciting new episode of Papa. PhD. So Welcome to part two of my interview with Danny. Harris and in part one we had just Finished by by talking about what are they today? As Beach, D researcher was in her domain. But in part to I'd really want Danny to focus on. What's your projects have been you know and? One of them we already mentioned and is quite evident but. Other projects you've been developing besides just your PhD research and the idea is also to see if we can take out of that, how that enriched your experience as a PhD student and how listeners out there could maybe take some some example of that too. Also wherever they are You know find a group of like minded people and also enrich their experience and make it a a richer one and A. How to make their PhD a more diverse experience than just doing their research? That's where I wanted to say. I've been to a lot of different things and this is something my supervisor has warned me for so. Now, a bit more cautious at I'm trying to do it a bit less, but I've been slowed down by the whole situation with corona. Anyway. So I just want that to be a little bit of a warning when I start talking about all the fun things that I did because you definitely have to keep in mind how much a person can do without burning out. By As let me start with w about my love for conferences, especially if they're paid for and abroad. in a way, it allowed me to keep traveling, which is so much love. In, my first year Beastie, I managed to spend three weeks in. Australia where never been before somewhere in the mountains beautiful place. at the form. And there are. A huge conference on different topics with two hundred. Students, not only be as there were just a few these most of them were in. From all over the world is shared my flats with someone from Pakistan right as an Israeli. F from the Philippines ends from South Korea and we went to arts events and I a events conferences about politics about health. All kinds of fields bunket, Moon spoke there prisons of Australia's spoke there I was invited as far as Israel delegation do very fancy dinner with people who worked at important banks and things like that. So this was like the big thing that I was very excited about enemies I might give per station about my research about a Mike Proposal and I got some really useful feedback from people from the field. So this was absolutely great. So in a way, it was a lot of fun at for me. It was free, but it was also different work because I got that feedback that I needed. Has to continue to projects, and then I've also spent some time in Brazil. which was the first time that was really great and I gave myself a few extra days in Rio. also about migration on a learned a lot about migration in the Global South 'cause, I focus very much Europe. And then I've done my trips to Germany for research. So this way, I get to travel been to Cairo in January for sight that have seen a beer minutes. For a conference of the. National Organization for Migration that's connected to the UN. And I presented my research on the bow dare. which was pretty cool and there will so policymakers there which is something I'm very much interested in going into after. Doing. The interesting. So also some networking definitely. And just to see how day spoke about similar topics outside of academia. So these are things that I love doing that definitely projects because you have to apply for these things especially if they involve money right and they need to plan all of your trip started dime and only Gives you a flight ticket place stay but doesn't say anything about the preparation of your actual doc or bolster at the conference. And then there you're also working 'cause you're networking is about your topic trying to get out be volts. Things like that. But for me, it was very motivating. It's It's everything I ever wanted to travel for work right. And besides that, I've always works next to my degrees I am getting scholarship, but it's not enough to survive off. So I'm working also for the center where I study. And they're responsible for organs of guest lectures like getting the guest lecturers in also from countries to speak to our students in English we also have trips for students plans, for example, to embassies here in Israel. So they can see what their options are after the grief. And also conferences and Colloquia. So this way I, really got to learn how to organize the these events and be working on something that's not so much research, but still helps with the network. So that's what I did besides that..

PhD Danny Israel Australia Papa PhD University of Haifa Grad school National Organization for Migr Pakistan supervisor Harris David Mendez Germany corona Beastie Philippines Beach UN Europe
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

