37 Burst results for "PEW"

America's Global Image Under Biden Skyrockets

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 4 d ago

America's Global Image Under Biden Skyrockets

"The world has a more positive view of the U. S. The Pew Research Center study says the U. S image in other countries has improved dramatically, thanks to President Biden's demeanor and his background. They say he's well qualified. They didn't think Trump was well qualified. They did think Trump was dangerous. They don't say that about Biden pews, Richard Weich says respondents still think the U. S doesn't take other countries' interests into account when making its own foreign Policy decisions at the U. S, pursues his own interests and doesn't really listen to other countries. Enough. Peter King,

President Biden Pew Research Center Donald Trump Richard Weich U. Biden Peter King
Fresh update on "pew" discussed on The Dana Show

The Dana Show

00:33 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pew" discussed on The Dana Show

"Someone's like I took up my third trip down at the border. Oh, good for you. You get another star in your book it chart Don't even start with me about you're just being selfish. Wait, you're talking about taking my money You pay for it if it's a discussion of selfishness, and why is in China, the country that unleashes pandemic on the world paying for it too selfish to spend their money to correct a mistake that they made a Dana show? I want to make it clear. NATO is critically important for us. Interest is in of itself. There weren't when we'd have to invent Edwin. Joe Biden. Um And there's some. There's some. I was going to say sweet audio cuts. Actually, it's more like Embarrassing audio cuts. Uh, but I got another one coming. That was Joe Biden before the NATO. Wow, um, Summit with NATO friends. Year ago. Yeah. We had a different president a different attitude. Different perspective from NATO when it came to the U. S, vice versa. President. You're welcome to our three of the the Dana Show. I'm Sergio Sanchez from from South Texas or Southern Command. You want to join the conversation? 844344 Dana. A year ago, We had a different leader in our country we had we had a leader. My opinion. A year ago, we had a real present a real leader, someone who demanded that NATO allies and friends that they pay their and, you know, fair share their so called fair share. There's a certain allocation of GDP that needs to be set aside by all these NATO countries and and Supporting this alliance, you know, try to counter the power of Russia, former Soviets and now Russia. And now we have a vacuum in the White House. Now we have a country that has propped And weekend at Bernie's weekend at Biden's It was embarrassing, amigo. I don't know about you, but just of a few video and audio cuts that made it into circulation on YouTube and Twitter, and it's out there. It's really embarrassing. For me as an American. It is embarrassing friend. I know about you. Maybe you think Joe Biden is like the greatest president ever that you've got a long list of somehow that you have invented and you fantasize of all the wonderful things that Joe Biden has accomplished and what he is doing, And he's the best president ever. Maybe you're one of those. I'd like to see what it is that you're fantasizing about, because I'm funny. I I checked Twitter like Facebook and social media. I don't see anyone posting Danny of Joe Biden's Earth shattering. Unexpected accomplishments. It has an abject failure and he is supposed to be the leader of our country by extension, the leader of the free world But a year ago we had a president and we Yes, we did have more of a tense relationship with friends at the G seven friends at NATO allies. We had a leader in this country that demanded that they pay up for their defense. The reason why our country should be Paying forward. The military, defensive Germany and France and Europe and what time Western Europe There's no reason for that They all need to be paying their so called fair share of that We had a leader back then. So you guys pony up for that you guys podium for for NATO. Now we've got somebody stumbling, bumbling his way to the finish line. At the G seven, for example, now over at NATO is making those comments about NATO. Did you guys see last week? I don't have. Maybe Dana commented on that, but I was shaking my head when I saw that Pew Research Center poll. Of 16 countries, which I found comical. I was laughing. I was laughing hard when I saw this news writer, nonpartisan survey in 16 countries like I'm sorry. I didn't know that Republicans and Democrats existed in other countries. What does party have to do with this? Pew Research Center poll last week, 16 countries found that over six and 10 residents And each of those countries said that they have confidence that Joe Biden would do the right thing and global affairs that the U. S image worldwide was rebounding. Under Joe Biden. What do you expect, friend? We've gone from having a leader to in effect being leader less We've got G seven nations. We've got NATO nations that are, in essence, chuckling and laughing at Joe Biden and by extension, laughing at us. Gas who voted for Joe Biden. You guys who voted against Donald Trump. The damage. You. You have voted against our own self interest. You have voted against our country. You have voted against our Children and our future. By in effect placing this weekend That Biden's propping up this This. Cartoonists comical figure head Everybody snickering and laughing at as apologizing because just, you know he's gonna get in trouble with his staff. He's gonna if he takes questions, and I think I saw one piece of audio. My wife showed me this morning getting ready for work and she showed me Um, the sick event. Principal. Who are these reporters who were following him around the G seven. I didn't hear any serious questions from these individuals. Um They? It was Jill Biden. Excuse me, Dr Jill Biden. Who had to whisk Joe Biden away because you know, Uncle Joe, you know that's more like Grandpa Joe as well being tempted is following like a bug following the light, or there is a light. There is a light is going toward the cameras and said, Joe, Come over here, okay, so and they all start falling, they start laughing, Although the press pool Because Joe Biden has to Shepherd guide Grandpa away from the pool of reporters. That's embarrassing, amigo. We have no leader..

Jill Biden Donald Trump Joe Biden Sergio Sanchez Pew Research Center Nato 844344 Democrats 16 Countries Republicans Last Week Edwin Twitter Each Youtube China A Year Ago 10 Residents Facebook
US Image Abroad Has Rebounded Since Biden Took Office

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 d ago

US Image Abroad Has Rebounded Since Biden Took Office

"A new survey found the United States image around the world has improved since president Joe Biden took office a pew research center survey conducted in sixteen countries found that favorable ratings of the United States have started to rebound after declining considerably during Donald trump's presidency growing as much as thirty percentage points since last year in nations like France and Germany the majority of the citizens six in ten expressed confidence in president Biden to quote do the right thing in world affairs in France a seventy four percent of the public say they have confidence in Biden compared with just eleven percent for trump the survey found many nations are skeptical of the U. S. a majority across the sixteen countries say the U. S. democracy used to be a good example but has not been in recent years Jennifer king Washington

President Joe Biden Pew Research Center United States Donald Trump Biden France Germany U. Jennifer King Washington
Fresh update on "pew" discussed on Armstrong and Getty

Armstrong and Getty

00:31 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pew" discussed on Armstrong and Getty

"Always hearing the argument that if local news goes away, it's going to be the golden era of corruption. We've set it here on this very show and that it's you know, important for civic society, etcetera. Etcetera. Etcetera we saw also have heard over and over. The threes in local news has collapsed is because Facebook and Google and all these different things have taken all the ad money and blah, blah, blah. For some reason, ignoring a Pew Research Center study from not that long ago that found an astonishing 42%. Said. They would not Mr paper much or at all. If it went away. 42% of people said they would not miss their local paper much or at all if it went away, even though 74% said that civic life would suffer a lot if the local newspaper died. So the vast majority of us believe all we got to have the local newspaper. It's going to be tough for our town, but a pretty big chunk of people say, But whatever. Well, I think if you offer people engagement or amusement, they will take amusement. About? I don't know 8 to 2. Out of 10 people. There are just so many ways to be entertained or even interested. You know, I sometimes have a little dismissive about. You know you're playing video games or whatever. Maybe you're just a really curious person. Now you have sources to read about quantum mechanics, which Jack brought up earlier. Are you looking at Kevin Williamson piece in the national review? You thought wow. Inflation? Yeah. How does that work? What's the story? Maybe you're looking into that. You just have so many alternatives. The the local newspaper was such a big, expensive endeavor, but it survived and thrived because it was among few choices. More than 2000. Newspapers have vanished since 2004 think about that, Yeah. 2000 newspapers that have gone away. It's amazing, um, money made from newspapers have halved. Recent Pew survey found that only 14% of people said they have paid for local news in the previous year, only 14% of people willing to pay for local news in the previous year. Boy. Yeah, I haven't and I'm more up on local news than most people, I think Duke University study of 16,000 local news outlets in 100 communities deemed that only about 17% of the articles are truly local. That's because the revenue has gone down so much. You can't afford to hire the people to actually dig up the local news. She just reprint national stories. And, of course that leads people to thinking. Well, if you're gonna put the New York Times story on the front page of my Local city USA. I'll just read it in The New York Times. I don't need to get any have paper. Also two people going through the police blotter and or printing press releases from local organizations and calling it news. 1940 when the population the United States was less than half of today, American newspaper circulation was greater than it is now. That's a pretty amazing statistics. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it's it's going to have an effect and not a good one. It's too bad, but perhaps the beast will evolve and find a different way to fulfill its needs. Or it'll be the golden Age of corruption. Well, it will be. That's it's guaranteed. We will. When things get bad enough. Then we'll start really hankering for local news and then websites will evolve and they'll make money and they will hire reporters. But things will have to get really bad before we do that. I just want to know how to cash in on her myself. I've made it clear I can be bought over and over again. Nobody's made any sort of offer whatsoever. How do I get in on the age of corruption? But it'll take a pretty big scandal in every town in America before you'll be able to set up a website hire some reporters charge people a fee to to read the news and people will be willing to go along with it. You'll need a major scandal in your town. Yeah, it turns out your city manager's making a million dollars a year and you know all that sort of stuff. I'd be surprised if even that were enough. So Bill Maher was on fire the other day wearing mask outdoors is idiotic. Alright, it shouted at people walking by you, Um and then put up your dukes. Just in case It's a good idea. As you walk past people Shout your an idiot. Yes. And, uh, and also probably, Yeah, our three We'll get to this toward the top of our three rental cars are insanely expensive right now. You've probably heard this if you've tried to rent a car. I mean, you're trying to rent a car for three days, You might have a $400. Bill. I mean, it's just insane. There are alternatives to rental cars that are getting really popular and really efficient. Uh, right. Good Guess, but no, no, we'll tell you about that in our three. If you can't hang.

Kevin Williamson Pew Research Center Bill Maher $400 Duke University Facebook America Google 42% 100 Communities United States Jack 74% Three Days 16,000 Local News Outlets 8 2004 1940 2000 Newspapers USA
Worshipers celebrate second Easter of the pandemic

News, Traffic and Weather

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Worshipers celebrate second Easter of the pandemic

"Sitting far apart in pews and singing courses of hallelujah. Through face coverings for the second Easter Sunday from Protestant churches in South Korea to ST Peter's Basilica in the Vatican. Worshippers were subject to restrictions conditioned by the pandemic. In Jerusalem. Air travel restrictions in quarantine regulations prevented

St Peter's Basilica South Korea Vatican Jerusalem
A highlight from Episode 76 Juana Barraza and Past Lives With a Martian Twist

Tipsy Tales

03:53 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from Episode 76 Juana Barraza and Past Lives With a Martian Twist

"A way you put it that way. Someone's invading your back door now. They're trying your front door of our my front doors open to go ahead printer hoop and yeah talk just upper front door open. Would you like it in the australian vice. Chancellor dr open. That was an australia without door. Close back door is never open back. Door bolted shut the fuck out. You're welcome have a nice day free breach. Do we got try to make you laugh to team. Which isn't going to make me do it. Worse tried make me. I know you're not supposed to laugh more when that it. Don't scratch your church. Yeah oh my god. So can i just say one time i was in church and an the front pews and i think it was with my mother-in-law sta and my sister in law and we were laughing so hard because this man kept pacing back in ford and his pants were wedged back. Birds watched and the greg of is. But i could not control myself. It was the funniest damn thing. Ever his butt cheeks were paperclips room time. Yes and everytime he'd walk and then you know clinch you could see when it's funny that the most inappropriate things. Yeah in church injured all the time we used to. Oh my god me and my friends my friend can would just turn around. Look at me. And i'd be like without during a funeral it has happened at has wherever it was me. My sisters we're in colorado. I'm pretty sure we were there for a funeral and all got the giggles and it was the most inappropriate time. The timing was bad. yeah it was awful. I thought we were gonna get in trouble so when time okay. I've already told you the whole thing so we have like these assemblies we have they have these assemblies like every year. So we drive to tucson four days at a time. We're in this assembly. It's a really huge like auditorium. This guy sitting in front of us. She's already board. yeah she's already snowing. She's like i find no humor in what you're talking about. So i have my legs across crossed in this direction and my sister has hers opposite direction and her foot is underway for and i'm wearing high heels and pantyhose teams day when we had to penny off with everything else frigging. Joe lie insane

Chancellor Dr Open Australia Ford Colorado Tucson JOE
Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

Democracy Now! Audio

04:20 min | 3 months ago

Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

"Joe biden and vice president khama harris head to atlanta today where they plan to address tuesday's mass shootings at three spa. That killed eight people including seven women. Six of whom were of asian descent. The trip to atlanta was originally scheduled as part of biden's campaign promoting nearly two trillion dollar american rescue plan democrats hailed. The deal has the largest anti poverty law in a generation. One study projects. It will lift. Almost fourteen million americans out of poverty including five point seven million children while the relief plan has broad public support. Not a single republican supported the legislation. We spend the rest of the hour with heather. Mickey author of the new book. The some of us what. Racism costs everyone. And how we can prosper together. Have there is the board chair of color of change and former president of the think tank. Demos thanks so much for joining us. Heather congratulations on your new book. Thank you congratulations on twenty five years. Thank you so much. The whole team at democracy now is celebrating. Hopefully soon we can celebrate together. Well you just sat there and watched once again. The reverend warnock you tweeted while he was speaking and said everyone should do themselves a favor and watched the speech. Can you talk about the significance of what happened in georgia for this whole country. Reverend warnock the first black democrat to be elected from the former confederacy. It was so moving. I mean i really think of the crucible of the twenty four hours between january fifth and january sixth as american promise in american paralyzed nutshell. I we saw a multi-racial coalition a multi-racial anti-racist coalition that was standing up to four years of division pain and suffering and putting the man who is the successor to reverend dr martin luther king marching through the pews of that story to church and putting him in office. Along with reverend with jon ossoff. That was an historic moment. So many of the political class had counted georgia out and yet a coalition that went from black folks who had been organizing for years with stacey abrams and the touch brown Two white women in the suburbs who turned away from the republican party for the first time and generations young people really overcoming a number of barriers to the ballot in the middle of a pandemic. Did the impossible with the promise of relief from this pandemic. it's self disease that has retaliated disproportionately on people of color. But that has shown that our fates are inextricably linked and then not twenty four hours later the dark spirit of american white supremacy. Fueled by a big lie that has as its core logic racism. The idea the common sense that of course a man who was rejected by the majority of people of color could not possibly have lost the presidency. That of course when people of color vote it is somehow suspect and criminal. This is the tension and explore this tension in my book because fundamentally racism has been the most powerful tool wielded against the best of america against american democracy against cross racial solidarity against the american dream itself. I talk about how it's brought us. The inequality era and figures like reverend warnock who put into perspective who in their own lives have so much of the course of american history on display are whom we need to look to right now to remind us that that tool always robs this country. It's best

