35 Burst results for "PHD"

Late musician Tom Petty receives posthumous Ph.D. for music

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 d ago

Late musician Tom Petty receives posthumous Ph.D. for music

"The the university university of of Florida Florida is is awarded awarded an an honorary honorary PhD PhD to to rock rock legend legend Tom Tom Petty Petty Tom Tom petty's petty's hit hit I I won't won't back back down down is is almost almost an an implement implement Gators Gators games games he he had had deep deep ties ties to to the the university university of of Florida Florida in in Gainesville Gainesville the the city city where where he he grew grew up up and and even even worked worked as as a a groundskeeper groundskeeper at at the the campus campus to to earn earn money money as as he he tried tried to to break break his his way way into into the the music music industry industry students students there there have have always always been been proud proud of of the the connection connection to to the the rock rock and and roll roll hall hall of of Famer Famer and and now now the the university university board board of of trustees trustees has has awarded awarded Thomas Thomas Earl Earl petty petty a a posthumous posthumous doctoral doctoral degree degree in in music music petty petty died died of of a a drug drug overdose overdose in in twenty twenty seventeen seventeen hi hi Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn

University University Of Of Fl Tom Tom Petty Petty Tom Tom Pe Gators Gators Gainesville Florida Famer Famer University University Thomas Thomas Earl Earl Petty Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn
The Left Is the Reason for the Spike in Crime

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:17 min | 3 d ago

The Left Is the Reason for the Spike in Crime

"Horrible story out of New York a 30 year old PhD candidate. I think computer science was randomly stabbed to death. A lot of stabbings to death taking place. Differently, it's an issue of knife control that we have to get engaged in. The national night association has to stop its activities. Crime in New York City is so horrific I think of deaths are up. I think 45%. And it is all as a result of the left completely 100%. So what will happen is they'll clamp down they may even elect a conservative. They might be a Democrat because it's almost impossible for Republican in New York City. And the crime will be reduced, and then they'll go back to electing leftists. That's what happens. I've lived long enough to see the pattern. Republicans or conservatives fix the destruction of the left and then people forget what the left did and reelect them to destroy once again, and it's an ever ongoing cycle of evil. Needless to say, I read about the extent to the extent that we know about the guy who stabbed him to death. This gang member, and he has an extremely long rap sheet. Why do people with wrong rap sheets? Get out of prison because of the left. Because they have this, they have this belief that people should not be put in prison for long periods of time. Especially a black and then the black, the blacks that are let out of prison or not put in prison usually hurt other blacks, in this case it was a wife student. Who was stabbed to death. Then he went over and stabbed somebody else.

National Night Association New York City New York
Michael J. Knowles: Liberals Can't Articulate Their Arguments, Resort to Screaming

The Dan Bongino Show

01:41 min | 5 d ago

Michael J. Knowles: Liberals Can't Articulate Their Arguments, Resort to Screaming

"You But you put it very well which is you don't need to be a rocket scientist to recognize that it's wrong to kill a baby that the constitution does not defend or articulate any right to kill a baby and that it's time to overturn it You don't need to have some advanced degree You don't need to have all of the PhDs and all the various accolades and credentials that the left seems to value so highly and you don't need to use lots of complicated jargon And it's pretty simple We actually can know the difference between good and bad and right and wrong and true and false And I think that the reason that the left tends to get a lot angrier and screeching gal and you remember after Trump won they started screaming no and they all went viral because the value literally screaming at the sky yeah That's right And the reason that they get so angry is because they can't see the reality They can't articulate their position If you understand an issue then you can just state your opinion and you can say Tom lady and you can be forceful but you don't need to scream and yell and pull your hair out But if you know that you're on shaky ground as the pro abortion people are in this case specifically And as the leftists are generally then they have to get emotional and they get frustrated because they can't articulate their views There were two demonstrations outside the Supreme Court today There was a group of pro lifers specifically there was a group of young pro life women and they were singing the national anthem and they were waving American flags and they were praying and they seemed very grounded and reasonable And then there was a group of pro abortion women who were screaming and yelling and literally taking abortion pills You just look at those two groups Dan which one do you think has it more accurately

Tom Lady Donald Trump Supreme Court DAN
Author Lee Strobel: We Are More Than Our Physical Brains

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Author Lee Strobel: We Are More Than Our Physical Brains

"Folks I'm talking to Lee strobel, who's the author of a new book called the case for heaven, a journalist investigates evidence for life after death. I am so fascinated by this. You were just about to say something before we went to the break. Well, you made a very important point error, which is that we're not reducible to our brain. We are more than our physical brain. And how do we know that? Because there's a difference between our brain our physical brain and our consciousness, our mind or our spirit, our soul. And the example that was given to me by the neuroscientists from Cambridge University who I interviewed, doctor Sharon Derek's PhD from Cambridge, who have well-known neuroscientists who wrote a book called am I just my brain and the answer is no, you're not. But she gave an illustration. She said, what if there was a woman named Mary? And Mary was the world's leading expert on vision. She understood the physical makeup of the eye how it was constructed, the physics, the chemistry, how the eye functions how images are carried through the optic nerve, how the brain processes that. She understands it better than anybody in the world. But she's blind. What if all of a sudden for the first time, Mary received her eyesight? At that moment, would marry learn anything new about vision. Yeah. She wouldn't be able to see she'd had the first person experience of seeing no amount of knowledge about the physical working of the eye and the brain would get married to that point of that first person experience of seeing. And so consciousness and the brain are not the same thing. Consciousness or they soul or the spirit don't is distinct from the human brain. Whenever you hear people talk about the idea that the brain is a computer, blah, blah, blah, blah. And you say, what is consciousness? I mean, this is heavy stuff. Yeah. But when is it that you become conscious, computers are not conscious? How big does a computer have to be before it makes the leap to consciousness? It will never make the leap to consciousness. Because that a brain is different from a mind. And when you're talking about this, I mean, this is very heavy and there are scientists who have really puzzled over this and there are some people who just sort of assume that, well, of course, we live in material universe, but that leap, it's an infinite leap. You can never make the leap from computer to

Sharon Derek Lee Strobel Mary Cambridge University Cambridge
Man earns Ph.D., fulfills dream of being physicist — at 89

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Man earns Ph.D., fulfills dream of being physicist — at 89

"In eighty nine year old Rhode Island man has finally achieved something he's dreamed up nearly his whole life Manfred Steiner had always been fascinated by physics but instead went into medicine after retiring in two thousand I really don't want to spend my life just sitting around so he enrolled at Brown University and after nearly two decades of classes I made it Steiner earned a PhD in physics this was the most gratifying point in my life his advice to others if there's something you want to do go ahead try it now that he has Steiner hopes to catch on as a research assistant I'm not looking for a paid job you know that's still I'm Sager made Connie

Manfred Steiner Rhode Island Steiner Brown University Sager Connie
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

04:13 min | Last month

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Etc etc because it's as always it's important to set realistic goals and the other important aspect and this may may be right away at the beginning of the phd but maybe also later on is to align those goals with your long term life goals. Be it having a family. Be it where you want to be in life in you know in five years what you want to do after up hd in or out of academia if you include those in this planning it's going to make it even better because again. These are going to inform decisions that you're going to take versus taking decisions and then later on realizing that. The decision wasn't in alignment with your more medium to long-term goals. Then the question of discussing long term life goals with your supervisor. That really depends on the person it depends on you too but it really depends a lot on the supervisor on their philosophy and the culture of where you are. I just had a conversation. Deputy episode that came out today of of the puppet peachy interviews with crooked yellow. Where she talked about her experience she wanted to have children new during the pg and finish her phd already having having her children and this is something that she had to put out there and discuss with with their supervisor but also choose the lab that she was going to accordingly and the culture so this is more of a sensitive question. I think if you can do it if there's openness for you to have these conversations they're really really good to have an in need can bring you so much peace to know that this or that aspect of your plan is accepted and that you'll have the support of your supervisor to say true with your plans. It's really good. It's not possible in all situations but it's it's a case by case the take home message is don't do we like i did. Don't go into the phd without looking ahead planning ahead and putting all of this information in a in a sort of mapping sort of plan could be posted it can be a journal. You know something that helps you focus. Because it can get scattered you will get koetter depending on what goes on. But you will get scattered sometimes during peach and having this document this kind of anchor that you can go back to and say okay. I had planned this or had put this as an objective. I had put this as a priority. It's really really a good a good tool to stay calm. Stay focused and not feel that you're losing control of your life of your phd of your projects etc. And of course the speech the map and the life map is a living document. So i always recommend that when you go back to its be open to changing things because your priorities will change and you will learn as you go and that can also inform what you do with the map. So this is what. I wanted to share. Today plan ahead. Avoid pitfalls beat find finance it having projects that are too risky and that in the end you'll be short to finish a pg plan ahead. Think of all these possibilities and you'll have a a much smoother adventure so that's it for today's episode of the pt. They'll joe i hope you enjoyed it. I hope you are going to do your model of this of this map and feel free to share any questions you might have. I'll be happy to answer. Thanks for listening and see you in two weeks..

koetter joe
Virginia Is Proof Why Americans Don't Want CRT

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:16 min | Last month

Virginia Is Proof Why Americans Don't Want CRT

"You. Let me ask congressman Gallagher to put on your PhD hadn't be doctor Gallagher for a moment and consider whether or not an Elaine luria understands why critical race theory is such a toxic issue. And respond if you will to the charge, it's not, I heard that on TV last night and I listened to about 5 seconds of TV. We were doing the Nixon seminar. We'll come to that in a second. And I heard a very respected commentator. It's like the Democrat trope. It's not hot in the Virginia schools. That misses the point, there is no curriculum marked CRT, but they're closing Thomas Jefferson high school to merit admissions on the basis of equity. That's CRT. Yeah, and then it's just empirically true that there is a an explosion of diversity equity and inclusion programs. Within a variety of government institutions, including the military, secretary Austin, his first week on the job, created certain positions with that in mind order to 60 day stand down in order to address extremism in the ranks, even though no one at The Pentagon can define extremism. And so it is not a made up issue. It's a real issue. I hear about it every single day in northeast Wisconsin. And I think it's bound up in this broader woke ethos that the modern Democratic Party is pushing so much of what we hear from the Democratic Party is based entirely on intersectional identity politics. And I think what we saw in Virginia is that Americans views. I mean, just average Americans, center left center right in Democrats Republicans, their views on race are normal. They don't conform to the radical intersectional identity politics stuff, the Democrats are pushing. People want to get along, they don't like racial essentializing. They really don't like it in the classroom, and they don't think the cops and the society writ large are racist. I think that's obvious from what we saw in Virginia and as for swing district Democrats, if they were inclined to think that this was just a fake issue before, I think the results in Virginia should tell them that the American people don't want CRT, they don't want the cottage industry of DEI commentators, and it's so far out of step with the mainstream that it's turning off a lot of independent voters.

