35 Burst results for "P. Policy"

Facebook is blocking events near the White House through Inauguration Day

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 59 min ago

Facebook is blocking events near the White House through Inauguration Day

"Blocking new events from being created online here in the nation's capital Just Daisy for president elect Binds inauguration Facebook says it's no longer allowing people to create new events near the White House, U. S Capitol or any state Capitol buildings until after Inauguration Day. The site says it will also review all inauguration related events and remove ones that violates, say policies and will block events created in the U. S. By accounts and pages based outside the U. S social media sites have tightened their content moderation since the deadly January 6th attack on the Capitol. Twitter's permanently banned the president and Amazon kicked parlor office Web hosting services for failing to moderate content. Earlier this week, Airbnb announced that all reservations in the Washington DC, area next week have been canceled and no new reservations in the area will be allowed during that time. Matt Piper. CBS NEWS. How

U. White House Facebook Airbnb Twitter Amazon Washington Dc Matt Piper Cbs News
Facebook, Airbnb block events, bookings near the White House through Inauguration Day

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 2 hrs ago

Facebook, Airbnb block events, bookings near the White House through Inauguration Day

"Mean security concerns of social media giant is blocking new events from being created online here in the nation's capital Just Daisy for president elect Binds inauguration Facebook says it's no longer allowing people to create new events near the White House, U. S Capitol or any state Capitol buildings until after Inauguration Day. The site says it will also review all inauguration related events and remove ones that violates say policies and will block events created in the U. S. By accounts and pages based outside the U. S. Social media sites have tightened their content moderation since the deadly January 6th attack on the Capitol. Twitter's permanently banned the president and Amazon kicked parlor office Web hosting services for failing to moderate content. Earlier this week, Airbnb announced that all reservations in the Washington DC, area next week have been canceled and no new reservations in the area will be allowed during that time.

U. White House Facebook Airbnb Twitter Amazon Washington Dc
Joe Biden reveals 'Day One' plans to roll back Trump policies

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 5 hrs ago

Joe Biden reveals 'Day One' plans to roll back Trump policies

"Up to a dozen executive orders on his first day as US president, immediately, reversing some of Donald Trump's most contentious policies. Measures do to be taken within hours of his inauguration on Wednesday include lifting a ban on travel from a group of mainly Muslim countries and rejoining the Paris climate accord. Mr. Biden will also call for masks to be worn on federal property to cut covert 19 infections on more financial support for those struggling during the pandemic. Next week. Take action to extend nationwide restrictions on evictions and foreclosures. This will provide more than 25 million Americans greater stability instead of living on the edge every single month. I'm asking Congress to do its part. Funded rental assistance for 14 million hearted families and tenants. Thousands of

Mr. Biden Donald Trump Paris United States Congress
Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

KYW 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 8 hrs ago

Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

"The incoming Biden administration introducing members of the new science team, Joe Biden on Saturday in a first announced that the administration will elevate the position of science advisor. Cabinet level status. Lying to be the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy is Eric Lander, his work It M I T and Harvard has garnered him worldwide recognition. He's a pioneer in the scientific community. Principal leader in the Human genome project. It's not hyperbole suggests that Dr Landers work has changed the course of human history. Now a member of the biting Cabinet, of course, needs approval to science team will be charged with examining issues to include public health as well as climate change.

Biden Administration Eric Lander Joe Biden Office Of Science And Technolo Cabinet Dr Landers Human Genome Project Harvard
Biden introduces key members of his science team

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:03 min | 8 hrs ago

Biden introduces key members of his science team

"And Vice President elect Kamila Harris introduced picks to join the White House science team at a briefing and Wilmington, Delaware. Correspond. Michelle Franzen has Mon Saturday, President elect Joe Biden named key members for his White House team, Dr Eric Lander, nominated to head the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Along with presidential science advisor for the first time in history. I'm going to be elevated presidential science advisor to a Cabinet rank. Because we think it's that important. Doctor Alondra Nelson for deputy director and co chairs for the president's Council of Advisers, Dr. Frances Arnold and Dr Maria Zuber and the president elect also formally announced Wendy Sherman as his pick to serve as the number two official at the State Department. Sherman served as the undersecretary of state for political affairs. The fourth highest post at the State Department during the Obama administration and was the lead US negotiator on the nuclear deal with Iran. Biden also announced that Victoria Nuland will be nominated for the role of undersecretary of State for political affairs when snooze time in

Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Michelle Franzen President Elect Joe Biden Dr Eric Lander White House Alondra Nelson Office Of Science And Technolo Council Of Advisers Dr. Frances Arnold Dr Maria Zuber Wilmington Wendy Sherman Delaware State Department Cabinet Obama Administration Sherman Victoria Nuland Biden Iran
Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 9 hrs ago

Biden announces new science team, elevates office to Cabinet

"Elect says science will always be at the forefront of his administration. And so he is elevating the post of science advisor to Cabinet level. Eric Lander, a pioneer and mapping the human genome is in line to direct the Office of Science and Technology Policy and service Science Advisor. Biden's also retaining Dr Francis Collins is director of the National Institutes of Health. And he's naming two prominent female scientists to co chair the President's Council of Advisers on Science and Technology. Caltex Frances Arnold, who won the 2018 Nobel Prize in chemistry. And M I. T vice President for research Maria Zuber. Biden says the team will ensure everything his administration does is grounded in science, fax and the truth.

Eric Lander Office Of Science And Technolo Dr Francis Collins President's Council Of Adviser Biden Cabinet Caltex Frances Arnold National Institutes Of Health Maria Zuber
Biden introduces key members of his science team

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:36 sec | 10 hrs ago

Biden introduces key members of his science team

"I'm in the corner virus pandemic. President elect Biden says. Science is top of mind and try to get a handle on pandemics. CBS is Michael George, with more on the presidential science team just announced. President elect Biden continued to build his administration introducing more key members of his science team. We know the science is discovery. It's not fiction. It's also about hope. That's America. It's in the DNI. A of this country hope Biden elevated the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy to a Cabinet level position nominating biologist Eric Lander of M I T and

President Elect Biden Michael George Biden CBS DNI Office Of Science And Technolo America Cabinet Eric Lander
Heightened security measures in place ahead of Biden's inauguration

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

00:29 sec | 11 hrs ago

Heightened security measures in place ahead of Biden's inauguration

"States are on high alert this weekend with pro Trump March is set to take place at state capitals across the country. In Madison, Wisconsin. Reporter Morgan Chesky says the city is taking steps to protect Capitol Square hearts of downtown Madison, including the Capitol Square behind me, everywhere you look Some places are boarded up and business owners hoping for the best. The FBI has warned of possible armed protest starting today and running through President elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday, A number of states have called up National Guard troops

Capitol Square Morgan Chesky Madison Wisconsin President Elect Joe Biden FBI National Guard
Biden says his advisers will lead with 'science and truth'

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 13 hrs ago

Biden says his advisers will lead with 'science and truth'

"Science and truth we believe in both so, said President elect Joe Biden today as he introduced his team of Scientific advisors correspondent Michelle Franzen reports the Biden Harris administration campaigned on putting a priority on science. I've always said that Biden Harris administration will also no lead. We're gonna leave with science and truth, We believe them both. On Saturday, President elect Joe Biden named key members for his White House team, Dr Eric Lander, nominated to head the Office of Science and Technology Policy, along with presidential science advisor to the first time in history. I need to be elevating presidential science advisor to a Cabinet rank. Because we think it's that important doctor Alondra Nelson for deputy director and co chairs for the president's Council of Advisers, Dr Frances Arnold and Dr Maria Zuber. Biden says they will help tackle some of the biggest crisis facing the U. S, including climate change the pandemic

President Elect Joe Biden Scientific Advisors Michelle Franzen Biden Harris Administration Biden Harris Dr Eric Lander Office Of Science And Technolo Alondra Nelson White House Council Of Advisers Dr Frances Arnold Dr Maria Zuber Cabinet Biden U.
Biden introduces key members of his science team

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 13 hrs ago

Biden introduces key members of his science team

"Elect show Biden and Vice President elect Kamila Harris introduced picks to join the White House science team in a briefing in Wilmington, Delaware. Correspondent Michelle Franzen has months Saturday, President elect Joe Biden named key members for his White House team, Dr Eric Lander, nominated to head the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Along with presidential science advisor for the first time in history. I'm gonna be elevating presidential science advisor to a Cabinet rank. Because we think it's that important doctor Alondra Nelson for deputy director and co chairs for the president's Council of Advisers, Dr Frances Arnold and Dr Maria Zuber land, the president elect also formally announced Wednesday. Wendy Sherman, as his pick to serve is the number two official At the State Department. Sherman served as the undersecretary of state for political affairs, the fourth highest post at the State Department during the Obama administration and was the lead US negotiator on the nuclear deal with Iran. Biden also announced that Victoria Nuland will be nominated for the role of undersecretary of State for political affairs. She previously served as assistant secretary of state. The European and Eurasian affairs in the Obama administration wins

Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Michelle Franzen Dr Eric Lander White House Alondra Nelson Biden President's Council Of Adviser Dr Frances Arnold Office Of Science And Technolo Dr Maria Zuber Land Joe Biden Wendy Sherman Wilmington Delaware State Department Obama Administration Cabinet Victoria Nuland Sherman State For Political Affairs
Biden: Science will be at `forefront' of his administration

