17 Burst results for "P."

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:43 min | 4 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"The results of this study show that student performance on practical and written exams is not affected by face to face versus online delivery. Student engagement with online material is the key factor towards performance on questions related to content delivered online further analysis done by the authors showed that students who performed dwell online content questions also performed well on face to face questions suggesting that strong students stay quote strong students. The authors acknowledged that the inclusion of the three hour practical lab session may have offset the self-directed aspects of the course since practical or lab classes served to supplement and consolidate the course content. Any issues and questions students had about their face to face or online content could be addressed in these sessions. In addition students who average less than one view didn't fail practical exam questions suggesting that practical lab sessions may have made it possible to succeed without commitment to accessing the online resources inclusion second year undergraduate students learn just as well from materials presented in the online environment as they do from face to face lectures and that repeated viewing of online videos with improved performance on assessments therefore a transition to online or blended learning does not hinder the performance of anatomy students provided the online resources are appropriate and as long as the face to face practical or lab sessions are part of the blended learning mix.

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

13:17 min | 4 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A if we want to have a different version of anyone attempt of anyone test and we want to allow at least three attampts. Whoa that's a lot of different tests to right. Isn't it allow unlimited tests? Which is the direction which I've been having then. Wow we need a Jillian versions of each test. Any of that is pretty much impossible right or is it impossible. Not only is it possible. It's fairly easy not super easy but fairly easy. All the learning management systems have the ability to use. What I'M GONNA call a question set but each has its own name for this feature. Here's how it works for test item. One I ride three versions. They could be three different ways to ask the same question or they could be three different aspects of the concept that I want to assess in test item one for example it could be three different examples of cardiac muscle tissue to identify or it could be one. Each of three major types of muscle tissue when a student takes attempt one one of those three items in the questions that will be presented as test item one in their next attempt. It could be the same item presented or more likely one of the other two versions because it's randomly selected by the learning management system. Even if it's the same item one that they saw in their first test attempt each item in the task. Let's say fifty items total we'll be similarly randomized so yeah okay. Test Item? One is the same as they've seen before. But maybe probably all or most of the other forty-nine items on attempt to will be different than they've seen before as with a slot machine having three items in each question site for fifty test items will generate now on your seats here. It'll generate seven point two times ten to the twenty third different possible test attempt versions. Yeah that's all right. It's it's more than a mole of different versions. The thing is I usually have more than three items per questions. I divide up. I want my students to know in the fifty categories some of which overlap because I want to attack some things at different levels of understanding or application or style of test item. Then once I get going and I'm constructing three items from my first category or my first question set you know what I always think of a fourth item which boxing idea for fifth item Mandalay that but for multiple choice and matching items I can set the LMS to randomize the choices. So I've got another billion Brazilian versions of that test being generated because not only is the LMS picking random items out of a question set of three or four or five. It's also scrambling up the choices within a multiple choice or matching item. When I first started doing this back in two thousand and two I got a math. Professor help calculate the possible number of versions on any one of my tests and her calculator could not go that high. It just gave an error being a math professor. She had a pretty powerful calculator. And you know what that's all I needed to know. I didn't need to know the exact number I just needed to know. It blew out the math professor's calculator so that was good enough for me. That is good enough to ensure the my students weren't getting the same test and every attempt of course I waited until the semester started to begin making my first time hoops ship. It started that way and advanced so well so heavy days that first semester. When I came home from school I immediately set my timer for twenty minutes and wrote as many test items as I could before the timer went off doing that every day. Yeah it was a chore. But really twenty minutes was not that big of a chore and it became a habit so it really wasn't that hard to sit down and do it for twenty minutes every day. Because that's just kind of what I got used to. After my first test was done I was really getting good at writing test items and getting faster and faster about coming up with good test. Items and his students were taking attempts of their first test. While I was working on test to they were taking the first test. And they were giving me feedback on. Which items were poorly constructed or just odd or Fulla? Typo is or something was wrong with it. I could claim that I did that on purpose. But I didn't know I just got started late but it did turn out to have that silver lining then the next time I taught that course it was easy to add a few more test items to some of the question sets of course I was by now a seasoned pro at test item writing something. I'd always dreaded it because I didn't feel like I was any good at it. But all that retrieval practice gave me a certain level of mastery mentally mastery of test item writing but I also gained insights about the AP concepts that. I was considering for test items. I lived through it and I'm a better person for it or at least a slightly better person for and so yeah like any new project. It seems intimidating but it's like a very long walking trip. You take one step at a time and I don't know if you walked for twenty minutes a day four days a week for two sixteen week. Semesters you'll end up having walked more than one hundred twenty five miles probably with no injuries. No collapsing on the roadside. No dehydration just a smile on your face. So do it one step at a time and you can do it to me and I also want to mention some icing that I put on that retrieval practice cake and decorations after all. Isn't that cake that much better when it has icing and grains one thing? I did that helped a lot. The icing was give students an online pre-test before much of the course and online attempt taken from that huge test bank that built over that coming modules content because I told them to expect to fail it but they had to take it to unlock the videos and other learning resources for the coming module honestly it took a while to convince them not to read ahead and not to study not to prepare for it. It was merely to give them a peek at what they be expected to know later. But we're not in any way expected to know yet and you know what those pretexts helped a lot now. The cake decorations consisted of making my online tests. Cumulative every test had questions from all the previous tests the really important questions the core concepts the big ideas. Yeah of course. They balked at that one. I I told them who wouldn't. We've all learned. The cumulative tests are scary. But it didn't take them long to realize that those questions from prior modules were the easy questions to answer on a new test and by the time they got through a few tests. Those questions got even easier because they kept seeing those kinds of questions again and again questions on those topics cap coming up so they grew to love cumulative testing. I know that sounds weird. I know don't believe me but I swear it's true and I know what you're thinking that if we're doing all formative testing and it's open book and students can even consult with each other than well. Can we trust that? They've actually learned anything that they have any knowledge in their heads that they can use without a book without asking anyone and also there on the right track. Well the answer to that is an emphatic. And wholehearted yes. How do I know that? And how can I be so confident about it? It's because when I first started this and for many years thereafter I also did to summit of exams to see whether all that retrieval practice worked. And you know what it did. Not only students walk into their exams with more confidence. They did way better on them. Then my pass classes had done on their exams before I started doing. Any of his formative testing possibly part of that improvement came from their confidence. But I'm sure that a lot of it came from all those open book formative tests and my students told me that they not only felt confident on exam day. They also told me that they tried to cram for the exam but found that well. There just wasn't any need to as they prepared to cram the night before an age old ritual. They felt compelled to perform they realized as they reviewed the course content that kind of knew it all and knew it pretty. Well so yeah. I don't have any problem thinking that. The formative testing alone gave them what they needed. There's more to my story of retrieval practice in the AP course and a lot of that story is told in previous episodes and in seminar that I have available in the links and the show notes episode page. But before I wrap it up for now I want to mention that I really think it works. Best if we write our own test items most of the time sure the test items at the end of textbook chapters in study guides in online study or quizzing programs and the like are all useful tools and have their place and learning. But I've grown to like making my own and I think if I use my own test items that integrate easily with the way I tell the story of amp it works better for learning. But that's a discussion for another day. A in.