Khama Harris Atlanta Reverend Warnock Joe Biden Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Jon Ossoff Biden Stacey Abrams Warnock Georgia Mickey Heather Republican Party America
War Games Suggest the U.S. Will Lose Fast If It Confronts China

The Dan Bongino Show

01:09 min | 3 months ago

War Games Suggest the U.S. Will Lose Fast If It Confronts China

"People's liberation army and the chinese communist party is clearly preparing for war with the united states. You never know that because we're too busy worrying about peppy. The pew and gina carano and the mandalorian we're not occupied anything like global thermonuclear war. God forbid we did something like that. So here's the first screenshot about what a were. I want to be clear on this. Given our current posture. Our current force alignment how we're prepared for global warfare. Now how these experts think it would go. Here's a quote from a military analysts. Talking about what would happen in are wargames now. It says at that point. The trend that are wargames was not just that we were losing but we were losing faster. We do these war games all time with china. Now we're losing quick. After the two thousand eighteen i distinctly remember one of our gurus of war gaming standing in front of the air force secretary and chief of staff and telling them that we shouldn't play this war game scenario chinese attack on taiwan again. Because we know what's going to happen. The definitive answer is if the us military doesn't change course with lose fast.

People's Liberation Army Chinese Communist Party Gina Carano PEW United States China Air Force Taiwan
Pepé Le Pew has been cut from the 'Space Jam' sequel

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

Pepé Le Pew has been cut from the 'Space Jam' sequel

"Started the first Warner Brothers Space Jam movie Back in 1996. But in the sequel, You're not going to find the animated character Pepe Le Pew. The Looney Tunes French Skunk has been besieged by controversy after the New York Times columnist Charles Blow wrote that the cartoon character added to rape culture. The online entertainment publication deadline has learned that a hybrid live action animation seen that features the skunk character was left on the cutting room floor. However, the report says the removal of pepper was not related to the newspaper commentary,

Pepe Le Pew Charles Blow Warner Brothers New York Times
Fauci Warns Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Fauci Warns Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

"More states. Reason. Coronavirus restrictions Arizona, California and South Carolina relaxed at least some of their restrictions Friday. South Carolina no longer has a statewide mask mandate. Arizona ended restrictions on capacity and businesses, while California is letting its theme parks reopen. Still, health experts warn the risk is not over and of states go too far too soon, it could lead to another surge of covert 19 cases. Most Americans say they either have or plan on getting the covert 19 vaccine. Jim Forbes has more, a Pew research survey found. 69% of Americans have either gotten a vaccine shot or say they definitely or probably will, infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says. Vast majority of people need to get vaccinated to stop the virus from spreading. He continued to say that combining the availability of the vaccine with the reduction in case numbers, the country could be closer to getting back to normal. Later this year.

South Carolina Arizona California Jim Forbes Dr Anthony Fauci
Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:04 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus Cases Could Spike as States Ease Restrictions

"Or easing coronavirus restrictions. Arizona, California and South Carolina relaxed at least some of the restrictions on Friday. South Carolina no longer has a statewide mask mandate. Arizona ended restrictions on capacity and businesses, while California is letting its theme parks reopened. Still, health experts warn the risk is not over and if states go too far too soon. It could lead to another surge of covert 19 cases, and most Americans say they either have or plan on getting the cove in 19 vaccine, a Pew research survey found. 69% of Americans have either gotten the vaccine shot or say they definitely or probably will, infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci says. Vast majority of people need to get vaccinated to stop the virus from spreading, he said, By combining the availability of the vaccine, with the reduction in case numbers The country could be closer to getting back to normal later this year. I'm

South Carolina Arizona California Dr Anthony Fauci
The Pandemics Impact on Americas Civil Courts

After The Fact

05:45 min | 4 months ago

The Pandemics Impact on Americas Civil Courts

"The way that our court system operates supposed outsiders and then issue an a decision based on those two sides but if only one side is in the room only one side gets hurt. That's erica talking about civil courts in america today. She leads pews work to modernize the nation's civil legal system which even before the pandemic has seen a dramatic rise in debt collection cases. Sometimes the people being sued don't even know it for the future trusts. I'm dan will do can. This is after the fact if you haven't been in a courtroom you've at least seen on. Tv a judge sitting on high tables with lawyers a jury of your peers but civil courts where cases like debt collections. Evictions and personal disputes may end up can be different from criminal court and as you'll hear in today's episode with the covid nineteen pandemic continuing to disrupt our economy experts expect cases to rise and that makes a major gap in the system even more concerning most individuals involved in cases. Don't even know they have a lawsuit filed against them as a result. Seventy percent of debt collection cases result in a default judgment or another way of saying it an automatic win to the creditors simply because the defendant didn't show up and that's our data point for this episode. Here's eric record. Our state and local courts here about one hundred million cases every year and that includes criminal cases that includes traffic cases and it also includes about over twenty million civil cases and that includes everything from contract disputes to personal injury cases to family law issues. Like divorce or contested wills who does use our court system and which companies feel comfortable bringing court cases and using the courts for lawsuits has really consolidated to business to consumer lawsuits that can include mortgage foreclosures evictions and debt collection lawsuits taken together. Those represent more than half of all civil case load debt collection cases are the single most common type of civil court case today and they've doubled in size since the nineteen ninety s debt collection cases are growing both in their total number and in their overall share so they've went from one thousand nine civil court cases in the one thousand nine hundred two now one in four civil cases. That's pretty dramatic that to me. Seems like really like our civil court system looks like a totally different entity than maybe a did thirty or forty years ago in criminal cases. You're probably familiar with the idea that you have a right to an attorney. And if you can't afford an attorney one will be provided for you but in the civil context that's not the case So we actually see that in about a three hundred every four civil court cases at least one side is not represented by a lawyer. So why why. Don't they have attorneys. Well there's a few different reasons why and what we've found is that in the jurisdictions where we can actually look and see who was represented in who wasn't about ninety percent of the time the debt collector of the company bringing the lawsuit is represented by a lawyer and the consumer is not and some of the reasons could be that the amount of the debt is even lower than the cost of a lawyer. So if someone can't settle five thousand dollar student loan dad or medical debt. Then they're probably not going to be able to afford an attorney to be able to litigate that case another reason is simply that people aren't aware that they're being sued in the first place so they can't go out and hire lawyer to represent them and so what happens if i'm sued for a debt and i never heard about it. I don't get my day in court But the people suing me do unfortunately in most jurisdictions. That's exactly what happens so in the in the states where we've been able to look at court data. What we've found is that seven out of ten debt collection cases ends in what's called a default judgment which means that the debt collector wins by default. They don't have to prove their case. They just win because they're in the room and the consumer didn't respond to the lawsuit so the judge never reviews to make sure the right person was sued for the right amount. They just stamp the case in favor of the debt collector. Do we know why they're not responding. What we've uncovered in our research. Is that actually. A significant number of these cases are resulting in a default judgment because the consumer wasn't aware that they were being sued the rules for how to get notified about a court case and the rules. For how a debt collection judgments can be. Enforced are really really different from one another so a debt collector might be able to find your employer and garnish your paycheck as a result of doing some investigation. After the court case but that wouldn't be the same way that they would be required to make sure that you knew about the court case in the first place and we should be clear here that you know in some cases obviously some of these people have the debt they should be paying their debt. It's the how you know. We want to see happen in society but if there is a dispute where you think you don't owe somebody and you've sort of walked away from a debt that doesn't necessarily mean your troubles are over because this sort of litigation than continue right the way that our court system operates it's supposed to hear both sides issuing an a decision based on those two sides but if only one side is in the room only one side gets hurt and this is something that has been flying under the radar until relatively recently even though these cases have been on the rise and even though so many cases end in a default judgment and in post judgment collection actions. We really haven't been seeing the what this volume might mean for us so most courts don't actually collect and report on detailed information about what's actually happening inside the courthouse. So policymakers and other leaders haven't been as cute into this key issue until relatively recently

Erica Wills DAN Eric America
Making a career change in the middle of a pandemic

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:50 min | 4 months ago

Making a career change in the middle of a pandemic

"I mean you're curious right about what it's going to be like in the economy yet to come because it's going to be different whether we're ready or not so. We begin today with two stories on that theme. The newspaper for the first of which is our regular thursday update on the state of the american labor market lousy in a word and other seven hundred ninety three thousand americans lost their jobs last week. Yes that is down a tad from the week earlier. But still as i think i say every week now stratospheric lee high and overall twenty something million people in this economy are getting some kind of government benefit so to the bigger point which is of course the theme of the top. Half of the program when it's going to be like when it's done to find new jobs when this is all over a lot of people might have to find new careers. The pew research center. Some new data out on that two thirds of people who are unemployed have considered going into a new occupation or a new field while one third have taken concrete steps to get new training or education as marketplace's mitchell hartman reports getting all the cogs in the back to work machine turning together leading can be easy in normal not pandemic times. Many rodriguez would have about twenty local men and women in the construction pre apprentice program. He runs in west chicago called revolution. Workshop recruiting from underserved communities typically talking about black brown and women. I mean the community desperately needs upskilling and a pathway into family sustaining careers. Most of the graduates go into construction jobs paying eighteen dollars an hour or more but the pandemic happened and seventy five percent of the folks that we have placed were laid off in the spring summer and fall revolution workshop. Didn't start any new cohorts of job trainees. Because there was no construction work for them. Thirty year jeremy smith of reno nevada got laid off from his job as a casino valet in march. He took his relief check and some savings and went back to community college with able to graduate with a bachelor's and why train management about two semesters early so ended up kicking me down the road a little quicker than i planned on. He's looking in his new field. But no luck so far. I'm sure it'll come roaring back. But it's a little dry right now. Meanwhile manny rodriguez at revolution workshop has a new class of construction pre apprentices. Now we are currently recruiting for our second cohort. So you know. I can put that blog out there or if you can do that for us every awesome. Consider it done website at our website. I'm mitchell hartman for marketplace gotta finish it mitchell it's marketplace dot org. Just make sure funny knows

Lee High Mitchell Hartman Pew Research Center Rodriguez Jeremy Smith Chicago Manny Rodriguez Reno Nevada Mitchell
Should Women and Men Handle Money Differently?

How to Money

07:11 min | 4 months ago

Should Women and Men Handle Money Differently?

"So first of all. Let's talk about how you get money in the first place and that is earn it right and according to the pew research center Women earned eighty five percent of what men earned in two thousand eighteen That pay gap is shrinking Particularly for younger workers which is a positive trend but that is still a meaningful hurdle to overcome. The pay. Gap is partly due to to work history. You know like having kids great you know. But as we mentioned with the fidelity study earlier taking time off to have quetta's like it often leads to job offers in worse income prospects not to mention the years of not generating any income which often reflects years of not investing in a workplace retirement account in particular. If there's a match there right and those are some big disadvantages to overcome yell like you said at the beginning matt that stat also reflects some structural issues when it comes to male and female pay. But here's another thing to matt When we're talking about pay women are actually often averse to asking for more money than their male counterparts. There was a survey from ron saad. Last year the found that sixty percent of women have never negotiated with employer. Overpay women are also more likely to stay at a lower wage job to according to The personal finance web site the balance. And that's not good right because even just a small bump in pay with a new employer or in a job that been in for years can have just a massive impact on your ability to earn more throughout the years and then also save more for retirement. So i think of all of the things in this episode where we see. Maybe you know women as sex falling short. It is in in the ability to ask for more at knowing what they're worth again. This is another instance where you might be listening and you're thinking i've never had a problem negotiating a race like i've never had a problem asking for more money so again. It's important to keep in mind that though the research shows us like we know any totally doesn't apply to everyone. I'm specifically thinking of two conversations with Kirstin and julian saunders. The couple behind rich and regular that was episode. Eighty six and julianne was just bragging. About how great pearson is at negotiating. Evidently she's just like the queen negotiating more. Pay if you had to listen to that upset go back and listen to that one. Is that regardless of your gender. Earning more it's just so important right and all of us could stand to our abilities on that front And we've had lots of different conversations on the show that specifically cover you know not just stories of individuals negotiating but just how to go about doing that. I'm of Ramiz sadie that was Backing up said one ten and he outlined a great process a great method You know when it comes to wanting to up your salary. You know what steps you need to take. In order to negotiate a solid race gam thinking to matt had far new darabi on the show. She is just awesome personal finance expert and at the same time. She is someone who has made a killing as a small business owner. She knows her worth. she knows. how to negotiate. Yes so like you said there are many women out. there are crushing it. Who don't have a problem and asking for what they're worth. Who don't have a problem asking for a raise. It's just when you read those statistics. There are obviously a number of women who do though. And i wanna see. That number changed for the benefit of women as a whole absolutely. Let's about spending to do women spend more. That's an interesting question. My wife personally met hates to shop. I really. She just defies the stereotypes. And actually i don't know i don't mind shopping. A little bit roles are a little bit reverse exactly but there was a study by the wharton school of business that found that women are more likely to view shopping as a recreational activity. My mom definitely fits that bill Most men wanna leave the store with their purchases quickly as possible but even though women enjoy shopping more it turns out men still spend more than women in a typical year so while men might not enjoy the process of shopping as much. They still shopping. Just from a utilitarian standpoint sure yeah also that increase spending with the stats as well. There's there's a survey from wallet hub earlier this year. They showed that men are more likely to max out a credit card. Women are apparently seven percent less likely than men to have maxed out credit card at least once in so while women they might enjoy the shopping experience. More than men do a lot of different stats. Show that women are more cost conscious. They're more likely to shop at alice. Stores more likely to to wait till something they want is actually on sale The store brands more than men. And so you know when it comes to spending this this is definitely a win in this category for sure And so i i of see this as a call to min to stop spending so much money on neighboring items fan. Yeah i feel like. I'm totally guilty of this. I totally fall into the study. I don't like to go looking for the best deal. I do because i'm spending less but like i'll look at maybe two or three different sites and then i just purchase right whereas for you like i feel you are so good at hunting and making sure you're keeping your eyes on the best deals out there making sure that you're spending the the least amount of money possible. I feel that's something that we all need to make sure that we're doing right. And so you know regardless of who you are. We should all work to just become a little more conscious and how it is that we spend our money. I gotta say mets. I don't care whether you're man or woman but store brands should be high on your list because they're going to save you a ton of money it's just like in savings when you go for the storebrand over the name brand equivalent unless it's your craft beer equivalent And you're wanting to spend a little bit more on the because it makes you feel nice. Can't name brand everything though. I think i think sometimes that's a tendency here. Maybe that men have The men just gravitate towards the name brand no matter what it is without thinking about it and that's where we need to shake things up right and we we need to consider storebrand's more frequently also too. I think we've talked about this. The quality of store brand items has gone up a whole lot in recent years. Her kirkland signature brag. There's other ones too man. Like target has some great Store brands that are better than their name brand equivalent. Sometimes so yeah. It's not just costco yeah costco rockstar Let's see let's talk about saving as well. There's more good news here. It turns out that the the savings rate for women is actually higher than their male counterparts. They save a higher percentage of their pay. They spend less of what they bring in and much of. That is due to the more frugal. Tendencies that we just highlighted when we talked about spending differences but even the women are saving a higher percentage of their income on average. They've actually got less than thirty percent of what men have in savings accounts according to data from the federal reserve from a few years ago That is likely due to the fact that overall they're still making less like we discussed earlier which means a smaller amounts of money saved overall. Yeah one of the reasons. Women have a higher savings rate as well Is that according to a survey by. Us bank women of all ages value financial security more than men do. But here's the thing than that. Focus on financial. Security can often backfire. If you keep more of your overall assets and savings and cds instead of invested in the stock market right like savings for saving for long-term goals is really important but so is investing For the really long

