35 Burst results for "PBS"

Capitol Police officials say intel on possible March 4 plot being taken 'seriously'

PBS NewsHour

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Capitol Police officials say intel on possible March 4 plot being taken 'seriously'

"There has been word from Capitol police today. I want to show an alert that the Capitol police sent out today, they said. We have obtained intelligence that shows a possible plot to breach the capital by and identified militia group on Thursday, March 4th. The FBI also said it sent out an alert. Of course, we don't know the extent of this intelligent intelligence. But after January 6th Capitol security officials are being more transparent than ever and more aggressive. That we do know, of course, that there is a very large fence around the capital for many blocks, and, of course, a national guard troops there that we're not there

Capitol Police FBI
Nearly 300 kidnapped Nigerian girls released

PBS NewsHour

00:22 sec | 2 d ago

Nearly 300 kidnapped Nigerian girls released

"Of girls kidnapped from a boarding school in northern Nigeria are free again. Regional officials deny paying any ransom, but they say they did offer amnesty to the captors. The 279 girls packed into a government building today. Waiting medical checks. Some told harrowing tales of their mass kidnapping last week,

Nigeria
Biden: U.S. will have enough COVID vaccine supply for every adult by end of May

PBS NewsHour

00:17 sec | 2 d ago

Biden: U.S. will have enough COVID vaccine supply for every adult by end of May

"President Biden now says that the nation should have enough of a vaccine supply for every adult American by the end of May. He is statement today was two months earlier than the previous estimate. President also directed states to make a priority of vaccinating teachers.

President Biden
Scientists establish freaky two-way communications with lucid dreamers

Kottke Ride Home

03:35 min | Last week

Scientists establish freaky two-way communications with lucid dreamers

"Scientists have breached a whole new level of the dreamworld. They've managed to communicate with people while they're dreaming and not just the one way communication. You may have with someone who is sleep talking. But two way communication the awake scientists would ask these sleeping subjects questions and they were able to respond without waking up. These results were published last week in the journal. Current biology and already aired in a segment on pbs. And one thing giving this particular paper a lot of credence is that it's actually the work of four different teams from four different countries who initially conducted independent studies before finding out about each other and joining forces in total. They brought together thirty six volunteers across fifty seven experiments and trained people with varying amounts of success on lucid dreaming. That is dreaming where you're aware of dreaming. That's cool thing that some people train themselves to do either for fun or with various conditions. Some of the volunteers already had experience with lucid dreaming. But not all of them quoting vice. The researchers verified that participants had entered rim sleep by placing electrodes next to their eyes on their scalps and on their chins by measuring activities such as brainwaves eyeball movements. Sleep experts can determine if a person has entered this deep sleep states. Some of the participants were then asked to confirm that they were in a dream with a pre-arranged ocular response in which they moved. There is in a specific left. Right pattern these icicles. Along with facial contortions were used as a means of communication during the sleep sessions for instance the researchers asked a nineteen year old american participant to subtract six from eight while he was in a lucid dream and he correctly signaled the answer to with two movements from left to right and asked again. He repeated the correct answer. Roughly eighteen percent of the trials resulted in this level of clear and accurate communication from the dreamer. Seventeen percent produced indecipherable answers. Three percent ended with incorrect responses and sixty percent did not provoke a response at all and quotes and from gizmodo quote win. The volunteers were asked about their experiences. Some reported being able to remember the pre dream instructions. They had received an attempted to carry them out. Some also reported hearing the questions they got while in the dream although not always in the same ways and some reported hearing words that clearly felt like they were coming from outside their current reality while others said it felt like they were hearing them through radio or other form of communication within the dream but there are still times when people couldn't clearly recall what had happened. Were win the questions. They said they received in the dream. Didn't match the questions. They had actually gotten and quotes is also worth noting. It was a pretty small sample size. But one of the study's authors can polar points out that the fact that those results came from multiple different methods employed by multiple teams around the world indicates. It's not an isolated phenomenon calling this interactive dreaming polar says they're working on expanding in a few ways they want to be able to run the experiments in people's homes where subjects would be more comfortable and maybe using existing smartphone app that teaches people how to lucid dream. All the main aim of the research is simply understanding the mysteries of dreaming a bit more. They're also some potential practical applications. Blake helping people with breaking habits problem solving having therapeutic benefits if you want to dive deeper put a link to the pbs segment which touches on a few other dreams studies as well in the show notes.

PBS The Journal Blake
Defense secretary confronts sexual assault in military

PBS NewsHour

00:16 sec | Last week

Defense secretary confronts sexual assault in military

"Video posted by a female Marine about sexual assault in the military rocketed across the Internet and into the Pentagon press briefing room today. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin promised to take additional steps to stop such

Secretary Of Defense Lloyd Aus Pentagon
The Hidden Force Shaping Drug Prices

The Pulse

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

The Hidden Force Shaping Drug Prices

"Soaring prescription. Drug prices are raising the cost of healthcare and have many patients either struggling financially or abandoning treatment and many experts. Put some of the blame on pm's so what exactly are pharmacy benefit managers. And how did they get to be so powerful. Liz tongue starts us off the more read about pharmacy benefit managers. The more they make me think of this fictional bad guy from the movie. The usual suspects heiser soza. Here's kevin spacey in the movie explaining who sows as be turkish. Say father was german. Nobody ever believed was real. Nobody ever knew him or sell anybody that ever worked directly for him but to hear kobe. Aussitot it anybody could have worked for. You never knew that was his power. Kaiser suze is mysterious larger than life and a big part of his power comes from the fact that no one quite knows who he is or the extent of his control which is kind of like pharmacy benefit managers or p. b. m.'s. Most people haven't heard of them and yet they wield a huge amount of power to the point that they affect just about every drug dispensed in the us. Every time you pick up a prescription. You're dealing with a ppm for example. Let's say you go into your local drugstore. walk up to the counter and give them your info and prescription. Yeah i'm going to pick up a couple scripts the pharmacy tech punches buttons. And then there's this moment you stare at the register waiting for the price to pop up wondering helmet dent. Is this going to put in my wallet. It's one hundred sixty six dollars and eighty cents the in a nine at sixty eight eighteen. Those are both through. Your shorts that to me seemed like a lot. I asked the pharmacist. How much most people pay for a month's prescription but depending on the insurance so people pay nothing's people player dollar up to like twenty dollars. Or whatever. So really just depends. I feel like. I never know what to expect when it comes to prescription prices but the surprising thing i learned is i am not the only one and the pharmacist has no idea what he or. She's going to get paid for that prescription. It's not until that prescription is processed and that that usually takes place in real almost in real time while the patient's waiting that's doug hoy ceo for the national community pharmacists association. Doug says this transaction is shaped by that unseen force the p. b. m.'s. They are the consummate middle man. The middleman between the pharmacy and the insurance companies these days. Pbs are huge. If you flip over your insurance card you'll probably see one of three names. Cbs care mark. Optum are ex or express scripts these three companies control seventy to eighty percent of the market. They say their size gives them the power to negotiate bigger discounts with the drug companies. And that in turn reduces prices for the insurance companies and the patients but critics say these are too big they've been called hidden monopolies even quote unquote legal cartels. But doug says that's not help he started out at first. The pm's were really plan prescription processors and so they filled kind of an important need patience before had to file their own claims In a sort of a pain meaning that instead of standing at the pharmacy counter waiting for the tech to punch a few buttons patients had to send their actual paper your prescription claims to their insurance companies and wait to get reimbursed but as more people got health insurance the number of claim skyrocketed soon. It was more than the insurance companies could handle. A solution came at the end of the nineteen sixties in the form of pharmacy benefit managers. Who made it their mission to handle and streamline all that