06:07 min | 6 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Domain that interests you. You'll see you'll find advice you can use to start building plan for yourself. Now. A lot was stalled during season one about transferable skills but a lot was also told about the blind spots, the things you don't naturally come out of graduate school knowing and being prepared for. One of the main ones has to do with preparing your CV and preparing to interview in a non. Academic Setting. If you listen back to the interviews where we spoke about job hunting and interviewing outside of academia. The main advice that came up again, and again was to tailor your CV to each potential employer and specifically to give emphasis to the soft skills you have accrued while performing research and keeping to a minimum. One guests even said to a single line anything to do with your publications, presentations or academic awards. He need to take a point I approach where the person reading your CV. Will know right away that you are a good candidate for the position. The second aspect has to do with interviewing. You may have done a bunch of oral presentations poster presentations, even elevator pitches to do with your research. And the performance skills you developed we'll definitely serve you in an interview setting. The difference is that when interviewing for a position industry, for example. Rather than listing your skills, the techniques you master the tools you can use. The actual goal of the exercise is for the interviewer to assess whether you are a good match for the position and for the team. So there will be a component of body language showing knowledge of the organization's mission in structure and having a good story to tell about how you came to be sitting in front of them for this interview. This is something you don't learn graduate school, but it's something you can prepare for one of the points. My guests stressed as being key in your career exploration and in preparing for interviews is doing your homework about the organization offering the position and ideally reaching out to people in similar positions and asking them for informational interviews around coffee or these days on video conference. Asking someone who has followed the same path that you want to embark on pointed questions about the reality of the job about remuneration about company culture is the best way to get to know what interviewers might be looking for in a candidate. In. Parallel with this, especially, if this is your first time interviewing. The other technique that was mentioned in recommended was rehearsing. In front of a mirror with friend. Preparing to deliver your story in the best way possible and to make it clear point of why you're the right candidate for the position. If you know that type of questions commonly asked even better prepare and rehearse your answers for them to. This way on the day of the interview, you'll be able to focus on the human interaction rather than on the content and show yourself in the best possible. In this first season, we also talked a lot about life balance and mental health. Stress is a part of our modern life and life as a researcher has a few particular flavors of stress. But my guests were clear about three components that can help you strike a balance and have a healthy journey. Physical Exercise Move Econo- team sport. Stay fit. Having a community outside the lab. Team sports do this too, but you can get into a club started student group. And finally including me time in your weekly schedule. This. said it is possible that other factors you have no control of our affecting your inner balance. If this is the case find professional help and take the necessary steps to heal. This may or may not lead to resuming your research and it's fine. What is important above all is that you stay healthy. With this note on mental health and on finding a healthy balance during graduate studies I'm going to wish you a great week a lot of success in your life and career exploration, and thank you again for being a listener of the show. But before I go I want to officially announced that next week we'll be the season finale special. To make sure that you don't run out of. PODCASTS. Listen this summer I've teamed up with the what are you going to do with that podcast and we've done a twin episode. Next Thursday the last interview of both our seasons he's going to air at the same time. I will be on their show and then he says there host will be on Papa. PhD. So, be sure to tune in and witness this academic podcast Collab- I'll be expecting you. And if you want to help the podcast, there are two simple things you can do. Number One Sharon episode that you really like with a friend or colleague. That's a great way to help and to spread the word. Number two if you're on an APP that allows rating or commenting, do that leave a star rating and leave a comment? That will help other people out there find the podcast enjoying the adventure. And it also gives me a chance to open a dialogue with all of you which I really enjoy. So, thank you again. Happy Listening and see you next week. And now for a short message. If, you're preparing to launch a podcast. You may be asking yourself what hosting platform to use. I launched puppies de on blueberry because I wanted to professional service that would interface with my wordpress website. That would robustly broadcast Papa PhD to all platforms. And that would allow me to grow my podcast in years to come. If you're starting a serious podcast project, do consider one of the first podcasting hosts out there offering state of the art services.

Papa PhD Physical Exercise PhD researcher
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"We always want to project into the future as the best possible version of ourselves that we often fall into the trap of setting our goals based on what we've been told we should aim for or what we see our neighbors aiming for big part of enjoying our time in graduate. School depends Benzon beaming tune with our personal values are strengths. And we'd what makes us tick this week. FELICIA party shares. How all she came into science and how she transitioned from the beach team your science to an all tech position doing what she loves most the old school way of thinking is that got a? PhD Is Training for an academic job. And if you don't do it it means you weren't good enough. I think that's also coming from time where there were a lot less ask people doing. It was less accessible. So the percentage of people going from PhD into academic research career was extremely high. But at this point that's not the case at all there's a lot of people pursuing PhD's because they're passionate about the research and they want to know more about that particular killer topic. They want to contribute to the knowledge or treatments are policy in.