Pew Research Center Women Ron Saad Matt Julian Saunders Ramiz Sadie Darabi Quetta Wharton School Of Business Kirstin Julianne Pearson Storebrand Costco Mets Kirkland Federal Reserve
Modern Oracles divination with Palmistry

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:08 min | 4 months ago

Modern Oracles divination with Palmistry

"Welcome to kiss miss and mysteries. I'm your host kit chrome today as part of my month long investigation into modern oracle destination. I'm putting the art palm reading under the microscope for a closer look. Palm reading originated from ancient asia and is now popular fashionable worldwide as way of person's fate and personality by reading the lines shapes colors of a person's palm and fingers. Let's start with the question. Most often asked which hand you have read. It is believed that the right hand the dominant hand for most people represents now in the future and thus can be changed with time and experience while the left hand represents past and traits the person was born with thus it is more meaningful to take the right hand priority in palm reading though both hands for most people are pretty symmetrical few differences there but in respect to the right and left hand reading. Some say the right hand is for females while the left hand is for males for reading birth traits and then right hand for males and left hand for females for reading present and future. This is because the left hand side is associated with males and fatherhood and the right hand side of the body with females motherhood at least according to chinese traditions. But let's continue our examination palmistry with the current or most common practice. But exactly what does science have to say about palm brady. Americans continue to believe in spiritual phenomenon by the millions that according to a two thousand nine pew research center survey that found that twenty six percent of americans believe in spiritual energy and fifteen percent reports seeing a psychic in the past year but popularity doesn't equal validity. So what is the verdict from the scientific community. Cutting to the chase. They're is scientifically no evidence whatsoever to support the claims about palmistry. So says james. Herbert had psychology department interim provost at drexel university. The core claimed people make. Is that the patterns of the lines. So the palm relate to something about your personality and this can be useful as a way of assessing personality traits more useful in standard ways. Especially if we're lucky at introversion or extroversion alright. Why do people believe in palm reading. It's called the illusory correlation. The human brain is a pattern seeking oregon. We've all to look for patterns. The cost of seen a pattern. That isn't real as smaller than the cost of missing pattern. That is real. So false positives cost less than false negatives on a personal note during the mid nineteen seventies. I took a girlfriend to the renaissance fair held at the time in nevada. California near block forest. I was performing his sword fighting routine with life fencing master during one of my breaks. I escorted by gal to gypsy. Palm reader lay the twenty dollars on the table. Little round table in the middle of attempt. I sat in the corner. My girlfriend extended her right hand. Palm up across the table for the gypsy to read within moments the gypsy roll my girlfriend's fingers up and began to cry. She got up left returning the twenty dollars process three days later. My girlfriend was struck by a car and killed. Did the gypsy see this. Within days of the accident. I contacted the manager and planner of the fair and ask for the name of the palm reading gypsy. They said that she had folded her. Tent was no longer associated with the fair and that they have no information name address or phone number for her. I was told that many of the smaller booths paid one. Initial price didn't fill out any other information and that they often only stayed for a couple of days. It was odd that she had left after only half a day.

Palm Brady Palm Oracle Pew Research Center Asia Drexel University Herbert James Oregon Nevada California
Amber Alert Issued for Missing Toddler in Celina, North of Dallas

Charlie Parker

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Amber Alert Issued for Missing Toddler in Celina, North of Dallas

"An Amber alert is in effect for a missing two year old boy from Selina, north of Dallas. Two year old levee Pew is last seen last night. He's described as white with blue eyes, blond hair 2 ft six inches tall and weighs £35. Police say they suspect 42 Year old Isaac few and the child. His disappearance. The two maybe in a white 2019 Toyota Tacoma with the Texas license plate, Emma's and Mike D. As in Delta, T isn't tango 16

Selina Dallas Isaac Tacoma Toyota Mike D. Texas Emma
Coronavirus Economic Downturn Has Hit Latinos Especially Hard

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:15 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus Economic Downturn Has Hit Latinos Especially Hard

"Economists hosted. Mondays is the president of the american society of hispanic economists which just released its annual report on the economic outlook for hispanics and by the way for this episode. We are using the term his annex as interchangeable with latinos because data how it is used in the report and by our guests and unsurprisingly report focused mainly on the effects of covid for example looking. At how the initial spread of the pandemic those first few months last year fell disproportionately on hispanics. You're talking about a group that already explained something like thirty three percent of all cova cases. Which is the highest among all the groups and they only constitute about eighteen percent of the population and part of the reason for this disproportionate effect. Is that hispanic. Households simply contain more people on average the non hispanic households. So it's easier for the virus spread. Yeah and more. Shockingly hispanics are also more than four times as likely to be hospitalized from covid as white non hispanics. And that's partly because hispanics are also more likely to have co morbidity like diabetes which may catching the virus more severe ms economic effects. The unemployment. rate for hispanics shut up higher than for any other racial or ethnic group in the early months of the pandemic survey from pew research. Find the nearly six out of ten hispanics lived in a household where someone either lost their job or took a pay cut. And this is partly because of the specific kind of work that disproportionately done by hispanics in the us. They were in a lot of ford facing jobs. A lot of central worker jobs that were either being laid off. You know forced to to go to work and eventually exposing their families to to cove it. So you're either you either have to go to your job or you're in a low pay job that was hit because of closures made by different governors right so you think of the restaurant industry. There's lots of cooks that are out there if you think about personal services so how many people have some over to their house to clean their house About forty percent of that industry is hispanics. Were doing that so when you are no longer allowing household employment to commit when. You're no longer allowing people to to do that work that that's a loss of income that's going on for hispanic workers. There's also an important distinction between the experiences of hispanic women latinos and hispanic men morning. You've got to see. It is the former president of the american society of hispanic economists and also contributed a study about latinas to the new hispanic economic outlook. Latina's tend to be areas that are very specific to service so leisure and of retaliatory or other services on retail sectors were had contact with clients and also tend to be sectors. That are are flexible. In terms of time or use of time but also sectors have very few benefits and overall latinos are more likely than non letting women to have multiple children and especially to be carrying for younger children and the burden of raising the kids often falls to them more than two hispanic men and latinos who are roughly in their prime working years aged twenty five to sixty five participate in the labor force at lower rates than women of other races ethnicities but in the years right before covid their participation rate had actually been going up not anymore. Latina's were starting to see. Alight economy was growing and and the social norms for changing too cold lead. The crisis has rain for some of those social norms and this dan impact latinas even further and covert manned up having another effects on the kind of service jobs that latinos disproportionately working but size that. It's how a latinos are in sectors in were the job kobe's subsitute by technology and during covid we are finding new ways to do things and even finding new ways to do services in the future what i would like to see what i would like to do and i would like to see. It's what is happening to this. Job are latinas laughed and how many of them are coming back. For example if more people in working from home after covid because of teleworking technology then there will be fewer customers for the restaurants and hotels that cater to them. And were many hispanics worked. Finally there is another way. In which the kobe pandemic made a big lingering effect on the economic future for hispanics the disruption to schools all the closures and reopenings and the different methods schools are using as they tried to teach kids sometimes online and sometimes in the classroom hispanic students already have big educational gaps between them and everyone else. For example hispanics are the least likely ethnic and racial minority group to have a college degree. Hosa says those gaps were likely shrinking over time as each successive generation of hispanics integrates more the us but the gaps are still big and the media in hispanic household has less than one fifth. The wealth of the median white household and so hispanic families are just less able to afford the kinds of workarounds. They can keep their kids learning at the right pace. You're not just talking about these. Twelfth graders you're talking about these fifth graders fourth graders. He's third graders. How do you teach things like reading. How do you see things as a fine ex through this type of interface. That gap is going to be there. It's gonna be persistent i. I know i'm gonna feel it on the shores of college when we see that their students arriving who are not ready and we're going to have to make adjustments to deal with with those things to deal with having them catch up. And so for hispanics. There remains a lot of uncertainty about what their economic outcomes will be throughout the rest of the pandemic and after both straightforward things like getting back their jobs and incomes and their kids learning in schools again but also for closing the disparities that still exist between how they experienced the economy and how

American Society Of Hispanic E Pew Research Diabetes Ford Latina United States DAN Hosa
Engaging Christ with Culture

Understand the God Who Speaks

03:16 min | 5 months ago

Engaging Christ with Culture

"Dr bob while would you tell us a little bit about what cultural engagement is in. What cultural intelligence is well. We live in a diverse pluralistic world. Which means that even the word culture is a little bit of a misnomer because we don't live in a singular culture we actually are made up of many subcultures. And i like to tell people that when you think of cultural engages a little bit like an eye to use it geological example but It's a little bit like plate tectonics against each other sometimes they build pressure etc and so Cultural intelligence is the ability to Negotiate the variety of us that are around and developing intelligence the ability to engage well in the midst of that variety you know not everybody. Shares the Theological perspective that you. And i would have i i i compare it to. I have two pictures. One is I say this to my students all the time when you're in the classroom here. Let's say you're in the church. Pew and theological reasoning is at the center of what you do and how you see the world. It's like a monocle that you put on your to lynch through which you see the world But the moment you get in your car on the side street and go and have a conversation with someone who's a neighbor. They may or may not sure that monocle and they may or may not share that the logical view. So how do you have that conversation with. Someone who may not even have a category that so central to the way you live in see life. That's the challenge of cultural. Intelligence is how do you. How do you communicate the truth of the gospel in a way that can connect to someone who may not have a theological category for that conversation. And unfortunately i think what the church is often done is to assume that if they just cite the bible that that alone is going to be good enough but the trouble is if a person doesn't have a high regard for the bible then citing. The bible doesn't help. So i tell people that we are used arguing that it's true because it's in the bible but actually the way we need to engage is we need to say it's in the bible because it's true it's not the same thing and it requires a different kind of argument and in fact if you think about what the bible is that actually is a reflection of what the bible is. God says what he says in the bible not because he wants to put it in a book because an premature to the idea he says it. Because it's the it's about the authentic way to live. it's the authentic way to engage. It's the way he's made us and to give us wisdom and all those kinds of things. So if we developed the ability to articulate why this is an important way to live as opposed to simply appealing to a book. We begin to build cultural intelligence. And and it's a harder step. It's a lot easier to just say you know the bible tells me so but But for someone for whom. The bible is not a meaningful category. That doesn't help them in thinking through what you're saying

Dr Bob
At The Vatican, A Christmas Eve Mass Shaped By The Pandemic

Ben Shapiro

00:13 sec | 6 months ago

At The Vatican, A Christmas Eve Mass Shaped By The Pandemic

"Celebrating the Vatican's traditional Christmas Eve, Mass. ST Peter's Basilica Tichy, would you if you were than 200 people inside, wearing masks and spaced out between the pews, Chuck Secrets in ABC News

Basilica Tichy St Peter Chuck Secrets Abc News
States of Innovation: In Depth With Sue Urahn, Pews President and CEO