professor AP cardiac muscle dehydration Mandalay
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:25 min | 6 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I know you've missed it but here it is finally once again were are where we practice what we all do in our teaching and take apart words. Translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're familiar terms. Sometimes their terms that are new to US may be so fresh that they're new to everyone and the first one on our list today should not be surprising. It's the term virus. Now that's a simple term that everybody uses all the time. But what does it literally mean? Well it literally means when we translate it poison which makes sense right it can also mean slime or ooh which makes it sound even uglier and Nastier than just thinking of it as poison. So these little particles that are creating such havoc in our world right now those we can think of in a way as poison particles. Of course they're going to be working differently than many other poisons do but they are a hazard particle that is a hazard to our biological function. The next term list is related and that is krona virus in the word part corona which actually is part of a lot of different terms in anatomy and physiology as well as in virology in corona means crown. This virus is named for the crown like arrangement of protein spikes in the virus particles protein code or captured. And of course the second part of the word is virus so it's just corona attached virus meaning the virus with the crown or with this crime like arrangement and that group of viruses called the corona viruses was named quite a while ago back in the nineteen sixties. So it's almost as old as I am. But of course we've only more recently been hearing a lot about it in the news and in coming up in various conversations that we're hearing right now and related to corona virus has our next term in our word dissection list and that is the name of the virus itself and that is SARS covy too so that's Capitol S. A. R. S. Hyphen Capital C. Small Capital V. Hyphen to SARS. Covy to and breaking that down the first part. Sars is an acronym that means Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome virus. Got that name because the virus that causing the current outbreak is genetically related to the virus that caused the SARS outbreak of two thousand and three and then the next part the covy part is short for Corona Virus Co for Krona V for virus. So putting those two parts together SARS covy. We're talking about a SARS related at least Czars Related Corona virus. Okay that tells us a lot so far but it wasn't the first one discovered it wasn't the one that caused the SARS outbreak in two thousand and three. It's a new one so we're going to call it number two because it's not the first one in SARS covy to was officially named in February of Twenty twenty now. This virus causes a disease that is called. Kovin nineteen and covert nineteen was broken down in a word dissection back in the special post preview episode number sixty four. She can go back and review that if you want now in that previous word dissection. I mentioned that the World Health Organization named Bokov in one thousand nine hundred. So that's the disease and they named the disease using existing guidelines and they did that on February eleventh twenty twenty now that who names diseases in the ICU D. or international classification of diseases on the very same day the International Committee on taxonomy of viruses or ICT named the SARS. Covy to as the agent of that disease. Now it's the ICY TV. Who such the official names viruses. So the World Health Organization names diseases and this organization on the taxonomy of viruses. They name viruses. Their official name is International Committee on taxonomy of viruses. Ict Now interestingly the World Health Organization has been avoiding using the term SARS covy to directly when they're giving out through public communications because they want to avoid the public confusing Kobe. Nineteen with SARS. That is that original operate from two thousand three because it is a different virus and a different disease. Yes related yes conceptually. They're with each other but it's so easy in public communications for things to get out of focus and confused so in order to avoid confusion there instead preferring to it indirectly as the virus responsible for cove in nineteen. Now they're not denying or abandoning the official virus name. They're just you know kind of finessing. Their language a little bit to avoid using the official name again to avoid confusion the next term on our list is pandemic and we all use this term a lot but breaking it down I think gives us insight into its meaning that a little bit different maybe than we we have when we're not thinking too much about what it means so the first word part pan means all and the next part damn means people as in our term demographics or democratic so when I say people I'm I'm really using out in the sense of a group of people as we would look at in a demographic study for example and then the icy ending means relating to so pandemic describes a situation that relates to all people now of course that's not met absolutely literally it just means that potentially all people could become exposed to a pandemic disease or be affected directly or indirectly by pandemic disease now that's a more widespread phenomenon than the next term on our list which is epidemic an EPA means upon so we put that together to upon a group of people are related something relating to something that affects a whole group of people so a condition becomes epidemic when a whole group of people is affected when that extends to a wider group. Pat Is across the globe now again not literally every single corner but much more widespread than a typical epidemic. Then we elevate that to the status of pandemic and again it's the World Health Organization that usually gives the official designation of something being an epidemic or pandemic. You'll see these terms. Often used outside of those official.

SARS World Health Organization official corona Twenty twenty International Committee US Kovin Capitol S. A. R. Pat Respiratory Syndrome Kobe EPA
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:37 min | 6 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Moving along here. I have tip number twenty seven which is even less is even more now. I mentioned this idea of less is more in bonus episodes sixty four B but I really mean it this time and I'm going to take it a step further emphasize that even less is even more because yeah. I know it's hard to let go one thing I'm suggesting is to take that beautiful new remote course that you've just built and slash everything in half remove at least half if not more really in one online course. I did quite a while ago. I had a weekly discussion and two weekly assignments. It was perfect. Immagination it was perfect in real life. It turned out it was awful. The students were so busy writing the required discussion posts and trying to get those assignments. Done that well. None of it was good quality. The learning going on wasn't anywhere near where it needed to be. So I made the discussion biweekly and the assignments biweekly alternating them. So that we'd have a discussion week and then an assignment week. And then a discussion week and so on that gave them more time to work on their assignments and less pressure to say something important in the discussion and that has worked great for the past several years. So yeah cut what you have in half do it. Now you know students are having a hard time coping with their whole lives right now. They may have lost the job that supports their schooling. The routines and lifestyle been completely disrupted. They may be sick or caring. For Sick family members. They may be coping with deaths among family and friends and neighbors. They may be stuck living in an uncomfortable or even dangerous situation. They've had to suddenly shift doing things way differently for most or all of their courses. They may be trying to manage their kids at home schooling or just to working their job if they still have one in at home mode even if none of these things are true. They are still under a great deal of stress. We all our our whole society is under stress right now as you know stress affects things like. Oh there's all kinds of stress affects disrupted sleep inability to focus and all of those things at makes it harder for students to cope with a changed up way of working in our course another thing that gets mentioned too little I think but is the big elephant in the room in higher education. A lot of our students struggle with mental health issues on a good day. P. T. S. T. depression anxiety and many other conditions. That are going to likely be especially hard for them to manage during this public health. Emergency and there's also physical conditions of many types and addiction and well. They're just all kinds of things that students russell with all the time that are now exponentially worse for them the flip side of this that we need to be careful to keep in mind. Is the teacher side of things? Our side of things self care is now a much more important issue than it ever was and it was already very important keeping our workload light and manageable. We'll go a long way to helping us coke to another suggestion. I have which I learned the hard way when I retired from full time. Teaching and became a completely at home. Worker is to not act. Like it's snowed. Hey every day get trust. Not necessarily what you'd wear to work but don't stay in your pajamas. I wear jeans and a casual shirt for example socks and shoes actually. I'm wearing western boots right now. I live on a Missouri Farm Road after all and you know I wanna stay comfortable certainly but I get dressed. Something else I learned is that I should keep a healthy sleeping and eating pattern. The more I stick to a healthy routine an actual schedule but starts in knowing starts in the morning with my morning alarm wakes me up. I do my Taichi form. I had my morning smoothie I play with the dog a little bit. I make some tea. And that progresses in a usual way throughout the rest of the day the more I do that the more productive I am and the better I feel less stressed. I feel Oh and I take breaks to. That's very important. Now when I say get dressed every day I also mean I shave. I brush my hair. I put on my son block. I check my hearing aid. Batteries all the stuff. I do as if I were going out to work on campus. No I don't have to do all that if I'm working at home every day but if I don't that I don't get as much done and well just don't feel like my whole self another thing both our students and we can do not as part of course but as part of our Self Care Plan is to keep a journal of our experience of what's happening in our lives right now. A pandemic journal. There's a lot of research to show that this can lessen anxiety and help us process our thoughts and feelings and reconcile them with the lives. Were now living really. It can help us now in real time and of course they'll be valuable to us nor families in the future as well tip number twenty forget seat time have all gotten used to this ridiculous formula of having to be in class for certain amount of time every week certain number of minutes certain number of breaks and so on whether we need to or not and it's hard to get out of that well established mindset. We've been cracking it a bit over the last few years. I think with more and more online courses and hybrid courses and flipped courses. And so on. But we've not shut it completely. It's still trying to hang onto US whispering in our ears to not let it go completely. One insidious way our seat time demon is trying to cling to us is to whisper the suggestion that we need to meet with students at appointed times. Perhaps even with a standard length of time resist. Please.

US P. T. S. Missouri
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:36 min | 6 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"So it's even more important for us to use headphones and ear buds than for our students. Because that's going to enhance the sound quality by preventing at Gaza and other problems..