Congressman Gallagher Elaine Luria Thomas Jefferson High School Secretary Austin Virginia Gallagher Democratic Party Pentagon Wisconsin
Eric Describes the Funniest Story From His New Book 'Is Atheism Dead?'

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:49 min | Last month

Eric Describes the Funniest Story From His New Book 'Is Atheism Dead?'

"There are a lot of funny stories in the book. And usually when I do interviews, I don't get to tell these stories. I've got a glance over the top. But you just asked me about one of my favorites. I mean, I can't tell you how much joy I just laugh every time I think about it. But this was the discovery in 1979 of what's called the silver ketef scrolls. And what that means is these are incredibly tiny silver scrolls that were so tiny they were worn as amulets. And they had the priestly blessing the ironic blessing where the priests would say the lord bless you and keep you the lord make his countenance to shine upon you and give you peace. I mean, this holy thing from the scripture of written in silver in really Proto hebraic because this is from 6 50 BC. Anyway, but how was it found? Yes. I, if you read books and archeology, it'll sort of tell you, oh, this was discovered here here by so and so and so and so I was okay. But somehow, in my research, because I have fun doing the research, I discovered this weird backstory. And the more I dug the funnier it became. Yeah. Okay, here's the story. The guy whose last name, oh gosh, what is it? It's Barack. I can never say his name. It's the book here. But anyway, it's not Jacobs. No, it's a 28 year old. It's a 28 year old guy studying archeology in a Tel Aviv, or Jerusalem. So he's a nobody. He's 6 years from his PhD, but he gets this idea in his head that below Saint Andrew's church outside just right at the outset skirts of Jerusalem. There are some old caves and burial caves, whatever. They've all, they looked like they've been excavated. There's nothing there, but he has a hunch that there's more to be found there. But he doesn't have any credibility or anything to get real archeological students to help him. So he has to be really humble and say, you know, I'll take anybody who can help me. Gabriel barques Gabriel bark, I think it's barkai, barkey. He has to go and this is like a joke. So archeology club, 12 and 13 year olds. They volunteer the kids, the kids can help you. So how'd you like 12 and 13 year olds annoying 12 and 13 year olds to help you on this big dig? So they do the dig, they find nothing. He's disappointed, and he says, well, you know what? At least to we've got a photograph, all these chambers, even though we found nothing, there was one kid that was so annoying to this barkai that barkey was like ripping his hair out and he says, I can't take another minute of this annoying 12 year old named Nathan. So here's what I'm going to do. All of these caves need to be photographed. The most distant one or one of the distant ones and over cave 25, he sends Nathan there, and he's really stern with him, like angry, like, hey, I've had enough out of you. I want you to clean that chamber. It's gonna be photographed. I want it to be so clean that your mother could use it as a kitchen. Like you really threatens the kid because this kid was very annoying. So Nathan trundles off to this distant place. And the joy, of course, is that it's far away, and we're not going to hear from this kid for two or three hours while he's doing what we do. But he takes a hammer with them, which is a weird thing, nobody knows. But the kid is so annoying that to go clean the cave, he just happens to hide a hammer on his person. And when he's bored in this sacred chamber, okay? There's nothing there. It's got a stone floor, whatever. He takes the hammer out. Nobody knows this, okay? He's all alone and starts smashing the floor with the hammer. Now this alone, I find it funny. The only reason he's there is because he was so annoying, they sent him as far away as possible. But if he wasn't annoying enough, he had a hammer with him and decides to use the hammer to smash the floor. The board Nathan smashes the floor with the hammer so hard that it cracks. It wasn't supposed to crack. And he finds a hidden chamber. He sticks his hand in the hidden chamber and is dragged into the bowels of hell itself. Just kidding. He puts his hand into hidden chamber and he pulls out some stuff, some like little ceramics. He now is like, hey, this is what I'm here for. I'm not here to clean. I found treasure. So he runs to barkai and tugs on his shirt. He's like, hey hey, look what I found. You could see bark. I could picture his hair standing on end, like what is going on? The annoying kid is back with some ancient treasure. So they run back to the place, barkai sees that, what do you assumed was an empty place was in fact hiding this stuff and the annoying kid was so annoying that he smashed the floor open or whatever. So he sends the kid home and they spend days now excavating the secret whole and they pull out treasure after treasure and the greatest treasure is what we described. And unbelievably tiny silver scroll so delicate that they couldn't unwrap it for three years. They didn't know how to have the technology without destroying it. But they could read the words inscribed in silver. Now if it's inscribed on anything but silver, it doesn't last. So the Dead Sea scrolls, which are amazingly old, they're not this old. This is even older. So this is the first extant writing from the Hebrew scriptures ever discovered thanks to the annoying 12 year old Nathan. He's probably in his mid 50s right now and he doesn't know. And when he's

Barkai Barkey Nathan Gabriel Barques Jerusalem Saint Andrew Tel Aviv Jacobs Barack
'You Will Be Assimilated' Author David Goldman on China's Contempt for the U.S.

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:44 min | Last month

'You Will Be Assimilated' Author David Goldman on China's Contempt for the U.S.

"China is not an enemy. And I think that's important for people to clearly understand. China is a rising power, China has been a rising power since Deng Xiaoping in 79. And they are going to develop themselves in our developing themselves into a great power. That is not to say, however, that they are an enemy. They're not an enemy. They're just a great power. That's according to the chairman of the joint chiefs when he was speaking in his private capacity as chief of staff of the army. The NATO summit, maybe that explains a lot about Mark Billy. We'll discuss the realities of what China thinks they are to us and how they're eating our lunch with the man that we always rely upon to tell us about the geo strategic reality in Asia and in Beijing. He's the author of a fabulous work you must check out right now. It's you will be assimilated. China's plan to Sino form the world. David Goldman. Welcome to one on one. A sub gorka it is an honor and privilege to spend fine with you, sir. Thanks for the invitation. I just realized I'm looking at the cover of your book that the Chinese dragon has a pair of iPhone ear pods in. That's a very nice little touch there. I missed in the past. David, we'll talk about Millie. We'll talk about the truth of China Beijing. Xi Jinping and everything else. But first, I have to ask you. The imagery of these super cargo ships off the port of LA, the president of the United States saying, oh, no, don't worry about it. And then Jen Psaki saying, oh, that's a high class issue. People having the Christmas present. So that's, you know, the pipes don't worry about that. Let me ask you, let's think like the Chinese Communist Party for a moment. What does China think of the fact that America can't unload its cargo ships? The Chinese have contempt for us. They think they can take us. We just published an a four times an excerpt from a book by Chinese economist used to be the chief economist of the World Bank Chicago university PhD. Who says, look at history. Look at the United States versus England at the end of the 19th century. The English were lazy complacent and the United States come from behind, took them out and ate their lunch. That's exactly what we're going to do to the United States now. We've got the people. We've got the supply chains. We've got the technology. We've got the will to do it. America's lazy and feckless and their right for the

China Mark Billy Deng Xiaoping Joint Chiefs Beijing David Goldman Jen Psaki Nato Xi Jinping Chinese Communist Party America Army Millie Asia World Bank Chicago University David LA England
Why You Should Get the COVID Booster Shot

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:21 min | 2 months ago

Why You Should Get the COVID Booster Shot

"First of all changing recommendations for boosters lead to confusion for vaccinate and their doctors you think fetching mrs hewitt ni- got boosted on friday no side effects just additional protection from code. I put a note of that on twitter on friday poster today at the may two zero side effects be smart. Get the third shot. When you're eligible stay healthy and happy and cdc keep expanding eligibility eleven hundred. People felt obliged to like that two hundred thirty people felt obliged to comment on it. One hundred eleven people re tweeted with or without common. I'm astonished that that's newsy. I just thought it was kind of fun that i was eligible. The last time the vaccine came up on the wrong side of sixty five nine sixty five. So i get the booster on the first day and a bunch of people told me i was risking my life and part of conspiracy. Look you can be crazy. All you want on the conspiracy stop. The butchers are good science by phd. Toxicologist brother urged me to get it. First day possible. I did urge you to go out and get it first day. If you've got an underlying condition your under sixty five going to see the pharmacist. Tell them of got asthma. And i want my booster. And they'll give here. It's a pfizer booster. You can't get them during a booster yet. Because the fda still screwed up the cdc screwed up go get boosted go get vaccinated

Mrs Hewitt Confusion CDC Twitter Asthma Pfizer FDA
Author Craig Stanfill Tells a Compelling Tale in His First Novel 'Terms of Service'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:32 min | 2 months ago

Author Craig Stanfill Tells a Compelling Tale in His First Novel 'Terms of Service'

"Hey folks As you know this is the eric metaxas show and as you also know whenever you read one of those websites that always says terms of service. Have you seen that. And i just thought to myself. It's so annoying because it could mean anything. Nobody reads it. And i thought what a great title that would be for a book. But i don't have time to write a whole book. So i thought maybe somebody else would and they did. His name is craig stand fill and the title of the book is terms of service. Craig welcome the program. Thank you eric. Okay this is a great title terms of service. Ominous is this a dystopia novel. It is an extremely dystopia. Novel portrays a future that we might be creating where you've got these huge big tech companies that run everything in your life and of course they're watching everything you do. Add the the final turn of the screw is they've got these a is that are constantly watching over your shoulders and monitoring everything you do and that lets them exert an incredible level of control over your life. Okay this i gotta tell you you've got your phd in artificial intelligence in one thousand nine hundred eighty three before. I think there was artificial intelligence practically so you are at least an expert on this subject. Most of us of course no nothing about artificial intelligence. So why does it seem so scary to you and obviously you put it in the novel terms of service which i hope people get a copy of but what do you see that the rest of us wouldn't have a clue about well first of all there's nothing intrinsically evil about it's sort of at some level just another technology it can be used for good or ill but when you develop a new technology with as wide ranging implications ai. You really need to think about. What are the risks associated with that technology. And what could happen now. The important thing to understand about. Ai is in the context of social media and so forth is that it is a force multiplier as they say as an example facebook has only fifteen thousand content moderators. And they've got something like two billion people use their platform on a monthly basis and do the risk to take can't watch everybody they can all. They can watch almost nobody. So what they do. In order to enforce their rains upon you is they let their is most of the work.