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 19 hrs ago

Biden: Science will be at `forefront' of his administration

"President elect Joe Biden says signs will always be at the forefront of his administration so he's elevating the post of science adviser to cabinet level Eric lander a pioneer in mapping the human genome is in line to direct the office of science and technology policy and service science adviser he would be the first to life scientists to hold the job Biden's also retaining Dr Francis Collins is director of the national institutes of health and he's naming two prominent female scientists to co chair the president's council of advisors on science and technology Caltex Francis Arnold who won the two thousand eighteen Nobel Prize in chemistry and M. I. T. vice president for research Maria's stupor Biden says the team will ensure everything his administration does is grounded in science facts and the truth Ben Thomas Washington

President Elect Joe Biden Eric Lander Office Of Science And Technolo Dr Francis Collins Council Of Advisors On Science Biden Cabinet Francis Arnold National Institutes Of Health M. I. T. Maria Ben Thomas Washington
COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | 1 d ago

COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

"Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
Vaccine Rollout Strategies Vary Between Nations

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | 1 d ago

Vaccine Rollout Strategies Vary Between Nations

"Welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
How Biden's appointment will affect international religious freedom

Jim Bohannon

05:37 min | 1 d ago

How Biden's appointment will affect international religious freedom

"There has been in recent years. A fair emphasis placed on the notion of religious freedom. And the question arises. Of course on this, like so many other issues. What changes will be made with the change at the White House and we're joined now. By Susan Crabtree. White House and national political correspondent at real clear politics dot com. Susan. Thank you for being with us. Thanks for having me Jim, are you speaking here about religious freedom in this country or around the world? Well, in this case, I'm talking about international religious freedom. That was a big emphasis in the Trump Administration, State Department with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Thean Basseterre for religious freedom. Can't uh And Brownback another cans and seeming up to make it a big priority in the Trump administration. They really did more on this issue than And the administration. In the past, they held a huge summit that attracted 100 and five countries from around the world, the biggest of its kind. To really Look out on this issue and talk about issues that there are playing out around the world that are basically Terrible circumstances in China with nearly million Wickers, um being persecuted and forced into labor camp. And in places like Burma, where they're working. Go. Muslims have been slaughtered by the tens of thousands in recent years and pushed out become refugees. Think huge refugee problem. So this Thies air issues that the Trump administration made a huge, Ah, big priority at into integral part of it. Um, foreign policy, and we're wondering on a lot of the people in the advocacy community in Washington and around the world are wondering if it's going to continue. And I understand that. Ah, Mr Brownback is quite optimistic that this will continue as well as our speaker Pelosi and former Republican Congressman Frank Wolf. Well, I don't know about Speaker Pelosi and and Frank Wolf. They were they did get together. This is a priority for secret Pelosi over the years as well. She's spoken about out about human rights in China. When, as far back as when the Congress is considering most favored nations status that creates status for China. She's always been ah, big advocate of human rights when it comes to religious freedom. She and Frank Wolf teamed up and did have a big debate. And, um, at one of the summit that I was just talking about, But in terms of where Biden is, we really don't know it. Kind of a candle in his administration, because He has talked about his own personal faith quite a bit on the campaign trail, but we don't know where he stands in terms of making religious freedom the priority of its foreign policy. Because he seems like people are fearful that climate change is going to really be the big push. We already see John Kerry being named as the Called climates are on, and the President elect Joe Biden, has that pledged he would rejoin the Paris climate accord. Although, of course we are able to walk and chew gum at the same time. I believe, right. We could do both, couldn't we Well, one would hope, but they will see pretty soon here, whether a divided names and Ambassador for religious freedom And that would show that he is he. This is a bigger priority in one might think for his administration. Um, the Obama administration left that position. Taken for several years, and that concerns some of the activists and, um and they're worried, very worried that this is going to become less of a priority. Under Joe Biden. But you know, it depends on who he named to replace Sam Brownback. He There are a number of people named circulating. Certainly Katrina plant of what is one of those people. She is the daughter of Tom Lantos, who actually served in the administrations. Certain Congress with Joe guidance, and he was on Lee, Holocaust survivor to have ever held a seat in Congress. And he has quite a legacy going, and until then, it was very supportive that in fact, Between plant is what is now running human rights sanitation, and she gave Joe Biden, um one of its big first awards a number of years ago, and Biden had pledged to not turn a blind eye to this type of religious persecution. Um, he actually said that we have to be true to Tom Lantos. His legacy so If he names a between Atlantic Into sweat. I think that be advocacy, community community and globally will be a little bit more sure that he's taking this issue very, very seriously and will continue these big summit that we've seen during the Trump administration. And the groundwork that Come peyote and Brownback laid

Trump Administration Frank Wolf Susan Crabtree Mike Pompeo Thean Basseterre Wickers Mr Brownback Speaker Pelosi Pelosi China Brownback State Department Joe Biden White House Susan Burma JIM Congress
The U.S.-China Phase One Trade Deal: Is It Working?

WSJ What's News

03:20 min | 2 d ago

The U.S.-China Phase One Trade Deal: Is It Working?

"Might be hard to remember. But today marks the one year anniversary of what was supposed to be a signature foreign policy effort of the trump administration. Abroad trade pact with china. The aim of the phase. One deal was to ease the mounting bilateral tensions with the world's second largest economy and to reduce large commercial imbalances that washington has attributed to beijing's quote trade-distorting practices but then within months came the coronavirus pandemic and its economic fallout. So what's become of the china trade deal. And where did the us and china stand now ahead of the biden administration taking office joining me to talk about. It is yuga hayashi who has reported on this yuga. Thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me all right. So let's back up a little bit. Remind us of what was all in this phase. One trade deal so this agreement has three elements to it. The part that gets the most attention is china's commitment to purchase a significant amount of us exports. They agreed to buy an additional two hundred billion dollars worth of us products over a two year period studying at last year. That was the first part. The second part is china's commitment to make some changes in its economy and reform to make it easier. For american businesses to sell items manufactured items in china it issued like protection of intellectual property. Refraining from requiring american companies to transfer their technology their joint venture locations in china and the third part is the us's agreement to reduce tariffs on chinese products coming into the us. Yes i guess. The big question is where do we stand now did the. Us and china each live their parts of the agreement so whether the agreement has been successful or not. The answer depends on who you ask so if you look at the purchase commitment china has failed to meet its goal as of november it had only purchased a little over half of what it promised to buy this year under disagreement now part of that slow pace is due to the pandemic in the first few months of the year. The purchases declined sharply so during the last few months of the year. China picked up the pace of buying products particularly agricultural products. But even after that they have fallen sharply of meeting the goal for this year and what about the tariffs. Toasts remain on nearly four hundred billion dollars worth of chinese imports and lord of us businesses have complained about them. They say that they only increase the costs of their production and that would lead to the losses of american jobs and also increased prices of products. That are paid by american consumers.

China Biden Administration Yuga Hayashi United States Abroad Beijing Washington
$1,400 Checks And Help For The Jobless: What's In Biden's Plan To Rescue The Economy

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:54 min | 2 d ago

$1,400 Checks And Help For The Jobless: What's In Biden's Plan To Rescue The Economy

"President elect joe biden. Says if the us is going to come back from his pandemic it has to spend big biden outlined his strategy last night. It's an ambitious plan with a total price. Tag of one point nine trillion dollars in additional congressional aide. Npr's scott horsely is with us this morning. Hi scott good morning rachel. At this point congress has already allocated around four trillion dollars in federal relief aid for the pandemic but biden. Now clearly saying that's not enough this right. He acknowledged the fixes. He's proposing won't come cheap but he warned. The cost of inaction would be even higher. He spoke at a time. When we're losing more than four thousand people every day to covid nineteen and more than eighteen. Million americans are still out of work. Crisis of deep human suffering is in plain sight. There's no time to waste. We have to act now in recent weeks. We've seen a frightening surge in both death and new infections and beyond the illness and the loss of life. There's been a serious toll on the economy. Rachel just last week more than one point. Two million people filed new applications for unemployment relief. We're still short millions of jobs and we actually lost jobs. In december for the first time. Since april let's focus in on on specifically the pandemic. How does biden proposed getting out of that. He was more aggressive federal response. You know president trump a lot of emphasis on developing new vaccines in record time. But once they were in hand the administration really left it up to states to distribute them. And it's gone much more slowly than promised in fact biden branded the rollout so far a quote dismal failure The president-elect is calling on congress has been twenty billion dollars on a nationwide vaccine campaign and he wants to hire one hundred thousand additional public health workers we'll have to move heaven and earth to get more people vaccinated create more places for them to get vaccinated to mobilize more medical teams to get shots and people's arms to increase vaccine supply to get it out the door as fast as possible. Federal reserve chairman. Jerome powell underscored that point yesterday saying the single most important economic policy in the country right now is healthcare policy right. They're completely entwined so. Even if biden meets his goal of delivering one hundred million shots in his first hundred days which experts say is a stretch. Right that's not suddenly gonna fix the job market. What is biden saying about that right. So he's calling for another round of direct payments. Have fourteen hundred dollars for most american. That's on top of the six hundred dollar payments that were approved last month he also wants to increase unemployment benefits and importantly he wants to extend those benefits through september or even longer if conditions warrant. He's also calling for hundreds of billions of dollars in spending to help schools reopen safely and help state and local governments keep teachers and police and firefighters on the job and he's proposing some longer term measures including a boost in the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour. I mean i guess. He's got some support in congress. It's tipping his direction. But what are the chances that actually gets through uncertain you know. Democrats have the narrowest possible margin in the senate and not much bigger majority in the house. as much as the president-elect is urging law makers to act quickly he acknowledged this is not gonna be like throwing a light switch when he takes office next week. We didn't get into all this overnight won't get out of it overnight. We can't do it as a separate divided nation only way we can do. It is to come together to come together as fellow americans as neighbors that is obviously a very different tone than what we've been hearing in washington lately. Certainly parts of the biden plan are not gonna win. Bipartisan support of the chamber of commerce for example are very skeptical of that fifteen dollars minimum wage but the chamber put out a support a statement especially about the vaccine turbo charging. You know everybody wants to put this pandemic behind them as quickly as possible.