Liz Tongue Heiser Soza Kaiser Suze Kevin Spacey Doug Hoy National Community Pharmacists Kobe Doug PBS United States CBS
Giving sources the power to tell their own stories

It's All Journalism

06:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Giving sources the power to tell their own stories

"Breeding is the deputy director of the global reporting center. The center has recently produced documentary series for pbs. Newshour called turning points which uses the empowerment journalism model. Britney's here to talk to us about that series and explain exactly what is empowerment journalism. Welcome to the podcast brittany. Thanks so britney you said before we turn to the that you had. You've heard our podcast and so you kinda know how we start out things. Could you tell us a little bit about how you got involved in journalism and how you ended up at the global reporting center so i think you're probably the first person asked me how i've gotten into journalism since my first day of journalism school but sometimes when i think back on it i'm not even sure how i ended up here but what i think happened was i graduated from undergrad with an english degree in fine arts degree and i was sure that i was going to be a teacher though. I moved to south korea just to sort of try it out and see what it was like to work as a teacher. I was teaching english as a second language. But in a funny way. I sort of missed being a student. I love reading and writing and losing myself in research and so i started to think really hard about what kind of career would lead me to new discoveries into an opportunity to spend more of my life learning and i think that that's really what led need to journalism and so i moved back to canada and enrolled in a master's degree at the university of british columbia. And they have this incredible program that was formerly known as the international reporting program is now known as the global reporting program and that really drew my attention and it gives you a chance to spend a full year working on enterprise investigative work of international journalism. And my year. We were lucky enough to travel to china to report on the emerging environmental movement. And it was just this amazing opportunity to really dig in and learn and after i graduated from my masters a new that daily news was not going to be my thing. I wanted to be somewhere where that freedom to explore a story to stay with it. And i know that those jobs are also a few and far in between but at the time one of our professors at u c was just starting to build a global reporting center and an adviser at the school had recommended me when our director. Peter klein was looking for someone to help out part time so i started working with him in twenty fourteen. Just right after graduating. And i was working part. Time will working some other jobs and just trying to fill out that full time schedule. Then when we launched in two thousand sixteen we had a lot of momentum. And so yeah. I've been with the goal reporting center basically ever since i graduated from a masters. And it's been a really wonderful opportunity in place to work because peter in the team are always willing to listen to new ideas and new projects in there's this openness to experimentation and i even working now with the golden pudding program as their multimedia producer so in some ways. My story is a bit full circle. Because i have both that career that allows me to discover learn but also one where i'm getting to work with students and help them grow in home their skill. So yeah it's been really great. And i i feel like i'm really lucky to have found myself where i am. We have peter klein on the podcast. A couple of years ago. And i remember having a really great conversation with him and he reached out to us about a month ago and said. Hey you should talk to the people about the turning points program that's being produced with pbs newshour. You know this is something interesting something different and had a chance to check out some of the The videos that you guys have produced for that project and it's really really powerful so before we get into that just could you explain what is the mission of the global reporting center. What are the types of stories that it does. Yeah of course so. We thought a lot about this. And i think i mean are small mandate are sort of one liner is global journalism done differently and then when you expand that in what that means split into three distinct areas so the first being the focus on collaboration so we work with journalists from around the world we work with a variety of media partners with researchers and scholars which we're lucky based on our position at the university to sort of have this wealth of scholarship around us an even now at this turning point project working roy subjects we. We don't generally work with fixers. We use journalists partners. So collaboration is really at the heart of what we do. And i think that that sort of sets us apart a little bit because you know. Journalism has been shifting for a long time towards less competitiveness. More sort of working together in this idea that we tell better stories when we're not silent off in working together in that something that we really take to heart and then the other sort of areas that set us apart. Are that experimentation innovation sort of area where we try to do our journalism in different ways. Were open to new methods and new methods. Don't always work out. Sometimes they fail and for us. That's okay because we just want to be able to experiment and try new things and see what works in take those pieces that are successful in and bring them to a new stage in the last focuses on our education avenue so on global reporting program and bringing on students every year to work with us when we have big projects in production like turning points. We like to give students opportunities to work on projects in meaningful ways and allow them in on the production process so that they really get that experience when they're going out into the world they have these pieces that you know they can point to and say that they worked on okay so now is a fair to assume that the the turning points is a collaboration that you're doing with the pbs newshour partnership with pbs newshour. We originally didn't bring on a media partner at the beginning and there were a couple of reasons why we didn't do that. I because we weren't really sure. This method is going to work empowerment journal. The model was very new to us. And so we wanted to make sure that we had that freedom and adaptability to sort of shift change and potentially fail if it was going to fail and so we didn't bring on a partner from the very beginning. We've actually been working on this project since two thousand sixteen

Global Reporting Center PBS Peter Klein University Of British Columbia Britney South Korea Newshour Canada China Peter ROY Newshour Partnership
How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader with author Minter Dial

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

06:01 min | 3 weeks ago

How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader with author Minter Dial