Eric Metaxas Craig Eric Facebook
The Seven Sins of Memory, With Daniel Schacter, PhD

Speaking of Psychology

02:28 min | 2 months ago

The Seven Sins of Memory, With Daniel Schacter, PhD

"Your book is called the seven cents of memory. Can you first of all talk about those sins are why you call them. Sins and some of them are as you say. Sins of omission incentive comission. What are the differences back around. Two thousand nine hundred ninety nine as i was kind of serving the literature on memory. Errors struck me that while psychologist known for decades that memory is prone to error. Nobody had really tried to organize our our knowledge. And try to suggest way of classifying these errors and my best take on. The literature was that there are these seven basic categories of memory errors and so by analogy with the well-known seven ancient deadly sins. I couldn't resist calling in seven cents of memory. So they're three sins of omission different kinds of forgetting four sins of comission when memory is present but either wrong or intrusive so the the three sins of omission. I call transients. That's forgetting over time. We all know from our everyday experience that all things being equal we tend to remember experiences and that are recent in time better than those that are occurred long ago memories tend to fade over time. The second Sin of omission. I call absent mindedness. So this doesn't this is not memory fading over time. This is kind of a breakdown at the interface of memory and attention. So we may be distracted focused on upcoming tasks and we put our keys down. We don't notice where we put those keys down. The event really never gets into memory. That would be an absent minded kind of forgetting or we may put our keys down and know exactly where they are But then we're distracted at the time of retrieval. We walk we walk out the door without archies. that would be another example of absent. Mindedness third kind of forgetting sins of omission. I call blocking this is when memories available. It hasn't faded away over time Where trying to remember doing our best to remember. But we can't come up with information that's actually stored in memory that i call blocking Omission since

A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:13 min | 3 months ago

A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

"The good vibrations antique vibrator museum is about the size of a living room. And in glass cases around the walls arranged in chronological order are about one hundred vibrators dating all the way back from the late. Eighteen hundreds up to the early nineteen seventies and some of them are these beautiful lustrous jewel toned pieces of plastic others not so much they were super steam punk looking in the early twentieth century in and before they were definitely little machines. This is our tour guide carol. Queen carroll is the museum's curator has a phd in sexology and has worked at good vibrations for decades for a first stop on the tour. Carol wanted to introduce us to one of the oldest vibrators in the museum's collection. It's called the v. d. vibrio tori massager. And whether it was supposed to make you think of venereal disease. I don't actually know that's lost in the midst of time at least as far as my information. Sources are concerned the v. is old school. No batteries no electricity. It's got a hand crank. It kind of looks like an egg beater. If i'm honest and the museum has an old photo of a doctor holding a similar vibrator using one hand to operate the crank and the other depress the applicator end of it against a standing woman's back. Yes her back. In the late eighteen hundreds most people would have come into contact with vibrators in the context of a doctor's office in the vibrators early days it was seen as this kind of cure all for all kinds of medical problems and it was used at first in the doctor's office and then later in the home there is an nineteen teens book that was published by the hamilton dietsch company. Yes the same company that makes the blender that we make our margaritas on friday night which made vibrators and was one of the major vibrator manufacturers. There were many but they're one of the major ones in the nineteen so hamilton beach made a vibe and they published a book called health and how to get it

Queen Carroll Venereal Disease Carol Hamilton Dietsch Company Hamilton Beach
Deep Reinforcement Learning for Game Testing at EA With Konrad Tollmar

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Deep Reinforcement Learning for Game Testing at EA With Konrad Tollmar

"Conrad woke him to the tuomo. Podcasts thanks sam. Thanks for inviting us to be here. I'm really looking forward to digging into our conversation. We'll be talking about As the audience might imagine the intersection of and games before we do. I'd love to have you share a little bit about your background. I mentioned what is k t h. Okay teaches royal institute of technology in stockholm. It's a technical university where i did my undergraduate as well as might be hd. So i i think my interest for a i started longtime ago starting with computer vision. I always been passionate about photography. And i saw them. There was an opportunity to combine my kind of interest for photography than webs kind of my academic. And the so. That's kind of my starting point here. Nice and tell us a little bit about the kind of research that interests you in your professorship and on your graduate studies so my phd more symbolic media spaces and we build different kinds of interactive in viramontes to connect places with vdi streams but also being able to use sensors to convey other kinds of information. If you're close or if you're in the proximity of a space for that led me and benchley to explore that further or after my ideas and i spent some time working smart and interactive environments some over this work for play and some were for more like everyday use and i think some of us could remember recall. The kind of demos sue sorted out the mit's media on the late nineties.

Royal Institute Of Technology Conrad SAM Stockholm Benchley MIT
Who Is Horace Cooper?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 3 months ago

Who Is Horace Cooper?

"Is senior fellow with the national center public policy research. Also with project. Twenty-one horace kupa welcome back to america. I well thanks so much for having me back on so we every time we talk to you. I could do it for hours. You are a thinker. You are a candidate individual however we've been growing exponentially we've got more than three million listeners. Video platforms you. Name it so for those people who've just locked upon this channel just been sent this link to this interview. Let's start at the beginning. Who is horace cooper. Where did he come from to be where he is today. Well i don't know if that's a simple question. I would say that i was born in texas. I am my mother and more importantly my grandmother's grandson Virjee johnson Was an amazing influence on my life. And i you know my mother and father had a little something to do With everything but she. Because my brother and i got to spend summers with her helped to instill in me a sense of independence a sense of the importance of how we as a individuals are stewards of our lives How we're responsible for what happens in our circumstances and She had nine children. She was able to get seven of those children to graduate from college. Three of those children including my mother get phd's and it helped really encourage the importance of education in our family and with me in

National Center Public Policy Horace Kupa Horace Cooper Virjee Johnson America Texas
Horace Cooper: What I Learned From My Dear Grandmother

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 3 months ago

Horace Cooper: What I Learned From My Dear Grandmother

"Sadly with many of Our black friends on america first. We hit this refrain again and again and again that it was my grandma. It was my grandpa in your case. It was grandma virjee. Why is that what. Why is it that that we see such proclivity or a train that that generation is skipped and the black youth in america seem to be many cases brought on by grandparents. Well i would say this in my case my parents merit at an early age and even having done so my grandmother said is still have to do your part. You still have to do the responsible things and that included for my father. He was one of the few americans who voluntarily signed up for The army during vietnam and he shipped out and when he returned. I learned a lot about the importance of devotion to one's country about sacrifice and the like With regard to my mother she started school. I undergraduate ben a masters and then a phd. If you've got a family that you're also being a part of you can't necessarily say we're going to be done in about five six eight years. It took a while but my mother was determined and she was able to get it done and with my grandmother. Being willing to say. I'll take up some of the slack. You can drop the kids off with me. Sometimes we stayed during the summers for few weeks at a time.

America Vietnam Army BEN
What Makes Artificial Intelligence 'Intelligent' With Dr. Craig Stanfill

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 3 months ago

What Makes Artificial Intelligence 'Intelligent' With Dr. Craig Stanfill

"Is the difference between a program or a an effective pattern in in in computer vice artificial intelligence. Where is that i'm familiar with. Is the turing test. That helps you identify where the something has achieved that level impractical terms what makes artificial intelligence intelligence are not interested in what the intelligentsia says you as the expert. The author of this new book. What makes it. Actually worthy of. The word intelligence dr stanfield. What makes it worthy of intelligence is that you will producing a result by a machine learning rather than programming. A programmer has to sit down. You know so if a then b and here's the formula for the circumference of a circle or just set a bunch of rules and write a bunch of code and the problem is that it's very brittle the person who is writing. The code can't possibly anticipate everything that might happen in hundreds of thousands or millions of examples. And it's hard to come up with rules. People for example for years and years tried to write programs to do translation language. The language translate german to english or english. German people were doing that back when i got my phd. That's you know was a an order form of. Ai called rule based programming or just to write a program to do the translation and that really never got very far because it was very difficult to produce the rules and it was very time consuming and it didn't necessarily give good results when they started using machine learning and take a bunch of examples and then train. Something like a neural network to Do the same thing. it is basler more capable. They can do things that you were never able to write programs to

Dr Stanfield Basler
Nudibranchs: Strange Body Snatchers of the Deep

Short Wave

01:33 min | 3 months ago

Nudibranchs: Strange Body Snatchers of the Deep

"Today. We're focusing on new brings a particularly charismatic group of sea slugs. They are remarkably diverse. They live in every ocean and most marine habitats. There are more than three thousand different species of them. Worldwide and emily people are like really into them. You remember ryan from earlier yeah. He was pretty hyped on them. Yeah yeah yeah so. He's a phd student at harvard studying evolutionary biology. But before harvard. He did his masters studying new brakes. And once you love new brings you. Don't just stop loving new to bronx. I live the passion every day. Even though like i've been working on other weird critters live in the passion. The new to bring passion. He says that some scientists who study new brings actually call themselves nerd or banks. And i love that win. The fandom has a name you know the passion real and i'll be honest emily. I was initially drawn to them because some of them are so cool looking but for me. The amazing thing about brink's is how they harnessed the powers of other organisms around them. And that's what i want to talk to you about today. Yeah this honestly fascinates me okay so earlier. You said some of these sea slugs have the ability to co-opt photosynthesis the process of using light to make food. I know that plants. Algae and some bacteria do this Like i've never heard of an animal doing that. How does that even work okay. So you're already on the right track the key for noodle brings is something you just mentioned. Algae that use photosynthesis to make food aka photosynthetic.