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

06:04 min | 6 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Immune. I guess one of the things I would need to keep in mind if I'm teaching. This technique are offering this technique to my students is that I need to emphasize with them. That lets him sitting down with a handful of students in my office and in there asking me you know. How can we deal with this fire? Hose of information and I'm giving them different techniques and they might say well concept. I just can't get the hang of that or flash cards. Just don't do it for me or you have something else you know and and also what about these memory palaces and kind of walk them through the idea of it but I guess something? I need to emphasize with them. Is that when they walk out of my office? They're not going to be fully prepared to that. It's something that they have to just keep coming back to until they get more and more comfortable with it. Would you say that's fair? I definitely think that's fair Personally I actually I heard about some of these demonic techniques before med school unfortunately I just watch a few videos online and tried to learn from that. I think I could remember a couple of numbers better because I made a visuals seen one time but after about a week or two hit a roadblock and I didn't know where to go so I completely cut off the practice without actually developing satisfactory technique. Can I didn't use it all through Mexico only revisiting it later on towards the end because it's not something that you're going to be able to teach in one session. It's something that requires a little bit of practice every day or a couple of times a week or something along those lines so when someone is actually taking this seriously we often recommend they spend ten fifteen minutes a day maybe in the morning first thing before they get out of bed using these demonic going over their old ones trying to create a new one or two at already have Flash Card deck for instance they can go through the flash cards probably on their phone or IPAD and then make a demonic or while. They're sitting there in bed. Write it down or store I would suggest writing it down on your flash card deck or drawing it out or having some reference point for later on because you might not remember it the first time. So there's still space retrieval required in it but it tends to be much less retrieval and much better organized when you can implement these techniques but this technique sounds great. I'm glad to have it now in my little toolbox that I can open up for my students in show. Hey look there's lots of different tools here and it. Kinda you know this this idea of taking a lot of practice kind of brings to mind something that I learned late in life and that I give up too easy you know. I'd need the channel that when I'm talking to my students who likewise you know You give technique like let's say the Memory Palace and and really give along with that. Not just the technique but the encouragement that it's don't give up too easy like I would unites when you're a little kid and you're learning to write for the first time you're learning to read or you're learning to ride a bike or catch a baseball. You keep working out. I mean just think about you know little kids learning to walk. They don't follow over and then give up. They get right back up when they try it again and fall over and get up and fall over and then eventually they get the hang of it and I need to to do that. You know I need to learn to do that as an adult when something is difficult for me. A new learning management system is thrown in my lap. Oh my gosh. I'll never learn. But if I stick with I do and the same thing with these memory palaces if I can encourage my students to stick with it then it can be a very useful technique and and there are a lot of resources out there. That students can to kind of get that. Hang of it and and learn what to do. And that includes some of those At your website and show notes in the episode page so you can learn these memory techniques and you can also point to them off for your students. And they're they seem to be geared toward medical students but I've listened to a lot of them and you know why they applied. Amp students to. I mean everything that they're talking about in their a fits with what our students are going through so I highly recommend it and once again thank you very much chase. No thank you and yes. There's a lot of examples on on the podcast and on our youtube page. They can go and check and feel free to email me or contact me on social media and give a little more instruction possibly a regular listeners. Know this but if you're new or just need reminding don't forget that I always put links and the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas much in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors for this episode chased DeMarco gave me a link for an example of how to build your own memory palace in a video tutorial called memory palaces for medicine they're also links to his podcast episodes on Memory Palaces. The story method pneumonic and a blog. Post on evidence based study strategies. You can reach chase directly by way of email or any of the social media accounts listed in the show notes or you can even set up on one on one session with him. And you're always encouraged to call in with your questions comments and ideas that the podcast hotline. That's one eight three three Lion Dan or one eight three three five four six six three three six or send a recording a written message to podcast at the Professor Dot. Org I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor and textbook author in human.

Memory Palace Professor Professor Dot baseball youtube professor Mexico Dr. Kevin Pat An DeMarco
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:21 min | 6 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Greg crowder is a dedicated and creative. Ap teacher besides being a rockstar literally Rockstar in creating in using music and stem education if you haven't explored his many many songs that relate to m. p. education. You really need to do that. When go to that? Link in the show notes or episode page also find a link to the page for another of Greg's pieces. That's great for a sing along that one students learn some basic ideas about spinal nerve plexus when you go there check out the fact that Greg provides many different ways to experience his songs for this one about nerve flexes. One of the options is a carioca screen. That you and your students can follow as you saying really you need to check these out a tip number fourteen read the book you know that unreasonably large and expensive tax book students bought for your course. Now is the perfect opportunity to get them to actually read it. They'll be socially distance anyway. One hopes and looking for something to read more students raid their textbook rather than actually reading it. Now's a good time to turn the reading of the book into a bigger element of the course. If You keep your instructor provided explanations at a minimum as I advised in an earlier segment then students have no choice but to get a lot of the needed information from their textbook tip number fifteen just in case and center substituting Your Plan Lecture Class activity with a case study. There are plenty of these case studies available online but I found it to be fun making up my own. It's much easier than you think. If you've never done it I often use medical images and make up a story around it and then ask questions. About this. Scenario the tease out important concepts of anatomy physiology one option would be to post that maybe divide the class up into groups in your learning management system and give each one a different case to workout and then posted in a discussion forum of just for that group. And they're easy ways to do that. Your folks at your institution will help you figure out how to do that. And then have them more the case and then have each group present their case to the other groups and what their conclusion was and why tip number sixteen learning is art and art is learning. Drawing drawing is a powerful learning strategy. Nearly everyone can draw. Sure some folks are regular Davinci's when they draw many of us most of us are not and that's okay making stick and ball. Figures can work just as well as the more realistic kind of art. This can really help with lab activities. When the lab's not available consider drawing in labeling exercises drawing out concept maps making organs from household items like paper or doe or scraps of fabric bake a cake in the shape of an Oregon in heaven share picture of it online things like that. Tip number seventeen simulate reality even if we've never used computer simulations of anatomical structures or physiological functions. We know they've been around for a while. Your institution may already provide access to some of these and there are some available online at no cost. I provided links to a few of them but go out searching. Send your students out searching and play around with them and see how that might fit into your remote learning scenario tip number eighteen embrace reality if things go well any temporary move of your face to face class to the online environment is well temporary probably a few weeks then the emergency past and we're back to our usual mode so yeah it may be nerve wracking but normalcy will return soon right tip number nineteen no side trips. Somebody in your course. Maybe you might suggest that you're suspended on. Campus class should meet somewhere off campus. Maybe a cafe or restaurant after all these venues are likely to be virtually deserted and would welcome even a little bit of business. Do not do it do not that would defeat the whole purpose of suspending face to face class meetings which to slow or even break the cycle of the viral outbreak. We're not doing this just for us. We're doing it as part of our social obligation to support and protect each other. So let's keep that our priority. Yeah there are a lot of other things that we can do quickly and easily once we put our minds to it and hopefully this short list has already stimulated some IDs. One final thought. Let's look at this at the adventure it is. The universe has thrown in unexpected challenge at us but tries to the occasion and tap our creativity in our experience to make some awesome. Lemonade or those lemons. Our positive can do attitude can go a long way to reassure our students and to motivate them to do some strong self powered learning a as. I mentioned several times earlier. I put links in the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors tell us what's going on with you your tips and suggestions and your questions at the broadcast hotline. That's one eight three three line Dan or one eight three three five or six six three three six or senator recording a written message to podcast at the AP professor dot work. I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor Textbook. Author in human anatomy.