Biden President Elect Joe Biden Scott Horsely Congress Jerome Powell NPR Rachel Scott Federal Reserve United States Senate Chamber Of Commerce For Exampl Washington
Economic recovery: one step forward, several steps back

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:58 min | 2 d ago

Economic recovery: one step forward, several steps back

"A big day. This was for the two people who will arguably be running this economy for the next number of years i speak here of course number one. A fisherman jay powell who did an online thing at princeton today in which he said among many other things now is not the time to exit. Allow to translates. If i might that is fed. Speak for we're going to keep on propping up this economy with low interest rates for as long as we have to and the other guy the one who's going to be in charge of this economy in six days said i see your interest rates jay and i will raise you one point nine trillion dollars. President biden is rolling out his economic relief. Plan tonight another fourteen hundred dollars in checks to individuals more unemployment assistance billions for vaccines and testing. Tracing all the stuff we all kinda thought would be in there and however much does pass the new congress. It is not going to come a moment too soon. Because this being thursday we got new numbers for initial unemployment claims this morning a big spike backup to almost a million people who lost their jobs last week and that comes as some new research from the federal reserve shows. The unemployment rate for this economies highest paid workers has fallen down underneath five percent. While for the lowest paid workers. We have it's as high as twenty percents marketplace's jasmine guy gets his gone. The numbers paint. What economists have called case shaped recovery. Things are improving for the better off and getting worse for the rest. Paul iverson an analyst at the university of iowa's labor center says there are long term ramifications to this people that were already in a precarious position that were one paycheck away from disaster. Now find themselves without that paycheck and so disasters the result industries like hospitality which tend to be low wage and employ more black and latino have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic manet. Yanko is an economist. At the university of michigan issue of very very different levels of unemployment in different sectors of the economy is not going to go away until we allow our restaurants and hotels to near full capacity in yesterday. Speech federal reserve governor brainerd. The need for urgent economic policy to help millions of unemployed americans travel logan an economist at ohio state university agrees we do need to support the income of the workers. Take uley those who are indeed high contact service industries working reductions than ours and now facing increasing and prolonged unemployment but he also says it conomic recovery hinges on the success of the vaccine rollout jasmine garst for

Jay Powell President Biden Paul Iverson University Of Iowa's Labor Cen Princeton JAY Yanko Federal Reserve Congress University Of Michigan Brainerd Ohio State University Logan Jasmine Garst
Life insurance advice with Clark Howard

Clark Howard Show

02:47 min | 2 d ago

Life insurance advice with Clark Howard

"Right. Clark yolanda in north carolina says. I'm a forty one year old single parent. I'm looking at life insurance. But i'm not sure how to determine what i need. I've a two year old son have policy through my employer currently in a small policy that should cover funeral. Expenses checked a few companies. But i'm just not sure where to start on this. Okay wonderful the you're looking out for your kids and what i recommend as just a back of the envelope. Simple way to come up with an amount is that you buy a policy that covers ten times. Your annual income that will provide a decent pool of funds to provide for your children in the event of your untimely devise. so that may sound cost prohibitive. But it's not if you buy the right kind of life. Insurance which is known as a level term insurance level term is where you buy for a set amount a set amount of life insurance or face amount of you know how many hundreds of thousands of dollars or whatever it would be for a period of time. You're worried about protecting your children. Ten fifteen twenty thirty years. Whatever that period is on clark dot com. You'll see my guide to buying level term insurance and there are many quotation sites. You can go to to get quotes for many different insurance companies. Whether things. I want to focus your attention on. Is that particularly if you go out. More than fifteen years on level term. I want you to buy a policy from a company rated a double plus by a m best on any of the shopping services that i would direct you to they will show you the a. m. best rating. Which tells you how healthy the insurer is itself. So the eight double plus means they have the highest level of ability to pay claims in the future. Because you wouldn't wanna pay for life insurance policy that later isn't going to pay out for you. Level term insurance has no goofy Savings accounts are investment accounts. It only pays a death benefit to your survivors period. That's all it does in the case of buying policy where you're a single parent and you have minor children. That policy usually will be done in a trust kind of arrangement. Don't be intimidated by that. The online sellers are very familiar with this. And you will be able to have someone you trust. Named is the trustee of that in the event that you pass away while your children are still minors

Clark Yolanda North Carolina Clark
"p. policy" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

07:35 min | 2 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Slate Money

"Now. At this stage is petsmart going to survive and thrive. I'm not sure. But I don't think that private equity coming in is what is going to be the determining factor? Yes. They still do have a decent amount of leverage although actually their leverage ratios has dumped come down significantly partly because when they IPO Chewy, they put like a Billion Dollars from those that IPO into kicking down the debt of Petsmart and then the other thing I'll say about busy partners they did just inject were billion dollars of equity back into petsmart which technically didn't have to do based on their contracts. They could have rip out shoe we in just like petsmart well, okay. We're not doing anything and they did so. I don't think this is necessarily just a story of Oh private equity comes in this company was doing so well and they killed it sometimes, it is the private equity story I don't think that's the story here. So I will just push back a little bit on this idea that by ripping out chewy from petsmart that de leveraging and it's something I've had a lot that you know you. It's there's a lot of numbers with XS in them and ratios like well, if you look at the debt coverage ratio when the income lab and I can see that argument. But on some level, my idea of leverage is how much of the value of the company is. Debt and how much of it is equity, and if you just take very basic idea of how much it's the company with in terms of enterprise value, and then split that up between and equity clearly, pets has become a lot more leverage as a result if this move by Z partners because you know Petsmart has twenty billion dollars, worth of equity in jewelry, and that's part of the business right now which is. Being ripped out and then it's losing will with the injury and all it's getting back is like you know a billion dollars of re-injection or something it's worse for overall the enterprise value has come down significantly there's still looks of debt you know there's more than enough money in shoe evaluation to pay off that entirely BBC partners has no intention to do that because they can play around into debt markets and and keep. Mark going even with two point three, billion dollars of debt you know needing to be serviced and it just seems to me that. You know a founder. Of Say Petsmart, you know someone who had built up who had about who got about the employees who had about the communities if they manage to make this great bat of like buying jewelry, which was suddenly worth lots of money, they would have taken some of the profits from that BA and said, hey, this is awesome. We can. Become this. Bricks and mortar slash online. Combined Company that can actually compete with Amazon. Amazon just doesn't manage to compete with chewy amazingly and we can. Be a great success story and instead. that's not how private equity things and you can kind of see that with. Whole Foods and Amazon the tie up there right I. mean there's this night you can have nice integration between bricks and mortar store and an online retailer I think like they're they're probably there could was room for innovation between Petsmart and Shui like there was a lost opportunity here I would think. To Cross promote, cross you know yeah, I mean it's all about Omni channel right? Like literally every single retailer in the world is trying to you know use the. Real world locations to drive online sales and you know trying to use online sale to be picked up real world league agents. This huge pet food, right which costs a fortune to ship. If you can just drive down to your local pet smart and pick it up and you save a lot of money, there's so many obvious synergies that idea that ripping is the obvious thing to do seems insane something private equity would do. You can make an argument that this. Was Never. GonNa work from the beginning for the fact that Chewy was very clear that they wanted to remain very separate entity from Penn smart. They need that very clear when they were purchased and I imagine that the assumption was well okay fine. But I'm sure we'll still be able to do a lot of the integration plans we want and I think that just never panned out and I think. Hindsight looking back you can say. Did this really make lots that's no granted at that point. That's didn't have a lot of options because they simply had no ability to compete by building out their own compe- competition too chewy. That was never gonNA happen. So rented. You could make the argument that moment they should have said well, then let's just get out of that business shift into services. Frankly that would've probably been a better option as opposed to buying to begin with. That's fair argument. Now, at the point we are though I don't think it makes I don't think either company benefits significantly from having the other attached to it, and you can say, well, there are these other concepts of leverage that I like but the but the leverage concepts that matter are the ones that affect the amount of money how much it costs for you to take on debt. So those leverage matters those leverage metrics matter and this does actually put. PETSMART in a better position in that way, maybe a slightly less terrible position, but there's still a deep into. Territory. You know I I don't like Chris idea that like petsmart is better off as a result of losing twenty billion dollars value. I just don't think that's an easy case to make. They pet them now? That pet. Numbers. Round. Driven number I do my number is one hundred and forty two, thousand Korean Juan. So remember a few weeks ago we talked about how big hit entertainment went public and it had this like amazing one day pop well, unfortunately. That hasn't hasn't worked out too well, and it's essentially lost half its value and I think the first day it was trading it got his highest three, hundred, fifty, one, thousand, one ended up closing two, hundred and fifty thousand. It's now down to one, hundred and forty, two thousand. So. Sadly, Korean boy bands may not be quite as lucrative as we thought. We knew that the big trade of the past few weeks shorting bts. How did they fail to short bt S. Emily was GONNA. Mine number is two. That is the number of documentary series that are currently going on right now about the colts nexium and the leader of that Colt Keith renewing this week was sentenced to one hundred, twenty years in prison and If you WANNA find out what happened there are these two separate documentary series one on stars and one on. Hbo Called The vow and they they really dig into the story of what happened with this quote, which was actually a multi level marketing company that didn't sell a product they sold like self help essentially. So it was like an. To. Begin with and then. Lots of really really bad things happened and I don't know what's going on with me. But I am obsessed with both of the documentary series right now because they say a lot about all the things. I'm interested in like misogyny and you know scams in general and I feel like there's parallels to trump if you feel like going down that road kind of it all all this news, the sky was scamming for a long time but no one cared until twenty. Seventeen because of the METOO era, there are all these like see list actors involved Catherine Oxen Berg is involved. She was in dynasty in the eighties like it's just there are a lot of levels to this and I'm down a rabbit hole..