"I want. say congrats on your latest book. You lead how being yourself makes you a better leader. What was the motivation for this book. So just like in the same idea. Be yourself how do you do that. And how much of you should you bring into work. We talk about authenticity transparency. But is it about being radically transparent. Radically empathic and radically you totally you. So that was the question. Mark ahead in my mind as i launched intas but actually i started writing this book in two thousand and fourteen and at the time i wanted to be like the book of my life like everything full out work personal and everything in between and it took me a long time to Stu and come up with this line which is hopefully to change the way we lead a not just in business but ourselves because in the end of the day. If there's is huge lack of engagement oversee the previously to books haven't exactly figure that out and then to understand how we can bring more of ourselves feel engaged fulfilled and up bullshitting ourselves at work. Which hopefully has knock on effective leading everybody else to want to be with you. Yeah i mean. Starting in two dozen fourteen. Roughly six years was their their moment where it accelerated for. You does seem like a long time. But i know other books. People have written not you but other people could take ten years fifteen years sometimes so. I'm just curious if there is an unlock moment for you. Well it's great. You know like those more academic papers need lottery such things like that. No this was the actually. The thing that happened here was sort of blocking moments Blocking tackle i had. I went off to croatia. At thirty thousand words. I was like all excited came back wife about it. I've really got a big slug of all of us. Had something happened. And i had actually three big loud bazooka moment blocking me or changing the course of my direction which included a call from the television station. Pbs saying hey mental. Your story so great. Let's put on television and clearly. That wasn't part of what i was thinking and and i'm busy doing something else. Meaning internet this actually takes preference so i then put on hold when off that one and then a friend of mine killed himself and that kind of took on another path and then so i've had these different things that have happened anyway. I would say that the walk. In kensington park with a friend of mine who had been published kogan page was the catalyst to getting contact with them and they said awesome. Great idea really. Love it and next thing you know. I had a publisher and that happened of course before the old pandemic started. We'll let's get into started down this path. And i stopped you apologised for the rabbit hole but i wanna to talk about what you mean by you lead. You talked about authenticity radically being yourself. Tell us a little bit more about what you mean by. You lied so i. I generally feel that everybody has leadership potential and but a lot of times. You sort of like won't take away the responsibility and this listen to orders. And i feel like if there's such disengagement at work something is not happening so the of initial premise. Is you lead you and you need to be master of you. Which essentially means at its heart getting to know who you are and what matters to you and so often we go through life. Allan where we're doing what we're supposed to do getting the title on the business card getting extrinsic ideas doing following in my father's footsteps or not as man whatever and we're not actually in touch with ourselves and this is a particular challenge when you're successful often mail. You just think that this is the thing and so the one. I'm trying to really griffin to is to be in check with who we are as an individual and then once we have that established we get rid of some of the chips in the shoulders. Were more cognizant when we're being emotional and irascible and disagreeable and and potentially more vulnerable and then we can definitely model a behavior that the rest of the team might follow through with got it and i mean those sound like great things to do like just a better know myself to be more aware of my own tics and talks. Yeah why is this important for leaders. Do you think well on one hand. My feeling is that leadership is still wonky. If not a terribly wrong and the other hand i think that is much as some people want to be authentic. It's they're not sure what they're being authentic about and why they're doing it so very quickly you can be put off the course you can be doing something because you think it's good to do because it's like there's the narrative being sustainable development is great. Let's do it but there's no real hook anchor back into who you are as we end up doing so many things because it's good to do. Oh that sounds like a really smart idea let's do that and by justifying rationalizing all these smart ideas. We actually ended up frustrating ourselves. Because we're going to not get to want to get too so i feel like the issue is. We've all been to university a lot of us or you know educated and were reading even if you haven't gone university it's fine but with intellectual curiosity we we kind of think we know ourselves because we have that arrogance may be pretension says i want of course i know myself. I'm fifty six allen. God dammit you crack question me on who i am but i think we have this sort of absolute ability gloss over the details. I'm an executive powerful. And i'm excited. I'm confident on curious. I'd fine but that kind of describes everybody at some level to sort of leggings generic concepts that you want to project but who are you deeply inside and if you're excited about sustainable development can you not attach it to something that's more relevant to you for example or hopefully i'll have one day grandkids. Well i'd like for them to live in an environment where okay well. That's at least a more personal hook as opposed to the intellectual size that it was going to help our customers think that we're better people.

STU Kensington Park Kogan Croatia PBS Mark Allan Griffin Allen
Dozens dead and many missing after glacier collapse in India

PBS NewsHour

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Dozens dead and many missing after glacier collapse in India

"Toll from a disaster in India's Himalayas rose to 26 today with 165 people missing. Glacier broke apart in the country's north on Sunday, sending a wall of water down a mountainside rescue teams work today to find more than three dozen workers trapped in a power plant tunnel. One man described the moment that the deluge hit That's a human eye witness something that looked like a scene from a Bollywood film about 50 to 100. People were running for their lives but could not be saved and they were engulfed by the river. Officials said. The potential causes of the disaster range from climate change to earthquakes

Himalayas India Bollywood Earthquakes
Marjorie Taylor Greene says Republican Party is Trump’s and ‘doesn’t belong to anyone else’

PBS NewsHour

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Marjorie Taylor Greene says Republican Party is Trump’s and ‘doesn’t belong to anyone else’

"Jonathan the Republicans in the House of Representatives this week voted in just in the last day voted not to take away committee assignments from Marjorie. Taylor Greene, conspiracy theorist of someone who's made deeply disturbing statements. They left it to the full house, meaning Democrats took that vote, she said. Green said today that it didn't really bother her that committees don't matter. And besides, it's Donald Trump's party anyway. Is she right? Well, she's right in that it's Donald Trump's party. But she's wrong about the fact that it doesn't matter. It does matter. And if she doesn't think committee assignments are being assigned to a committee matters, then she shouldn't be in government. She should resign her seat if she doesn't believe that, sitting on a committee, doing the work of being an elected representative and representing your constituents in Congress. If that doesn't matter, then perhaps you should go back to Georgia. But this is indeed Donald Trump's party, and we saw it with the votes that were taken within the Republican caucus. Marjorie Taylor Greene was able to hold on to her committee seat because the vote was a public vote. Within the caucus, Liz Cheney was able to hold on to her to her leadership post within the Republican caucus because that vote was a secret ballot, and we talked all last week or all this week about how her hold on her leadership post was tenuous because the base was so angry. The caucus was so angry And yet by secret ballot, she won reelection to that leadership post within the caucus overwhelmingly, so this might be Donald Trump's Republican Party. But behind closed doors within the Republican caucus, at least says it's playing out in the house. There are some tensions there.

Donald Trump Taylor Greene Marjorie House Of Representatives Marjorie Taylor Greene Jonathan Liz Cheney Green Congress Georgia Republican Party
US economy adds 49,000 jobs in January — a grim sign for the jobs recovery

PBS NewsHour

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

US economy adds 49,000 jobs in January — a grim sign for the jobs recovery

"This morning, the nation woke to a bleak picture of the economy still hurt by the pandemics. Winter surge. The Labor Department's January jobs report revealed US employers added only 49,000 jobs. The unemployment rate fell remained high at 6.3% and at the 22 Million jobs lost since last spring. About 10 million jobs remain lost. That's worse than at the height of the financial

Labor Department United States
The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:49 min | 3 weeks ago