Greg crowder professor Rockstar Professor Textbook m. p. education instructor Davinci Oregon Dr. Kevin Pat An Dan senator
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:55 min | 6 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Your students. Don't expect a Ron Howard film or Morgan Freeman voice over. They just expect you being you in fact the more you you can be the more comfortable you and your students will be during this weird adventure that we're all on right now or maybe a slightly more laid back and casual. You might be an order. You know to engender that all important. We're all in this together vibe that we want to create right now tip number nine. Do some audio visual courses such as anatomy and physiology. You probably need at least some images for some of your instructional media but consider supplementing with audio in remember your textbook into our lab manual or lab atlas probably has a lot of the images you need anyway now audio is often even easier than video and students love it. They're part of the podcast generation after all and they can stream it to their mobile device and listen while they're doing other stuff like organizing their survival bunkers supply of toilet paper and bottled water. You'll be right in their ears as if you're sitting on their shoulder and sharing your insights tip number ten keep things brief. The knee jerk response to switching from live video and audio his simply do lectures that you've given classroom into a camera and Mike you do that if you want. If your anxiety level is climbing that may be the best strategy for you but remember an earlier point about less being more. Consider just doing really brief media clips. It's easier to hold the tension into effect of instruction in short bursts when working remotely trust me on this one too if you must spend a lot of time on a topic then break it up into short clips but consider taking those. Long winded presentations and chop chop chop them into a simpler easier to digest version. Tip number eleven be nimble in the martial art called Tai Chi Chuan. One way that we practice being nimble is to always keep our knees flexed a bit sort of like cats do when they're on the prowl. Doing that one can quickly move with great power into any of several defensive positions swats do that. Let's be nimble by being ready to shift positions quickly in response to what's happening in our course ready to change directions if we have to expecting to have to shift some things around. If your regular listener you knew I was GonNa Work. Taichi analogy somewhere right. You're probably also waiting for me to somehow work in term carbon no hemoglobin. But you know what I just could not find an angle. So you won't be hearing me say carbon hemoglobin at all in this podcast because carbon me. No Hemoglobin just doesn't apply right now. Tip Number twelve teach by testing. Give a lot of low stakes open book multiple attempt quizzes and tests retrieval practice. Any I've been preaching this message for decades but even in face to face courses. This strategy is a game changer. Now's a good opportunity and try and prove me wrong. Tip Number. Thirteen testing is not always teaching. Okay wait really I think. The testing is always teaching something. But you know there's the formative kind of testing I was just talking about that. Is All about retrieval practice. And then there's the summit of kind of evaluation after students have had a chance to do retrieval practice in this kind of some of testing test. The final outcome of learning. Maybe for this emergency we could just combine them and call the formative testing summit of when I picture when I say this is that we could allow multiple attempts at an online test with only the best score counting toward the course grade that would allow students to do retrieval practice until they gain more and more mastery some links in the show notes and episode page at the A. P. Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. That explain more fully what I mean by this..

Morgan Freeman Mike A. P. Professor Dot Org Tai Chi Chuan Ron Howard
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:32 min | 6 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Radio and audio smorgasbord for teachers of human anatomy and physiology home. Okay this is weird but if you noticed in the introduction. I said that this is yet another brief on your introduction episode number sixty four. What that means is it's really kind of the second preview episode normally. There's a preview episode than a full episode preview. Episode full episodes. But this time there's two preview episodes. Kinda SORTA this one's GonNa be really brief and it's not going to have the usual elements of a preview episode. But I wanted to put this out here because well last Thursday. I release the preview accidentally. It was a mistake. I remember back in episode sixty three. I said that everybody makes mistakes. And that's okay even if they're very public and we can't take them back. It's okay so hopefully you're okay with my big mistake because when I released that bonus episode inbetween about how to prepare for Kovic nineteen influenza disruptions. In our course I I messed up the scheduling. I meant to push episode sixty four back a week in so I pushed the full episode back a week. But the preview dropped too early so it dropped west Thursday and and now some of you are expecting on Monday for the full episode to come out. And it's not. It's not gonNA until next Monday and so I didn't WanNa leave you hanging there and think that you did something wrong because it was me. That did something wrong. So yeah it's all a big mistake but that's okay. There's a couple of interesting things that I wanted to share with you anyway. And so that gives me the opportunity to do it and then you know mainly I just WanNa tell you to hang on the new episodes coming. It's coming next week. And it's GonNa be a great one. We chased the Marco who's GonNa tell us about memory palaces. What they are and how they can help students remember a lot of information. That's all related to one another. So that's in the upcoming full episode.

influenza
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:20 min | 7 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"It's time once again for. Were dues where we practice what we all do in our teaching and take apart words and translate the parched to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're old and familiar terms and sometimes the terms that are new to us are maybe so fresh that they're new to everyone. If you're ready have a Latin dictionary in your head. Then you don't need this review introduced. Skip ahead but I need the review. So maybe the rest of you will join in with me. The first term. I have on my list. This time is the term imposter syndrome. Which clearly is not a a impede term not a term. We typically discuss amp. But it's going to relate to that idea of talking about mistakes that I mentioned a moment ago. Let's pull it apart and see what it is. The first WORD IS IMPOSTER. And when we break that down we get the first word part. I am which is a variant of I n Pan that can mean the same thing as the English word in or could mean on and then the Second Word Part P. O. S. means place or put so when we put those toured parts together we have impasse or impose and that means to put on as in deceive and Omar ending means an agent or an actor. So imposter is someone who puts on or deceives fraudulent in some way and then the part of the term syndrome. The first word part is sin S. Y. N. And that means together. Then the second part is drome which is a rate chorus or just ecorse of something that the path along which something progresses and so when we put that together it's win. We have different things that come together and are part of the same course of things so we could say when we apply that to actual English usage. That Syndrome is a set of signs that occur together in the course of a disease condition. So Imposter Syndrome means a set of characteristics that occur when you feel like you're an impostor now. This term was first introduced in Nineteen. Seventy eight in an article called the impostor phenomenon in high. Achieving Women Dynamics in therapeutic intervention that was written by two professional women Dr Pauline glance Dr Suzanne imes and they defined it as an individual experience of self perceived intellectual phoniness or fraud. That is just sort of reinterpreting. These said in the article. It's when one thinks that even though they've had some success they're really not the expert that everyone thinks that they are and even though it was first described in high achieving women apparently affects off groups equally at a rate of around eighty five percent of working in Tulsa. Yeah Eighty five percent. I don't know really because I'm not smart enough to understand much less. Explain it but I do know that it's been very well studied. And there's a lot of different aspects and causes and so on but it's really important to know that it's not a pathology. It's just a thing that happens in the normal spectrum of human feelings. But what do I know right? We're going to be talking about this in the upcoming full episode as it relates to how we feel when we make mistakes in front of students or maybe we won't talk about an. I don't know because I'm not sure. I know enough to say anything really the next term that I wanNA talk about is norepinephrine. Now that's a term that we use a lot named Py right but let's break it down nor an. Or is chemical prefixed that relates to an UN branched carbon chain and then EPI means Opon- and then the nefer part any HR nefer part that means kidney and then I e ending means a substance. So we put that all together in. It's a substance that has an unbranded kerpen chain and what does upon the kidney. Meanwhile that's the tissue from which it comes is upon the Kidney. That is the adrenal clamp and that is related to the term noradrenaline which means almost the same thing ad in this case where we have nor which is still that unbranded carbon chain and then we have ad which means toward or at and then arena which means Kidney Ao means relating to so it's relating to something that is toward or at the kidney so adrenal gland. Yeah that's a little hat sitting on top of the kidney right and The terms nor up Ephron and noradrenaline are used interchangeably. No in the United States. It's more typical to use the term norepinephrine outside the United States. It's more typical to use the term nor adrenaline are nor adrenaline. But they refer to the same substance. This substance is produced by fibers called Adra nerve fibers. So looking at that word address. Jake well the Renault part. We already know what that means because we broke that down. But the the urge or Erg E. R. G. Means Work and the ending means relating to so a fiber that has adra nerd. Jake works somehow related to the adrenal gland that is it's releasing a substance similar to what is released in the Adrenal clan and then Melanin is a word that we use a lot name P and breaking that down. We have melon which means M. E. L. A. N. which means black and then the I n ending means substance so a melanin means a black substance. Now it's tricky about this. Is that the Melanin that were first given this name look black under certain lighting conditions and pack together densely. But when you look very closely at them under you know sunlight. They're actually very dark brown. So it's kind of a misleading name in a way it means black stuff literally but it should be very dark brown stuff and what's even more interesting about that to me at least is that there are two categories of Melanin that we have in human skin and hair in that is the U. Melatonins in the e U prefix. It goes on you. Mellon means true so literally. They are the true Melanin. So what we mean by that is those are the melons that we think of when we think of Melanin. And that is this very dark brown or blackish pigment. This found in our skin. The other category of Melanin sit we find in human skin are the feel melons. And that's P. H. E. O. Prefix on Melanin in feel translated. Literally Means Dusky in this refers to Mellon's that have kind of a reddish a tan ish color to them and they're lighter in color than the U. Melatonins so we're GONNA be talking about Melanin Because we're talking by gray hair right. It's the absence of Melanin in our hair. When our hairs turn white on her head and produce a gray look to them. But we'll talk more about that in the full episode. The last thing I want to do before we leave. This preview in terms of terminology is define the acronym H. L. A. Which I'm going to be using in the preview H. L. A. Stands for Human Leukocyte Antigen.