Petsmart Chewy Combined Company Amazon BBC founder Catherine Oxen Berg hit entertainment Mark Omni colts Z partners Chris Hbo S. Emily Penn Shui Colt Keith
"p. policy" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

06:31 min | 2 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Slate Money

"With a little bit of equity is now freely traded on the stock market and if you look at what the stock market says. Is Worth and is now with about thirty billion dollars. Thank you pandemic. So this should be great for Petsmart right? Because petsmart bought Choo Choo he's now with that you billion dollars Petsmart is in the clear it's making lots of money that's not what's happening and this is why I think was choice story is so interesting or other the busy partners petsmart Jewish story is so interesting somehow you can make a bet which turns out really well, Petsmart can be in this position of owning a really. White hot on fire E, ECOMMERCE business, and still be stuck with billions of dollars in that and a junk bond credit rating and. Not really be out of the woods tool. At this point it doesn't make any sense to keep those companies together because what Chu Dot com is doing is basically cannibalizing business from petsmart? Part of the reason that BBC partners initially acquired chewy with because they had their original investment thesis, which was kind of based on the idea of like look petsmart throws off cash, but it's not growing. It's sales have declined. We want to rationalize its prices, Blah Blah Blah, and they did that but then. Consumer. Start to shift to buying things online and they could either try to build something or they could buy it, and so they took on debt to buy. The problem was you never integrated those companies so there isn't really any benefit to having them together. For petsmart is again, you have this company that's essentially taking business away from them and on top of that, it makes their leverage ratios worse because Chewy doesn't make money petsmart has not been fantastic, but it doesn't make money. So it will actually be in a better position leverage. Wise when you separate the companies and this enables that company to kind of refocus on services and like pet doggy daycare and prescriptions, and then let we deal with the business of selling people. Good. Okay. I feel like you're contradicting yourself a little bit here because on the one side you say. Let's just talk about the news here, which is the BBC partners is ripping jewelry out of petsmart entirely leaving petsmart with no e comex basically tool you'll saying well. What this does is allow Petsmart to concentrate on doggy daycare and real world stuff, which is fine but also saying that they never really integrated it. So how would not able to concentrate them doggy daycare well along well, yes. In theory if they really wanted to, they could have focused on doggy daycare but. It doesn't make any sense to do this while you have this other company attached to you that is making it more expensive for you to borrow money. So when you have to businesses connected to each other, that are need to do very very very different things. It doesn't really help either event to be connected. If you're a company like Petsmart, you can make you can continue to be connected with chewy and what's going to happen while you're probably gonNA eventually just go out of business. If you're separating them you at least can have a focus and again, slightly better metrics to move forward. I still think probably GONNA end up going out of business at some point, but they're still a possibility. And chewy. It doesn't make any sense to have this bricks and mortar company connected you that doesn't really add anything. So I think that there's probably more value having as two separate companies. Look I thought when we were GonNA talk about Chewy and Petsmart, it was gonna be like kind of a cute story about you know puppies and like selling pet food and stuff. and. Then you read about the history of Petsmart and Chewy and this. BC partners. That owns both of these things and it's just like financial shenanigans. It seems like to me like no one was thinking like when petsmart bought chewy. If it was doing something interesting in the space of like cute puppies and selling pet food and services I feel like there was a good like analysts saying a good integration play where a petsmart could have like become a more twenty twenty kind of pet retailer in there could have been nice integration between the two companies and A. Plan but it seems like all. BBC partners wanted to do was kind of like acquire a competitor, suck all the value out of it suck all the value out of petsmart and separate them again like it doesn't seem like anything was done in the best interests of the actual companies here I totally agree. If you look at. PETSMART as a company rather than as like. Portfolio Holding. What's happened to Petsmart here is not. Good. The BBC partners has been very good at financial engineering and extracting value and making Claes, rest of it but if you're an employee of Pets My, if you're like a stakeholder of Petsmart, who's not the shareholder, then you're looking at all of the Houston arrogance and you'll saying, well, Hey, my owners have just made eleven billion dollars from this. You know financial engineering I'm still making minimum wage there was. Still. Pays minimum wage in a lot of different states a bunch of complaints about how they haven't been providing enough late mosques and stuff like that for employees and. Partners. So say consent hey, they're making money that's their job, right? They may they. They exist to make money for their limited partners and they've made money. So Congratulations BC partners you've done a good job in that but for petsmart itself as a business as a part of the community as a place which employers people this none of this seems to have been good for them and I feel like that's been a criticism of private equity since you know before Mitt Romney ran for president but then it was big point of discussion when Mitt Romney Ran, which is the private equity is just not good at creating real value in the community as as opposed to making money full billionaires I would say that number one. Part of the reason that petsmart was originally bought by a private equity firm was because it was not seeing growth it was seeing revenue declines almost certainly did not have a very healthy future ahead of it just part of the reason it was purchased by. Private. Equity. So?.

Petsmart Chewy BBC BC partners Mitt Romney Chu Dot BC president Houston Claes
"p. policy" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

08:04 min | 2 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Slate Money

"He their sleep money listeners. Before we start the show I want to let you know about a fascinating story coming up. You'll hear it midway through today's episode. It's from one of our partners UNISOM. UNICEF's programs in Lebanon even during this pandemic and in the aftermath of the Beirut explosion continue to empower young entrepreneurs like mean, and got not long ago. They figured out a way to change the day to day lives of local and refugee women by teaching them an invaluable skill. Stick around to hear Hanini and Got Story. So let's talk about the economy. We had a GDP report for the ages this week thirty, three point, one percent annualized growth rate, which is seven point four percent annual growth rate, just quarter to quarter, which is huge, and it's also a statistical artifact because we fell even more than that the previous quarter and there's a lot to be said about the GDP report which I guess you can read some of it in my newsletter i WanNa talk about something kind of bigger though which is as we all go off to the polls and Kosta votes. How important are they? Just purely economically I you know there's a million different reasons why you would want to vote for one candidate or the other. But the thing always told us that people wind up voting on the economy and I am wondering like. Presidents actually make a difference when it comes to the economy and I think that. The combination of the president and the Congress can make a difference. Can make a difference. How often does it make a difference I? Think it is it like every every administration? Is it some big? It depends on what you mean by make a difference because you're always obviously working at a counterfactual something else had happened. I. Mean I think if you're considering okay. Well, if I have a president and Congress in the same party, they're probably going to be able to put through certain policies and in this particular curious the ability to potentially put through more stimulus probably could have don the economy. But I'm just saying like generally speaking you know if if Mitt Romney had one instead of Barack, Obama would that have been particularly different for the economy I imagine. No. I think that the impact that the president and Congress can have definitely varies depending on what the other effects are. There are there are always larger economic forces that are going to be bigger than any president or any Congress globalization. What has happened with rates. Global Monetary Policy No one president's GONNA be able to change all those things but that doesn't mean presidents at certain times haven't had massive impact even look at Lyndon Johnson in terms of all of the spending in the great. Society and the Vietnam War and how that affected policy in general FDR obviously nother example. So it's not that presidents can never have an impact but there are still obviously these larger forces at they're always acting kind of in concert with. Yeah I think presidents. And the economy the relationship depends a lot on just sort of like and timing also like someone like George h.w Bush comes in sort of. Peak and then there's a cycle down, it looks bad for him or Barack Obama comes in during the depths of the great recession. So you know he brings things up. So that looks good for him like there is some of just like the timing of the business cycle and the president that may be a little bit out of the president's control, and then like Anna saying if the president and the Congress are on the same team that can have control more control over the economy. But like again, to go to Obama, they're on different teams than Congress can work against the president's plan for the economy and in the case of Obama and kind of like hold back stimulus or. Go, for austerity when the president wants to do more stimulus but I think in this election, the tie between the president and the economy is actually really clear because the key to the economy right now is really getting the pandemic under control and we've seen how trump does that and we know he doesn't. So it sort of to the economy's advantage I would think to switch out the president and try someone who might be better at. Controlling, the virus. So I'm fascinated by this question if trump and the economy because it's the one area weirdly way he's pulling ahead of Biden we are in a huge economic downturn we have down feather from even after that Lust Q. Three GDP growth figure we are still down further from the peak than we wear the debt of the great in two, thousand nine, we have you know twenty, five, million people collecting unemployment every week it's it's. Objectively terrible economy and yet in the face of this objectively terrible economy. The population as a whole trusts trump on the economy more than Biden and they trust him despite the fact that the reason that the economy is so bad is because of the pandemic which trump handled so atrociously. I don't entirely understand that but. One thing I will point to if you look at other countries which have handled dependency bad. They're still having massive economic problems and really the effect of trump on the economy is entirely a really I think down to. The way that he reacted to the pandemic and. The effect he had on the economy yet, he had an effect on the US economy, but he had an effect on the global economy because the pandemic is a global thing and if America had stepped up and taken the leadership role, the everyone expected it to in the event of global pandemic. Then that would have not only worked out very well for the US in comparison wax it would've worked out very well for the rest of the planet to yeah that's the bigger counterfactual like at the very very beginning of this if the US had acted. If we had had a different more competent administration, the scope of the pandemic might look different right now on the scope of the economic kind of collapse wouldn't be as bad. Yeah. I. Mean I think you're completely correct. It's it is interesting because. Trump hole so poorly on the pandemic but for whatever reason, a lot of people are able to separate those two and kind of assume that there is aspects of the economy that weren't really caused by what trump did I agree with you I think that while we can't one hundred percent, it seems fairly likely that if we had at least had someone who took this seriously from the very beginning and put. Him Policies to limit the spread especially at the very beginning to prepare all the states at the very beginning we one would imagine not being the police. We right now we probably would have taken the economic hit, but just probably not to the extent that we did I was looking back at articles from when trump was first elected and everyone not everyone but there are a lot of pieces that were like. DONALD TRUMP'S GONNA crash the economy from Larry, Summers and There were a few of these pieces a naturally. The stock market would fall off a cliff. It didn't and yeah everyone kind of thought like the the intelligence year old thought that Hillary Clinton would be much better for both the economy and the markets and trump would be, and with hindsight at least if you look at the first three years of the trump administration I'm not sure that was true economy did. Fine under trump I, think it would have done find under Clinton I. Don't think there's that much to choose between them I do think that trump is better at taking credit for that kind of thing than Clinton would have been but I think the interesting aspect of all this is that It's not actually the president's economic policy that determined that..