Harvard Bronx Ryan Emily
Black US Farmers Awaiting Billions in Promised Debt Relief

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Black US Farmers Awaiting Billions in Promised Debt Relief

"The government wants to provide billions of dollars in debt forgiveness for farmers of color as part of the pandemic relief package but a judge has put the money on hold because of lawsuits filed by white farmers claiming reverse discrimination in Virginia John Wesley Boyd junior with the national black farmers association has been spit on called names he once watched as a federal official tore up his farm loan application and threw it in the trash the land knows no color the land never mistreated anybody people do voice says farmers of color like all farmers are struggling but he's not giving up you can leave your PhD do you have children but I can leave my pool raggedy farm to my children boy is pleading with the young people of color to return to the soil more staff void is raising everything from soybeans to beef cattle some of it on land that was once part of a plantation where his ancestors toiled I'm a Donahue

John Wesley Boyd National Black Farmers Associa Government Virginia
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:59 min | 9 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Help me. Maintain the quality of the show and potentially bring to life some of the cool ideas i have for it. You now have a simple way to do so. Just go to papa. Phd dot com forward slash patriotic and chooser tier or create. Your own again. Thank you for being a listener now. That's it back to my conversation with. Gary twigg so i have a question for you because i had a were things went wrong a lot for lots for a long.

Gary twigg Phd dot com
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Well, I was talking a lot about networking in this in this episode. So let's Network. So I'll be disappointed. If I don't get any new invitations only 10 after this. I just feel like I didn't really my pedagogic skills were very low if I didn't get any invitations. So guys, like if you want to connect with me just to it. I'll be very happy to get new contacts and not get to meet you and I can confirm that Natalia is very responsive. So, so if you if some some of what Natalia shared during this interview resonated with you. Raised questions just hit you know hit her up. She's going to respond and and you know, and and she's she's really fun to talk to Natalya. Thank you so much for having accepted an invitation for having been on on poppy seeds. It's been really great pleasure. Thank you so much. Thank you so much again and always pleasure to talk to you and I hope we meet soon found some other occasion. Actually Papa PhD was also a guest at the welcome Solutions Channel recently. So if you actually curious so I can see that he's not very wage vocal about his own story here at this podcast. So if you curious about his career, and he's very interesting career path so far then please take a look at our YouTube channel and take a look at this episode. Very interesting one so I can totally recommend checking that that is true. But Natalia on Papa p h c it's all about you, but Well, thanks. Thanks for the shout-out in dimension. And and yeah, if you're curious about my story, I had a great conversation with Natalia on on her channel. So just just look for my face and how long you'll be able to hear it. So yeah, thanks again and and all the best for your projects. Thank you so much. And now for the weekly podcast Discovery segment, I present you with trailers from two shows. You might find interesting jolly green scientists and curiosity cake. Give them a listen and say hi for me roll the tape. Hi, my name is are van with Texas A&M agrilife extension and I'm they're grown with Texas Tech University, and we are the jolly green scientists bringing you information from scientific literature and popular science articles related to the green industry straight into your ear. Dome each week will take one or two papers that we found interesting and shared with each other and we'll discuss them in terms that anyone can understand and even though we'll do it every week wage only going to share with you bi-weekly. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I was always one of those curious kids. I had the chemistry set a microscope or telescope. I would take my toys apart to see how they worked. And now that I'm a grown up. I still have that huge sense out of curiosity. If you too are an adult who was a curious kid, then curiosity. Kick is made for you. I'm your host immediately any join me as I talked to the best Minds from Academia and elsewhere may bring you accessible and engage in conversations across a wide range of topics with no prior knowledge required..

Natalia Papa PhD YouTube Texas Texas Tech University Natalya
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And once you take the plunge into the job market wage, what factors end up determining where you end up? These are the types of questions. This week's guest Natalia Belichick is interested in and likes to reflect upon In our conversation, we talked about her academic journey and discuss this whole question of navigating the job market as a PhD. Don't try to think about jobs for phds as a separate category of jobs job market is one like oh system in an in this ecosystem. Every one of us has some role to play. It's a bit like a loss of Faith. There are certain rules that govern why certain salaries are higher than others, which is all based on how your value and value of your work is perceived by the rest of the society. I'm just trying to understand how the job market shapes how it evolved. What are the rules and I think this is a more actually the problem of navigation in the job market is a more General problem is not only a problem of phds. Welcome to Papa PhD with David Mendez the podcast where we explore careers and life after grad school with guests who have walked The Road Less Traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules. Get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of pop a PhD. Welcome to this week's episode of Papa PhD this week. I'm really happy to have with me in Italia Belichick. Natalia is an entrepreneur researcher author and philanthropists home. She graduated from the College of inter faculty individual studies in mathematics and Natural Sciences at the University of Warsaw Poland with a Triple M S Title in physics mathematics and psychology wage there after she obtained a PhD in computational neuroscience at the doctor's Institute for brain cognition and behavior in name. Again, the Netherlands in 2018. She launched a public Foundation stick thing. So low is under joke and on trickling aiming to help early career researchers find new careers in Industry. She also owns welcome Solutions a company developing new tools and practices to help Professionals in navigating on the job market and finding or creating their dream jobs..

Natalia Belichick Papa PhD welcome Solutions Natalia the Netherlands David Mendez College of inter doctor's Institute University of Warsaw Poland Natural Sciences
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"If you want. Medical Writer. Clearly. Listener out. There is looking for medical writer also, I didn't think of that. Vera. We're almost at the end of the interview. and. One of the things that I still wanted to talk about although it does not have to do with your career per se but it's something that you're doing. Now you're putting energy into and annoying and created putting content content out there for for PhD's is you have a youtube channel can you talk a little bit about it? What it's called and what type of? A feeling of reflection lead you to start that to start on that mission. Thank you for letting me talk about my youtube channel. Yes. So the I fiqh PhD student on Youtube because I felt like. The most on this opinion about a PhD. Study can is hard to come from the real actual he student because of time we're learning by doing and I mean, even people put fluoxetine stuff. But like you know if you want to the most honest experience and help full ones, you have to ask from someone who has struggled and seen everything in reach And talk about how my previous career could be like a voice ex-boyfriend and people some people don't like to talk about ex-boyfriend. Talking about your past and knowing what you have done and how far are you have come from there it gives you the consolidation to move onto the next chapter and I also am a big fan of put paying it forward because I mean all by mentors and everyone who helped me he s g they don't need anything from me most of the time I think it would be a word to them if I can help. Other people that are coming along later in the journey to to be successful scientists. So that was my mission and I forgot to say the Channel Name, his PhD coffee time that was inspired by the French poetry of coffee. Breaks. Because we had to is mandated breaks. Enough that it's like a very. Religious at eighty in France, they are not religious anymore like the the French coffee break is everyone's religion in a day like the. So, yes. So I felt like if we could highness this type of social activity PhD because I felt incredibly helpless and isolated when I time I really along when I was doing postal PhD and I wonder if they better way because I mean sometimes I, it's not that I don't have friends but I know if I talked to a friend, it took another two hours and I have problems stopping from conversation. So I wonder if there is a way to have a virtual social feeling that people feel like they have someone to talk to. They also learn something you know that's how the best coffee place like people give you a the two cents and to is the two cents for is valuable advice and maybe solving a whole week of problems so. That was the. Intention is. I want to pay it forward and I wanted to make better use of my time during this seemingly harsh and unproductive time of. Career is a career break and recruit can look down on a why can you explain why you have nothing and no employer wants you I feel like instead look blaming the system and how visas can hold me back from getting the job. I am I'm in control on every aspect that I can't control which I mean nobody can stop me from putting a video on Youtube. And helping other people and I am a strong believer that if you are willing to put yourself out there and help the others I think naturally the universe with do something back and help you as well and I think also it helps me to know that I'm helpful like if makes sense. Totally makes sense basically the reason why I started. The same. I might be hd was done years ago and I had the same feeling I want to give back to that community and to I want to help you help you know a handful of people not fall into the same mistakes that I did. It'll be mission accomplished for me and I think I think you probably have the same feeling? Yeah Yeah and I think a lot of. Alumni, they only vocal when they made it to professors like. Don't make it to become a professor. They become this pilot. Themselves may be feeling like I failed in mission of trying to be professor and I have nothing valuable to share but that's really not because they those other nineteen ninety percent of the population that is out there and there are ninety nine percent of all of these PhD that doesn't lend on. Professor job that once that advice maybe before they become depressed or having issues and I felt like having being okay to talk about unemployment and like why I'm showing up to date I, it's not like I I have you know I am I am not embarrassed about by unemployment I mean I'm a little embarrassed but like his I think I also. Of let me rephrase that it's not like I am not embarrassed about being unemployed but I felt like it is more important to have someone opened talking about an employment during this time is then hiding it nukes which by the way depending on when the listener you're listening are listening to this episode this is being recorded. Just you know we're Cova distill around and it's impacting hiring left and right and so there's there's. Many. Other reasons and I I agree with you. You shouldn't. You shouldn't feel bad about that and you're definitely taking action towards not staying in that situation for too long. So so Kudos to you for that Vero, we've reached the end of the interview. Thing I'd ask you is to share to tell the listeners how and where they can. They can find you online and and maybe yet shared the the your your Youtube Channel You are l., or your twitter handle twitter handle. WHICHEVER PLATFORMS, Iran So my PhD copy time Youtube is just by YouTube dot com slash PhD coffee Italian. I'm also on Instagram at coffee time apparently a Lotta PhD student now. Love Instagram. So I have to get back on that I'm also on twitter on person no name Vera s Chen. So, you could find me there on twitter. So unlinked in swell if your recruiter and interested in hiring marine science transitioning medical writer. Thank you. Excellent. You mentioned Lincoln Yam. Linked in is also VP as Chen. I. Didn't realize what be as means until I come to America and that's my initial. So I couldn't change so. Well. No. No you started watching your videos the know you're not vera. Thank you so much for having come to to. This zoom interview. Thank you so much for sharing all these. Experiences that you've had in what you're going through right now then I'm like I said I, you're taking all the right actions to eventually land a job that you like that will fulfill you and. Let's keep. Let's keep talking and and maybe we'll have an update interview sometime. So thank you so much for for being you to the young pope. Peachy. Thank you. It means a word to be on this show and.