After The Fact

04:22 min | 6 months ago

States of Innovation: In Depth With Sue Urahn, Pews President and CEO

"Welcome to after the fact for the pew charitable. Trust's dan duke. At a time. When many of us feel is gridlocked. It's important to remember. There are places where real change is being made this season. we're looking at states of innovation examples of state governments. Who have creatively addressed problems with solutions. That are working as always we start with the data point for this episode. That number is sixty seven percent. Sixty seven percent or about two thirds of. Us adults are confident. In local elected officials according to the pew research center and those local officials are central to the innovation. We'll be covering ciaran. Got her start in state government working for the minnesota state legislature where she saw research translated into policies and laws that improved people's lives that led her joining pugh twenty five years ago where she eventually launched pews work with state governments around the we talked to sue about pews focus on evidence based policymaking and how it continues to make a difference. So you're an welcome nice to be here. It seems to have you joining us because your background is in state policy. And you're also the new president and ceo of pew so welcome. Congratulations thank you. I wanted to talk about your background. Because you started in state government before you came to pew. The reason i ended up in the legislature was fairly simple. I was finishing a phd in education. I loved doing research. But i had a fairly significant desire to also have an impact and not the basic research does not have an impact. But i wanted something a little bit more immediate. During the time i was in grad school i had an opportunity to work with the higher education coordinating board in minnesota which set education policy. And i just loved it was the to do research and then to see it. Translated into decisions and policies that had an immediate impact. And i was hooked right from the beginning. I have a deep deep fondness for my home state and the ability to be able to work on policy affected. The state mattered. A lot to me. So the end of the day. I stayed in minnesota and i went to the legislature an unparalleled opportunity to not only see the sausage getting made but to be part of the sausage making process so for me it was also an ability to continue to learn. I had in grad school. Obviously done a lot of research and a lot of presentations and a lot of conversations on that. But i had never been up front and involved in the policy process so during your tenure is the time to pew is really made its evolution into much more of a policy oriented organization as opposed to a grant making organization. You eventually became the director of the pew center on the states. Which gets us to our topic of this season. How did that come about. And what was the whole idea behind. Pugh getting involved in a center focused on the state's well. We had had a couple projects just before that one of the very first one. I did when i moved over to the program. Side was a pretty significant multi your investment to help states invest in preschool for kids and based on the very compelling research that was not widely known at that time that there was a very good economic return on investment. When states were able to do that it was at a time when states were very frustrated about their lack of progress on k. Twelve or form so. i think they view preschool. As a really great place to invest and we viewed it as a place that was ripe for progress at the state level so we moved that program forward and worked in several states. And as we did that it became very clear that the opportunity to engage in different kinds of policy areas at at the state level was something that you should really take a very close look at so launching. The pugh center on the states allowed us to bring together different kinds of policy whether it was education. Or how well states perform or sentencing and corrections and develop buck capacity at pugh that allowed us to work across different issue areas but bring some of the same approaches and thoughtful research to bear. That would help. State policy makers make better decisions.

Dan Duke Minnesota State Legislature PEW Pew Research Center Ciaran Legislature Pugh Minnesota Pew Center On The States Grad School United States Pugh Center
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

12:05 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"They were either open by former employees? <hes> you learned from cholesterol often decide to open their own school. I'm sure about the direction of Lester Roloff. It wasn't like Hey I'm leaving going to do my own thing. You know that was his way of expanding. Herman found was one and every almost every single one that was opened were either former employees recurrent employees. I should say and that guy still around like you said he does his shoes and there's no way you can still be around and doing these things. Don't have connections died in nineteen eighty-two but the person that took yes. Oh maybe it was that he died in nineteen eighty two and this widely cameron took over for him but to this day this cameron and his wife still still run the Lester Roloff ministries in still play radio show I think in Missouri or someplace like that maybe Texas I'm not sure and they still play sermons every Sunday and they have their people's Baptist Church that still open. <hes> and and yeah <hes> and maybe think it's something that you said before about <hes> how <hes> we were you know basing everything on our experiences and whatnot but every single the thing i think he could agree that we're telling our experiences it all can be documented look online and type of stuff and it can be thousands and thousands of testimonies for every one nurse in india says i wasn't there long enough and too bad happen to me and again i everything happens for a reason new treated away for a specific reason but those on grid other documented statements men's bhai people saying the exact same things that that we are in some you know to a t. whether it's the the room that i was brought into and strap down because i gave him a hard time in the tapes role well then i was like man i don't know if i'm ever gonna find somebody else can back this up in our people and believe me and i did and i found somebody that at that exact same experience it wasn't just a room at the chair would not the back it up that would have been enough but backed up the yongping strap specifically to bed and for you know right because he died no clock but i believe it was at least two or three days in continually having herman phone being preached you know into my into my head of the whole armageddon issue in building this army of children that very deep and you know those are the things that i don't have a duty not happen very many people the only high to a few for a specific raise again because compartment so it didn't happen to you of course consume crazy it sounds like come on lay it it happened also we already know we've discussed this time or two before is that the ones that do come out and say we're crazy were lying <hes> this didn't happen to me it i am forty eight years old and i can look back only now i was sixteen when i went there and the last thirty years i can now look back at certain things that happened in my life that are directly resulted to my time there you made decision subconsciously throughout throughout your whole life up until now just that directly related to how you then on a daily basis and that's what brainwashing is is about last with you for forever you don't know it ally these these people that are commenting on their from from either side and again don't realize that even today but again get older some people either really still sticks with just depending on their level of capacity to handle this were it starting need to come out the sorta come out nightmares or dreams or bathroom yeah they'll start to have memories of things that happen to and you know what if it doesn't whether physical syariah nature night her paintings plenty of those things south and if it doesn't if they'd never realized hey that's great if they're happy in their lives and fabric exactly because after the realization is when the anger and you know you go through all the stages of green and and and then the healing and that takes a very long time berry longtime so i'm i doubt that i hate to say i mean appoint thinkers but you do look at some of them and you start to do research again which which i'm good at you're good at anybody that just takes time but it's like you had this mental block not that you that ride search and for even came on and i'll tell people now but we talked about when when my father was coming to pick me up and it was some police station in a more positive oatlands that brought me because he was i believe this man was planted there for a specific reason to really device it's technique in the brain watching for everything else that i believe that was going on behind the scenes but where he whispered into my year we are going to come and find you and we're going to kill you like he was almost like triggered something in me that even though i felt that was strong in and i felt like guy i knew it was going on around me i bided my i time and i wasn't brainwashed still occur to me on the certain level especially being strapped down i do have periods of time that i don't remember i don't so i don't know exactly what what occurred even though i have a very good long term memory but those times are blacked out and they're bothersome to me and i think that statement was almost like a trigger because again that's how it works within within brainwashing or you know that's within basic hypnotism it's used but awry on trigger words that really <unk> shut me up because i did for at least twenty years after that other than just tiny little statements to people like you know what i went through this weird experience one day i'll tell you on it but that's all i could you'd get out even though i wanted so badly to talk about it there was so much fear about whether or not they were never going to believe me or whatever was i just did not have the strength even i've always been a very strong person but for whatever reason that just destroyed me and i couldn't discuss it and <hes> but i think that had a little bit of something to do with it i really do how absurd it definitely yeah you have anything else you wanted to add an hour i don't think so <hes> like i said some some of the other stuff will will get into next time and trying to wrap everything up so it kind of all makes sense absolutely yeah the next episode ill either be a longer one will break it up into two more episodes i think we can pretty much take care of anything unless something else comes to light somebody contacts us with the digital information which we do do you encourage please if you did go to bethel in the eighties early any other time and experiencing talking twenty year from you at poll up a pew p. u. l. l. a. p. e. w. <hes> podcast p. a. d. c. a. s. t. at gmail.com send us an email let us know and we love to have yawn or at least talk with you and <hes> minimally her her help you go through any issues you're going through we're here for you <hes> and also to make make a plea <hes> you know we're not a massive podcast you know we do this because we feel we have an obligation to do it ravenously not doing it for the notoriety or doing us that this does not happen again we're hoping that a lot of parents are listening or people that are christians in end belong to the church which are a lot of mercury the greatest people i've ever met but even they know that this can happen it could be taken advantage of and used in the wrong way and used for evil you know used for <hes> you know things that it just don't even want to be repeated <hes> but we want to encourage people to please help out with anything it can through petri on uniterd through donations because right now history not just myself adjusts go don't naveh production don't have you know editing crews and all of these different different things at most podcasts half nor giving re-lead <hes> want them at least at this time we don't the need it as necessary <hes> we don't need a flower things with music and sound effects and all that stuff i think is getting the information out alone <hes> should should be enough for people to get serious serious about what we're talking about to under understand it to ask questions if you need to or again to get this appearance to have them listen because it is still occurring today and it is very similar <hes> not that there aren't good <unk> programs if you've got children that do need help they're acting out but you know kids are cotin inches or teenagers do things it's best to keep it within the family you can work it out if absolutely positively one hundred percents something thing that you can't do that outside of your abilities and yes of course but do the research because ninety percent of the ones you're gonna look up online are not legitimate they are part of these wasp programs that we'll get into in the next episode or to explain what's going on there your kids can literally be sent to third world countries and you don't even know that that's where they are no kidding so that's eh you know that's what's going on so but <hes> for patriarch on <hes> you'd go to patriots p. a. t. or e. o. n. dot com forward slash pull up a pew no podcasts at the end just pull up a us that's patriot on p. a. t. r. e. n. dot com forward slash p. u. l. l. u._p. a. p. e. w. even if it's a dollar a a couple of dollars a month guys you have no idea how far that would go <hes> to help us in especially with the research you know all of that takes a lot of time and and there's even some information i've noticed that it's out there that i'd love to be able to get through <hes> different states you gotta get a pain for that stuff you know to get copies and get to that information so that's what it would be used for so it anything else jessica right thanks everybody nobody for listening you guys have a great fourth of july i don't know if you're going to hear some of the fireworks going off in the background <hes> thank god it wasn't it wasn't too bad and we won wish everybody a great holiday weekend and <hes> put some thought into what we're talking about after the holiday have a good time right now after think about these things but then it'll take a dive into it and take this stuff seriously that <hes> you know you we feel we're doing it for all the right right reasons and we've got a lot of great feedback from people phenomenal phenomenal feedback but this is only going to get out there by word of mouth worse throughout.

cameron Lester Roloff Herman Baptist Church Missouri Texas forty eight years ninety percent thirty years twenty years twenty year three days one day
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"I will be doing that. Sure. And the only reason on plugging our social media is because we are so small we haven't had time to catch up yet. But people we will drop on our Facebook. In Graham, and I'm still trying to figure out Instagram. The. Out get smoke. If I think once I get Wayne involved in and the producer. Now, a lot of stuff will change for the positive which is really good. I'm just glad you know, doesn't matter. How many anybody that listens? Polls of a pew takes a seat and learns something any right? Thing. Thank you. To all right psoriasis. Thank you, my friend. Go at the right guys have good night. Route. Thanks for listening. And hopefully, you've added something to your knowledge base. Subscribe now, and please give us a five star rating spread the love and feel free to leave a kind written review for us. You're humble hosts gain knowledge after every episode follow us on Facebook and Instagram at pull up acute podcast, that's p U L L UP A P E W podcast again, Facebook and Instagram at pull up a pew podcast. He U L L UP. Hey, he w podcast and Twitter at Pulo up, Hugh, again, he U L L UP A P E W Twitter at pull up you. Please also consider supporting us through Patrie with anything you feel you can afford at patron dot com. Slash pull up. A few patriot is spelled P A T R E N dot com slash pull up Hugh. That's p AT R E O N dot com slash p u l l UP a he w we will also be doing shows and supporting the innocence project, there can be no greater crime or misery than having your liberty and freedom taken away knowing your innocent. So thanks for listening. And if you're a new podcast or and want to have advantages, we can offer you through our partnership with asandra production and worldwide motion pictures than Email is at info at pull up a few podcast dot com. That's pulled up Hugh, P U L L UP, a he w podcast dot com.

Hugh Facebook Twitter Patrie Graham Wayne producer Email R E O
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Was. Shotguns. It is. Nine enjoy. Those is always great to to with like minded souls about DNC psychedelics, different perspective. So thank you very much roof antigen to thank you, though, anx is for you and for providing your knowledge and experience, it's really been a pleasure and an honor to have you on. Thank you. Thank you. Thanks for listening. And hopefully, you've added something to your knowledge base. Subscribe Nell, and please give us a five star rating spread the love and feel free to leave a kind written review about us. You're humble hosts game knowledge after every episode. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at pull up a few podcast at Twitter at polo Pugh. Yeah. For Facebook and Instagram at whole up the pew podcast that p u l l UP. He w Hodge chest. Following us on Twitter. It's Twitter at pull up a pew pod. That's p u l l UP. He w pod. Please also consider supporting us through Patrick with anything you feel you can afford at Petra dot com slash pull up a pew. We'll be doing shows supporting the innocence project, so please support us in this effort through Patrie, its patron dot com slash pull up you. That's patrie. He AT are be o- N dot com slash p u l l a w. So thanks for listening. And if you're a new podcast or and want to have the advantages, we can offer you through our partnership with a Sandra production and worldwide motion pictures, then please Email at info at pull up a few podcast dot com.