PhD Benzon
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to episode Twenty Six popper PhD being the last episode of Twenty Nine Thousand Nine hundred instead of an interview and this week. I'm bringing your collection of inspiring full of wisdom the guests of shared so far. I hope you enjoyed them. Having sneak a happy sharing welcome to papa. PhD With David Mendez. The podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of Papa PhD. I'd really love you the audience to play an active role in the show. So if there's a theme you'd like to see covered on the show or if there's a guest did you like me to interview head over to anchor dot. FM FOR SLASH CAPUCCI and drop us a voice message to be featured on a future episode on the PG see website you can also subscribe to our newsletter and get our resource sheet at the bottom of every page and you can also leave us a written message contacts page. Welcome to the show on episode one. The new Murchison shared about the importance of allowing self to think big when thinking of career opportunities. I think the the first biggest thing would be To to think big about what the possibilities are you know Well I think you know things like like this project. You're working on you know things it's like this podcast really help people to to realize there are a lot of opportunities to raise the go in addition to just you know continuing on academia right. So you know. Don't be scared to kind of be a little bit audacious about what what kind of direction you might be able to go into And to really think about what. What's what's GonNa work for you when it's going to resonate for you And then you know to you know work figuring out how you're gonNA spend yourself how you're going to and how you're GonNa get all personal brand how you're GonNa you know how you're GonNa spin it so that you're the right person to do that. Ah On episode. Two Joel. mccower talked about the importance of staying curious. I you still learning stuff. Yeah I thought I've got a PhD. I'm an intelligent person But when I was doing my MBA. I realized that If you're not not studying something quite rigorously you know. You don't feel union in especially of course I was in my late forties doing my mba as well but You don't Your mind does begin to stagnate so keep leading cause after a year of my MBA. I felt I was twenty years younger mentally again. My agility amd back and that was great you know is a great feeling To I would say just keep letting no matter what it it is do Of course you know Learn about extraterrestrial life. You know If physicals search for extraterrestrial life or learn about anything I think that's really important again. Every opportunity increases you'll network on episode three Mark Roberts shares. Why should never feel like you're stuck professionally? The key mindset is just to keep reminding yourself that if what you're doing say that new job outside Academian started if it doesn't live up to your expectations that doesn't mean that you made the wrong and that somehow failed so you really should have just stayed in academia. Now that's not that you can always leave. That new job can find another the job either in the same field perhaps discovered that field just isn't for you so if something brand new again you're really never stuck in this. You convince yourself you're stuck and so What what I would really recommend is that everybody is their own pep squad? So when things aren't aren't working out just keep telling yourself that things will turn around you one way or another on episode four Rob Hutchison talks about why it's important to identify your strong suits. I I would say to identify what you are good at and what you enjoy doing so they may not not necessarily be the same thing but hopefully future job would contain elements of both and next. I would say start working on your brand early so so this would mean developing your CV and your Lincoln page but also putting together your elevator pitch to summarize your profile. This is something that you should have prepared to recite someone on its opportunities arises and then third I would say. Don't be afraid to take a leap to try new things and do things that scare you like. I mentioned before some people might like the idea of just doing the same old repetitive tasks and over and over again. But if you want to progress in your career keep things interesting and do more meaningful work and makes a real difference whether it be for your clients or for anyone else that I think they need to take risks and put yourself out there. On episode six Fiona Robinson Talks about the importance of finding your passion. If you're doing research I think that the two top things you're at are transferable from that are your critical critical thinking skills and your ability to take a big project rated into pieces analyze those. Get those done tied back together and bring her back to the whole. I think you can do that pretty much. Anyone doing research is being back. Then you can do anything you can. You can take on any kind of challenge. So then it's finding where do you want to put your allergies. What are you passionate about? I know they say you know do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life. Whatever you still have to work? It's not always fun and not everybody gets to work doing what they. But there's gotta be something but you're doing or that you wish you in that that draws on episode seven Philippa Kereta Bauza talks about. Why you deserve to be where your today? Life is really really stressful nowadays in every field so you really stressful but if you are doing winging it is because it deserves and love your child as it's been hard in win nowadays the working. Where'd you live science will? Is Everything Itar and so rest. This will take all these days on episode eight. Emily Blue Roberts tells us what's important to have a side hustle during your PhD. Start doing actual work outside of your role role as a graduate student OR POST DOC By work I don't necessarily mean paid work. Although that is preferable it could be volunteer work but anything just just to gain any kind of experiences outside of your primary one as a researcher As a student as a trainee because working saying if it's a side hustle or a volunteer position or an internship or whatever it is gives you again those additional perspectives That you might be seeking at this this time and you know usually something you can put on your CV. Because a lot of the the fear I think at this stage is around I don't have any work experience. I don't have any reason working experience. All employers are looking for the PhD plus two years. He's Mary's as an entry level position. Well of course we know. That's negotiable right But something you can do while at the same time you're finishing her PhD. You can start that work experience clock even on a part time basis just by reaching out and having some of these other Arab experiences in episode nine killer look shows advice on finding a fulfilling career. Yeah so that is A. It's obviously a huge task to that transition and to even begin to understand what you want to do and I think one of the main things is needs to do. Your research find vocation that is profitable fulfilling but also can provide value to your audience and make you feel like you're making a valuable contribution And that's not always the easiest thing to do but if you do that research in you you have a decent idea that something's actually going to earn your money and filling. That's ninety.

Papa PhD David Mendez Grad school Rob Hutchison Fiona Robinson dot Philippa Kereta Bauza Murchison Mark Roberts Academian Joel. mccower Emily Blue Roberts Mary Lincoln graduate student researcher trainee