The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

"I recently wrote in forbes about how kamala harris may be able to heal the wounds between black women and white women but i defer to our terrific yesterday on these issues. I'd like you to meet dr. Marcia chatelaine a provost distinguished associate professor of history and african american studies at georgetown university here in washington dc. She's a scholar of american life and culture previously. She was an assistant professor of honors in african american studies at the university of oklahoma in norman. She earned her. Phd at brown university and her undergraduate studies at the university of missouri columbia in journalism and religious studies fellow aspiring journalists. They go. Marsha was a terrific expert featured in the recent pbs series. The vote on how women fought for and won the right to vote over an eighty year struggle or more welcomed green connections radio. Marcia thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Oh you're welcome. You're welcome so our start in the heart of this issue. As i said in my introduction i've understood the black and white women had a kind of love hate relationship if you will during the suffrage battles as i understand it. Black women wanted white women to include abolition in their struggle. But the white women leaders believe the combining the two would keep the legislation from. What is your take on it. Tell us the truth. Because you're the historian so the issue at hand between abolition and suffrage are deeply tied. And that's because a number of figures in the suffrage movement were first activists in the fight against slavery and i think the poignancy of the battle for women's suffrage was the fact that many of the white women who were at the lead of the suffrage movement were anti-slavery and they had supported. Abolitionist may have believed that there was a moral reason to end the system of slavery but when it came to suffrage they were divided over the issue of universal suffrage Some do not believe that black women white men should equally have the vote. Some did not believe that black men and black women should have the vote. So i think that the suffrage movement really exposes the limitations of racial solidarity even among people who were on the right side of history one issue were not able to transfer that sense of grace to the issue of suffrage. And that's where you see the fault lines. In the suffrage movement really emerged from it was the fact that they did not want include african american women visibly or prominently or ideologically in their fight for the right to vote because they believed that it would degrade the quality of the vote of degrade the preciousness of the right and a number of these women again. Even though they were morally opposed to slavery they would not immune from white supremacist ideas. Okay so there's so much to unpack in there. You said something really interesting you said and i paraphrase of course but the the the divisions over the vote represented larger divisions in the racial schisms. If you will Racial solidarity behind the vote. Yes so one of the things that i think. A lot of people don't understand from how they're taught history is that we often think of the issue of slavery as one in which people were either pro or anti and it's often presented as a matter of north versus south union versus confederacy. But if you look at the movement to end slavery and look at abolitionists. They all had very different ideas of what happens next. They knew that slavery is a scourge on the nation. But they didn't agree on. What would it mean for african americans to be elevated to the level of status rather the level of a citizen and what that status should mean and so there were people who were abolitionists but they were segregationists. There were abolitionists who believed that african americans should be repatriated to colonies in africa. They were people who believed in complete and total social equality in some people believed in some level of social quality but not marriage and so those debates among the abolitionist movement i think are very much mirrored in the debate among white selfridge's who should get the vote i who should be allowed to vote. And what measures should be taken in order to ensure their desired goals

Marcia Chatelaine University Of Missouri Columbi Kamala Harris University Of Oklahoma Georgetown University Brown University Marsha Marcia PBS Norman DC Washington South Union White Selfridge Africa
GameStop Reddit-rally sends Wall Street tumbling to its worst week in months

PBS NewsHour

05:37 min | Last month

GameStop Reddit-rally sends Wall Street tumbling to its worst week in months

"In late January, a handful of unlikely Wall Street stocks began to skyrocket in value. It has led to big market volatility, and that will be the subject of a special meeting tomorrow with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and other government regulators. As Paul Solman reports, the spike in these stocks was driven. By an unconventional group of traders who banded together on a buying spree determined to take on the market for their own reasons. It is the latest in our economic Syriza's making sense. The frenzy. Obviously, this thesis is based largely on the fundamentals, Internet chatters hyping and buying stock and seemingly more a bun companies and you're right. It doesn't make any sense at all. AMC Bed, bath and beyond, and the bubble Gamestop crazy, and we're not as dominant as everyone thinks we are. We know what we're looking for. Is the regular Joes versus Wall ST Joe's using the free app Robin Hood to buy Gamestop, a money losing brick and mortar monger of video game disks that seems obsolete now that games are bought and downloaded online. And yet the stock skyrocketed last month, we're going to try to explain what's been happening with Alex Seamus from the University of Chicago Business School and my grandson show violas 17. So Alex set the scene for us What's been going on? There's people on this platform called Reddit, who decided to buy up a lot off the stock a lot of shares, partly because people hedge funds on Wall Street started short selling it. Okay, before we get into that, Joe, So I remember taking you to game stop when you were younger to buy you video games as kind of nostalgic appeal. Absolutely. And I think a lot of people my age in a little bit older grew up with Gamestop and I'm seeing a lot of people on platforms such as red It were saying isn't bye Bye Bye and Gamestop Two reasons one to make money, and the other was to stick it to the rich elite of the hedge funds. Hedge funds that have been betting against retro games stop by shorting its stock that is Now. In keeping with the retro theme, Alex suggested a retro product to visualize short selling. So here I've got an iPod, which I scrounged from somewhere in my basement, right, so on iPods kind of late game stop, it was very popular in the two thousands. And, you know it's not a bit obsolete because you know everybody's got music on their cell phones. So how do you short sell an iPod? So let's say I'm a hedge fund, and I think that the iPod is worth less than what it's being currently sold for. I go to you, Paul and I say, Can I borrow your iPod? So what I do is I sell the iPod that I just borrowed from you. And then buy it back for the future price. So if the price goes down, I make money because I'm basically getting the difference between that You just want me to lend it to you. I'm gonna borrow your your iPod. And I promise I'm gonna give you a little bit extra money whenever I return it. And to promise contractually to return my iPod by a certain date or whenever I ask for it back, So now you get wind of this short selling Joe. And what do you do? Okay. I grew up with this product. It's got a certain nostalgic value. I'm going to tell lots of my friends on social media may be read it to go out and buy iPod so we can all get in on the trend. What happens to you The hedge fund, Alex so because I Embedding that the price as actually going to go down in the future. If it ends up going up. I end up losing money because I have to buy it for Maura than what I sold it for initially and as you buy it, you're driving up the price even higher. Exactly, And that's what happened with game stop. $18 a share just last month. My grandson bought one share last Wednesday. And what price $293 I want to point out that I did not advise on this trade. I'm thinking that as more people are saying on social media that they're going to buy the value is going to go extremely high. Well is that I want to continue to stick it to the man, these people in Wall Street who have been running everything. And sure enough out on the street. I think it's great that rich people are losing money because capitalism is destroying this world. I look at the whole game stop with stocks is a revenge of the nerds. Kind of attack. This is one of the most complex attempts to coordinate on a single strategy that I think we've ever seen a sort of people's hedge fund says he must coordinating on the Reddit Forum. Wall Street bets. Urging one another to buy with rocket ship Emoji is which is to say, Look, this asset is going to keep going up so everybody should buy and toe hold with diamond hands. We are not going to break. We are going to keep the price up, and there's even a buy and hold sea shanty with diamond hands. They knew they profit if they could only hold But hold on most Wall Street. Hedge funds aren't short sellers. They bet on stock's going up. And in this case, some hedge funds have actually profited hugely from the so called revenge of the nerds, as have Robin Hood's paying customers, big investors, many of them hedge funds, who, by information from Robin Hood, about what people there are trading As for short sellers, are they bad actors? Sure, they bet against a parent losers like Gamestop, but also against frauds like the infamous end Ron, which short sellers helped take down nearly 20 years ago. By exposing its phony