Twitter Patrie Facebook Patrick w Hodge Nell Sandra production polo Pugh Instagram
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

07:13 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Do you feel as if reality has been altered that something is not quite right? And hasn't been for quite a while. The this is the podcast for you. This is the sound of duality the sound of DMC molecule as its awakening your mind to the wisdom. You see? It's also the sound of sheep or being asleep in a state of bliss ignorance. So subscribe now to the pool of the pew podcast and take a seat. This is a podcast of all you touch. And all you see enjoy the ride and enjoy the duality of knowledge and bliss and the very thin line between each. I this is drew. I have my co host, Jennifer. Hello. There are. Yesterday is dick Conn, and this is the pool up you podcast and feeling that we're going to have a really epic show today. Dick is the author of DM tea, and my Colt mind investigations of a cult realities using the spirit molecule, which is really one of the cooler names that I've I've heard of the book on this subject so kudos there. Pretty pretty cool. Dick one or two. Go ahead. Just give us a brief background of what you brought you to writing this book. Yes. Show hydra. Hi, jennifer. So yet was. Mm inspiration was just chance in home the spirit molehill documentary by Dr Rick trust, man. And you know, I just absolutely chance to comment. Our a time in my life where. Stop smoking weed after a long long habit. I was messing about with some some of the legal highs research chemicals. No, you know, not regularly. You know? You know, having some good times with those. You know, I mean. I'm a family, man. It was like a fulltime jokes is as when I could, you know, get away with that just on the documentary manages goosebumps upon goosebumps. And I just knew I thought that that is big. And I really I gotta try the I didn't even know you could smoke it. You know? And I hate needles. I was like whatever I got the spurring Molocue or. Yeah. So spoke to you. Yeah. Eight kind of bra home, you know. I some pre weird things happen as a child which know from speaking people. Now, you read my book or follow me on social media. I, you know, I think he's quite common. The you know, when when you're young very young, you know, I suspect people do inexplicable an unusual experiences. Kind of. Kind of took me back to that really piqued my interest in in Inasa, teric Ecole literature, you know, which are a chance to Palmer's and adults that chimed with man, you know, I I read as a David as broad as I could, you know, again as a as a full time, you know, with full time job and family really really Chind strongly with yet. Just autho. I gotta try that. No matter what that's funny that you say that I've I've heard that a lot too. I think you've hit the nail on the head there that a lot of people have experiences that are that are young that open you up to wanting to go deeper. Let's say into these experiences because you wanna know what happened. What was that all about toward, you know, or I guess were also people that are searchers, let's say. You know, were probably continually searching for more and more knowledge. I know I am. I imagine you are too. I know Jen is and. Yes, I kid. You know, like, I was still in the news that you know, you know, we've been to the moon on a nano the some conspiracies that kind of who is all you know, I wanna go to the moon out of a straw. Obviously. You know, we can all do that. But you're right. I think, you know, mankind this I nature an ex Laura an investigator a risk taker nothing psychedelics. You know, Seiken not collect flirtations. I think volley d'exploration absolutely Savelli science is just a valid Savelli opportunity for for individuals on humanity as a whole to explore something that's Polly documented, or unknown. You. Let's go on. Then anybody can do you don't have to be a Magellan or a positively on you know, to, you know, to have like you said is exploration of anything. He and I heard you make a comment on another interview. I think you said it was your your father. You were having a discussion you're very young. And he said, look son, you know, you can start racing out past the moon and pass the planets and stars faster and faster in as fast as you possibly can go and you'll still never reach. The edge of the universe. Right. I think you had said something like that. And that just blew you'll let. So not clear like that. You know? I mean, having the, you know, having he's kinda give me goosebumps. But yes, exactly where he said, you know, I mean denied lay in bed awake. And I just think in about on trying to use hand Cillian Alba trying to reach the edge of the universe enlight walls there when I get the edge. Eight just blow giant when you consider the. Has no head. It's crazy. That's where to make you think of the old maps of of where they show the edged. And then you know, you see a sea dragon. You know, something here lies the edge of the world. The nothing can go past it. And that is interesting that because that were starting to use this. Let's say western man is starting users more that the more that we use it. Maybe we're gonna find at that map doesn't have those entity them on he's already. But that dragon. You know, that we can't go any further that

dick Conn Jennifer Dr Rick trust Inasa Jen Cillian Alba investigator Laura Palmer Polly David
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"When. The okay. Yeah. So like your local grocery store, or they haven't piggly-wiggly taxes or TV. But so public up in time I approached them about Gannex in about what they do wonkery short. This is that I got another couple of other groups of small ones like myself of five oh one C threes. Ambi does hounded in hounded helped write the legislation because that's what I was doing for this other group, even as a very young early twenty somethings. I was going to Washington I was dealing talking with new Gingrich at the time the about different stuff. So I kind of knew how to do it and got them to create what's called green wise, which is now in every Publix across the nation. So it's mid Ahmad trying to say that it's like, hey, look at me look at what I did. That's not at all. That's not how I am. It was just that one small effort is the point that just one person and doing one small thing. That the domino effect. And you don't know where it's going to it certainly does. And it's not just things like that. It's just like a simple act of kindness to a person at the right moment can totally turn their life around in. You may not even be aware of it. You may never find out about how that moment you spent with them change them. But it it on my end by somebody doing that to me. So yeah. So I mean, there's so much another that we've really emphasize so many of the bad things that are going on the world right now. But there's so many wonderful things going onto and there's so many wonderful people, and they're not the people that are famous. They're just noble that they're living there every day. And just making it a a little bit better for themselves and for somebody that happens to be fortunate enough to come into their spirit influence, even if it's just a kind word because words words them powered. And I don't know. I I get, you know, get a little upset about things like anybody else's. I really hope hold out hope that we can't change things. And whether it's about in you and. And we don't want to save your way must do it ourselves. When most do it ourselves. We can't depend on our president or congress or even aliens whoever to site. We h do it on our own in our own best way using for our highest invest good of everyone. And I know that's a big order a tall order for anyone. I think we can do it. It's at hundred monkey takes one. It's going to be the tipping point about one person of doing what you said earlier. That's my belief at least. Yes, I do believe that blade. We each have the ability to do the. That's right. I all ready to. I know for funny. But that's my way you really think by am. I have conservative leanings that I knew what John Lennon meant, you know, by those very very powerful words that people would say are very very socialist in nature, but it's not necessarily true. It just means we've got all live together on this victory tiny rock floating in the middle of nowhere. You know? I. I. Got very few chances of making it. Right. So I really enjoyed this. I really did. I really enjoyed -joyed the talk, and I'm like you. I don't I just hope people whatever like to hear his people open dialogue with one another where they even though they just religious talk. Yeah. Solutions from time to time. Sure. Great great will will definitely plan on that. They ham different subjects and get some some of these other things out. 'cause I wanna hit on that on the DM teed subject. But then come back around to some other things again getting get a little bit more into the into the high strangeness and wait at even scratched the surface, your lows, even those who am I talking with? I'm talking with where did the road go coming up soon, and he does late night radio show Durling you'd actually know him. I think I'm saying the name of wrong, but and I'm horrible with names that I was forget, but you know, but anyways, but yet as late night radio show on high strangeness, but also music, which will you hands on my guy that I will of Glenn Miller all the way to AVI, you know, along ever. On music country, western rock music, all of it. Then rap, but I do wrapping some old stuff. Like, if it's if it's all the ramp like my first year, let me just say this real quick. And then we'll go let you guys go talk in yours, but I bought sugarhill gang's rapper's, delight. Oh, my. And and Pink Floyd wall, though is what I was getting like the weird duality of that. It doesn't get any stranger of two right of things. So unless it's blonde doing that one song about alien that were on your apps on. Yeah. Right. What the first one? I actually remember hearing was that Blondie did. Laterally cool. I mean that's in. That's a whole other really cool discussion alone on music, and how the senses in talking about when we were talking about the senses earlier, and what it does bring back memories in thoughts feelings, and there's just there's a really cool show. Just in that alone. L? Yes, I agree with you. All right, aggravating. All right, ladies, I really really enjoyed it. And let's pick this up again. Go ahead and click on our out tro in. Let's stick Santosh through Twitter. And oh, and I do wanna make a quick note that on the outdrew for Twitter. It's actually pull up a pew pod. Peo- de ammused left off the pod the peo- de. So it's P U L L UP A P O D out of horse at pool up a pew pot. And that's where you'll find us on Twitter. All right. Well, thank you. I enjoyed it. You're welcome. Have a good one now. Bye. Bye. Thanks

Twitter Publix Ambi Washington Peo- de ammused Gannex Gingrich John Lennon president Durling congress Glenn Miller Blondie Santosh
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Half. Yeah. Thank you, Dr pry for everything that you're doing. And you know, God bless you. And and I hope you're able to knock some heads there in Washington get this done for us in and hopefully, the people that are listening like you said will will work within their own states to see what we can get done on on local levels and send out messages and send out tweets in everything that we can possibly do. Because if people were listening to what we were just saying, they they would understand again that this is probably one of if not the greatest existential risks. We have right now mine for essential threat to our civilization. But it is also you'll excuse for us to be vulnerable to it. It's one of the few essential threats that we can actually able hip with actually down in. Next week. I'm driving down there to work with some of my colleagues who are want to get Florida protected. Good. Very good. That's good to know for me. Thank you for doing that so much are let you will let you we'll let you go in less. Jennifer had anything real quick or no poor, Jennifer. We should've let the Jennifer do more. What I think she I think we lost her by accident are no worries. Thank you so much again for coming on doctor pry and putting up with me. Over and over Jonah get John thank you for for making the time to do this. And I know our listeners are going to, you know, absolute enjoy this and do the right thing. And hopefully will will get this done K. Well by. By our? Have a good time on your next interview. My. Thank you for listening now, please hit that subscription button. And give us a beautiful five star reviews who people can find us, and maybe a short nice written review to if you don't mind also follow us and help a great cause in the making of this podcast, and our dream of supporting the innocence project hit that patriot support button in the show notes and help us with whatever you can today. Keep us up and help us keep the duality of life and check by producing more and more incredible content. Also, follow us on Facebook. Under pull up a pew podcast and Twitter at poll up a pew pod. Peo- de Instagram. Pull up you podcast. Don't have a lot up there yet. But we will for all you touch. And all you see this is drew and I'm out.

Jennifer Dr pry Washington Peo Facebook Twitter Jonah Florida John
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"The everything that ease. He's crea. Gated out of consciousness, physical reality is literally a literally unappy phenomenon of consciousness, and that an older for us to function within this simulation. We have to have certain belief systems. We have to going back to the point. I was making before we need to have an understanding of spe distance between things we are linear time time has to low of time it self, you know, he's just a an extrapolation from. Thermodynamics an entry pay. Things go from older to disorder. But then again, the while if that is the case how is it that Eva Lucien seems to be going away yet their way. I have a whole theory on that were actually devolving that we were one consciousness one singularity at the beginning. And that every time, you know, somebody's born I shouldn't say somebody's born. But another consciousness is brought with into the universe that were cutting that in half and that we keep doing that. We're cutting the the original singularity in half every time. So every time we do that. It's kind of like a simile of ourselves that, you know, like, each each facts is a is a worse picture of the original. If that makes sense, so we're not really moving forward in evolution that we're going backwards in that were what we're dealing is for using technology in order to make up for what we've lost thousands of years ago that we had so much knowledge the sages that we that you talk. Talking about all of the different people that if if history Israel, and they did that they had a different way of of thanking their minds were just as intelligent as we are. But I'm arguing that they were probably even more intelligent to the point that we can't even conceive what they were thinking at that time of how their minds were used because each time again that somebody's born were cutting into that that one singularity of consciousness that occurred in the beginning of time. And allergy is. Yeah. That we're making up for that. We think that we're. Evolving with the guy, you know, and all of the things that were creating that it's actually removing into an Inari that we don't understand were playing with you know, as being God's, and that this might end up something tragic that that funnel effect that we've got to get through that. If we don't make it through this this tight funnel and get to the other side without fundamentally destroying ourselves that we might have to start over again, you know, existence of the human reality in life, and and might cease to exist in and maybe just a few of us left and we start over again willfully enough. This is I'm involved with a group of people. We meet started to. As every every three full weeks, some houses palment in London, and will to the guidance of the couple people, and this is exactly what we're trying to do is to bring awareness of the fact that we need to start thinking differently in terms of how we relate to the environment on how we relate to each other. Because we seem to be on a collision Colson so many different ways. And we don't necessarily know how we're gonna go forward. But the some very very interesting people involved in that, you know, some really top notch will famous people, and it's a movement away from this may I it's it's more twirler civil thick worldview. But sadly, I think the vast majority of humanity done Saint that way, you know, the into Metairie of materialism that into may I this this no spirituality anymore here race generation. That's all it's about. It's it's too. It's made to sign up the Ritz that we took when when we develop the first atomic weapon, and what von Braun had said, you know, that the, you know, the famous quote of what we unleash, but they were doing the mathematical Satistics of whether or not the entire. Higher.