Youtube twitter Medical Writer professor PhD Vera s Chen fluoxetine France Lincoln Yam Vero America VP Iran
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"About conversion rates. Videos and I know exactly. Thousand. People Click on the video maybe only ten of them subscribe. Always, a conversion rate in life and yeah and I think to be making to make normalize and celebrated success. I think is the most important in this journey who so? I. DON'T WANNA GET Too much of a clean break here and I do WanNa talk about your Youtube Channel and we will talk about it soon. But. We started talking about Lincoln. Talking about skills and skills that you were trying. To tally up what you had accrued throughout your journey but. Excuse me. But. What I what I was wanting to ask now is. So, once you did this introspection once you looked at, okay. What can I put on linked in this this this this. I imagine you found gaps what what did you do What were what what initiates initiatives that you take to then fill out some gaps that you found that you that you thought okay. You know this I can I can get this extra skill I can. Do this extra networking etcetera etcetera. What and I imagine that you. In the middle of this process. Now, right that that you're looking for a position and again thinking about listeners and listens to who might be in the same situation, what strategies have been winning strategies for you. Well. I was a winning strategy could be overstatement since I come I myself. I got the job yet but I do have a strategy is i. Read People's Profile. And other times I analyzed how they structure the words and Watson those they use and it may be a right. The Iran might may not be anything right to wrong but I I would be. Giving a score in my head like where does it reads? Maybe some people use like coffee symbol or some people use like an Arrow Ha I need to change my actually but like the ongoing process and there's no one and done do for in. But I think keep breathing what people put their and knowing this gives the valued like maybe that that specific species name that I have worked on not it's rather than thinking. Maybe they value the skews of like searching for genes on NCBI platform and blast know like those could be the key word and you never know so I think taking good time backward to look at what you have and don't lie about what you don't overstate it. But like also to see what how people frame it, and what are these people especially those who has already you know they probably have a lane profile that's working so. Dot to take note and learn. And about. 'CAUSE here we're talking about how to kind of format and and we're talking. About creating a nice. Nice Very well tailored profile link in. But what about you know in in day-to-day life? Skills that you that you. That you. Feel that you were lacking in. In these last few months. What have you been doing kind of to fill up those gaps in black I'm glad you asked this question because I did. Take a lot of initiatives during my free time when I am officially unemployed well, I would tell my previous boss. I was do writing a manuscript for her like it's ongoing. But like I also had taken a lot of self improvement time first of all I started. Thinking that you know I can't have this negative moment of my life be a training woman and I need some food for by praying that is nutritious for me to do meaningful things. I turned to books that are helpful like the like Basically Shea Book Rich Dad Poor Dad. But I think is really good rate because it talks about being rich and being poor is the state that what is decided or what what you do it right now decide whether you're rich poor is not whether your bank has money or not and I. think that means a word to me at this moment because I understood that if I m taking myself as a leader and if I am training and improving myself as if I were working in that big pharmaceutical company and what I would do as their employees in the future, maybe I will end up in one you know. It's important to to make that I commitment to to be a rich mind person and I I mean financially. But like I think maybe financial come a long after. So and also Walk Rich Dad Poor Dad has taught me Tako message was we may be one skill away from the job. Being very successful, and in my case, I think it resonates with PhD we are trained and tunnel vision to one particular. Discipline. One tool but sometime, we may just need one skills like law accounting but computer coding like for me. I have taken a few online courses on Pizon and a little bit of machine learning I also took have taken clinical research pharmacology classes. Those two were offered by Nih and I did the certification after that. So updated those on my lenten profile and also was. Both enough to write a post about it. So people saw that I I was committing my time to improve and got the skills and knowledge of clinical research because I'm a biologist which I say basic science research. But I was surprised by how similar we are. Because by statistics like it's The p value is the same meta-analysis, the same like hypothesis testing. I use her US human. Difference and I think that's that's an important thing to convey, and if I haven't learned and heaven taken a look from the other perspective through those courses because I felt like you can't invent your skills from nothing, you have to take a perspective from the other and then creates that list of what is desirable. So after that car, I actually got the phone calls from recruiters. Ask about my background. because. So you building something and then you're you're leveraging your Lincoln profile to kind of show what you're what you're doing, and again show that you're open for business A. Blueprint and I just just tell you the all the people. I know that are working in regulatory or medical writing beach freelance or or not they all come they. The they studied birds the studied And now they're they're working in Pharma. So I totally agree that the so many transferable skills and that it's you know. Once, you acquired these specific skills that you are that you've been talking that you talked about let's say from the. H.. You become a really really great candidate and I think again, listeners out there great blueprint follow. Comment.

Youtube Lincoln Nih NCBI Watson Iran Dot US PhD
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to another episode of Papa Peachy. This week on the show we're going to talk about uncertainty. Particular employment uncertainty in academia and outside of it in the current pandemic context. Now in between jobs after her third post doc. My guest will share her journey up to today and we'll talk about how confinement led her to take on new projects, teach herself new skills and double down on her investment in networking. And Remember, I have to new podcast discovery trailers share with you this week. So be sure to stick around with US until the end. Last year I have doubled to my linked in connection. I think in the past I had the mental barrier thinking I shouldn't ask anyone who I've never met. My lengthy profile should be statement like facebook page friendship like only know this people in real life and I only connect with these people and I have taken a long way to break that mental barrier that I could. Make friends with pimple that I haven't met yet in real life. But guess what these people ended up like maybe I would say five to ten percent of them had actually given a phone call and tell me about the stories become relationships that you're. Welcome, to Papa PhD with David Mundus the podcast where we explore careers and life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules..

US Papa Peachy Papa PhD facebook Grad school David Mundus
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to another great episode of Papa PhD this week. I'm bringing you a conversation with someone who has recently made the transition from her PhD to the non-academic job market has done so into the PHD Career Development and recruitment domain during our conversation Rebecca mammen, not only recounted her experience exploring career Avenues during her PhD and not getting that transition, but she also shared valuable insights based on her research and on her recruiting experience working in an organization that focuses exclusively on phds off and remember stay tuned until the end for the podcast Discovery segment where I'll be presenting you to new podcasts play anthropology and dear grad student. Enjoy the show off. Really, you know the interview is just to find out about you, right? They already see your skills on your CV. So I am in the habit of preparing about four or five different Source stories and just making notes of what those stories are and my notebook before I start the interview and sometimes the question might be different. It might be like a challenge or they might say like, you know, what is a time when you had a disagreement like the question might change but usually the themes are pretty similar so they want to know the way that you act in certain situations. So having you know, I prepare those ahead of time and they're super helpful and interviews. Welcome to Papa.

Papa PhD PHD Career Development Rebecca mammen
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Sometimes also we rent. You can read our stuff on plants and pets dot com also for plants and for pets in your favorite podcast. APP. Floods of events, we talked plant science. Working in research trained to do the best science you can. You A team leader, a Research Assistant Post Doc, PhD student, or any other type of scientists are you looking for a place where you can sit relax and listen to inspiring people? Well. We have good news for you. You've just found what you're looking. Hi Everybody May name is GonNa Pool and I am Jonathan. Whites? Welcome to the. Helping scientists..

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Find interesting in the conscious I've had a at universities is i. feel that even universities now are. Getting the message that that. They need to prepare the students for this reality of not everyone can become a professor and it's it's as simple as that not not everyone apart from not everyone just a small percentage of people have and I think even now with with all this, the the the problem with covert and and with the pandemic, the closing up of of universities all of that is even getting more access to those positions is getting even more more difficult. At this time. Yes. So I mean, typically the UK something. Like fifty percent if PhD's Austin academia three and a half years after they graduate and so yeah. With a bit of a split of. some some deeper obviously doing research work still. Stuck some people are doing teaching lecturing, but probably half of will pay. Something, somewhere in administrative positions. Awful pasties will be working outside of academia. When you tell that to especially like first and second year Steve's they, they can't believe it. It's mind blowing and. Even even when I talk to people about. People and they introduce myself southbound PhD or something, and they say, what? What are you working Oxford Cambridge you've got to pay. That must be what you should help in doing and it's it's. It's it's interesting this powerful expectation, but it's trying to educate people really about. coolest. Sometimes, like career consciousness developing conscious beyond just just wha- who's around you. But actually this whiter this way to picture when you tell people the statistics I think. That that is real sort of netter them. Because the important thing and. Busting the time but is this doesn't mean? Stop. And go do something else doing up she is something that's going to this to a lot of value to your to you as a person. To you as a contributor to society later on just don't. Just expect that. It's not a given that you're going to end up being professor but like you said, you can say India all act college, right? The alternative academic career paths that are out there. There's a lot of things you can do in around the university but then. The. The job market out there needs sometimes the in I. It's funny. I'd love I'd love to have your input on that maybe another conversation. Industry doesn't know they need pc's but they do and when the interview these people they're like okay. Oh, this is actually a very good candidate I'm going to take them. GonNa take them in. It is interesting because PhD's like we need. We need like a branding agency got something. Totally. I think in some ways, what I've been trying to do with jobs on taste really is elevate is like how do you? How do you rebrand the PhD? Some the? Different to the people who are doing it, and so people outside I think it's very hard. It's very hard. Job Employers it's kind of it's going to. It's kind of impossible but I think we have done a good job and I say things in the media now, which I would never have seen about about as being light multi skilled and flexible knowledge workers who can kind of what we were saying they switch from project to project. What we are capabilities very much fit the kind of. The the job market of today I think as long as we can. We've. PhD's can make the. League employers can also drop center that prejudice is a as well definitely the the. Love imaginative leap because. You picture yourself in that position, allow yourself to picture yourself in that position and then go talk to the people. The things you said he didn't didn't do per se but but go go. Find people around you who know someone who does that job that interests you they'll be happy to and know especially if they have a PhD to, it'll be happy to take time to take coffee to have lunch with you share their story and maybe point point you towards something that might interest you. Chris Yeah, we really have reached the end of our time. If. People want to want to reach out to you want to You know a C-, whatever you you've been writing lately. How where can I reach you? Why can they reach you online? What's the best way to to be up to date with the with with what you've? Up to The faces to go to jobs on toast DOT COM. Nastase. My my website were probably published an article every every two months but Yeah you can say I'm on twitter so that's just Job On toast So yeah, I'm. Trying, keep up a putting out content on twitter by sharing content, but it was sharing some of the best. Stuff. RAPE HD careers. As well, so yeah, there's places where you can where you can find the excellent Chris. Thank you so much for for having a to come to the microphone and chat with me a definitely I would have talked. A full other our. Because this we know there's so much talk about. Who knows if we can if you can have another conversation maybe on a specific theme I, I'd love to but thank you I i. it's really an inspiring path the to the to have a an inspiring journey that you've had and to me it's especially inspiring that you you take time. To apart from your professional life family life, keep trying to bring this message to people in graduate school out there that there's A. Whole Universe of things out there that they can do after graduating and that they will be fulfilled at doing and and you intellectually stimulated and part of. A productive part of society and? I think that's very precious and it's very noble. My statement weren't enjoyed talking to you. Thanks for inviting me on. High again. I, hope you enjoyed the conversation and that you took at least one take home message from it. If you did make sure to subscribe on your podcast APP and to share Papa Peachy with your friends. I'm sure they are asking themselves the same questions in that they will enjoy it too. Before, ending the road, let me introduce you to podcasts that you might also enjoy. Plants by pets a podcast about plants in about the research around them. And the lonely pipette. Sounds like we have a team going this week. The brand podcast aiming to help scientists do better science and roll the tape. Delay Plan. Like really really likes them. Do you wish you could get a glimpse at how they work on the inside, how a growth flower avoid problems like rotting meat and how they defend themselves against the tax. Too. That's why we applied to pets explore the fascinating to know workings of Balaji in our podcast and on our blog. Know that bumblebees can control the flowering time of by gently watching on them or that soap bubbles are grateful plant pollination. We are Teagan and your to plant scientists with allowed bring you the hot near reset without all the scientific jog. Lost, we talk about topics, diversity and equality academic system. And Brings Fun Science Bachelor last week, and we talk about cuts and.