Gamestop Treasury Secretary Janet Yelle Syriza St Joe Alex Seamus University Of Chicago Business Paul Solman Alex Reddit JOE Maura Emoji Paul Robin Hood
Buttigieg wins Senate confirmation as transportation secretary

PBS NewsHour

00:14 sec | Last month

Buttigieg wins Senate confirmation as transportation secretary

"Buddha Judge easily won Senate confirmation to be the Secretary of transportation. The former South Bend, Indiana mayor and presidential candidate is the first openly gay person to be confirmed by the Senate for a Cabinet

Senate South Bend Indiana Cabinet
The Number Of Hate Groups Declined Last Year — But Hate Did Not

PBS NewsHour

00:24 sec | Last month

The Number Of Hate Groups Declined Last Year — But Hate Did Not

"Back in this country. There is word that the number of identifiable hate groups in the U. S actually declined last year as extremist moved online networks. Southern Poverty Law Center reports. That shift makes them more difficult to track. The report identified 838 such groups. That's down from a high of just over 1000 in

U. Southern Poverty Law Center
The Sundance Film Festival debuts Rita Moreno documentary

AP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last month

The Sundance Film Festival debuts Rita Moreno documentary

"The Sundance Film Festival is taking place over the next week, and one of the documentary showing is about Rita Marino. The first Latina woman to win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Freedom. Marino exploded on the screen in West Side Story, but Rita Marino just a girl who decided to go for it is her story, and she calls it real. Compared to the documentaries. She see. I've always thought, Well, G. That's just too perfect. All the time. S so I I just made sure that I was perfect some of the time. It's a raw look at her life. Her relationship with Marlon Brando the racism she faced in her career. You are Porter region, so you don't you're not worth much. The film was produced by Lin, Manuel Miranda and Norman Layer in airs on PBS later this

Rita Marino Tony Freedom Sundance Film Festival Emmy Marino Grammy Oscar West Side Marlon Brando Porter Manuel Miranda Norman Layer LIN PBS
Trump and Kevin McCarthy meet in Florida

PBS NewsHour

00:23 sec | Last month

Trump and Kevin McCarthy meet in Florida

"President Trump left office, But House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy was in Florida today. To meet with the former president, where they agreed to work together to win back the majority out of power on Capitol Hill. The Republican Party is deeply divided on issues like The attack on the Capitol, the impeachment of Mr Trump and even his role in the party for a check on

President Trump Kevin Mccarthy Florida Capitol Hill Republican Party Mr Trump
Federal judge halts Biden's 100-day deportation ban after Texas attorney general's challenge

PBS NewsHour

00:11 sec | Last month

Federal judge halts Biden's 100-day deportation ban after Texas attorney general's challenge

"Federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked President Biden's 100 Day ban on most deportations, the Republican attorney general in Texas had challenged the van.

President Biden Texas
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 10 months ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PBS newshour major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by life isn't a straight line and sometimes you can find yourself heading in a new direction the Delhi is here to help you work through the unexpected with financial planning and advice for today and tomorrow B. E. N. SF railway consumer cellular financial services firm Raymond James the can data fund committed to advancing restorative justice and meaningful work through investments in transformative leaders and ideas more I can do to fund dot org Carnegie corporation of New York supporting innovations in education democratic engagement and the advancement of international peace and security at Carnegie dot org and with the ongoing support of these individuals and institutions this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from viewers like you thank you.

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"World due to fears and concerns over the corona virus for the PBS newshour I'm on the device late today vice president pence said that twenty one people aboard the grand princess cruise ships have tested positive for the corona virus the ship has been holding off the coast of California the vice president said the ship will be brought to a non commercial port this weekend more passengers will be tested and some people will be quarantined will focus on the concerns over quarantine measures after the news summary in the day's other news the latest U. S. jobs report showed the strongest pace of hiring since twenty sixteen the labor department said in February U. S. employers added a net of two hundred and seventy three thousand jobs the unemployment rate fell slightly to three and a half percent matching a fifty year low in job growth in December and January was revised upward eighty five thousand positions the report was completed before corona virus affects spread in the US Democrats on the U. S. congressional committee accused Boeing today of quote a culture of concealment in vaulting issues with at seven thirty seven Max passenger jetliner the house transportation committee members said that the problem contributed to two deadly crashes that killed three hundred and forty six people the report also blamed poor oversight by the Federal Aviation Administration in Afghanistan at least thirty two people were killed when two gunmen opened fire at a ceremony in Kabul the Islamic state group claimed responsibility dozens of people were wounded and rushed into ambulances from hospital bed survivors describe the chaos suddenly firing started people around me got wounded one of my friends was wounded as well as I carried my friend people started running I fell down and they stepped over me a lot of people were wounded and martyred the attack came just days after the Taliban signed a precursor to a peace deal ISIS is not party to that agreement a cease fire took affect in northwestern Syria today stopping the fighting between Syrian and Turkish forces Turkey had opposed a Syrian offensive in inland provinces that sent refugees flooding to the Turkish border today people in make shift camps said the halter shelling and airstrikes will not let them return home previous cease fires failed to hold back in this country Ohio State University announced a settlement with some of the men who say that a team doctor sexually abused them the late Dr Richard Strauss allegedly groped and mistreated some three hundred and fifty athletes over the course of several decades terms of the settlement were not disclosed in the democratic presidential campaign Bernie Sanders went after the newly resurgent Joe Biden in Phoenix Arizona Sanders criticized Biden's support as a senator for trade deals for the Iraq war and policies that oppose gay marriage and gay military service it's a very difficult moment we all know that and all I can tell you whether it was Iraq with the result whether it's don't ask don't tell both with difficult votes I was there on the right side of history and my friend Joe Biden was locked Sanders also accused Biden of trying over the years to cut social security Biden fired back on Twitter saying get real Bernie the only person who's going to cut social security if he's elected is Donald Trump the US justice department today rejected a federal judge's criticism of Attorney General William Barr the judge yesterday accused bar of making misleading statements about the special counsel's Russia report a department spokeswoman disputed the criticism and said bar relied on justice department lawyers and others in making his judgments president trump got a first hand look today at this week's tornado damage in central Tennessee twenty four people were killed in the region on Tuesday night in Putnam County east of Nashville the president toured wrecked neighborhoods later he also met with displaced families and on Wall Street stocks fell hard again on corona virus fears and then clawed back some of the losses in the end the Dow Jones industrial average was down two hundred and fifty six points to close at twenty five thousand eight sixty four the nasdaq fell one hundred and sixty three points and the S. and P. five hundred gave up fifty one still to come on the newshour one corona virus hits a country without guaranteed.