Eva Lucien allergy von Braun Colson Saint Israel Metairie London
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Nails and things like that. Why are they more real than the reality? This presented to you by Bryan on the answer is you've got no way of knowing a way of knowing I play a game with Jennifer about how you know. We cannot prove the past exists. There is no possible way for us to do that that right now in this moment. Whatever happened five seconds ago. We cannot prove happened. All we can prove is what's happening right now. And we've been the phone, and I've told her Jennifer remember this conversation, and then we'll get back on the phone two weeks later little ask her. What's happened? We cannot prove that any of that occurred accept what's happening right now. I mean, we we have we have a memory night. Don't know exactly what that is what we're creating filling in the blanks so to speak like you're saying of what's her. But Jennifer, right. We've talked about that. And out quickly it occurs. Like, you know, we were just literally on the phone even though is two weeks ago. It was really just now a, you know, a immediately to. The issue is not any that you can extrapolate from the future into the future futures on -ticipant tree the future actually existed till we save it. And then Bradley becomes the past on the only thing that actually happens is the next point between the future that is yet to cut the full doesn't exist in the past which ceased to exist uneasiness in memory, and we already know from people's memories the memories can be manipulated. They can be changed this many things. So when getting deeper deeper into these issues of section the whole thing seems to fall Paul's which ninety-nine percent of the population. Never think about these things the not issues to them up consciously. They're thinking so you've got that. What do you call it? Everybody's consciousness literally creating what's happened the collective unconscious. It has and that again with with there being no pass, no real Roman history that we're all just really creating that for this one moment that you know, none of that actually happened which is something that I constantly drives me nuts. You know, thinking about will the area or actually occurred will the moving into at the moment is the concept of the GRA goal. And the Negra goal is a should belief system. The people have becomes extent also themselves on again, it some anybody. Who's in a Colo will know about the concept of the Google? It's being something that is being part of of magical tradition for many many centuries on it's the idea of somehow making the the reality out the plastic by the act of Fulton observations on I'm reminded. Hey, you know, people who have created things Cole toll Parr's, which kind of won't falls that actually become manifest in three reality. Now, there's so much evidence that these things take place on only needs is a question of belief on a question of attending attention. You know, we all agree that the world is the way it is. Because we all agree. That's way, it is. Now, could it be other people see the world in a completely different way on indeed the philosophies that are arguing now? The you can't you can't you come on even say that so many from different cultural background or belief system. Sees the world in the way, you do that will likely different again, it could be down to language. It could be the way. It's something called a snake? Wolf pulses that occupies this. Intriguing this on, but what are your feelings on Boltzmann brains, and that were just kind of floating out there existing as a. Basically, just a a mind with no physical structure whatsoever in that were creating this reality that's all around us. But have have you heard of that that Boltzmann brains? I know the principle of so I presume the plano bolts both men as in the guy that actually came up with the country septa venture pay Bryant who suddenly committed suicide. So that's not good stalls for that one. But. Laugh, they all is. And I run to book with last about this about. We confuse sometimes soon that consciousness is simply nappy phenomenon of Brian behaviors and we fail because we can measure what happens in somebody's Brian when the site playing tennis or the thinking some things the full the thinking of those things he's actually embodied in the brain. But it just as easily analogously could be the brain is reacting to something that's external to itself, the reality behind this reality, which we all exist within the we all we all beings that as a tie on showdown said, you know, that we all spiritual beings, having a human experience, the what they says, it's a simulation that we are inside. But the real our Damon. I would argue of that. And the Damon does need a brain to exist because consciousness is prime the

Jennifer Bryan Damon Brian GRA Google Bradley Cole toll Parr Paul Fulton tennis Bryant ninety-nine percent five seconds two weeks
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Worst space space. Go is. Space just Baid up of the objects that are in space or does it have objective existence outside of us? And the question is we really don't know. So is space simply a creation of consciousness in some way. Now, David bone, the famous, I know American philosopher, scientists when the wills talk quantum physicist to these time Heo, the what this known locality on this entangled particles really tells us is the level of reality, though, the same particle, we see them as two particles, but it's actually one in fact, everything is one because everything is holographic. You know, we exist within a holographic structure that we believe is three dimensional when it's not it's two dimensional not only that. But the latest research she's actually doing the signs of how this seemingly three dimensional allusion is created again, so many questions. Yeah. The whole holographic universe principle itself. Oh, totally. You know, that the thing is that the people is people like one man the corner who's doing work on this the guy that really is the big gun. This recently Jacob beckon stain. Also over there in Canada in North America. There's a guy called Craig HOGAN works of the perimeter instituting Canada in Ontario and doing work at the moment. Trying to find the pixelated of the program. You know, this is one blowing stuff that actually trying to find the pixelated. They know what size the pixel. Shen is the pixelated of what's called plank. Length squares smallest is you can have. And what is intriguing about these plump clinks scores is that if you decided that the edge of the universe? Mention the universe. Expanding out like a Balu the out the inside of the balloon is the edge of the universe is expands outwards if thought was peppered with plank scale squares on each punk scale square had one digits of information, one binary digits of information one bit of information, and it's sending information in woods, the relationship between the numbers of data and the amount of data which is needed to explain the universe as we know. It's it's the same. It's the same. It's like one of these kind of numbers that scientists think is impossible. How can that be the case? But it is it's telling us something. It's like why does the universe seem to work on something cold the plank number what is it flying over the planet? The plunk number. He made it up. He used it. As a tool to explain the survey ships that were taking place, but socially, this number occurs everywhere at it's because human beings think about something and it comes into existence the act writer thinking the action creates what's out on this areas of the begun to my new book. It's interesting that you know, we call it a saunder productions it, and that's what pull up you podcast falls under the definition of saunder. Which we can go into another time. But you're would be viewing. Let's say a a light in a far off distance in an apartment any know that somebody's living there and their life is just as complex as yours is. But they're just a background like an extra in your movie your life that you'll never know. But what makes me think is? Is that truly a life existing there? Or is it kind of in a gray scale of existence? If that makes sense. Nope. It does of of of existing not existing because. Not able to quote, the Schrodinger cat is opened up that box and be able to see into create that. That's far off enough off distance within a building. Let's say that you can't physically see them, you know, or they existing inside that box were or they truly real. I don't know if that makes sense or not do it's it's the philosophical question of the minds, isn't it? You know, they are the only thing I can know with absolute sets shoot is something perceiving something everything Aries is mid conjecture. I don't I never I never actually directly into face with external reality show. I'm sitting on the moments mind might backside Nottingham tied with the because of electric impulsion. An also the power exclusion principle. So I never come tech anything. I never touch anything my eyes see things, but that the things the my is saying the electromagnetic waves in the lightness hitting my retina is not the same light. Or indeed, it's not even light self inside my brain in my visual kotex. So everything I'm saying is being created by a recreation of electronic electric signals in right of a mime Anura. I the darkness. Of our skull insider girl as you quite place possible. But the external visual system, you'll looking now if you look out of your is now you'll seeing a wraparound fully textured fully colored reality yet. He's created by an inverted postage stamp size image on your retina Nelson's out. But you have a blind spots at the back of a giant. I would say this is become the brain fills in the information. It needs from the but will the blinds in needs to fill in. So you've got no way of really knowing that what you'll seeing externally is radio. The so that themselves to us the building of questions about the nature of hallucinations, the nature. My mental tricks Amina when you see die method demento trick to me imagery, when you see Donald trip to me nails

Canada hallucinations Craig HOGAN David bone Jacob North America physicist Heo Nottingham Shen Amina Nelson Ontario writer Donald one digits one bit
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"It's unbelievable. Now, then then I approached Bruce, Grayson, and he agrees to write forward to that book. So professor, Bruce Grayson wrote the forwards to the book now unfortunate was going to be called chasing the Ferryman. Another explain why I wanted to call it chasing firm, if you're interested, but my polish Walter dick down the original version that I've written was far more technically. Precise. It was had all the science had. I had three chapters on quantum physics alive. Just explained the quantum physics of time. The quantum physics of of atomic particles Halliday Blinken announce of reality how they can be two places at the same time. It was all supporting material, but the polish awarded it down because they said, no, it's too technical. It won't Sal. I know what you're trying to do. But it will not sell the full. I'm we think cheating the firmness to obscure title. And we think you should call it just as that life after death. Now, my frustration without was the book doesn't deal with that. I never ever discussed. What happens after you die? I don't discuss his life after death the whole hypotheses. What happens the split second before you die? In other words, everything I talk about takes place when the brain is still functioning. So I don't need to come up with any kind of theory, dishing body spirits because it's all happens want. Dying. And the it ended up and confuses people because people now by the book and say he doesn't talk about that. But I think I feel but I do want to know when you're ready to do explain why you did call it cheating, the Ferryman. Okay. Again, is one of the curious events of how things just come together. For me. I've never been particularly knowledgeable about ancient Greek minutes. I know a little bit about them like moat, but it's lay people too, but I don't know depth. But I started was writing the book I started to digging to the beliefs of the pre Socratic and the Lucian mysteries tight used to type place just outside Athens for many many years, I'm one of the Greek belief systems, and this is where it gets really really interesting 'cause I believe these guys already knew about this. I don't think there's anything in my writing that isn't already known. It's just it's Nonni esoteric traditions its Hayden Colt. And I'm the first writer joining the dots. And in fact, I've been approached by Colt groups to three of them approach me said shit. You've you don't you? You've been talking about the years. The ancient the pre Socratic used to believe that when somebody died you put a tiny coin cold Obelas underneath tongue of copes, and you probably two coins. All you put two coins on the eyes. This. The reason would be is the two coins on the eyes would stop them being able to look back and come back and be a ghost back in the real world and the coin onto the tongue was for particular purpose because when the person died they would find themselves on the edge of a huge rhythm. Technically, people would call the sticks. It's not it's actually really Acharon the technical about this. But is one of the rose this they acro- and they find themselves Paige and out of the mist comes about. And the boatman. He's coming across. And he's cold Carol now carom then will take the obelisk as a tip. Payment to take the raid across the river Styx, the I chrome to go to Haiti's. Okay. So this is where I talk about cheating the Ferryman because I all can you don't cross the Akron. You cheat the Ferryman of his obelisks. He's cheated, but this mole to this. Because if you look great the engine Greek miss, what used to happen was when the shade when the dead person got the other side of the of the caro-. They were given the opportunity of either going forward and living in the listen fields and living in whatever walls, all they could go back and live their lives again live the life again there life not reincarnated to somebody else, but live, right? Rely again in something that's known as the eternal returns, the eternal return. Okay now in order to do this. And this is where it gets quite strange. The ancient Greeks believed that you had to drink of something called the Wolters of the leaf eight L E H H A the leafy was another tributary of the stakes like the caro-. And it's called the river of forgetting so you drink the waters of the leaf and all your past memories would be white claim. And then you'd go back across the Akron and be reborn again from the start of your life with no memories of who you were or anything. Now. This is identical to something that millions of people do every day in twenty first century world. It's a third person computer game. Okay. You stop a third person computer game. We'll happens you load up the computer game Bank. You have your shade. You have your onscreen being the grandma torrents help get through the game. Laura Croft, for example, the onscreen computer game is bull at that moment. It has no memories or anything of the past. Installs the game as he stalls. The game runs down a corridor. Goes into a room, the big monster. Laura Croft gets killed that's warm life dead that Leedle on on the screen has died. However, the Damon which is the game player and then back to the stalls reconstitute another Leedle identical ADL in the same world in the same environment living the same life. But this time the Damon knows that if it goes if the delong goes into that room it gets killed. So what he does is walls in any way can to stop the Leedle on the onscreen sprite going into that room and allows it to survive a little bit longer till again it's killed the start of the game in the end after multiple times. The Leedle lidge the perfect life. It gets through the game. And I think this is what life is. We live this tight life multiple times. And every time we change it slightly. Every time we have we do something different. We avoid dying. I say to my people when I do my talks, and I say, isn't it amazing? The people, you know, around you die, but you never do you witness death. You never witness your own because we never witness around deaths, and again before people are going all this on scientific nonsense. I strongly suggest you check out something cold quantum suicide the river on YouTube, you'll find lots of references to this. It was first suggested around about fifteen years ago by a Swedish American physicist, professor max, tag, Mark who I think is Princeton and tank mock uses all present knowledge of quantum physics to prove that the observer within his own universe. Never ever dies. And it's to do with an application of something cold shrouding cat. Yeah. He's running -solutely spot on because we are creating around us. We'll collapsing the way function of all reality. We are. Collapsing. The way function of the game that each one of us exists within and all games overlap with other people because all the time, we'll all creating all Rome. What I call the federals, your creating your phones now, and they're interfacing with mine and the way functions of us are overlapping at the moment. And the next time we may Elon Velappan again because we've become entangled. And this is life is a computer game. But on top of that, we know the physics riots likes to make an excuse for this entanglement. You know issue they go around that to make ceases of how to electrons can tend interface with each other from great distances right up. They they have no idea. How this this completely flies against all knowledge of of how we believe right base to base space and time space is something there are objects in space, and they are distances from each other. But one of the biggest philosophical questions unfit on questions being asked by physics, including Ernest MAC, the guy that came up with the max max Payne and everything else was the imagine a scenario the Spacey's entity under just one object. Yeah. Worst

Bruce Grayson Laura Croft Akron professor Walter dick caro Damon Halliday Blinken Haiti Athens max Payne Rome federals Elon Velappan Nonni Hayden Colt YouTube Paige writer Carol
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"There is a reality behind this reality. But they also argue the NAS sticks that inside each of us is a show the little bit of the Bianchi behind the. Reality. Another Shaw is called the Damon. On the everyday person the links in this life is called the eagle. A little bull went on in my head, and I will bloody how that's it. That's it the voice in my head. The guiding spirit that I have is the Damon the NAS tick Damon, and the I am a regular eat alone, which is living the life normally now so then get carried away. I get started interested in the chemical constituents of what takes place when somebody dies. What happens in the brain a ninety scope, something quite strange, the something cola glutamate, flood glutamates his euro transmitter in the brain. And it floods the brain times of stress and pressure and death. Now when people have glutamate flips in all circumstances. Well, how time slows down full you have been involved in a call crash or somebody gives you buy news or whatever. Time just kind of. That's the glutamate glimpse is also responsible for migraine classical migraine temple Obama Polisi schizophrenia eighteen inches known constituent. They measure this particular neurotransmitter in the brain. So here we have temporary epilepsy. Then I get a phone call from a recruitment consultancy on. It's a lady and she phones me up and she said, Tony we all looking full a business consultant do business consultancy force. Would you be interested in doing it? I said no count because I'm writing book, and as most people do she said what about on a said, I don't really know. I think we got all over the place. But the moment I'm very interested in the urological constructs of something called temple epilepsy. She goes requires and she says we need to make up. So I ranked to me are metro in a place called the Cup hotel literally round the corner where where I'm now living in place to Horsham living in a place called Croly unkown. He's one of the villages around Gatwick pools. London secondary port which is only three miles down the road, four miles down the road. May sirocco and she turned around. And she said, I think you'll to qualified for the job, but I needed to speak to you. Because I've recently diagnosed with temple Obama laps. And she said some of the things you were talking about sending shivers down my spine on said why? And she said because of what happened to me when I I realized I had t Ellie. And I said, well, can you tell me she said, you know, of course, she was get this. She was a word. She was a work, and she was visiting clients place. And she was in the cafeteria of the clients the clients sitting opposite her and the discussing contract that they can do as her client. Sits back starts pouring herself a coat tail out of a teapot. My friend only Clawson says there was a snap over her left. She heard distinct snap over areas. And her friend start moving. She looked at a friend, and friend was frozen. And she what's she doing? Why she stopped? And then she could hear this low humming. Sound? And she slicking at friend, and then she looks around the counting. Everybody's frozen. Everybody is not moving and she's thinking offer got say what is happening to me. And then she looks at a friend again and after about five minutes, or so if her time she notices, a friend is moving incredibly, slowly, and she realizes that the humming sound, she's here is people talking a metabolic rates gone. So high the literally her time perception had just expanded beyond belief. Now, she she said to me, I don't know how long I was in state. She said it could've been weeks. It could be months it could've been years. It could've been a lifetime. But she said after what seemed like forever? There's another snap over my air. And my friend continues pouring, the taste sits back instead of you. Okay. What she'd had is called a petty mala scence. In other words, from the point of view have have friend. They woman she literally just stood at for about half a second and come to. But she'd been away for weeks days months years. Okay. She so upset and worried about this. She goes to see an urologist, and she's diagnosed with temporal Polisi. Now, for some reason, I do not know why I turn around, and I said to her do you get deja-vu sensations, and she looked at new absolute shock, and she said, absolutely. She said it's Paul to my pre seizure aura. I know I'm going to have a seizure because I get the most profound deja vu sensations. I said if he got these who sensations. How far in the future? Do you know what's going to happen? And she said ten seconds. Probably she said, I can repeat in my mind while people are going to say to me. This was. Amazing kasumi. I was then be able to draw ring because of course, not work to the hypothesis because if somebody who's temporal lobe epilepsy spirit since temple Obama laps. If the newer logical construct slightly different in means they can chew into the world of the Daymond slightly more. And we're cost we know that if you'll living in a recording of your life, you can fast forward, you know, you can know in a Hatton because it's already there. It's already happened. It's just your stocking linear time moving through it. But there is another time that runs parallel, you know, all tho- tho- Khanal time that roams on a direct right time. From everyday time time be time bay. Yes. Of course, time be on as you probably know from my writings is to do with the writings of some they called John William done who in nineteen twenty nine wrote a book cold an experiment with time twenty seven twenty twenty nine. And again, we have certainly all this evidence. Supporting my hypotheses unin. The final piece of amazing thing is that. I'm I then get then contact the national association of near death. Studies enjoying the ancestral cessation industries. Who do I get in contact with professor Bruce Bryson of the Grayson scale? And then helps me get my first Akademik paper published and by hypothesis cheating. The Ferryman first appeared in a peer reviewed. I condemn paper published by the international association of near death. Studies in two thousand four. Spring two thousand fighters two thousand five. The back of that. I then got my first book deal when the the foot when the book was finished on the sheeting Ferryman idea was there. I then found a publisher send the paper to them. And what happened was again? This is how life works. The owner. The chief executive of the particular publisher was troubling to American business. He just picked up one of the manuscripts on his desk at random to read on the plane. It was my manuscript. But by the time he landed usual, he was on the phone to the London office to say my God, we've got to have this book. It's