PhD Chris Yeah professor twitter UK Austin Oxford Cambridge Steve Balaji RAPE pc Papa Peachy India
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"University I never really knew much about it but you a change as Kinda cliche changes the constant now but when you look at rate of change the pace of change in our society. And who is who is the he was with the people managing those changes that project managers, and it could be like the could be the Olympics or it could be. Election candidate or it could be the upgrade on your phone every time something changes or was a big event or something project managers have to sit down with a blank sheet of paper and work out and it's it's it's really to me to feel part of that that community. Project managers and see I guess eventually that's how my professional identity is solidified whereas it was originally. So it's like a research. Will maybe he know what kind of? Education learning specialists have been tech companies but really might. Might federal agencies solidified around and project manager or even now it called sort of chain manages because is becoming less the case. Okay. Change Managers Yeah because the case that. There's a distinction between light run run the bank change the bank is you can talk about with banks. So in the old days, banks mainly run the bank most of the banking was the same, and then maybe some department introduced some new thing every so often but the now the. Road is still important power what banks do obviously running day to day operations but. There's so much change any time you know anything about banking on your phone. And all these sorts of services that th the changed the bank functions is become much bigger. It's not an occasional thing happens every so often, but it's a constant. Yeah. All the time you know and you you you can't stop like we think about your phone you can you com- you can't stop having updates. which my phone would just stand still willingness doesn't it? It keeps it keeps changing and that's really what's exciting to me is when is When is how do you manage continuous? How do you manage continuous change? Yeah. It's interesting and it's really we notice it on on your phone banking is definitely one of them and now imagine with crypto currencies getting more and more importance I. Anyway. I don't think we're going to go into that but. I find it very interesting from what from what you said, the used the term solidify my my professional identity solidified around this this activity that I developed but. What one thing I find interesting interesting is don't be afraid of. Not Knowing what you're going to become when you when you leave because that's going to materialize with time and again because you you probably want, you may be lucky and have very good networking and start right away with the job that you adore and that you're going to stick. With life, but it's not it's not a given. So I think that's that's a very, very interesting interesting thing and he goes what I said before. Give yourself time to slowly get to where you WANNA get right. But yeah. One thing. We're reaching the end I am kind of annoyed that. We're we're my time is almost ending for this. For the interview but so. Along with all of the at a certain point, you decided in two thousand twelve to start something to give back to the community you had come from in a way, the students the PGA soon as the Masters Students, which is jobs on toast and. You know you've spent all these years kind of. The mission that I have kind of taken for myself of helping people out there who are doing their master's were doing their PC or post stock. And who are in doubt about what is my future? What's my professional future? Let's just like to talk a couple of minutes about jobs on those about what your experience has been maybe changes you've seen in the in the in the in the latest years because things are changing. The. Ender. Maybe finish by sharing two or three pieces of advice for people out there who may be anxious about not really knowing what they're professional future will look like if or when they. Ended up leaving academia. Yeah I mean I guess. Is Interesting John came about like. Deputies. Way. I was invited by my dissertation advisor to go up to your thousand nine to give it a little seminar on the on the topic I was invited. It was like how to market yourself careers outside of academia pick and. Jeremy asked to go up and could you dislike took on this subject for narrow so we'd be pleased to how you never really thought about it. So I went to do that and gave that talk and. You know it was just really it without sort of blame trumpet as such. The impact it made on the people here in not room and the change in. Demeanor and how these spoke to me and they spoke afterwards was. It just like it just showed to me that there was there was a need I never really thought of our densify that this information was really helpful beyond in the room. But so I just thought, well, how could this information get to a wider audience because really at that time it was not anything else and I, think that's toll PhD may have being around and. So but then I really determined how could I get some of this information what I've just said? The Internet, you know if I could just make a website disseminates it. and. Maybe. Go Talk other universities so that's when I It took me a long time because it took me until two thousand twelve actually to figure out blogging and how to make a website and I was busy with my job and my family and everything. was always a project. Yeah. But I Lord Scienc- thousand twelve and just really kind of built up tried to have an ambition of light. Once every two months rising something. Going trying to give talks and then reflecting on my experiences of that and writing about that so. Yes in the beginning it was really trying to find the way and it was linking up with some other people as well like like Jenn poke I'm from from Canada and the other days from PhD to life just trying to find other people Hainkel from cheeky scientists on the same kind of mission and so yeah that's like in different countries but it was but he was very, it was very early days but. I mean it's interesting now because I, kind of feel like their staff loss of people who who joined in from different countries. Yeah. Like yourself David just really it's really exciting to me that. What will I started over a couple of started off is really great into a bit more of a movement and. Also to see the impact on universities that is not son. Often thought you know really that, hey, maybe one year we should think about talking to the PhD's about other careers but actually some universities a building into their actual graduate training careers, advice and careers outside of academia. That's what excites me is that. In ten years, we've actually built with into A. INTO THAT It is a, it is changing and. Some. A lot of the people you mentioned are still. There in in helping a lot of people the things that have changed lately. In terms of. Spreading the message our twitter. Social, in general podcasting for sure is is is something that that has brought a different. Reach. Andrea but but. What.

PhD project manager Olympics twitter Masters Students Andrea advisor Lord Scienc Jeremy John David Jenn Canada Hainkel
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Really happy to have you here <hes> especially given the years of experience you have helping people with masters and Ph ds like just mentioned finding their path and I think a word. . That I think is really important is in the abundant number of career opportunities that are out there I think this one key thing that that people are going to. . Wealth people need to understand to kind of break this this feeling that they may be failing at life or at least at the their professional life if the. . End Up leaving academia after after graduate. . School. . Yeah it is. . It is. . So hard to describe when you see the light bulb come on somebody's head in new. . People people just say. . It. . Yeah. . And it. . It is. . What always of joys me on like just when somebody says down they felt or how lost or how they didn't know what to do, , and then they say that you I when you're okay now I just. . Found the way forward or hope or something you know you just why would why would have stopped? ? Doing what I'm doing I mean because that's the greatest thing you can do. . Even if you change one person's mind or sometimes I talk to one hundred people you know I think if I could. . Difference that many people but not like yourself day job what you're doing on your the more that can do it that more intense. . We can have and we can reach more people in our own countries or in different languages. . <hes> or different backgrounds. So . yeah, it's , it's cool to fail that there's more there's more of us than. . Doing this doing this thing. . You don't just listen think about being a PhD that just you just have this unique. . Bonding Experience With With with anybody else like I just met you but you know it just. . It's strange. . We everyone knows what they went through, , and then just you can just click with people and. . It's powerful as powerful stuff. . So as I mentioned, , we talked before about Chris's PhD and you can find our full one hour and a half conversation on the Papaya she youtube channel. . We eventually also talked about what led up to his post doc. . Chris. . Was Now considering after his post doc <hes>, , and after the his after applying to some lecturing positions and not having the materialize thinking. . Okay. . What am I going to do an end looking at the non-academic landscape and seeing where he was going to fit? ? How did you go about that? ? Were there appears around you who were also having that reflection. . How. . Was that process? ? How easy was that process or not easy? ? I was that that. . Exploration. Let's . say. . He is kind of mixed because I think on the one hand. . As I kept getting rejections from the academic jobs, , Kinda go to feeling of. . Like feeling of running out of time or this is this isn't going well. . If I could just get academic job everything would be. . Okay. . So that was like a downside to it but on the other hand you know. . I was really excited by the things that I was saying around me like like the Internet was something that was just really taking off in the late ninety s and I was just fascinated by the internet and this whole and. . I mean I. . I say Democratic Dissemination of information which is. . Not. . <hes> Disney triple the time easily, , but the way. . To access to information or study or learning the United. . States can be quite elitist or privileged or and causal money and time, , but just like the idea that. . The anybody can just access any type of information videos and things as well. . It was coming along time and could learn anything. . They had the Internet connection did just Exchange. . My view of the world and so excited me as an educator and as a scholar, , this potential and always really enthused by that and could see this trans transformative potential of it and so that's when I kind of thought. . Well, , this could be an area where. . You I would be happy and excited to work in, , and then I had to try and figure out. . Well, , how do I get to that from medieval studies? ? kind of like the opposite. . Of this new of this new techy technological thing. . But then I figured out. . There was this area of e e learning with a training where people were taking courses that which <unk>. . Clause three more even vote on a CD. . You know we're not making it to the web and I just thought is dies <unk>. . That's what I'm GONNA do. . I really had to look. . For jobs and companies. . looked. . Learning companies read white papers and things are. . Looking googling jobs, , you know learning jobs based training and I saw that they were these jobs out Aaron. . Didn't necessarily know how to do them. . I felt confident that if I applied job I reckon I could I could do that and so that was my plan B. Really that. . Stuff didn't work out then come at the end of my funding. . This was going to be. .