U. Melatonins Mellon United States Jake Kidney Ao Tulsa Omar Py Ephron UN Dr Pauline adra fraud P. H. E. O. Erg E. R. G. H. L. A. Dr Suzanne imes M. E. L. A. N.
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:30 min | 7 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Useful <SpeakerChange> for you going <Speech_Music_Male> forward. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Hey <Speech_Male> don't forget that I always always <Speech_Male> put links in the show <Speech_Male> notes and at the episode <Speech_Male> page at <Speech_Male> the Professor <Speech_Male> Dot Org <Speech_Male> case you want to further <Speech_Male> explore any <Speech_Male> of the ideas mentioned <Speech_Male> in this podcast <Speech_Male> or if you want visit <Speech_Male> our sponsors <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and you're always encouraged <Speech_Male> to call in with <Speech_Male> your questions <Speech_Male> comments and ideas <Speech_Male> that the <Speech_Male> podcast hotline. <Speech_Male> That's one <Speech_Male> eight three three Lyon <Speech_Male> Dan <Speech_Male> or one eight <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> three three five <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> four six <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> six <Silence> <Advertisement> three three six <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> or send a recording <Speech_Male> a written message to <Speech_Male> podcast asked <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the <Silence> <Advertisement> Professor Dot Org. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'll <Silence> <Advertisement> see you down the road. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> The <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ANC professor <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is hosted by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> actor. Kevin Pat <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> An award-winning <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Professor and textbook <Speech_Music_Female> author in <Speech_Music_Female> Human Anatomy <Music> Physiology. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The content of this <Speech_Music_Male> episode is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ninety seven percent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> recycled waste <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> therefore unsafe <Music> drinking <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> support for this episode <Speech_Male> comes from <Speech_Male> the American <Speech_Male> Association <Speech_Male> for Anatomy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the Human Anatomy <Speech_Male> and physiology society <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> the master Sir <Speech_Male> of science and Human <Speech_Male> Anatomy and physiology <Speech_Music_Male> instruction. <Music>

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:44 min | 7 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Don't forget that initial the I found out just a couple of weeks ago. Somebody was trying to do that. And if you just put amp professor is not going to show up afterward the amp professor and then you just download it for free and put it in your vice. So what are they. What are the bonus content items that are in there? One is a little video showing you how to make flash flash cards flip in the air so that one was a silly one but the rest of them were a much more to the point in terms of actual teaching and learning one was the list of syllabus warnings that I include in my syllabus and we talked about him one of the episodes so that gives you a copy of what I am so you can use that is sort of a launching point for perhaps including your own warnings in your syllabus and along similar lines I also had a page a handout type thing that have my safety information. uh-huh called safety first. So that gives you the kind of safety addendum that I give in my syllabus. I have another resource there. That's called terms terms that are often misspelled or confused. Name P and I think that's a good one to revisit every once in a while just Ha- just print it out or save it on your disc or something somewhere and go through it every once in a while in that is useful for students because they can go through and see where they're likely to make mistakes but it's also good for us because we make mistakes stew but it's also good in helping counsel students and then another resource was regional spelling differences. So it I was GONNA say it spells out but maybe that's the the WHO said it walks you through how spelling is different between. US spelling and non you you asked spelling so it gives you some of the patterns and then gives you examples of each of those within anatomy and physiology so that you're aware of some of these different spellings so those are the regional spelling differences. And then the next resource was actually was published. Are Put out there before that one. I'm going in can reverse order. Here is a handout on the fishbowl model of homies stasis which I talked about in one of the episodes so it kind of spells it all out and you can use that handout with your students or just use it as kind of a starting point if you WanNa tell the fishbowl story or stories similar to it. I also had a video which was a seminar that I did at one of the half's meetings on running concept lists so you can go look at that and then. I had a little video showing when you a sorting folder that I use when I'm doing tests and exams in class and this is especially useful for a large class even a smaller moderate size class. What it does does? Is it Kinda automatically alphabetize student papers as they turn them in in a very simple straightforward way and the video shows you how it works and then I have a diagram that you can use in your course if you want. The chose the location of the FABELLA which is a bone of that more and more of us are showing up there showing up on our knees. It's increasing its frequency in the population. It was considered to be relatively rare anomaly announced becoming more common that was discussed and one of the episodes and then we have another table that you can use as a hand off of your students or just for your own years and it's a muscle name cable where a translates each of the major muscle named it translates them literally and we can use. That is the Monica device to help us remember characteristics risks of that muscle so shoe. Lots of stuff this year. And that's not the end of it. I'M GONNA actually dive into some of those groupings that I just talked about in later.

professor WHO
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:28 min | 7 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Cartoonist and film producer Walt Disney once we keep moving forward opening new doors and doing new things. Because we're curious and curiosity keeps leaving us down new paths welcome to the amp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy the and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin Past this episode is review of the past year of this podcast. Just mentioned in the intro and also talked about out in the preview episode that preceded this full episode. What I'm going to be doing is debriefing? What went on in our podcast cast over the last year and I did something similar last year at the end of the first full year of the P. Professor podcast and I called that episode sowed a big year and so this episode of calling another big year? I should've called it an even bigger year because I was actually Kinda surprised as I. I went through my process of debriefing and Look what went on holy smoke. We covered a lot of stop. And I'm beginning to that in a minute but before I do I just want to remind you that. Debriefing is something that I've mentioned a lot. And that's because I really believe in it. I think that at regular intervals throughout the academic year and maybe even separate debriefings. You know at the end of multiple years like every five years or something like that. We should step back and really take some time and effort and really mindfully debrief and decide and review and reflect on what we've been doing because I think this can be really affirming. I mean it is for me that I can go back in especially in a year or a semester or even a half a semester. When I'm thinking that all I've been doing is putting one foot in front of the other and that really accomplishing publishing? Anything much. Not Anything useful. I often find that when I go back and actually like tally it up and look at it and think about it. I'm really happy about the fact that there were some things in there that I really did accomplish some things. So that's one of the main reasons so I I liked the briefing is because it makes me feel good but it also gives me some great ideas on things that I can leverage and maybe do better next time for or extend in and do more or gives me an idea to do something completely different and so I just WanNa spend a few minutes talking about the advantages of debriefing. It's a good reminder for ourselves what worked well and what didn't work well over the past period of time. It's also also a good time to bring our C. V. up-to-date our resume or publication lists. However it is that we're recording our life's work and we can do anything anything related to that so Chaz it some schools You need to submit a timeline of things that you've done committees you've been on projects you've done and how often you did pet sitting for your deans pats and that goes into your promotion package or it goes into your evaluation file or something like that so you you can really make that debriefing time you can roll a bunch of different tasks into it and make it a really useful thing it in many different ways and and it's also a form of spaced retrieval practice because it gives us an opportunity to identify in reinforce or concepts concepts because we're going over them again in recalling them again and pulling them back out of our brains so as I go through this episode and I mentioned past topics things things are going to get pulled onto your brain. You'RE GONNA go in there and start pulling things out again and that's going to help keep them in your long term memory when we do this in our courses. We could ask students to do that. Students always want in class reviews right for them. I think they see that sometimes as a substitute for actually really studying like let's review the test. Meaning I don't want to spend my own time reviewing for the test. I want you to review for me but might not be a bad idea if you have have class time to do that. Yeah they're looking for specific. Can't on exactly what's going to be on the test. They'd they'd probably preferred if you just gave them a list of the correct panthers or something thank by what you can do is just spark them a little bit and get them thinking about all of the different things that they have been learning all along long and that will help them with their retrieval practice. There are other ways to do it to The way I usually do tonight in class but in the form of online practice exams Right before the midterm exam and final exams so that gives them the way to do their greet debriefing and relearning stop. Because it's Kinda showing them wear wear and their study materials in their textbook. They need to dive back in and refresh themselves. So let's do it. Let's.