Damon Obama London temporal lobe epilepsy publisher Shaw Cup hotel Ellie Clawson Tony Akademik consultant Hatton Paul chief executive John William professor Bruce Bryson eighteen inches five minutes
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"All impressionism through the surrealists. So I have very good brand. Grounding in a lot of supporting areas from the areas, I I'm interested in. But when I was university. I also myself a good friend of mine who's now back in the UK in American guy called upstate myself involved in a few others. We used to travel around the Warrick Chicago side trying to find hold into pubs in Holte locations. And indeed we found an authentic coal spot in a well-known hold pub in Warwickshire. Wheels visited places bully rectory and very so the prices so intriguing time, but when I actually then went to finish on university career, I'm going to do postgraduate, and I wanted to do a PHD in the altar guy Pyotr della Francesca who was released on Salty's to really interesting guy because he was one of the guys that I use perspective. But of course, reneges on salsas. Well, it was an awful lot of esoteric beliefs behind the paintings symbolism. The masonic symbolism. There was a lot of things in there. I'm sorry again, drew sorry. Lotte hidden meanings in at the arts were including oh, totally you know, everything in Rene Sant's paint. You Rita Rene Sant's painting from the symbolism. I mean as a very negatively by gyco Hugo onto goose who was a Flemish all test. On the symbolism in from the flowers to the building that the characters ring it all messages and people in medieval times in late medieval times, Rene Sant's times could read the painting because he gave so many messages, whereas we just see a picture of an say, that's not the case. Unfortunately, I recently spent six or seven months working at the National Gallery in London working with a lot of the the renovators of the paintings and the all historians. So wonderful position of actually doing what I love which is on the stand. But. When I graduate. What when I left university, they weren't willing to give me a grant to do a page in history. But they said you can't do postgraduates. Luma school of economics in some form of business. Qualifcation do a post graduate course in international label or what if he wants to do we'll give you for that. And that's what I chose to do in the end. I don't tell that. I liked the idea of doing postgraduates at one of the world's top universities. You know, the address is they're in the top five in the world for reputation. So for me to go from Warwick, which regulates number five or six in the terms of academic achievements. The LSAT is is just below Oxford. Cambridge in fact for Paula politicians, and sociologists and social scientists. It's the number one university probably in the world. So it was great. And it was a wonderful environment to either. But I never lost my interesting as Terrassa, so I then had the business career, but all the time I was continually reading, but another thing that had always fascinated me was UFO's and the UFO experience. And I think probably the area that I read most about in my late teens and twenties was probably Ufology. I know the major cases, you know, have extensive knowledge probably is extensive as anybody who's written books on UFO's. But I've never any written about those as such. But then the period time travel tonight, full Fullwood and all the time. I was reading books. I was wondering what full very strange. I I am of a read like, you can't believe I know people say they read, but I read seriously our no books, I make notes on them. And I remember them, and they all go in and they stay they stay minded fact, I can people find this astonishing that I can do this. Sometimes if I'm trying to find a reference I can visualize the page in the book, and I can read down the page in the book and actually find in my mind's eye the reference, I won't and other times. I will just know something's rights, even though I don't even know when I read it. Which is where the and I will go back, and I will discover I was right. You have that voted memory these called Derek memory? It's almost like, right? For instance, on never been beaten in trivial pursuit of a by anybody ever. Nobody is the big Mitch of your process, maybe will happen one day, but it's never ever happened unknown. Full people always want to be in the quiz teams. Because of the way my brain works. You know, people say you should go on these programs. But that's about that's not what I wanna do. Right. You know, it's just not made to get you on what's ours here. Jen, the big one, Alex trebek's? You could make works and on their role because I know. You though, that's the thing is because I'm bizarre characters also heavily into spoiled under my spoil myself and on top of that. I I have huge record collection of music, and I love my music throat music classical music. You know, I'm into everything literally. It's really strange drives. My wife crazy collection right now

Rene Sant Rita Rene Sant UFO Holte UK Warwickshire Pyotr della Francesca Terrassa Luma school of economics Alex trebek Salty National Gallery Hugo London Paula Jen Warwick Oxford Cambridge seven months
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

11:58 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Margaret credible. Guests. All the touch. Something. Mike. Komo's Jennifer and this is the view pot gas. All right. Welcome everybody. This is Andrew I've got my co host Jennifer on Anders steamed guest Anthony peak on yard or do this for. I can't tell you how long in excited we are too happy Anthony on so how're you doing? Anthony. I'm doing extremely well is the wonders about technology that can be talking like this across the vest. Atlantic is raising ruling even very busy very busy beaver. So it may have been absolutely. Yeah. But this is not particularly for an hour. Relax, Asian discussion, an ideas and everything else which helps makes it helps me get my ideas together in my own mind as well. That's good. Very good. I know gets you're working. It's your eleventh book coming out. Correct is. Yes, it is. Nice deadline. I have to deliver it by the middle of June because I've had to delight twice because of business business commitments typical. Yeah. Get together Radi. Well, I'm really delighted as to how it's gonna go. But with all my writing brightening tends to how news I write a book. And then I write it again. Because Christie's original completely Chang move it round with this will what I've got his got about fifteen different chapters, and the challenge is actually linking the mole in kind of a logical structure. Come to me. Because my Damon always makes it tells you prime it just amazes me that I stole spoken. I think might go to where where am I going with this while it's going to happen with this? And then six months later, I sit down I ride the final woods. Mike outwitted elect come from. I love that your game in will just tell you. It's all together in it has been burying. So the last the last decade hall. Means that that has happened just just so uncanny. This to be bas. All but on top of that very much indications of my overall, hypothesis cool cheating fireman. The it does actually suppose if we have the opportunity joining this podcast. I'll explain some of the background. Why believe that I have lived this life before not being through this before man? Yeah, absolutely over and over again and also the concept of time, which I love to hear you talk about and Dan, hopefully, we can get some step. It's of the new book and direction you're going at there would be great for the listeners to hear actually new listeners. He can bring in as many many new new people new Anthony peak fans that we can. Absolutely. Righty? Anthony. Let's let you loose. Okay. Okay. Well, let's pose the first thing I won't be discussing his exactly who I am Walt shakes my tree. And the reason why I write because for many of the listeners who listening to this. They'll be going onto never heard of any done what he's about what he does. Or even indeed worries areas of interest lie while I'm originally from place in the Liverpool in the northwest of England. I did my schooling the and I left there in nineteen seventy three to go away to university. But I have been interested in strange phenomena and indeed altered states of consciousness ever since I was very very young. And I think the basis of this was that in nineteen sixty six I was I was fairly ill with w Monja. And while I was ill with w Monja. I remember having some very very powerful, hallucinations. First time I've mentioned this on on podcast, by the way. So they this is new to everybody, but the prime some of the things I still in external space, very real. I remember seeing what seemed like doll kkob. Jecht's moving around the bedroom and. He's moving around. And I thought to myself exactly what is going on here. So when I recovered from that I started to to start to read quite deeply about esoteric subjects and out. Not time. Ran about nineteen sixty eight hundred thinking was in the UK anywhere. There was a were called man myth and magic and meth much was really wonderful because it was like it was appalled way came out every week. And it was a magazine, but it turned into an encyclopedia. But it was an encyclopedia of of of of of mysticism. But it wasn't a kind of popular Swanee actually highly academic. So it had a deep analysis of apology of comparative anthropoid Aji of different belief systems from around the world, how they integrate with other belief systems, but it also had areas on such things as ghosts exactly what we mean when we have good. We have go seen counters and it also occasionally touched upon creek. Zoology in various other areas of all experiences. The people at hand, you're the is this thing delighted me the when I had the opportunity to go to university. And in those days to go to university from somebody from from my background, anyway, which was very standard working class background was was somewhat unusual, particularly because I had in the UK eleven years of age, you have to take an eleven plus a night failed that because I've always been kind of an oblique thinker, and I think differently to what a lot of people think. So therefore, my my mind way, my mind, works the way, my logic works everything else. We'd eat Choon to the kind of things they were looking for Sam. People. Yeah. So I ended up in cool secondary school which in those days in the mid nineteen sixties in working class community, you're actively written-off life. You know, particularly because the school wasn't expecting may. I ended up in the stream which is the third tier down in terms of what we consider to be your intelligence. So I had to find my way out now, though was eleven year old. I was actually reading philosophy. I was I was you know, we're interested in dinosaurs. I will just interested in dinosaurs. I was interested in the different species of dinosaurs. I knew the difference between all this current a sore Iska dinosaur because he's to do with the way the hip structure works. This was completely bizarre to my teaches. You know, they they won't be talking about the podcast entire on the sewers. Rex an coming up with obscure dinosaurs pointing out on the Cajun's that that's not a dinosaur lizard, all that was an amphibian Nicole to dinosaur. They couldn't just couldn't get me. But around full. Eighteen fourteen years of age wanted to teach his soaring me an MNT gets the stream, and they saw me a- variably thinker, and they started to nurture me and grow me. And I then with managed to to what I think was my fifteen plus which transfers you if you pass it to local grammar school, which is a completely different educational system. And I'm on each to pass that on I ended up the local grammar school, but I had to catch up because I may stray for years of ingrained education. So I missed a lot of the grounding of physics chemistry and mathematics. But I was instinctively. Good language is always instinctively good at at grammar, and at English, language English literature, joker fy history. The subjects that you can read up on your own. I was excellent ads. But my problem mostly through tip subjects that you have to have you have to be told how to understand how chemistry works and how physics works and how mass works. I was way behind in terms of that. But I'm a frustrated scientist, but I had a fairly meteoric career the grammar school because it was the right? Kind of environment for some delight may because I was extremely sporting. They loved it. Because you know, I was a champion athlete. I represented the county in the hundred meters two hundred meters, and they love dole Lanos also very good footballer and everything else. So tennis know most sports I could do so they love that. And I then I was in top of the class. I think quite regularly. Whereas the second school I was always around ten or eleven in class, whereas the grammar school I flew and a very quickly found myself in the position within four years from leaving a second remote in school. I was I was on drought to go to university. And this all started from a fever when you read child, correct, correct? In few things you had a around that. That's that's interesting. It reminds me not not only that. But it's something I've touched upon mug books, but I've again, never discussed in in other interviews is I believe the mind, particularly people who know me know that this is quite strange capacity. I don't forget things if I read something I remember it, and I remember forever, and I can bring up information and facts and figures, and I throw from somewhere, and I believe why they says is to do with my birth on the circumstances of my birth because my mother was seriously ill with tuxedo when she was pregnant with me and indeed five weeks before I was due to be bold, the actual date than I was jus people. My father was cold into say that. We're gonna lose your wife and your son. The socio asleep. And he was given the option, and I think my mother was getting the option of elite even though he was a legal that time to just curfew a may because or though probably poisoning each other, you know, but that day because my mother was quite religious. She was Roman Catholic, and she said on there's no way I'm ever allowing this to happen. So she bull bull with it. But she then took a turn for the worse, and they had to they had to get me out quickly so five weeks before my birth probab- earth. They caught me out in a merging see seizes Zarian section. I'm when they pulled me out, they broke my all as well. So there I was the tiny baby. I think I was something like three three pounds ten ounces or something. Which in those days was was allowing Lee small. Now the question then had was then I was in an incubator full about eight weeks. So I had no human contact. I had no physical contact with any of the he remained for that period of time normally a baby's straight in the arms of its mullahs. And they hug it. And you know, you have tactile feedback. I had none of that on top of that my research now tells me that something very curious happens around about the second or third week before babies born when they run full term. I'm what happens it? There's a massive style of cells in the brain does a huge neurological dial somewhere in the region of sixty percents of brain cells die off on a replaced with Newell's. You you won't new owns a neurons. I