Chris Papa PhD UK Kris Humphry David University of Southampton Bob University of York Disney Guardian Mendez project manager Huchon DOT UK youtube program manager Austin
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And who will be recounting how he navigated his transition and how he got to the position. He's in today. But before we go into the interview I, want to quickly share with you what new features you'll be noticing starting today on Papa PhD. The first big change is that the interviews are now going to be shorter around forty minutes and they'll will be published as a single episode on Thursdays. Second you see that I'll be spending more time discussing what my guests do today and what advice they have for you and you'll see. The more we go into the interview, the more value find. So be sure to stick around till the end. And finally, every episode I will have short section at the end where I'll be sharing trails of podcasts I. Think you'll enjoy and that are friends of the show. I hope you enjoy the new format. So without further ADO, here's episode one of the Second Season of Papa. Peachy. Took in the UK. Fifty percent of PhD's Austin and academia three and a half years after they graduate. Busy doing research woke still post some people are doing teaching lecturing and some some are in positions awful. Pitch Dis will be working outside of academia. When you tell that especially like first and second year PhD's they couldn't believe it. It's like mind blowing. You know even when I talk to people and they introduce myself have got PhD and they say. Working oxford-cambridge paged that must be what should have been doing. Welcome to Papa PhD with David. Mendez the podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad, school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in world of constantly evolving rules. Get ready to go off the beaten path and Huchon for an exciting new episode of the PhD. So today on Bob. Peachy I, have with me. Dr, Kris, Humphry. Kris Humphry is a project manager and careers consultant and the founder of the popular careers website jobs on toast. He holds a B A in English studies and an MA in culture and social change both from the University of Southampton. He completed his PhD in Medieval Studies at the University of York in Nineteen Ninety seven and held a postdoctoral fellowship until two thousand. Since, leaving academia Chris has worked as a project and program manager in the private sector specializing in technology transport, financial services, and sustainability. Today he works as a team leader and project manager for a leading European, sustainable. Bank. Chris is passionate about helping people with their careers and Personal Development He has given numerous career stocks at universities in the UK, Ireland Australia and the US. and has taken part in life. Events on the Guardian's website and for jobs dot CO DOT UK amongst numerous other contributions. In Twenty, twelve, Chris founded the website jobs on toast as a way to help masters, students, doctoral graduates, access the abundant opportunities available outside of. Higher. Education. In our long conversation Chris shared his academic journey all the way to the Post Doc. In today's episode I'm sharing with you what came after how and why he started his career outside academia. Welcome to Peachy Chris. Well thank you. David, for inviting me for having me on. I'm really happy to have you here especially given the years of experience you have helping people with masters and Ph ds like just mentioned finding their path and I think a word. That I think is really important is in the abundant number of career opportunities that are out there I think this one key thing that that people are going to. Wealth people need to understand to kind of break this this feeling that they may be failing at life or at least at the their professional life if the. End Up leaving academia after after graduate. School. Yeah it is. It is. So hard to describe when you see the light bulb come on somebody's head in new. People people just say. It. Yeah. And it. It is. What always of joys me on like just when somebody says down they felt or how lost or how they didn't know what to do, and then they say that you I when you're okay now I just. Found the way forward or hope or something you know you just why would why would have stopped? Doing what I'm doing I mean because that's the greatest thing you can do. Even if you change one person's mind or sometimes I talk to one hundred people you know I think if I could. Difference that many people but not like yourself day job what you're doing on your the more that can do it that more intense. We can have and we can reach more people in our own countries or in different languages. or different backgrounds. So yeah, it's it's cool to fail that there's more there's more of us than. Doing this doing this thing. You don't just listen think about being a PhD that just you just have this unique. Bonding Experience With With with anybody else like I just met you but you know it just. It's strange. We everyone knows what they went through, and then just you can just click with people and. It's powerful as powerful stuff. So as I mentioned, we talked before about Chris's PhD and you can find our full one hour and a half conversation on the Papaya she youtube channel. We eventually also talked about what led up to his post doc. Chris. Was Now considering after his post doc and after the his after applying to some lecturing positions and not having the materialize thinking. Okay. What am I going to do an end looking at the non-academic landscape and seeing where he was going to fit? How did you go about that? Were there appears around you who were also having that reflection. How. Was that process? How easy was that process or not easy? I was that that. Exploration. Let's say. He is kind of mixed because I think on the one hand. As I kept getting rejections from the academic jobs, Kinda go to feeling of. Like feeling of running out of time or this is this isn't going well. If I could just get academic job everything would be. Okay. So that was like a downside to it but on the other hand you know. I was really excited by the things that I was saying around me like like the Internet was something that was just really taking off in the late ninety s and I was just fascinated by the internet and this whole and. I mean I. I say Democratic Dissemination of information which is. Not. Disney triple the time easily, but the way. To access to information or study or learning the United. States can be quite elitist or privileged or and causal money and time, but just like the idea that. The anybody can just access any type of information videos and things as well. It was coming along time and could learn anything. They had the Internet connection did just Exchange. My view of the world and so excited me as an educator and as a scholar, this potential and always really enthused by that and could see this trans transformative potential of it and so that's when I kind of thought. Well, this could be an area where. You I would be happy and excited to work in, and then I had to try and figure out. Well, how do I get to that from medieval studies? kind of like the opposite. Of this new of this new techy technological thing..

Chris Papa PhD UK Kris Humphry David University of Southampton Bob University of York Disney Guardian Mendez project manager Huchon DOT UK youtube program manager Austin
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"The University of Haifa. The second part than his talks about her life outside her research. During this conversation, we had a great exchange about working versus volunteering and about the importance of non research activities in terms of networking for your academic and professional life. I in a way learns that academia is about rejection you will have to face rejection, but the thing about its end, what I learned about it is that that's okay. You just need to find a way for yourself to deal with stats do not stay off that personally like you're not getting a scholarship you getting into conference or your article being dismissed doesn't mean that you're failure it doesn't mean anything about you as a person and that's what we're saying beats the is a lifestyle, but it isn't the only thing in your life you need to find these other things that are important to you. Welcome to Papa PhD with David Mendez The podcast where we explore careers and life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules. Get. Ready to go off the beaten path and hop on an exciting new episode of Papa. PhD. So Welcome to part two of my interview with Danny. Harris and in part one we had just Finished by by talking about what are they today? As Beach, D researcher was in her domain. But in part to I'd really want Danny to focus on. What's your projects have been you know and? One of them we already mentioned and is quite evident but. Other projects you've been developing besides just your PhD research and the idea is also to see if we can take out of that, how that enriched your experience as a PhD student and how listeners out there could maybe take some some example of that too. Also wherever they are You know find a group of like minded people and also enrich their experience and make it a a richer one and A. How to make their PhD a more diverse experience than just doing their research? That's where I wanted to say. I've been to a lot of different things and this is something my supervisor has warned me for so. Now, a bit more cautious at I'm trying to do it a bit less, but I've been slowed down by the whole situation with corona. Anyway. So I just want that to be a little bit of a warning when I start talking about all the fun things that I did because you definitely have to keep in mind how much a person can do without burning out. By As let me start with w about my love for conferences, especially if they're paid for and abroad. in a way, it allowed me to keep traveling, which is so much love. In, my first year Beastie, I managed to spend three weeks in. Australia where never been before somewhere in the mountains beautiful place. at the form. And there are. A huge conference on different topics with two hundred. Students, not only be as there were just a few these most of them were in. From all over the world is shared my flats with someone from Pakistan right as an Israeli. F from the Philippines ends from South Korea and we went to arts events and I a events conferences about politics about health. All kinds of fields bunket, Moon spoke there prisons of Australia's spoke there I was invited as far as Israel delegation do very fancy dinner with people who worked at important banks and things like that. So this was like the big thing that I was very excited about enemies I might give per station about my research about a Mike Proposal and I got some really useful feedback from people from the field. So this was absolutely great. So in a way, it was a lot of fun at for me. It was free, but it was also different work because I got that feedback that I needed. Has to continue to projects, and then I've also spent some time in Brazil. which was the first time that was really great and I gave myself a few extra days in Rio. also about migration on a learned a lot about migration in the Global South 'cause, I focus very much Europe. And then I've done my trips to Germany for research. So this way, I get to travel been to Cairo in January for sight that have seen a beer minutes. For a conference of the. National Organization for Migration that's connected to the UN. And I presented my research on the bow dare. which was pretty cool and there will so policymakers there which is something I'm very much interested in going into after. Doing. The interesting. So also some networking definitely. And just to see how day spoke about similar topics outside of academia. So these are things that I love doing that definitely projects because you have to apply for these things especially if they involve money right and they need to plan all of your trip started dime and only Gives you a flight ticket place stay but doesn't say anything about the preparation of your actual doc or bolster at the conference. And then there you're also working 'cause you're networking is about your topic trying to get out be volts. Things like that. But for me, it was very motivating. It's It's everything I ever wanted to travel for work right. And besides that, I've always works next to my degrees I am getting scholarship, but it's not enough to survive off. So I'm working also for the center where I study. And they're responsible for organs of guest lectures like getting the guest lecturers in also from countries to speak to our students in English we also have trips for students plans, for example, to embassies here in Israel. So they can see what their options are after the grief. And also conferences and Colloquia. So this way I, really got to learn how to organize the these events and be working on something that's not so much research, but still helps with the network. So that's what I did besides that..