PBS
"pbs" Discussed on Talking Tech

Talking Tech

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"pbs" Discussed on Talking Tech

"Tax live gives you access to experience. CPA's and E as who you can review your return line by line to make sure your taxes are done right turbo tax. All people are tax. People you're a PBS fan. And you WanNa Watch watch pbs via streaming and you wonder how when where TBS would like you to know. There's an APP for that. As I recently learned in my conversation with Ira Rubinstein. Who is the chief digital officer? BBS have listen. You know. I talked with a lot of digital conferences and when I talk about our APPS I talk clutter streaming. People are like shocked. We're like a big secret and we are there and I think we have a lot more potential. I'll give in one case study example K. Q. E. D. in San Francisco did a promotion around the bart stations or through barter. As is they had an outdoor campaign just outdoor just part. They saw twenty five percent lift in their streams from that one campaign and what that tells me is even city sophisticated San Francisco when it comes to digital the latest. Were secret secret. I think it's because of the budgets to be honest. It's you know we we don't have the same marketing spend to To promote that and I think what's happening in content is you consumers are if they're net flicks viewer. They're going okay. I'm GonNa go to the net flicks and then they disassociate from from the broadcaster caster ordeal assume that the broadcaster has it. And I think there's that's part of it and I think it's a little live a generational thing where a thirty year old for example definitely. Remember Mr Rogers but not might not make that connection to Nova or Even a front line and so it's my job as both marketing. Marketing and digital is to elevate that and that's what we're doing so frontline for example We are Testing and and launching full episodes on Youtube. And they're doing quite well and what we're seeing is. It's getting a much younger audience. Those viewers may may never turn to broadcast. And that's okay because they're still consuming the content and we're not GONNA be able to change How consumers are designed to view their content? And so I think we can do and we have to do is make sure content available along all these different platforms and as these consumers are choosing how they wanNA consume that were there they understand. That's PBS or a little different. They understand that there's a local station and because of that relationship with local station discounted there for them to consume. All of our shows are there. We have have a huge library of shows that are free. And then if you're a member you can activate your local station passport and then you have access just to a library of content so if you want to catch up on say Victoria from masterpiece from a year or two ago you can do that. You want to catch up on. I can burns country music. You can do that There's just a much larger library of content to for our members to be clear that sixty eighty dollars a year as a donation to your local station. It's a member benefit and so there's a minimum level That that members have to donate and that is five dollars a month or sixty but for any donation level. You get you get an access. Ira Rubinstein the Chief Digital Oakland Marketing Officer for PBS. Thanks for filling us in about the big secret that you work on. PBS Dot Org. Gret that's correct. TV DOT ORG or research for the PBS APP. On any of your favorite platform you've been listening to talking tech. I'm Jefferson Graham. You can find me on twitter at Jefferson Graham. Thanks thanks for listening to talking tech. Ethan Subscribe Dr Wherever you listen to online audio I will be back tomorrow with another quick it from the world attack everybody. Everybody has to do taxes and yet not. Everybody feels comfortable doing taxes. which doesn't seem right especially when you consider all the amazing the things these same people accomplish every day of their lives? Turbo tax believes that with the right tools and encouragement. People can be good at anything yes even taxes and to help people feel more comfortable with the tax process. Turbo tax live gives you personal access to experienced. CPA's his and EA's who are there for you even on nights and weekends. They're happy to go through your return with you line by line to double check that you've done everything right so so you can be sure to get your best possible refund turbo tax. All people are tax people..

PBS Ira Rubinstein CPA pbs Jefferson Graham San Francisco K. Q. E. D. Chief Digital Oakland Marketin Mr Rogers TBS officer Victoria Ethan
"pbs" Discussed on Talking Tech

Talking Tech

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"pbs" Discussed on Talking Tech

"Tax live gives you access to experience. CPA's and E as who you can review your return line by line to make sure your taxes are done right turbo tax. All people are tax. People you're a PBS fan. And you WanNa Watch watch pbs via streaming and you wonder how when where TBS would like you to know. There's an APP for that. As I recently learned in my conversation with Ira Rubinstein. Who is the chief digital officer? BBS have listen. You know. I talked with a lot of digital conferences and when I talk about our APPS I talk clutter streaming. People are like shocked. We're like a big secret and we are there and I think we have a lot more potential. I'll give in one case study example K. Q. E. D. in San Francisco did a promotion around the bart stations or through barter. As is they had an outdoor campaign just outdoor just part. They saw twenty five percent lift in their streams from that one campaign and what that tells me is even city sophisticated San Francisco when it comes to digital the latest. Were secret secret. I think it's because of the budgets to be honest. It's you know we we don't have the same marketing spend to To promote that and I think what's happening in content is you consumers are if they're net flicks viewer. They're going okay. I'm GonNa go to the net flicks and then they disassociate from from the broadcaster caster ordeal assume that the broadcaster has it. And I think there's that's part of it and I think it's a little live a generational thing where a thirty year old for example definitely. Remember Mr Rogers but not might not make that connection to Nova or Even a front line and so it's my job as both marketing. Marketing and digital is to elevate that and that's what we're doing so frontline for example We are Testing and and launching full episodes on Youtube. And they're doing quite well and what we're seeing is. It's getting a much younger audience. Those viewers may may never turn to broadcast. And that's okay because they're still consuming the content and we're not GONNA be able to change How consumers are designed to view their content? And so I think we can do and we have to do is make sure content available along all these different platforms and as these consumers are choosing how they wanNA consume that were there they understand. That's PBS or a little different. They understand that there's a local station and because of that relationship with local station discounted there for them to consume. All of our shows are there. We have have a huge library of shows that are free. And then if you're a member you can activate your local station passport and then you have access just to a library of content so if you want to catch up on say Victoria from masterpiece from a year or two ago you can do that. You want to catch up on. I can burns country music. You can do that There's just a much larger library of content to for our members to be clear that sixty eighty dollars a year as a donation to your local station. It's a member benefit and so there's a minimum level That that members have to donate and that is five dollars a month or sixty but for any donation level. You get you get an access. Ira Rubinstein the Chief Digital Oakland Marketing Officer for PBS. Thanks for filling us in about the big secret that you work on. PBS Dot Org. Gret that's correct. TV DOT ORG or research for the PBS APP. On any of your favorite platform you've been listening to talking tech. I'm Jefferson Graham. You can find me on twitter at Jefferson Graham. Thanks thanks for listening to talking tech. Ethan Subscribe Dr Wherever you listen to online audio I will be back tomorrow with another quick it from the world attack everybody. Everybody has to do taxes and yet not. Everybody feels comfortable doing taxes. which doesn't seem right especially when you consider all the amazing the things these same people accomplish every day of their lives? Turbo tax believes that with the right tools and encouragement. People can be good at anything yes even taxes and to help people feel more comfortable with the tax process. Turbo tax live gives you personal access to experienced. CPA's his and EA's who are there for you even on nights and weekends. They're happy to go through your return with you line by line to double check that you've done everything right so so you can be sure to get your best possible refund turbo tax. All people are tax people..