panthers Kevin Past Walt Disney professor P. Professor producer Chaz C. V.
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

09:56 min | 8 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"We dissected the term Allah stasis and Alice Static and then we we dissected the term emoji and looked at the word Emoto Khan and and we also decided the term cumulative then episode sixty one Chimera came up again and forensic and apoptosis and we talked about the controversy surrounding the pronunciation of apoptosis and then we discussed WIFI which we learned is a registered trademark. So Oh shoo man. One hundred seven terms and I made it in one hundred eight lot of terms there that we dissected for the last year and so so now I think we can better see that when we do just a few were dissection set time in our classes that over the course of many classes over one semester oster and then the next semester named Py one. AP to it really gives the students a lot of examples and of course those are just examples they get the students started on doing their own. A word dissections immune. This podcast is sponsored. By half's the human anatomy and MM physiology society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. And don't forget February twenty honey i. It's coming up soon. And that's the deadline to get the early bird rate for the annual conference in Ottawa Ontario. This may it's also the deadline to submit a proposal for a poster or a workshop at the conference. I hope I'll see you there. Just go visit habitat the AP professor dot Org Slash paps. That's Ha ps okay..

Emoto Khan Alice Static professor Ottawa Ontario
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

15:01 min | 8 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Uh well it's time once again for. Were Irish where we practice what we all do in our teaching and take apart words and translate their parts to deepen their understanding in since. This is the preview to the looking back episode. I thought we would take take this time to look back over the terms that we dissected over the last year and you know what I counted them up. There's one hundred seven of them. That's amazing one hundred seven terms. We dissected we took apart and as I just said a moment ago sometimes their terms that are very familiar to us and sometimes their terms that are new because they've just been coined in the literature or they're things that we just don't run across much being AP teachers and you don't want I'm GonNa make that one hundred and eight. I'm going to go ahead head into sucked one new term or at least one term that we haven't dissected before and it's a term that is very very familiar to all of us as the word dissect if if we break that apart we have two main or parts disc dis and sacked. And this is the first word literally means apart or or away or asunder or having a negative or reversing force on whatever other word part it's attached to and then sucked that a second word part literally means cut so we put it together in dissect means cut apart which makes sense right. I mean that's what we do when we dissect something we're cutting auto part so that we can understand it in a different way than we can't possibly understand it. When that thing is hall now in Anatomy Physiology Allergy? We normally think of dissecting as dissecting a body or an organ so that we can understand it better that is cutting it apart at at least some of it gets cut apart or cut away and we can see what's going on but what we've been doing of course in these previews is dissecting terms so we're cutting the terms apart into their word part so that we can get a little bit different understanding than we have when we're looking Out them hole and even that word dissect when we pull it apart and put it back together again. I think we can understand it more deeply and think think about it in a different way than we would have. If we hadn't stopped to really be mindful of what the word parts are another aspect of of this particular dissection dissecting forward decide is that I think it Kinda helps inform our pronunciation of the term. Now I've been using the pronunciation dissect but you might use the pronunciation dissect and you know what when you look in the dictionary. Even the medical dictionaries you will see that both terms are pronunciations. I should say are acceptable. And so neither one of them is more correct than the other in terms the pronunciation but I do have a preference which you now know what it is it's dissect because I think that is a little more clearly early tied to Toward parts dis insect member. We have to ashes in there so they come apart in between those two asses. If if we use the pronunciation dissect then it sounds like the first word part is die which means something different than deaths It could mean to for example or it could mean through our others there's other interpretations but it's not the same as diss so dissect could be misleading to a beginner especially beginner who's starting to pay attention to how word partook put together to form scientific terms. And so that's why I prefer dissect over dissect but you know what Missouri Missouri. It doesn't matter it's okay I'm just pointing out why I have have that preference so let's go through the hundred. Seven dissected trump. No we're not going to go through all hundred seven them but I am going to mention on inside novel and I'll stop occasionally only in this list just to mention one or two things about him but we're not going to actually do the dissection but I think this is a good exercise to go back and review and to reinforce force what we learn because remember. We're all about long-term learning year and it might remind you something that you might want to go back to and look out again or listen to again. I should say so in episode thirty. Seven we dissected five terms neurogenesis and boy remember neurogenesis has come up a lot over the last two years in this podcast because of Different discoveries that are being made about neurogenesis in adult brains so we have neurogenesis and then we talked talked about Some emerging ideas and auto nommik pathway. So we decided the terms cranial sake. Rel and th- auricle Lumbar we. We also dissected the term Jimeta poetic stem cell or hse and then we talked about the term Rosette specifically anatomical resent because we we talked about it as a tool for helping students get oriented to anatomical positioning and then episode thirty eight. We dissected the term kyw I MIRA and chimerism and those came up actually in the most recent episode the episode before this one as well so we did that one twice and then an ala graft is another term. We did episode thirty eight and Progenitor Cell then an episode thirty nine. We decided to hit a very very familiar term especially several very familiar. Terms was Sara Bellum. We dissected muscle which oddly means little mouse so we talked about that a little bit. We decided the term tendon and anglicized. Because we were talking about terminology and how we anglicised Latin terms sometimes and then in episode. Forty we dissected the term FM and Topa him member a token him is named after a place whereas FM is a term that is named after a person and then we talked about Hamilton Canal. And even the pronunciation of Harrison Canal which is an acronym and then we went onto episode forty one where we dissected genome or them and we talked about the plural forms. There's more than one plural form and then hippocampus and then in episode sold forty two. Well that was the Kevin's unofficial guide to the Annual Conference Twenty Nineteen Edition and so we dissected the terms conference and the proper Noun Portland because the meeting last year was in Portland Oregon. We found it was actually named after a different said he in Portland and then we have episode forty-three where we had a long list of terms that we dissected all having to do with Anatomic variation which was the topic doc of that episode and so we looked at the difference between the Terms Anatomic and anatomical and why there are two versions versions like that that we use can we likewise compared physiologic with physiological and then we look at the terms scientists in versus Seitis Sola leave Oh Cardia Dextra Cardia and Abella floral FA- belly which is has a bone that exists in actually an increasing number of people in the knee joint and then we went on episode forty four where we dissected the terms gamification Zygote old friend of ours that Zygote we use that term a lot tripolar which is is kind of weird. We don't really WANNA cost that much but it was in one of the news updates that we talked about in the full episode and in that news update we also talked about pro nucleus nucleus so we decided that term locus and blastocyst. Another old friend that we've used a lot in our teaching and learning earning of anatomy and physiology and then we have episode number forty five where we dissected an old old old en- dear friend and that is Homeo- stasis I am Thermostat and we looked at the term sodium and its origin and also the origin of the symbol and a for natrium and then we likewise to the same potassium and looked at the origin of the symbol K for calcium in episode forty. Six we talked about Kendra site another often used terminate. MP and CONDO PROGENITOR cell which may not be so frequently used amp teaching and then we dissected the terms of prefaces and EPA physial plate. We dissected the term Amnesia and we dissected the term measles which we found out literally means specs which makes sense we talked about measles right and then we went onto episode number forty seven where we dissected dissected the term artificial intelligence the term a microbe and microbial in episode fifty one and notice. I skipped from forty seven to fifty one because we had some special summer classic episodes in between there so an episode fifty one. We dissected the term transparency art because we were talking about transparency. Not only in this podcast but why we should have transparency in our course and really tell students why are courses designed the way it he is and why our policies are the way they are and then we also dissected the terms O- faction station and sub ventricular Sonar S V Z an episode fifty two. We looked at the word case as in case study and its origin. We dissected the term in hyper Kelsey mea the term parcel education and looked at the origin of the Word Atlas and we also dissected the term EPI genome and then in episode fifty three dissected metastasis extra cellular vesicles actual soem on Kozomara and Trans Psychosis. Remember Trans Psychosis is a process of going across cell that is through the middle of a sow. Wow and then an episode fifty four. We can trust the terms I so volume up and volume metric and that had to do with with a change in terminology and the hats learning outcomes and similarly we are for similar reasons. I should say we compared compared the terms hemodialysis and him outta polices. We also dissected the term vaccination and dissected the term CD eight eight so in an episode fifty five. We looked at the term paranoid. Compare to Niem and talked to the fact that they're very close to one another but they mean very different things and some really commonly used terms in amp and that is femur fibula also looked again at that word word case but this time not in the context of a case study but this time in the context of letter case that is upper case letters and lower case letters because we were talking about spelling and proper use of terms and so on and we wanted to talk about how to capitalize terms properly when using scientific terminology then in episode fifty six. We looked at the origin or the the meaning of the terms. Formative imitative and summited as they relate to different kinds of assessment and we broke down the term practical as in a lab practical alab test and and we dissected the term rheumatoid arthritis and we looked at a fairly newly discovered form of our anti called. Why aren a so we looked at that term trump and we looked at the term glacken and some terms related to it in the story that was told in the full episodes so besides like and we we had we had Incan and Oak Lichen and Casa Click on my gosh? I can't find anti say that did I have traveled in the episode. Dan Going to have to go back and listen to get an and klecko cessation. Okay Doc I think susie collected down by the seashore and she or Peter Piper picked him or something like like Oh salaciously coastal okay. I guess I need to use that word more. So that it just flows off my tongue like carb amino hemoglobin does and then an episode fifty seven. We revisited some terms terms that we had come up in the previous year and we looked at and that is syllabus and syllabi syllabuses which is yes and a legitimate dement correct plural of the term syllabus. Syllabi is okay too. And that's what I think. Most of US use but syllabuses is correct as well and then an episode fifty eight. We talked about an Osmania. We talked about crib reform plate. We dissected polly Denver aside Alexandra site the N. G. She to sell or energy to glee and figured out what to means. And and then we took a very ordinary term that everybody knows even outside of Anatomy Ed physiology and this flash card but we kind of extended our conversation a little bit and learned that flash cards if all from an old learning tool called all the hornbook and they might want to go back to episode fifty eight. If you WANNA learn about that and then episode fifty nine we looked at the terms obverse and reverse 'cause we were still talking about flash cards and those are terms are useful when you're discussing how flash cards are used and then we looked at the term pneumonic onic which had been used in a lot of episodes up until that point but this was the first opportunity we add to dissect it pneumonic as an pneumonic phrase or any other. They're kind of pneumonic device or tool that we would use for memorizing things and then we also dissected the term pneumonic because a lot of people spell MNEMONIC onic as if it were the word pneumonic and pneumonic and pneumonic mean very different things pneumonic means relating to the Airways mnemonic means means relating to memory. And so yeah they are somewhat similar and they both have a silent letter hit beginning so I think that's why they're so often confused but they are two different terms and then we also.