president DONALD TRUMP Congress Barack UNICEF Beirut Biden Hillary Clinton Mitt Romney George h.w Bush US Lebanon Kosta Hanini Lyndon Johnson FDR
"p. policy" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

07:52 min | 3 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"Students whose family has technology on. Get everybody into school. We can not get everybody in the school. everybody we can do it safely. And that's where in the in the big Municipality in the big cities and their suburbs that have low transmission those Do they're not opening and that's politics you know and once again i. I think that. I think that i agree with you here. Tim i think that schools that can be open. Should because we are seeing a lot of fallout from students being kept at home Losses in educational capacity The inability of parents to work or get things done in the pandemic. That said i just continue to think that we can't. We can't underplay the idea that you know teachers and in fact some parents still are scared. Actually one thing that i found really remarkable From last night's debate on this topic was the president ito trying to say that covert isn't that bad he got it he's immune. He used the example of his son. Barron who apparently contracted covert and has happily recovered To say that you shouldn't be afraid of it. He didn't even say that he had been worried about his son. When his son contracted the girl virus he didn't seem to express any emotion or understanding that the prospect of this disease is extremely frightening extremely alarming for people and guess could be deadly. I think saying we can't worry about it. We can't hide home. We have to do everything to open as a little bit. Misguided doesn't actually reflect the complexity of thought and feeling that most americans have whether they are parents or teachers christine. Did you see anything. That indicated that more schools would in fact be open. If biden wins this election. I mean you know. I assume that he would sign another relief. Bill that would have some more money and we might see that coming to schools sometime in the late winter early spring but one thing the president said it echoed pants a couple of weeks ago. The vice presidential debate was it a lot of the things that the vice president says he would do if he wins are things that they're already doing or at least on paper. They're supposed to be doing so. You know the the president's response. I think has not been very on top of things i i think it's a little bit open question. How quickly things would be. How much different. If we change presidents being exactly what you said. These are things of the president. Says that he's doing he puts on paper that he's doing as we look around. We can see that a lot of things are not being done. I think to the point of what i was saying earlier about. Actually being you know legitimate fears from parents and teachers about reopening schools. I think actually just giving school funding yes to replace these h facs systems. Yes to be able to actually break out into smaller class sizes yes to get real training on how to properly work with students in different environments so that the Possibility of contracting this disease is lessened would actually make. I think teachers become more comfortable with the idea of their classrooms and even teachers unions. I think would be more comfortable with sending their teachers back if they knew that there was funding allotted to make the circumstances much safer. I think that if joe biden were to actually make good on these promises of funding quickly not just say that they're coming on paper and then never do anything about them that can change the mood and schools immigration has been. I think kind of weirdly absent from this campaign and felt for a few years like it was central to our politics may maybe even to central compared to its importance as an issue. And then it's it's flipped and now it's like completely absent below the real level of importance. It has so there was at least a little bit of discussion of immigration But it was this sort of very narrow slice of immigration. The candidates talked about the central american migration crisis specifically the hundreds of children that our government has failed to reunite with the parents at separated them from they talked about border. Security biden talked about a path to citizenship for dreamers. What i didn't hear from either candidate was a vision of what immigration is four and who they would allow to immigrate to the country in the future. And that's where to me because it feels like this is the really important part of immigration policies. What kind of country are we going to build And so tim. What did you make because if you did ask these candidates about that. They have very different views on that they do. And it's it's why we got trump right that the elites of both parties believed in sort of large numbers of immigrants and the republican position was kind of and we let the chamber of commerce. Tell us what to thank. The republican position on immigration was largely. We need to get labor. In to help businesses run at lower costs and that vis created this massive opening for donald trump that he was willing to comment and say no. These guys are driving down wages. In addition to all the other things he said about them not being the the best people in the world but the voters it was largely yet that i'm a worker without a college. Education and importing ton of immigrants is hurting me but that was literally the point of republican immigration policy for years so it would be great if sort of in the trump republican party there were an articulation of immigration is for and at the washington examiner. We said let's start with refugees. Let's start with people who are fleeing a really bad place and then after that we need to have a discussion. I don't think we should have guests workers. There are a lot of people who say we need the high-skilled workers people who say we need the low skill workers. It would be nice to have that debate now. That trump has shaken it up but trump's views on immigration never were terribly nuanced and refined so it will be good to watch to how the where the republican party goes next. But we certainly haven't gotten that. This election cycle and christina. I feel like we didn't at least in this debate. Really get the positive vision about that from biden. Either you know. I think i have to agree with you. Tim i don't think that there has been a clear. Articulation of what the good the real good the substantive good or in fact substantive bad About immigration is for either party. It's a big picture question. And frankly the big picture questions have been jumped to the wayside for years at this point but actually i think if you read between the lines a little bit and just talk about or think about how trump versus biden talked about the immigrants who are already here those envisioned. You do kind of get a sense of you know what i think. Immigrants are doing what they think. Immigrants are for Joe biden went directly to you. Know talking about daca talking about dreamers. He described how many of them are first responders. He talked about how they are trying to invest in their educations so it seems that he imagines or envisions imigrants as productive citizens who become part of the country and contribute to it in various ways. Great trump on the other hand of course went back to greatest hits two thousand sixteen Describing them as rapists and murderers As hideouts in sanctuary cities who are somehow siphoning away. The government funds at the rest of us should be getting. That's a pretty grim and yes xenophobic. Racist envisioning of immigration. And i mean that's the tone that he's taken throughout his administration. I don't see that changing going forward. Another issue that came up in this debate was the minimum wage. And this i thought was interesting because we got a pretty clear contrast between the candidates now first of all christine Joe biden pushing for a fifteen dollar national minimum wage. This is a big victory for the left that i don't think really gets remarked on that much. This was a relatively extreme position within the party. Not that long ago now. The relatively moderate candidate who won the nomination. He's out there pushing for it on a national basis. Yeah it's a huge victory And it's a long time coming but it's also incredibly reasonable. If you actually think about it and ask the american people i mean according to pew surveys Something like eighty six percent of democrats are in.