PBS Ira Rubinstein CPA pbs Jefferson Graham San Francisco K. Q. E. D. Chief Digital Oakland Marketin Mr Rogers TBS officer Victoria Ethan
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Monday on the PBS newshour the PBS news hour every weekday from three to four o'clock here on KQED San Francisco and cake you we I north highland Sacramento the time now is twelve thirty I'm in a way that you're listening to the take away and I've been speaking with Greg Schneider staff writer for The Washington Post and Alex yeah blanc who covers guns extremism and domestic politics and we're talking about the new national politics around gun reform and the lessons from Virginia state house elections back in November Alex we've been talking about how Virginia democratic candidates were able to use gotten reform as a campaign issue but are there democratic candidates in other parts of the country who were able to run strongly on gun control legislation Lou scenic bath a African American woman whose son had been killed in a dispute at a convenience store buy a quote unquote while biting Conor managed to do what John office office sort of you know straight from central casting typical moderate Democrat could not do with Lucy Nick bath flipped a wealthy suburban typically hard core Republican house seat in suburban Atlanta and she ran with the extremely heavy emphasis on connection to gun violence and she was overwhelmingly backed by a gun control groups and of course Lucy make bath is the mother of Jordan Davis who was the high school student who was killed in Jacksonville Florida as you mentioned by a forty five year old white male over an argument that Jordan was playing music Greg how is law enforcement preparing for this influx of armed protesters who are planning to come to Richmond in the next few weeks there's definitely concerned we're seeing it in the first days of much greater security presence more capital police state police officers at the events here just as you know the legislature gets up and running there's been a lot of planning behind the scenes that they don't like to talk about the particulars and one question is whether the Democrats are going to try to change these long standing rules at the capitol that actually allow people to bring guns into the Capital One both house and Senate side there are many members who who have concealed carry permits and carry weapons during the legislature and then visitors can also if you've got a concealed carry permit bring guns into the capital and into the house side there some restrictions on the Senate side sue Chang our twentieth is the traditional day where citizens come and lobby the legislature here it's Martin Luther king holiday so kids are out of school and people are out of work and so that's the day that the gun rights supporters have have designated for this massive rally that they're trying to get people by the thousands to come to Richmond and protests these proposed gun restrictions so are the Democrats are looking at putting some prohibitions in place before that happens to keep thousands of armed people from being in the capital itself or in the square around Alex said rounding out the segment here I mean when we think about these militia and far right groups are they growing across the country in response to the shift that we're seeing when it comes to language and potentially policies about gun control they're certainly getting more vocal and more aggressive and I think they feel that they have to engage in the shows of force because the political tide could be turning the the militia groups have kind of always been there since basically I was a twenty fourteen since the Cliven Bundy Uncasville standoff in Nevada as they become more emboldened they've gotten kind of winks and nods and even clear braces from more mainstream groups like the again or any one national network of hard right quote unquote patriots call the oath keepers has actually been signing numbers up to provide what they called security at trump campaign offense they sort of see themselves as the thin red line between a a potential blue wave and traditional gun rights in it what is difficult to see is anything other than a sort of racially tinged nostalgia for a bike on America Alex you have one as a reporter who writes about guns and domestic politics and Greg Schneiders a staff writer for The Washington Post thank you both for joining us thanks so much yes thank you.

PBS
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PBS newshour. major funding for the PBS newshour has been provided by. our economy for one hundred sixty years BNSF the engine that connects us. when it comes to wireless consumer cellular gives its customers the choice our no contract plans give you as much or as little talk text and data as you want and are you S. based customer service team is on hand to help to learn more go to consumer cellular dot TV. the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the front lines of social change world why. and with the on going support of these institutions. and friends of the news hour. this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from viewers like you..

PBS BNSF Ford Foundation one hundred sixty years
"pbs" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"pbs" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

"You the mullahs reporting laid out a road map for? Frontline is made possible by contributions to your PBS station from viewers like you. Thank you. And by the corporation for public broadcasting major support is provided by the John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation, committed to building a more just verdict and peaceful world, more information that macfound dot org. The Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the frontlines of social change worldwide at Ford Foundation dot org. Additional support is provided by the Abrahams foundation committed to excellence in journalism, the park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues the John and Helen listener family trust supporting trustworthy journalism that informs and inspires. And by the frontline journalism fund with major support from John and JoAnn Hayward. The mother investigation was directed by Michael Kirk written by Michael Kirk, and Mike wiser produced in reported by Jim Gilmore Gabrielle Shandor and produced by Michael Kirk Mike wiser and Phillip Bennett, the managing editor of frontline his Andrew Mets, the executive producer of frontline his rainy, Aaronson wrath. To water, the Muller investigation on DVD visit shop PBS or call one eight hundred play PBS..

Frontline Michael Kirk Mike wiser Michael Kirk Ford Foundation dot Ford Foundation Catherine T MacArthur foundati John D Abrahams foundation PBS Mike wiser Jim Gilmore Phillip Bennett Andrew Mets Aaronson JoAnn Hayward Muller managing editor executive producer Gabrielle Shandor Helen
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On tonight. PBS news hour. Major funding for the PBS NewsHour has been provided by. On a cruise with American cruise lines travelers experienced the maritime heritage and culture of New England. Our fleet of small cruise ships. Explores American landscapes, seaside villages and historic harbors where you can experience local customs and cuisine. American. Cruise lines, proud sponsor of PBS news hour. B N S F railway. Consumer cellular. Babbel, a language program that teaches Spanish French Italian German and more. And by the output p Sloan foundation supporting science technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the twenty first century. Carnegie corporation, supporting innovations in education, democratic in age meant and the advancement of international peace and security at Carnegie dot. And with the ongoing support of these individuals and institutions. This program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from viewers like you..

french england pbs newshour
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you, see you soon. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by. Be an S F railway. Consumer cellular financial services firm, Raymond James. And by the Elfriede Sloan foundation, supporting science technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the twenty first century. Supported by the John D and Catherine t MacArthur foundation committed to building a more, just and peaceful world. More information at macfound dot org. And with the ongoing support of these institutions. This program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from viewers. Mike. Stay tuned to public.

pbs
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PBS NewsHour. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by. for one hundred sixty years be NSF the engine that connects us. Consumer cellular. Financial services firm rim and Jay. Supporting social entrepreneurs and their solutions to the world's most pressing problems. Skoll foundation dot org. The limousine foundation committed to improving lives through invention in the US and developing countries on the web that Lemelson dot org. Supported by the John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world. More information at macfound dot org. And with the ongoing support of these institutions. This program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from.

pbs newshour
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More on tonight's PBS news L. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by. Our economy for one hundred sixty years be NSF the engine that connects us. Consumer cellular. Financial services firm. Raymond j. Supporting social entrepreneurs and their solutions to the world's most pressing problems. Skoll foundation dot org. The Lemelson foundation committed to improving lives through invention in the US and developing countries on the web that Lemelson dot org. Supported by the John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world. More information at macfound dot org. And with the ongoing support of these institutions. This program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from.