Portland Progenitor Cell Missouri US Anatomy Ed physiology auricle Lumbar Sara Bellum Harrison Canal Hamilton Canal chimerism polly Denver Cardia Dextra Cardia Homeo Kelsey mea Kendra EPA Amnesia Oregon Niem
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

12:24 min | 8 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Are episode. Page can you the topic of required prerequisites got me on kind of a ramp about how we can't really expect students remember much of anything thing from a prerequisite course. I hope you stayed with me anyway. Because now I'm ready to tell you the really good news about amp requisite. Perhaps you remember that I mentioned layering or interleaving in the previous episode. That is episode. Sixty one way that can work is when you keep bringing back concepts that we're learned in earlier experiences that could be earlier experiences from that course or could be from from learning experiences from a prerequisite course and every time we re encounter previously learned concepts concepts that were likely lead to a forgotten we relearn it probably more quickly this time and in doing so. That strengthens our knowledge and it also promotes our long term retention of it. Each time we do that encounter the need to retrieve that knowledge again we strengthen our mastery sorry I really think that to learn amp deeply. We need to go over it again and again and and again then again that's four again which is about as high as it gets on my scale so for me that means and that it's good for me to accept that my students probably don't remember much from the prerequisite course or courses but I also so now that this is how we learn that. Is we learn. We forget we relearn we forget again although probably not as much as we forgot the first this time and we relearn and we forget in a cycle that brings us closer and closer to full mastery. I'm not really sure when that the cycle ends for amp. Because I've been at it for decades and I'm still not finished. I'm a lot further along than I was ten or twenty or thirty years ago but I'm still a student not a master and that's how I look at learners coming into my ap course with their prerequisites. They're still in the process of mastering what they need. I'm meeting them at an early stage in their learning process and I accept that being novices. They've not really mastered anything yet. At least not much for many of them then the next question Russian is this if we can't expect many of our incoming amp students to know much about those foundational concepts. We really really wanted them to know what we do. The first step I think is that we need to review foundational concepts whether there we have prerequisites are not. I'm not saying we need to do it all at the beginning of the course but I do a lot of it at the beginning of the course at least east some of it. The first thing I do is give them a self paced online test at the beginning of the course that reviews all all those foundational concepts. They should've learned in the prerequisite course. I call that tested zero which I introduced way back in episode twenty twenty four which. I'm now thinking I should've made required prerequisite to listening to this episode but you would have forgotten about it so here it is. I'm reviewing something that maybe you learn about before Kevin Zero and what that does if they really have mastered mustard all that they were supposed to learn them prerequisites than ten zero. We'll take them hardly any time or mental effort and the handsome retrieval practice to refresh their knowledge right at at the start of a p one but for those who forgot probably most of my incoming students they have time to get back up to speed and if there are any concepts they never really did learn. They have time to get at least a little bit acquainted with them and you know what if they get stock I hi and their classmates can help them. But it's not just that independent review in the form of a task that they can attempt several times. I also quickly quickly review some of those core ideas in the course this further refreshing and reinforcing knowledge. I admit I've I have gotten a bit of pushback from students when I do that. For example I'll never forget a student talking to me at the end of the first week and he asked if this was I was going to be a repeat of general biology. Maybe he was in the wrong course he wondered. I explained my strategy and the student understood what I was doing and he was okay with that now even though that rarely happens I mean very rarely happens his still looms Arjun my mind like any pushback does disproportionately large mind. Isn't that weird. How I do that not give much thought to when my I students are on board with my course design but fret over the rare student who may not get? What I'm doing is not right away? I don't know maybe you do that too. Who sometimes but way? That's not all remember that layering I was talking about. I'm going to keep on doing that. Bringing bringing back concepts again and again throughout amp p. one and continuing on the MP two and you know what when I start amp too. I'M NOT GONNA assume assume they remember everything from AP one so. I'm going to have that test zero again and I'm GonNa keep on just a layering stuff off throughout amp to marketing support for this. PODCAST is provided by half's the human anatomy immune physiology society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. Go visit us at the professor presser dot org slash half's and speaking of H- APPs I wanNA give a shout out to listener Kevin Flaherty. Who mentioned this podcast and a reimposed imposed from the House blog? He mentioned the annual episode. That I do called Kevin's unofficial guide to the annual conference. The last one I he did was episode. Forty two in anticipation of the two thousand nineteen conference in Portland. He mentioned that because he was going to be a first timer. There there that episode really helped him get the most out of the meeting not that one needs a guide to the conference but it can kind of prime the pump a little bit it and get you in the mood for a great meeting. Well thanks a lot for that testimonial Kevin and you know what I'm planning the next edition of my unofficial guide to the half Samuel Conference as we approach the twenty twenty conference in Ottawa Ontario. And I'd love to include your questions your for advice or tips and any of your stories from half's conferences. You might have and that you wanNA share any kind of story really even if it's silly especially if it's silly just call the podcast hotline or send me an audio recording or written message and remember you can always always find out details about the upcoming conferences at the AP professor dot org slash paps h APS. Dan I've been chatting about required prerequisites in the AP course and I proposed the we shouldn't expect students to remember or anything from any prerequisite courses they've taken and that's okay because that's how learning works. And when we know that we just start there and and make it all work for them. I'm saying that by laying aside that frustration with prerequisites we can be both happier with our task and and more effective. And now the question remains what good are prerequisites should we even have them. And if so what what exactly should they be okay. That's more than one remaining question. I realize but they are kind of all wrapped together at least in my mind. Signed their illogical bundle of questions. So here's what I've come to believe I think prerequisites are valuable people. I don't think they have the magical qualities that we often believe they have. That is they really. Don't give us any expectation that students coming into amp will know any particular concept or at least know it particularly well. Yeah okay there. There will always be that group of students in the front row. will but I'm kind of thinking? They know it all whether they met the prerequisite requirement or not. I've also come to believe that what prerequisites do give us. Are those initial layers of learning. Yeah the learning thing is mostly forgotten. But it's mostly still there somewhere and just need some more layers refreshing and retrieval practice to bring it to full fruition. So what is the perfect prerequisite for amp. I don't think there's an an answer for that. I think perhaps guidelines offer some great help but it really does depend on what you want accomplish in in your course. What kind of pre learning will best support that? I think it also depends on some practical things. For example is there room in your institutions curriculum to add a coarser to without requiring that two year degree program to become a two and a half the three year degree program or to extend that four year degree out to four and a half for five years. Not just that but can they really squeeze that yeah prerequisite in before an MP in their semester by semester schedule. I think some sort of introduction of biological principles is useful even if not absolutely necessary but having a prior experience of them as much better than not having them write. What I don't think is all that critical is exactly what form those prior experiences take? I have a feeling that each new generation of teachers will continue to want to reinvent the a p prerequisites in the earnest. Hope that will finally only get this right. That's okay let them. You can't see me but I'm smiling with that. Buddha like smile all right now while they're all fighting that fight. I think it far more productive for us to use our time and effort to learn how to make what prerequisite we do have work to. Its full capacity. That is to spend our time on taking our students and just where they are when they reach us and design learning experiences for them that will bring them closer and closer and closer Tomaso before they leave us alone as.