joe biden president donald trump Tim republican party vice president washington Barron Bill ito chamber of commerce daca
"p. policy" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"And welcome to left. Right and center. You're civilized yet. Provocative antidote to the self contained opinion bubbles that dominate political debate. It is late. October and this week was the second and last presidential debate of the twenty twenty campaign. This one was considerably more normal than the last one partly. Because the candidates microphones were muted during their opponents. Two minute answers in the opening of each debate section and partly because president trump seems to have decided that his strategy of constant interruption in the last debate didn't work right for him instant polls showed respondents tending to say biden. Won the debate but not by the same kind of margins. They said that about the first debate. In fact when waited to the electric poles tended to show respondents saying biden won by about ten points in line with biden's actual lead in the polls and suggesting that people basically thought their guy won this debate since there was more policy conversation in this debate than the last one. I wanna try to delve into that this week and do that. Let's bring in our left right and center panel as always your center. I'm joined by tim. Carney columnist the washington. Examiner and resident fellow at the american enterprise institute on the right and on the left. Christina nba calmness at the washington post. Hello hey josh josh. Let's start with cove and school. Something we talked about on this show last week Like the first debate. This one started with discussion of the covid response. In a point of agreement between trump and biden was that more schools ought to be open but they seem to disagree on why so many schools are closed biden. Blame the president for failing to deliver federal aid to schools that they can make the changes they need to open in person. Trump said people are worrying too much about the risks associated with opening schools. Andy said the democrats are trying to keep things close to hurt him politically Tim did you think either candidate got to the heart of what's going wrong with with schools in covert here now i think donald trump has always turning everything to himself and in this case he was definitely wrong. I put the blame. The hands of local officials. yes but local officials who are bowing to a teacher's union that is being absolutist in its claims. I mean when we see unions going ahead and demand if the new york times union said we wanna sabbatical. We want more pay. They drew an extreme line. We would see it as part of a negotiation when we see teachers unions like some now saying in northern virginia. There's a union saying we shouldn't even open until the next school year. Maybe that's just their extreme line to draw on early bargaining position. But guess what this means. Tons of parents are going to have to find a way to work and educate their kids at home while sticking their kids in front of a computer screen. I think the teachers unions extreme demands aversion to finding a way to open safely. That is the real problem. I think biden's right that there should be lots of money from the federal government sent to schools to help them whether it's you know putting plexiglass dividers. New air conditioning systems. I think the blame lies equally on both parties for that but If we're going to talk about this we're gonna talk about the unions. The teachers unions hurting our children. And in addition to the funding the other thing christine mentioned here was that because the president has not gotten the virus under control that has forced the closure of not just schools but other things in in in our economy. And so i think that there are. There's sort of three things there. One one is the money thing which biden point to one is the community spread thing and anything that you're trying to do with groups of people as harder the the more out of control covert is in the community but the third thing. I think maybe what what tim is pointing to here. Which is that even though conditions should be better so that more schools should be opened. I think there are schools. That could be opened right now in the conditions that we have especially elementary schools where we're starting to see stronger evidence that at least elementary schools do not seem to be big drivers of covid spreads. So i guess. Did you see a satisfactory account here from either of these candidates about why we're not doing that you know i wouldn't say that i saw satisfactory account from either candidate's simply because this is not a satisfactory problem. There's not necessarily a good solution here I do want to point out that you know the fact that the virus is not under control is just a huge. A huge part of this josh. You're totally right Tim i have design your analogy to the new york times taking a sabbatical as a little bit off here. Because there's a difference between wanting to go on sabbatical and you know being afraid of a deadly disease that might kill you And i think that it's fair. That teachers are worried about this. Are worried about contracting it. From their students are worried about their students spreading it to each other yes. Schools are for now have been proven to be you know not necessarily superspreader. There are ways to keep. Hopefully the caseloads down in schools but some of that fear is justified. But i agree. But i would say that. I think josh pointed at sort of the the middle of the road. The open all the schools up which trump sometimes says is wrong. There are places. Now with twenty percent positivity and there are certainly school said just cannot find the space the open air the good weather to educate their kids and those on a state or local or school by school level. Should be making the decision to close where i live in the washington. Dc area we have sub three percent positivity more than ninety seven percent of every coronavirus test comes back negative and yet the public schools. All around here are closed and in some jurisdictions are talking about closing them through the next school year and if these schools open they would be opened with masks they would be opened with all sorts of rules. They would Hopefully be getting money to upgrade soft but even so in schools that are open that are using these precautions. There is a near zero transmission inside the schools. And those are the things we gotta find the places where we can open. Gotta find the students who need it. Most students with learning disabilities.

biden tim josh josh donald trump president washington new york times american enterprise institute virginia washington post Christina nba Carney federal government Andy christine
"p. policy" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on After The Fact

"We're talking about the ongoing conversation between the science community and the policy making community a conversation. The . takes on added urgency amid a global pandemic Mary, , Wooley as President and CEO of Research America. . We heard from her earlier this season and she joins us again. . Let's put Cova decide and I to talk about it because it's obviously central to our lives right now. . But let's put that aside for a moment and and speak more. . Generally you've been watching this intersection of science in public policy for a long time. . Can you trace the progress of how well that's worked and whether we're at a good place whether we've been making the sort of linear progress that we would hope we would make I think it's been fits and starts to be honest. . The reality is that science. . <hes> like everything else in life exists in a context, , a public context and part of that context is political and by political, , I'm talking not about partisan politics but about the policies of the nation, , the funding for agencies that are the relevant agencies, , and of course, , this is way beyond goes way broader than medical and health research. . There is a public context and the public context if it's ignored by the science community are only intermittently attended to can rear up and take you by surprise and as a result with. . You way skewed up and down and a radic funding policies that maybe don't seem to make sense to the science community. . But sometimes, , that's you know to be laid right at the feet of the science community itself for failing to pay attention and to be responsive and accountable to the public and its policymakers to think about public engagement in how they can help make sure that the public knows that sciences they're working for. . Everyone when it comes to the COVID nineteen pandemic, , we know that much of the science is working for everyone as you say, , trying to find ways to treat the steadily virus and we have scientists around the globe were putting aside other less urgent research and collaborating as never before to battle the coronavirus. . How is this effort reshaping the world research? ? I think Dan it's shaping up profoundly and it will never be the same again. . For Finding out that we can move more quickly in science not only if we're well resourced but if we determined to work together more effectively and that is happening right now, , that's a good thing. . Another good thing is that the public is paying more attention. . That's terrific. . So there's progress in the right direction and just add one more thought right now with Kobe we're seeing science in real time like never before. . And it's every day every hour every minute of the day and more people who aren't scientists are realizing that science doesn't move in a linear constant progress way three steps forward, , two steps back. . So we're getting used to this I think progress is being made. . We'll scientific discovery isn't linear and science. . As you've said, , exists in public and political context policymakers listened to their constituents. . Their role in thinking about science is no different in many respects than their. . Role in thinking about defense or thinking about the economy and broad strokes and very limited once but they have to respond to the crisis of the moment and right now, , the crisis of the moment is the pandemic and they rely on the science community as a source of information and advise and also to be responsible to the American public. . So having found out that, , we can cut a lot of red speed things up we're not going to go back. . I. . Think the People Care About finding solutions to what ails us and I don't mean just our health and science historically has provided those solutions and given a chance will continue to do so. .

Pew Research Pew Charitable Trusts Pew Charitable Trusts Vice Milken Institute Dan Luke esther Croatia Molly Irwin President executive director tim
"p. policy" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

04:45 min | 4 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on After The Fact

"After the fact for the Pew Charitable Trusts on Dan Luke, we're continuing our conversations on science. We might tend to think of science says experiments and research, but often for science to have any meaning in our daily lives that has to become part of the policies and the laws that helped frame our behavior. Scientific studies have shown us how alcohol can impair judgement. So we have laws against drunk driving science tells us that vaccines are important for public health. So schools require students to have them that leads us to our data point for this episode, sixty percent according to the Pew Research. Center six out of every ten Americans say that scientists should take an active role in policy debates about scientific issues. What public policy allows us to do is to set the foundation and create a level playing field. If we don't get it right I think patients suffer. That's esther Croatia executive director of faster. Cures Center at the Milken Institute which is. Working to speed up and improve the medical research system. We begin our conversation this episode with her and it turns out that getting faster cures nearly as easy as it sounds crazy that level playing field allows access to medicines and treatments that allows access to clinical trials that allows access to the broader medical research enterprise. We need tim emboldened individuals to say we need access to healthcare anyone wherever you are for whatever socioeconomic background that you have. That's where he needs to start from. So we all have a role to play, but of course, we have to rely on the experts to guide us in seeking good laws and policies. The Pew. Research. Center has surveyed Americans and found that eighty six percent of adults have confidence that scientists act in our best interest to learn more about how science becomes policy we spoke with Molly Irwin the Pew Charitable Trusts Vice. President. For Research and science..