Anthony Anthony peak Mike Jennifer UK w Monja Komo Atlantic Margaret Liverpool Andrew fever Damon Jecht England Dan Walt scientist Lee
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Yes. Absolutely. And the grand daddy of a mall. D M T. Which will probably bring on you know, some specific guests that are. Experts in the fields of psychedelics and how they're being used right now in studies, and like what Jennifer just said in. PTSD and a lot of other ailments at oh. In addiction LSD has been known to cure people heroin addicts that have been here when addicts for twenty thirty years hard time and just one experience in a perfect setting called set and setting and the use of LSD and never used heroin again never used any kind of drug ever again. Absolutely true. It's it's that amazing because of the effects that it has on the subconscious mind. So folks, I guess we're going to kind of wrap up here. We just wanted to give you an introduction. I hope that gives people a little bit of an idea of what we're gonna be doing assure you that we will have a guest that will blow you away at some point in some time, whether it's every single one or just one we're gonna find them. And again on just about every topic because that's the tagline for all you, touch and all you see. In. You know, everything that falls in in between that because I think some people would find that. Absolutely. That's all your life will ever be right. Jen. Are you go? So I'm drew. This is Jen. My just you got anything. They wanna say. Wanna say wait to hear Anthony? Yes. Absolutely. Oh, our Date's. Anthony, I believe we are ethic. It was the. Six the six it was the sixth of February run eleven. AM eastern standard time he's over across the pond. And then yet near we are planning on having on the thirteenth, which is perfect. So it's about a week later, and the by that time will have a number of other guests already lined up for you, some absolutely incredible people in and even see if we can match them up with some celebrities that I already have in mind, I don't want to give it away already. But we might have some incredible names to match up with some people. And if not that's okay too. Just having the guests on will be will be plenty enough for people. I'll. What week and a half two weeks? We'll do this all river again with Anthony. And I look forward. Absolutely. Yeah. Everybody you need to subscribe, whatever it is that you use for podcast you need to subscribe. And if you can if you don't mind, I know you really haven't are too much yet. But if you can hit five stars. This is huge for the algorithm. That's how people find us. It's it's not even so much for review. It's weird. But it's it's the algorithm. Excuse me that I tunes in and say Google uses in order to find you. So we really need that. So people don't just have the necessarily type in pool up a pew podcast and some other subjects might pull up and then below that. It'll say here are some other subjects that you might be interested in, and I think anybody listens to podcast they understand what I'm saying. They see that. And that way it'll pull up pull up Abe you podcasts. So if you guys could do that or just leave a little statement on there about looking forward to the guests. Oh, and please feel free to suggest guests to us. You can't Email us at pool up AP podcast at g mail dot com. And also, I believe at believe I have it set up info at pool up a pew podcast dot com. Either one of those you can reach. No, I'm Jen. At least in at least in this reality. Your Abby normal. All right, everybody. We're going to go ahead and sign off in then we'll see in about a week. Don't forget to subscribe and hit that five star button for us. Okay. Thanks, everybody. Bye. Bye.

Anthony Jen LSD PTSD heroin Jennifer Google Abby Abe Wan twenty thirty years two weeks
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"Right. Person is Leonardo Davinci that I know just. Excites. You know, how versus Talpur genius. He was and I would want to spend at least a couple of months just writing down the questions making sure that I. You know, I was able to ask much possibly, but. Yeah, he would he would be my guy. Absolutely. So many so many people from formation ancient history. And I've got a lot of people from theoretical physics. Also, Arthur c Clarke. Science fiction are two thousand one space odyssey in many many other books. I think Adamov. This loved to pick both of their their brains. You know, Arthur, actually, invented the satellite, and so even contributed to something within the the real world something that you can touch and you can see so. Yeah. Yeah. Very interesting. So let me just mentioned disrobe quick about you near year works in physics. And he went to the Massachusetts Institute of technology, and he got his post doctoral fellow at MIT and IBM in the nineteen ninety one. After a junior faculty appointment at the whitesman institute. He became an associate professor of engineering Boston University. He left Boston University in ninety seven became president of the New England complex system. Institute, and that's really what we're going to be dealing with. And when we talk about complex systems, it's really everything. And again, it's our tagline for all you touch. All you see it's it's it's that an everything in between. It's composed of many components that interact with each other some examples would would be climate organisms the human brain for God's sake, which is considered the most complex organized system in the universe. Which of course, is up the date. How would we know what what else is out there in the universe? But as far as we know, but you've got the power, great transportation communication systems, social economic organizations, just cities themselves building out, the structure the infrastructure eco-systems. It living cell and ultimately the entire universe. So that's the near. So that's obviously going to be just an incredible show than extremely looking forward to. I mean, both both people are Anthony as well. And yeah, because I'm gonna hit them up with some really hard questions different questions than they they are used to getting from some of the other podcasts in radio interviews that I've I've heard them on in in the past dealing with holographic universe theory. Simulation theory, which I wanna say his new, but it's really not new now, you know, it's been out for for a while holographic universe has been on for a longtime. Simulation theory was made. Famous once. What's his name came out with it? Test test on my list. I would love to have. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Well, Lewis tesla. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. He would go on to lift, absolutely. Anyways. So those are going to be the topics that we're going to start with. You know, we're also going to deal with the use of psychedelics just to give everybody a little bit of a warning that we don't really consider that a drug that really back in the sixties when Timothy Leary got ahold of it him in the Mary prankster's in. And you know, let the listener go back and do some of their own research into the subject, but the find that he he really was a great advocate for the use of LSD. But for the wrong reasons, any Brill gave it, you know, a bad name were asserted to be used recreationally where people didn't understand it. 'cause it's an incredibly powerful powerful, and the stride pointing Jorg tell people suffer stop really drawn TST. Addictions, right. Depression. Yes. Yes. Because of the nets were all these in the stigma behind. Yes.

associate professor Anthony whitesman institute Leonardo Davinci Boston University Lewis tesla Arthur c Clarke Adamov Massachusetts Institute of tec Timothy Leary Jorg Depression junior faculty LSD New England MIT Brill president IBM
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"That. Bander snatch. That was actually the first time. I heard the phrase pull up a pew. And I I'm curious, you know, why you chose to. Name the podcast pull off the Pugh. You're absolutely right. That's exactly where it came from. Because I was I was so intrigued by the movie, and I kept thinking of Anthony and his subject matter in his way of thanking one of the characters decides to use this term pull up a pew while he was taking LSD psychedelic drug, and he was basically schooling this individual. And I don't want to spoil the plot of the movie, but he was explaining a lot of what was occurring within this person's life. So that the term itself from what I've learned is is a Australian term that people will use say somebody that's a little bit older might say to somebody that's younger, the pool of appeal young man or young lady, you know. To your about the here's some wisdom. You're about to hear something that you can add to your knowledge base. So yeah. So I decided I found that very interesting in decided perfect name for the podcast. 'cause that's what we're going to be doing is asking people to pull up a pew take seat and to have a listen and taken it as much information as as you can't. We're not gonna force feed. It you know, it's up to you. It's going to be a lot a lot of crazy ideas. The you may or may not agree with, but we're going to bring him to you. Anyway, whether you like it or not 'cause it's our fault gas. So that's what we do. So let me go ahead and bring up you near bar YoM, who's gonna be our second guess, and it was a bit of synchronicity. I I met Yang near on. Twitter down diem there and noticed that he worked in a field called complex systems, which is really what saunder is saunder itself is describing really the entire world in how you fit into it never ready else fits into it at mentions that anthill and everything that's going on within that that anthill or that you might possibly be just an extra in the background as somebody's moving past you, and that's it never to be seen again. But your life is just as complex as that. Other person's was all the friends in all the things in for all you, touch and all you see. And I think some of you out there. No the rest to that statement. Amok and say it because I might get sued. Since it's the part of the lyric credible songs, ever Maili. Great guests that we're going to have for our first few podcasts. I have a question for you. If you had been able to bring on any guest living or dead onto the podcast who would that be? That's a tough one gender. So many people. Dan, Coralline might be one. Who's a podcast her mentioned to you before who I find absolutely amazing. If nobody's ever listened to him, Dan Coralline, and he's got a history podcast literally brings history alive. I I love history and his podcasts can be extremely long. I I enjoy long format podcasts that are at least two hours or longer. Let's say and he makes a five hour podcast just fly by he's got that ability just to do drag you in and make you feel as if you're literally Abram in soldier or a hop light. You know, living back in in in those times. And most of what he deals with is in ancient history, but he's been doing some twentieth century. Work as well lately. So anyways, I highly recommend him. I'd love to have him on the podcast. Also hunter S Thompson. If he was living would be an incredible guest. I feel. There's a lot of controversy with hunter S Thompson that I did not know about him. Way beyond just the fact that he was incredible drug Hatami talking about that in others. There's some other interesting things about him. That may be true may not, you know, unless you know, person personally, there's really no way to know. Right.

Dan Coralline hunter S Thompson Abram Anthony Pugh Twitter Yang YoM LSD five hour two hours
"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

Pull up a pew podcast

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"pew" Discussed on Pull up a pew podcast

"The. Whether it's guests. Just us. All the sea. We know they'll make me something that lies in between. Drew? My jennifer. Podcast. Hi, jen. Doing today. I'm doing well about yourself. I'm doing pretty good doing pretty good. I'm excited to do. This introduction to our podcast in just quickly. Explain what it is is our objective for this podcast and a little bit of information about her first two guests that we're gonna have. And if people have noticed our production company. Is called a saunder productions and what I'd like to do is quickly. Read the definition of saunder. They find it to be one of the most interesting words there is that you won't find in the dictionary yet so saunder is the realization that eat random passer-by is living a life is vivid in complex is your own populated with their own ambitions, friends routines. Worries at inherited craziness in epic story that continues invisibly around you like an ant hills sprawling deep underground with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives, the you'll never know existed in which you might appear only once. It's an extra sipping coffee in the background as a blur of traffic passing on the highway or the lighted window at dusk. That's absolutely amazing. Isn't it that is? I know the first time needed discuss the saunder with me. I didn't want to seem as if I didn't know what it meant that. I was googling it as I was speaking to you. Yeah. It's one of those words that's just kind of appeared on the internet. I'm not even sure that the person that that created it. But whoever he is was pretty pretty genius. But yeah, you can't find it in in the dictionary. Now, there may be a internet dictionary that it's been a place into I I have found it. Other than the image that we use and the definition of it, which it is unknown. For those of you that were wondering something is. Stupid is is it announ. Her is it additive. I guess it really can be whatever it is e wanted to be. No me. Explain. Yeah. Go head curious. What? Why did you choose to create a podcast? I've always had so much curiosity. You know, about knowledge knowledge is is key to everything in your life. Wisdom. With age, obviously, we gain wisdom, and we gain knowledge, but it's something that I've been doing since you know, my early twenties Mike curiosity level was always been through the roof. Whether it's a conspiracy theories in UFO's too hard science in theoretical physics, and especially the concept of time which fascinates me. More than I can explain right now. We'll obviously get into that into a lot of different podcasts holographic universe theory. And I think more and more people have the hunger or an interest for. Some of those subjects, you know, the that will be discussing. It's a great opportunity to bring that knowledge to the world's in. So it's I'm really excited about our upcoming guests, and and I feel if there are any of our listeners out there who would like to have someone. Join our podcast if you have a certain subject or a celebrity or someone who is specialized in a certain topic. We'd love to hear your vineyard about that. Yeah. Bring 'em to us. That's what it's on. Productions is all about is for podcasters that might not have the ability. Or funds in order to produce their own podcast. We are lucky enough to have access to incredible producers and directors we have access to celebrities many celebrity guests that will we'd like to do is to pair them directly with say a specific person in a hard science subject such as complex systems theory, which we're gonna talk about your in a in a second and be able to get that celebrity's opinion. Because I think a lot of people don't realize, you know, they have lives of their own. They have knowledge base systems in beliefs of their own. And I have a feeling that a lot of them sit up late at night like myself staring at the ceiling. Contemplating the universe? You know? Like like, most of us do even as curious children staring at the sky and wondering our place in this universe that we see all around us, and then having to completely rely on scientists, and what they tell us is is truth. And I think most of us that that do have wisdom that are old enough now to understand that that's not necessarily true at all that science, and the definition of certain topics change almost daily that the. Technology itself is somewhat like a spiral spiraling tighter. And tighter. And tighter where we're gonna get to a point. It's called the singularity, which we might even be there already very very possible. We're gonna have guests on the specifically talk about that. So let me talk about our first guest. Actually, we'll talk about our I guess or I guess is Anthony peak who should be known by many people already. He's written nine books. He's right now working on his tenth book. And he actually even be joining us once he's finished sometime around may possibly June as a guest host. And he started round the year two thousand his life was changed yada set of circumstances. That allowed him to take a year sabbatical from his business career. He decided that he would focus the fruits of his reading and research and writing a book so exactly a year later he surface with the manuscript of his first book than entitled cheating, the Ferryman. The book was a distillation of all as areas of interest in quantum physics neurology. Ancient myths altered states of consciousness in the mystery of death. So there we go. I mean, that's just hitting every one of my in. And why finding. Don't to see. And I look forward asking him. How his theories or his beliefs have changed from the first book to the tenth book that he's writing right now. And I'm hoping he'll hit us a few tidbits of the of the book that he's currently writing. So, you know, we'll have a chance to your some of his his thoughts and. I'd like to make suggestion to if people have net flicks is to watch the movie Bandres snatch. If you watch that movie, you are basically going to get a lesson in what Anthony peak is actually been speaking about the last ten years, and what the Ferryman actually is. And what he calls the Dame in not demon. But the Damon. I'm just gonna leave it at that.

Anthony peak jen Mike curiosity Damon ten years