PhD Danny Israel Australia Papa PhD University of Haifa Grad school National Organization for Migr Pakistan supervisor Harris David Mendez Germany corona Beastie Philippines Beach UN Europe
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Domain that interests you. You'll see you'll find advice you can use to start building plan for yourself. Now. A lot was stalled during season one about transferable skills but a lot was also told about the blind spots, the things you don't naturally come out of graduate school knowing and being prepared for. One of the main ones has to do with preparing your CV and preparing to interview in a non. Academic Setting. If you listen back to the interviews where we spoke about job hunting and interviewing outside of academia. The main advice that came up again, and again was to tailor your CV to each potential employer and specifically to give emphasis to the soft skills you have accrued while performing research and keeping to a minimum. One guests even said to a single line anything to do with your publications, presentations or academic awards. He need to take a point I approach where the person reading your CV. Will know right away that you are a good candidate for the position. The second aspect has to do with interviewing. You may have done a bunch of oral presentations poster presentations, even elevator pitches to do with your research. And the performance skills you developed we'll definitely serve you in an interview setting. The difference is that when interviewing for a position industry, for example. Rather than listing your skills, the techniques you master the tools you can use. The actual goal of the exercise is for the interviewer to assess whether you are a good match for the position and for the team. So there will be a component of body language showing knowledge of the organization's mission in structure and having a good story to tell about how you came to be sitting in front of them for this interview. This is something you don't learn graduate school, but it's something you can prepare for one of the points. My guests stressed as being key in your career exploration and in preparing for interviews is doing your homework about the organization offering the position and ideally reaching out to people in similar positions and asking them for informational interviews around coffee or these days on video conference. Asking someone who has followed the same path that you want to embark on pointed questions about the reality of the job about remuneration about company culture is the best way to get to know what interviewers might be looking for in a candidate. In. Parallel with this, especially, if this is your first time interviewing. The other technique that was mentioned in recommended was rehearsing. In front of a mirror with friend. Preparing to deliver your story in the best way possible and to make it clear point of why you're the right candidate for the position. If you know that type of questions commonly asked even better prepare and rehearse your answers for them to. This way on the day of the interview, you'll be able to focus on the human interaction rather than on the content and show yourself in the best possible. In this first season, we also talked a lot about life balance and mental health. Stress is a part of our modern life and life as a researcher has a few particular flavors of stress. But my guests were clear about three components that can help you strike a balance and have a healthy journey. Physical Exercise Move Econo- team sport. Stay fit. Having a community outside the lab. Team sports do this too, but you can get into a club started student group. And finally including me time in your weekly schedule. This. said it is possible that other factors you have no control of our affecting your inner balance. If this is the case find professional help and take the necessary steps to heal. This may or may not lead to resuming your research and it's fine. What is important above all is that you stay healthy. With this note on mental health and on finding a healthy balance during graduate studies I'm going to wish you a great week a lot of success in your life and career exploration, and thank you again for being a listener of the show. But before I go I want to officially announced that next week we'll be the season finale special. To make sure that you don't run out of. PODCASTS. Listen this summer I've teamed up with the what are you going to do with that podcast and we've done a twin episode. Next Thursday the last interview of both our seasons he's going to air at the same time. I will be on their show and then he says there host will be on Papa. PhD. So, be sure to tune in and witness this academic podcast Collab- I'll be expecting you. And if you want to help the podcast, there are two simple things you can do. Number One Sharon episode that you really like with a friend or colleague. That's a great way to help and to spread the word. Number two if you're on an APP that allows rating or commenting, do that leave a star rating and leave a comment? That will help other people out there find the podcast enjoying the adventure. And it also gives me a chance to open a dialogue with all of you which I really enjoy. So, thank you again. Happy Listening and see you next week. And now for a short message. If, you're preparing to launch a podcast. You may be asking yourself what hosting platform to use. I launched puppies de on blueberry because I wanted to professional service that would interface with my wordpress website. That would robustly broadcast Papa PhD to all platforms. And that would allow me to grow my podcast in years to come. If you're starting a serious podcast project, do consider one of the first podcasting hosts out there offering state of the art services.

Papa PhD Physical Exercise PhD researcher
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"We always want to project into the future as the best possible version of ourselves that we often fall into the trap of setting our goals based on what we've been told we should aim for or what we see our neighbors aiming for big part of enjoying our time in graduate. School depends Benzon beaming tune with our personal values are strengths. And we'd what makes us tick this week. FELICIA party shares. How all she came into science and how she transitioned from the beach team your science to an all tech position doing what she loves most the old school way of thinking is that got a? PhD Is Training for an academic job. And if you don't do it it means you weren't good enough. I think that's also coming from time where there were a lot less ask people doing. It was less accessible. So the percentage of people going from PhD into academic research career was extremely high. But at this point that's not the case at all there's a lot of people pursuing PhD's because they're passionate about the research and they want to know more about that particular killer topic. They want to contribute to the knowledge or treatments are policy in.

PhD Benzon
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to episode Twenty Six popper PhD being the last episode of Twenty Nine Thousand Nine hundred instead of an interview and this week. I'm bringing your collection of inspiring full of wisdom the guests of shared so far. I hope you enjoyed them. Having sneak a happy sharing welcome to papa. PhD With David Mendez. The podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of Papa PhD. I'd really love you the audience to play an active role in the show. So if there's a theme you'd like to see covered on the show or if there's a guest did you like me to interview head over to anchor dot. FM FOR SLASH CAPUCCI and drop us a voice message to be featured on a future episode on the PG see website you can also subscribe to our newsletter and get our resource sheet at the bottom of every page and you can also leave us a written message contacts page. Welcome to the show on episode one. The new Murchison shared about the importance of allowing self to think big when thinking of career opportunities. I think the the first biggest thing would be To to think big about what the possibilities are you know Well I think you know things like like this project. You're working on you know things it's like this podcast really help people to to realize there are a lot of opportunities to raise the go in addition to just you know continuing on academia right. So you know. Don't be scared to kind of be a little bit audacious about what what kind of direction you might be able to go into And to really think about what. What's what's GonNa work for you when it's going to resonate for you And then you know to you know work figuring out how you're gonNA spend yourself how you're going to and how you're GonNa get all personal brand how you're GonNa you know how you're GonNa spin it so that you're the right person to do that. Ah On episode. Two Joel. mccower talked about the importance of staying curious. I you still learning stuff. Yeah I thought I've got a PhD. I'm an intelligent person But when I was doing my MBA. I realized that If you're not not studying something quite rigorously you know. You don't feel union in especially of course I was in my late forties doing my mba as well but You don't Your mind does begin to stagnate so keep leading cause after a year of my MBA. I felt I was twenty years younger mentally again. My agility amd back and that was great you know is a great feeling To I would say just keep letting no matter what it it is do Of course you know Learn about extraterrestrial life. You know If physicals search for extraterrestrial life or learn about anything I think that's really important again. Every opportunity increases you'll network on episode three Mark Roberts shares. Why should never feel like you're stuck professionally? The key mindset is just to keep reminding yourself that if what you're doing say that new job outside Academian started if it doesn't live up to your expectations that doesn't mean that you made the wrong and that somehow failed so you really should have just stayed in academia. Now that's not that you can always leave. That new job can find another the job either in the same field perhaps discovered that field just isn't for you so if something brand new again you're really never stuck in this. You convince yourself you're stuck and so What what I would really recommend is that everybody is their own pep squad? So when things aren't aren't working out just keep telling yourself that things will turn around you one way or another on episode four Rob Hutchison talks about why it's important to identify your strong suits. I I would say to identify what you are good at and what you enjoy doing so they may not not necessarily be the same thing but hopefully future job would contain elements of both and next. I would say start working on your brand early so so this would mean developing your CV and your Lincoln page but also putting together your elevator pitch to summarize your profile. This is something that you should have prepared to recite someone on its opportunities arises and then third I would say. Don't be afraid to take a leap to try new things and do things that scare you like. I mentioned before some people might like the idea of just doing the same old repetitive tasks and over and over again. But if you want to progress in your career keep things interesting and do more meaningful work and makes a real difference whether it be for your clients or for anyone else that I think they need to take risks and put yourself out there. On episode six Fiona Robinson Talks about the importance of finding your passion. If you're doing research I think that the two top things you're at are transferable from that are your critical critical thinking skills and your ability to take a big project rated into pieces analyze those. Get those done tied back together and bring her back to the whole. I think you can do that pretty much. Anyone doing research is being back. Then you can do anything you can. You can take on any kind of challenge. So then it's finding where do you want to put your allergies. What are you passionate about? I know they say you know do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life. Whatever you still have to work? It's not always fun and not everybody gets to work doing what they. But there's gotta be something but you're doing or that you wish you in that that draws on episode seven Philippa Kereta Bauza talks about. Why you deserve to be where your today? Life is really really stressful nowadays in every field so you really stressful but if you are doing winging it is because it deserves and love your child as it's been hard in win nowadays the working. Where'd you live science will? Is Everything Itar and so rest. This will take all these days on episode eight. Emily Blue Roberts tells us what's important to have a side hustle during your PhD. Start doing actual work outside of your role role as a graduate student OR POST DOC By work I don't necessarily mean paid work. Although that is preferable it could be volunteer work but anything just just to gain any kind of experiences outside of your primary one as a researcher As a student as a trainee because working saying if it's a side hustle or a volunteer position or an internship or whatever it is gives you again those additional perspectives That you might be seeking at this this time and you know usually something you can put on your CV. Because a lot of the the fear I think at this stage is around I don't have any work experience. I don't have any reason working experience. All employers are looking for the PhD plus two years. He's Mary's as an entry level position. Well of course we know. That's negotiable right But something you can do while at the same time you're finishing her PhD. You can start that work experience clock even on a part time basis just by reaching out and having some of these other Arab experiences in episode nine killer look shows advice on finding a fulfilling career. Yeah so that is A. It's obviously a huge task to that transition and to even begin to understand what you want to do and I think one of the main things is needs to do. Your research find vocation that is profitable fulfilling but also can provide value to your audience and make you feel like you're making a valuable contribution And that's not always the easiest thing to do but if you do that research in you you have a decent idea that something's actually going to earn your money and filling. That's ninety.

Papa PhD David Mendez Grad school Rob Hutchison Fiona Robinson dot Philippa Kereta Bauza Murchison Mark Roberts Academian Joel. mccower Emily Blue Roberts Mary Lincoln graduate student researcher trainee