Pew Research Pew Charitable Trusts Pew Charitable Trusts Vice Milken Institute Dan Luke esther Croatia Molly Irwin President executive director tim
"p. policy" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:14 min | 5 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Well good. Thank you. Glad to know you know my name. Thank you and I even had officers that were coal with May that would come out and say, Ooh, yes by whom I hear all about you and I'm like really what do you hear? They're like stone you're good stop because I did become known to put paper in their life and that means riding bph, nine stands and eleven's The BPA is an informal resolution meaning that. You you give it to your counselor and they try to resolve it with the staff member, and if they supposedly resolve it, it doesn't go in there fall then the non goes to the warden. You have to get to a ten to get to region in eleven to get Washington and I would what's an example of something you said you wrote a couple of these. What would be something that you wrote wrote some we had a guard that was violating rights. He was targeting a lesbian women and he was calling them. Those identifies other in it and I I took great offense to him doing that even though I'm not lesbian, it's just the point you're not gonna mistreat someone like that. They have their right to their their personal beliefs and he would call a call us hood rats and Co Chino's which means spilt the dirty pigs and Spanish. He would target specific inmates for instance, if he did count and he thought you looked. At him weird or something during count he may have thought you whispered to your roommate count. You know we have the four o'clock count but ten o'clock camp that standing counts that you have to stand up and they come around and count guard states that's at every institution wide. So, if he thought you moved wrong or look wrong or whatever he thought, he would announce to the entire unit. Well, you just lost her TV and common area tonight because of room such and such. So he would actually try to pit in made against inmate, which is a huge violation of B. O. P. policy because you're creating unsafe living environment arsim foremost, and you're supposed to be there to to keep order insecurity. Secure. Does that guy have to be to be doing shit like that? That's well, it was crazy he he did a lot of things he he would at mail call he would if an inmate smell called the night before which you're not required to come to mail call first and foremost there's no policy requiring me to go pick up my mail I mean if I don't want my mail that's my prerogative right so he would try to embarrass inmate he would tell them I'm gonNA write you a shot or you can get your chair and when I do call tonight, you'll be sitting by the desk up here where he did the mail call so he just tried to intimidate. Humiliate Demean you know all that is abolishing of policies well, because it says staff is not to demean or retaliate or you know any of those things to inmates you're not inmates cannot be cuss by staff in the sap dozen all the time. So I wrote staff up for for that I. mean you know you don't get to tell me to stop FM slap in my gums I mean he's telling this to every body not just the person that he's talking to and mass unilateral punishment is also abolishing to be O. P. Policy and when you're taking away the common area, which is where the tables are in the seating area inside the unit for everybody to use, and that's where the TV's are. Also in you're saying you can't watch TV you can't be in the common area you can. You know you can't do this you can't do that only because he got mad at one room during count. You know your punish an entire unit for one person's behavior or what he thought was one person's behavior. He would it male call? He would like throw millet people. He would sit there and read peoples mail out. Loud. He had no right to do that. In fact the O. P. Policy States to federal crime to be doing. It does say guards staff members are able to read your mail they're able to look at it, but the policy strictly prohibits them from actually even discussing I male with another staff member unless it's for security reasons, he would sit there and start reading male out loud now are indeed which is receiving discharged. They are the ones that are over the receiving of the male and they're the ones that approve what mail comes in. So the mail that comes to the unit has already went through the screening process and has been approved for the inmate to have. This particular guard would start you know critiquing it and saying this person just here a few months ago. There's no policy that says you can't communicate with an inmate that just left now if you're on. Probation I think there sometimes, probation officers will prohibit you from talking to somebody, but that has to be a specific. In. It would be the inmate that's on the outside that would have to deal with that. Not The people still left behind that are getting the mail from the inmate left right so he would start saying, well, this inmate was just here when they when they just this facility. critiquing male or he would tell he told a woman one night he said. you have a whole lot of books. What are you doing? Celanese she's like no I'm an avid reader. In fact, she ran the library shit elaborate on our unit that she shared these books with we all everybody like that. We good. We all donated them in. She made sure there was plenty to read bring nights right? He's taken her and the policy says, you can get five books per day. You can get as long as you don't get more than five a day you can get them every day. You can't have all be stored in your locker or stored somewhere but like I said, she ran this library. So there was a spot that they were to be stored for us check out and things. So he told her well, you keep getting this many books. Going to I'M GONNA I'M GONNA stop. Let have. And he had no right to any of this to say any of this and he wasn't particularly targeting me because you know he never really messed me..

O. P. Policy States O. P. Policy Washington
"p. policy" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

08:38 min | 11 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Things are edging back up a day after the Dow fell two thousand points the most in twelve years. I'm David Brancaccio in New York. Even talking about stimulus through government spending to combat the corona virus is stimulating a stock market at the moment twenty minutes into the trading day. The Dow is up six hundred. Seventy one points two point eight percent the SNP and P. is up two and a half percent the Nasdaq also up. Two and a half percent the. Us Federal Reserve tried with monetary policy last week. Now the other lever fiscal policy to decode. Here's Jeffrey Cleveland's chief economist. At paid in wriggled in Los Angeles. What do we mean by fiscal policy? David I think at the end of the day. It means returning money to the economy. One way it could happen is through a payroll tax. Cut Consumers would see that immediately in their income Another way would be you know. Income tax cuts and then spending that would directly target industries. That have been impacted by the downturn so tourism cruise lines airline etc a payroll tax cut percolates into the economy. Quickly but question is. How quickly could they enact such a cut right so the central bank can meet overnight and implemented and then emergency rate cut policy makers could take longer? It's something that could take. Let's say three to four weeks. David and in the interim will financial markets have patients. That's a question Jeffrey. Cleveland is the chief economist at Payton. Unreal thank you very much. Thank you David. Despite the balance this morning the Dow is down sixteen percent from its high February nineteenth with people avoiding airplanes. The CEO of Southwest Airlines is taking a voluntary ten percent. Pay-cut CEO Gerry. Kelly announced the move in an internal message to employees focused on the economic impact of covered. Nineteen marketplace's Nancy. Marshall Genzer is in Washington. Nancy docking one's own. Pay To what end. Well David something. Ceo's do during tough times to try to show workers. They're willing to share the pain but Kelly is taking a ten percent cut to his salary. According to southwest latest proxy filing his salary in two thousand eighteen was seven hundred fifty thousand dollars but his overall pay package including stocks and bonuses was more than seven million dollars still cornell university economist. Kevin Haluk told me this is not an empty gesture is real money. Even you know ten percent of a CEO's pay can be many many workers salaries for the year so it may be a way to keep people on in the firm for example. You think we should expect other see us to do this. Nancy. Well how it says. It's too soon to tell. It depends on a company's culture some corporate executives did take voluntary pay cuts during the financial crisis. Though and Haluk says this can be a way of telling employees. You know what they're going through especially in companies facing pay cuts layoffs. Nancy Marshall Genzer. Thank you very much and today. Representatives of the Centers for Disease Control are due on Capitol Hill to talk about strategy and funding marketplace's Kimberly Adams reports president trump's 2021 budget proposal for the CDC cut funding to the agency by about sixteen percent now with an eight billion dollar funding package. That was just signed into law. Jay Shambaugh the Brookings Institution says. You're seeing continued activity to try to make sure anything that needs to be funded from a public health. Standpoint is funded and right now thanks to low interest rates. The government can borrow money cheaply says Desmond Lachman at the American Enterprise Institute but takes time to spend that kind of money efficiently. So I wouldn't expect an increase in the very near future. Shambaugh at Brookings says the money is good in the short term. But now there's a much broader conversation in Congress about an appropriate kind of fiscal response that stretches beyond the immediate funding the public health agencies as well responses like tax cuts or paid sick. Leave that may address other consequences of the outbreak in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. The State of New York population twenty million is just going to wait around for scarce hand. Sanitizer it's gotten the New York prison system to go into production on its own brand dubbed New York clean for now it's just for US government agencies like prisons or the subway governor. Andrew Cuomo gave himself a Spritz to Purell and Mr Amazon and Mr Ebay. If you continue the price-gouging we will introduce our product which is superior to your product. And you don't even have the floral bouquet. The floral bouquet of Lilac and hydrangea Cuomo claimed Tulips Amazon for its part has been working to get the gouging off the side and Ebay has banned. Us sales of sanitizer go Joe. The parent company of Mr Parral has increased production. It is your last chance to get our new marketplace t shirt with a donation of just thirty dollars whether you're giving for the first time or renewing your support. This is an opportunity that you don't WanNa miss but don't hesitate. This special offer ends this week contribute to independent journalism that trust today at Marketplace Dot. Org and get this shirt as a special. Thank you from us once again. It's marketplace dot Org and thank you checking in with organizations as they figure out the right thing to do given this rapidly changing corona virus story today. The group that helps medical schools coordinate among other things eighty one thousand med school students currently doing clinical rotations in hospitals. The training is required and parameters are very specific yet in some situations. The students may be asked to leave. John Prescott is an emergency room doc. Who is now? Chief Academic Officer at the Association of American Medical Colleges. Thanks for linking up glad to be here Dr Prescott. I assume your association is continuing to meet on this issue and gather information as new information comes in. We are meeting every single day. We have internally we have something called our our rapid response team and we are checking into here. What's going on nationally and locally We're working with the federal government We are working with our teaching hospitals to figure out how to best meet the challenges that are going on with the with cove nineteen might some of the hospitals. Ask The students to leave temporarily or might some of the medical schools be interested withdrawing their students temporarily depending on the situation on the ground involving corona virus. Yes that could happen. Students could be asked not to attend certain clinical rotations because of several factors one might be the lack of a personal protective equipment which is essential for for their safety. And that's been an issue that we're starting to hear more about And as a second thing may be that the team is so busy taking care of patients that they may not have enough time to teach the students. The students get training early on in how to keep themselves safe. I mean the guidelines of the CDC put out are things that students learn early on in their medical education. I mean this is. This is what we do medical schools. Get accreditation you're making changes to your approach to some of this training in the face of the corona virus. Is there a danger that schools could run afoul of the promises they make under accreditation? Our accrediting body. The Liaison Committee on Medical Education has been reaching out to our medical schools and likewise the medical schools have been reaching out to the Al-Shimi so that they don't run a foul Really with the coal goal of of accreditation is is to assure the public that the graduates of medical education programs are going to be good doctors even as we are confronting the challenges of Covert Nineteen. John Prescott is the Chief Academic Officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Dr Prescott. Thanks for doing this. Well thank you very much and dear listeners. At your organization. Have you been in these meetings now to figure out how to keep your people in your customer safe? We would very much like to hear how your company is approaching this given so much uncertainty. Email US using morning report at marketplace dot. Org in New York. I'm David Brancaccio. This is marketplace morning report from APM American public media..