pbs
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reasonable pros to the PBS NewsHour. I'm mixture. Meanwhile, in Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel announced she will step down as leader for conservative party. She also confirmed she will not run again when her fourth term as chancellor expires in twenty twenty one her statement in Berlin came after the ruling coalition suffered new losses in a key state election on Sunday. Chide him and biotechs allies with this decision. I'm trying to make a contribution which enables the German government to finally concentrate its efforts on good, governance, something people demand and rightly so this step is also based on the clear intention of the German government to evaluate its worth Markle has been chancellor since two thousand and five, but she's faced heavy criticism for admitting large numbers of asylum seekers in two thousand fifteen that decision helped fuel the rise of a far right party back in this country. Former president Jimmy Carter appealed to Georgia's Republican candidate for governor to step down from his post as secretary of state Brian Kemp overseas state elections in that role and he's facing allegations of voter suppression in a letter to camp Mr. Carter said stepping aside would foster voter confidence on Wall Street. Stocks started with a rally then swooned amid talk of new tariffs on China. The Dow Jones industrial average lost two hundred and forty five points to close below twenty four thousand four forty. Three. It had been down more than five hundred sixty points earlier, the NASDAQ fell one hundred and seventeen points and the S and P five hundred slipped seventeen and it's time for another party in Boston. After the Red Sox won the World Series last night for the fourth time in fifteen years. Boston beat the dodgers in Los Angeles five to one to take the series in five games. The city will honor the winners with a parade on Wednesday. We turn now to our special news our coverage from Florida and to Judy Woodruff. Thanks, the state of Florida is proving yet again to be a battleground in this year's midterm elections. From contentious race for governor to a neck and neck Senate contest key races up and down the ballot could decide control of congress and be an indicator for political contest to come. We begin our special coverage with a look at some of those important campaigns iron is for you and more benefits for him. I don't think we can do goodbye rowing together. Y'all the Florida governor's race pits. A self-styled conservative warrior against a progressive Tallahassee. Mayor Andrew gillum is fine to be the state's first democratic governor since one thousand nine hundred ninety.

Chancellor Florida Angela Merkel Boston conservative party Jimmy Carter German government Markle PBS Germany Andrew gillum Red Sox Judy Woodruff Tallahassee Brian Kemp Berlin
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you. And we'll see you soon. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by. Kevin advice for life life well-planned. Learn more at Raymond James dot com. S F railway. Consumer cellular. And with the ongoing support of these institutions. This program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your PBS station from viewers like thank. Cake. With Jeremy Siegel.

pbs
"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PBS NewsHour. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by. our economy for one hundred sixty years, the NSF the engine that connects us. Consumer cellular. Financial services firm rim and Jay. Is supporting social entrepreneurs and their solutions to the world's most pressing problems score foundation dot org. The limousine foundation committed to improving lives through invention in the US and developing countries on the web at Mendelssohn dot. Supported by the John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world. More information at macfound dot org. And with the ongoing support of these institutions. This program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to.

pbs newshour
"pbs" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Nearly eight thousand firefighters are struggling against wildfires across northern california tonight as wins kick up again officials report more than twenty fires have left at least twenty one people dead and consumed at least thirty five hundred homes and businesses we begin with a report from meena kim of pbs member station kqed as the sun rose today sylvia parkinson's surveyed the ashen burned metal that was once her home in santa rosa nothing left there's my steps this is our front patio that goes around you can see my fireplace system a'sine there's nothing left you know what i didn't say is a fair wedding rings the one thing i grabbed dozens of homes and parkinson's coffee park neighborhood were swallowed by the fast approaching fires that broke out sunday night and today cinema county officials ordered new evacuations you have a place to go go and the less people here in las be we have to vacuous debater awful unit be yesterday winds from the south spread the plains north but the winds shifted today intern gusty again pushing the fire south in nearby napa county officials ordered evacuations for nearly half of calisto ga a town of five thousand people firefighters there say the two are bracing for windy flow humidity conditions that fuel fires we are expecting some extreme fire behavior and growth of or incidents currently and that is going to lead us to challenges all told more than twenty fires are burning across northern california none are close to being contained and most if not all.

california sylvia parkinson pbs kqed santa rosa intern napa county
"pbs" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"In richmond texas i miles o'brien for the pbs newshour and as miles us said costs are just one of the questions about whether this model could be replicated more widely and mild joins me now from boston so miles tell us more about why as and this is the first plant of its kind what are the challenges in trying to replicate this somewhere else and getting the same result well judy the secret sauce of this one according to the innovators behind it is they reduced the cost of creating the carbon capture when i say cost the cost in power normally what the the assumption is that it it reduces the output of any given power plant by as much as thirty percent in order to run the carbon capture system what they did this case was they decided not to use the actual turbines which light the lights that i'm using right now but rather a separate cogeneration plant a smaller plant on site they can be run much more efficiently and they say that they it's costing them about fifteen percent of the power generating capacity of that plan so that's a big hurdle that they've gotten over fifteen percent is still a big number and unless you have some commodity are or a the co two has some value the business model doesn't add up just yet and you were telling us miles there are also some physical challenges as well well being eighty miles near an old oilfield that could use that co two capture and recover a lot of stubborn oil from the ground makes it all work the question is could a fossil fuel plan of any kind that's a long way away from an oilfield could it avail itself of this kind of transaction.

boston carbon capture richmond texas pbs fifteen percent thirty percent
"pbs" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"pbs" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"And on air force one today president trump said of assad officials say defense secretary james mattis me discuss military options with the president in florida for the pbs news our on william bring him the has other major story came in the united states senate where the stage is now set to confirm judge neil gorsuch to the supreme court republicans swept aside the main obstacle as partisan tensions pete lisa days are down begins our coverage as a dark downpour hit outside inside a long brewing manmade storm burst on the nomination of neil gorsuch a colorado to be an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states first republicans tried and failed to get the sixty votes needed to end a filibuster blocking gorsuch the motion is not agreed to without republican leader mitch mcconnell launched a series of historic parliamentary acrobatics to remove that sixty vote requirement altogether audible order that the vote cloture on within ninety minutes republicans voted for the socalled nuclear option to reinterpret the rules and change precedent so that a simple majority could guarantee a supreme court spot mcconnell insisted republicans were in the right if part of a much larger story another extreme of collusion never and drop the politicized the court and the confirmation prophet republican stress that former democratic leader harry reid opened the door to this by lowering the threshold for all other nominees four years ago current democratic leader chuck schumer argued the supreme court is different the nuclear option.

trump president florida united states neil gorsuch colorado chuck schumer assad defense secretary james mattis pbs william senate pete lisa mitch mcconnell harry reid ninety minutes four years