Kevin professor Kevin Zero AP Kevin Flaherty independent review Arjun Tomaso Buddha Portland Dan Ontario Ottawa
"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:34 min | 8 months ago

"p." Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A common and perennial conversation among amp. Faculty is what prerequisites If any should be required for the amp course that is should students have to pass a biology course or some other course maybe chemistry or maybe even some flavor of English or Algebra before they can be expected to succeed in our anatomy and physiology. Of course heck I've thought about requiring a solid study skills course before student gets into my AP class. I think I'd rather they be able to make a news flash cards and make concept maps then to be able to solve quadra equations for example the AP Course skied lines from the human anatomy and physiology society half's suggest a whole list of required and recommended courses with a minimum among grade of C hats. Members can access the course guidelines at the AP professor dot Org Slash perhaps that's Ha ps ps but perhaps guidelines are well intended as recommendations for programs that want to align in well with the learning outcomes which I've mentioned before in this podcast specifically in episode fifty and for courses that one have a high level of rigor in their program in my mind at least these recommendations are not absolute requirement. And that's that's helpful but when things are not strictly definitive are when we have obstacles at our school for implementing anyone's list of recommended prerequisites requisites. Then we meaning. I tend to still fried about things a bit or sometimes fred a lot. Sure sure any answer to the prerequisite question is going to depend on factors unique to that institution or to that program or department. Our course Actually they're even more considerations than those I just listed but I'll circle back to some of those a little later even after we account for all all those factors. The answer never seems to satisfy Est.. Does it at least not over the long term. We we seemed always WANNA come back to it because no matter what our prerequisites aw or our previous decision not to have required Requisites it's we never seem to be fully satisfied that things are just right. Why because not all our students students seem to transition easily Dr Course and not all of them succeed at least not at first so a solution that always seems obvious? Assayas maybe we should reconsider our prerequisite requirements and it seems to me that this is a wheel that is continuously elite. Reinvented over generations. And remember. I'm as old as an oak tree. I've actually been around for generations all that time paying attention to what we're doing with prerequisites because that's what we aim peaches do right we ask teach other about prerequisites and we theorize about what's ideal and it seems that no matter how much or how often we fiddle with our course prerequisites that prerequisites situation. We have just well never really works. I've come to the conclusion that it's not that prerequisite courses don't work it's just the prerequisites never truly fulfill fill the expectations that we have for them so that begs the question. How much should we expect students to remember from their prerequisite? It's my answer to what we should expect from prerequisites. Is this nothing really. We should not expect anything. I know I know that. Seems like a negative cynical answer but but I don't see it that way. I think it's realistic. And it's well kind of freeing in a way if I'm not really expecting expecting my students to really own concept of ions protein synthesis or chemical equilibria or what. ATP is what it does then. I'm free of expectations and because of that I won't front about it really now. I smile the smile of a Buddha when I hear my colleagues fretting about the prerequisite requirements or at least. I like to think I'm doing that not only that now. I'm far less likely to be tempted to judge. Judge my colleagues teaching those prerequisite courses badly and I'm less likely to be tempted to judge my students. Badly to by not having Any expectations of prior learning were all starting with a clean fresh slate. What a great feeling man you might ask ask? Why don't I expect students to remember anything useful from what they may have been exposed to in their prerequisite course or courses well first off? I don't mean to imply that none of them know anything. I'm just saying that I've come to believe leave that. It's just not realistic to assume that most of them remember everything and that's kind of what we do right. Expect them to know everything from their prerequisite courses. Why don't I expect that partly because we don't typically teach for the long term think about it the classic way of teaching and approach that I used myself for many years is to prepare students for the next test best and hope they all pass for those that pass? They've learned at least sixty percent of what I wanted them to learn. Now think about that for for minute. That's just a little over half of what they ought to have mastered and that's just for those who actually passed for those who didn't pass pass that test all is not lost. They can learn about two thirds or so of what they ought to on the next test and it might average out to a passing course grade right. But let's say they're learning a solid. Seventy percent are so on average a C grade that means means they've mastered or at least become familiar with a bit over two thirds of the material for their unit test. But because they're not asked about again until the end of the semester it's going to disappear until the week before the exam one. It's going to be relearned at least in part for another week or a two and then lost again. That is unless we excuse them for the exam. Because they've been doing well on the unit tests that measure short-term learning even those with solid long-term learning need refreshing but let's say they were and of course that really did promote long-term learning. Let's say they had to master eighty five to ninety percent of the concepts and that they were continually expected did to retrieve that knowledge and demonstrate mastery on a test. Okay they're still gonNA forget some of it even if they mastered a hundred hundred percent of the concepts and then taught the prerequisite course or the or maybe they taught all the prerequisite courses. There's still gonNA forget some of it maybe not all of it but some of it but of course the more typical case is they're not that competent when they reach us so again. Isn't it more practical. That is more useful to just assume that.

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