David Brancaccio John Prescott New York Nancy Marshall Genzer CEO Marketplace Dot Association of American Medica chief economist Us Jeffrey Cleveland Kevin Haluk Chief Academic Officer CDC Kelly Kimberly Adams Washington Liaison Committee on Medical E SNP Los Angeles
"p. policy" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:10 min | 11 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Microsoft teams where you can contribute to meetings from anywhere chat with coworkers and find all your files in one place ready to unleash. The power of your team open teams more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams support also comes from capital one brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase. Your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your Wallet Dr? Maria Syndrome is an epidemiologist at emory university. And she says another big problem. In the nation's public health infrastructure is pricing. It is often extremely unclear. How much a procedure or a test is going to cost for Jebel in Miami? A traveler who is just back from China was feeling badly and he wanted to make sure that he did not have the corona virus so he got tested for the flu to see if that's what he had and he did. He had the flu but his insurance company tried to bill them more than three thousand dollars for the ER visit and the test pricing for tests like this when there is an epidemic needs to get fixed so that people are not afraid to get tested. The way that we set up paying for healthcare in this country is really not very conducive to a large scale. Pandemic like the one that we're experiencing right now. So that's another really important thing I believe that New York Has Directed Insurance NOT TO BILL FOR CORONA virus. Lita testing so that will hopefully remove that Disincentive for people in that state. And I hope that that is something that everyone takes very seriously so to sum up paid sick leave a better epidemic testing process and healthcare pricing. That makes more sense. These would start fixing some of the problems in the country's public health infrastructure and also potentially protect the economy from epidemic but Dr Syndrome ads. Not all of the responsibility for public health falls. On our policymakers. Some of it falls on us. If you're concerned about your risk. If you're concerned about the risk of your household members wash your hands for twenty seconds you can sing the happy birthday song twice. You can sing The refrain from Africa by toto. Which is my favorite. There are a lot of other things that take twenty seconds make a game out of it take it seriously and know that that is even though it is maybe really boring. It is the best possible thing that you can be doing the rain Africa Benson. Never been you ever advice for but wash your damn hand. It's good for your health. It's good for the economy to it for all of us not to so that we can have healthier lives but also more prosperous livelihoods or just because you want an excuse to Africa by toto. This episode was produced by Lena. Sons Gary in fact check by Britney Cronin our editors Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is a production of NPR.

Africa Maria Syndrome Microsoft flu Jebel Gary Dr Syndrome emory university Pandemic Paddy Hirsch China NPR ER Miami Britney Cronin New York
"p. policy" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:26 min | 11 months ago

"p. policy" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Heroin. Stacey here this is indicated from planet. Money the story of the spreading corona virus and its potential damage. The economy seems to change every day. So let's take a quick stock of the measures that US policy makers of either put in place or proposed in order to limit that damage. I the Federal Reserve tried to give the economy boost by lowering interest rates. The idea here is that lower interest rates make it cheaper for companies and people to borrow and spend money and for his part. President trump has suggested that Congress should cut taxes specifically payroll taxes. Which would put more money directly into the pockets of workers. Congress has not yet taken up the idea instead. Congress is working on legislation that would spend about eight billion dollars to help. State and local government agencies deal with the virus contribute money to a vaccine and two other measures that would help combat the virus directly now something. That is both obvious and important about these ideas is that they are all reactive. They are responding to a growing problem and they are necessary in part because of a vulnerability in the US economy. That is only now getting attention. Because of the virus the country's public health infrastructure so says Dr Maria Syndrome an epidemiologist and research fellow at the Rollins School of Public Health at emory university. And it's because we don't like funding infrastructure. It's boring and when it works. Well we don't see that it has worked. Well we only see when it doesn't work. Well it's very very important that we fixed that problem of lack of preparedness because it it's right now we're seeing how the weak links in the chain are being exposed and we can be certain that this is not the last epidemic that we will deal with Dr Syndrome says public health touches every part of our lives including our economic activity and the corona virus. Because it is so contagious has made this really clear some environments. She says Heaven especially elevated risk of spreading the virus and in cases where people are at musical concerts or like for example the the NCAA tournament where people are going to be cheering and yelling and talking a lot. That's going to be a prime environment for the transmission of respiratory droplets respiratory droplets. You mean coughing right. I mean coughing but also you know people who are talking really loud or cheering can also spread respiratory droplets so not just coughing respiratory droplets are like when you're yelling screaming. Sometimes you see like the spittle leave. Somebody's mouth That's that's what you mean. That kind of thing. Yes a Louis doesn't have to be like such big drops but that is kind of the the biggest possible version of that Respiratory droplets if you like when I ride the subway. Those are the two words that are now going to be just going through my head and a little cycle drops. Thank you thank you but already. A lot of companies are canceling their participation in future conferences and other events because for events like these possibly the only thing that can be done to limit the spread of the virus is to cancel or postpone them altogether. If the risk becomes big enough you just lose that economic activity at least temporarily but Dr Syndrome says there are a lot of mundane daily activities. Were better health. Policy can help activities where people aren't yelling or cheering or spreading respiratory droplets but there is still a real risk of infection for example eating in a restaurant. The bigger concern about restaurants in the food and beverage industry. In general is that The workplace practices for a lot of a lot of those companies in that industry are very much that if you were sick you still need to come to work and that is because your your job security can be on the line if you don't come into work so that is one problem with the country's public health infrastructure. She says not enough people have paid sick. Leave which means if they do not come to work they will not get paid and that brings us to today's planet money indicator which is twenty seven percent and that is the share of all workers in the US private sector. Who Do not have paid sick leave. That is almost thirty. Five million workers a lot of these workers have very low paying jobs. Jobs that are heavily concentrated in restaurants. Waiters waitresses cooks and they also include a lot of cashiers and people who work in sales in healthcare AIDS. In other words people whose job it is to interact with customers or patients but cannot take time off if they think they are themselves sick and that can lead to a downward spiral because the more they show up to work the more the virus spreads the more. The virus spreads the worse. The economy gets the worst. The economy gets the more nervous. The same workers will be about missing work so they will be even more likely to show up sick and keep spreading the virus and so on and so on so that is one policy that Dr Syndrome things would help. It's for more workers to have access to paid sick. Leave another policy would be to fix the way that the US tests for epidemics other countries have been testing tens of thousands of people for the corona virus but so far because of a combination of bureaucratic manufacturing obstacles. The US has been way behind earlier. This week Dr Matthew McCarthy who works at New York Presbyterian Hospital was being interviewed on CNBC and you can hear the frustration. He was experiencing because he could not get better guidance on who could be tested or even get testing kit from the Center for Disease Control. We hear that it's coming very soon but I'm here to tell you right now at one of the busiest hospitals in the country. I don't have it at my fingertips. I still have to call the Department of Health. I still have to make my case plead to test people. This is not good. We know that there are eight hundred cases. In the United States there are going to be hundreds by middle a week. There's going to be thousands by next week in recent days. Us government has been taking steps to make testing easier and more available for example by relaxing. Some of the criteria for people to get tested and by allowing more labs to use their own tests but the delays mean that the. Us has been losing time to fight the virus and nobody has any idea. Just how many people have the virus in the first place? Dr Syndrome says that anybody who is suspected of having krona virus should be able to get tested. That's something that we haven't quite yet achieved and I hope that we'll achieve that very very soon. Gore ways to fix the nation's public health infrastructure.

US Dr Syndrome Congress Federal Reserve Rollins School of Public Healt Heroin. Dr Matthew McCarthy Stacey NCAA President Department of Health trump Dr Maria Center for Disease Control Louis Gore emory university research fellow
"p. policy" Discussed on Over The Edge

Over The Edge

09:53 min | 1 year ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Over The Edge

"Okay and welcome back now that we are done with the interview section of this podcast. I'm no go into just Kinda my portion. I'm going to go over all the facts and stuff that I pulled out from my research and you guys can start to use it to help form your opinion maybe or strengthen your opinion whatever whatever you believe leave right now. I'm going to start off by taking a look at legalization of cannabis and then we're going to move into the pros and cons of decriminalization of drugs and then also taking a brief look at legalization of all drugs and will finish up taking a look at what Portugal's done With their drug policy and see how that's been affecting their society so starting off with cannabis just a personal thing. I say canvas instead of marijuana just because of the the guess origins of the term marijuana but five slip my bad so cannabis legalisation. We're starting off with the pros of of this. Boosts the economy marijuana industry in the United States could exceed twenty four billion in revenue in two thousand twenty five and for every one dollar dollar spent in the cannabis industry between two to three dollars. An economic activity is generated between tourism banking food real allstate construction transportation. Few other industries chemists can benefit all of those next up is that legalizing cannabis results in a decrease actually and teen cannabis use in states with Lille Lille cannabis in teens. I believe one point one percent less and and within certain subgroups. That's even less it decreases by even more. I know within the African American community decreases by almost four percent on states in in which is legal moving on traffic deaths and arrests for. Dui's don't actually increase decrease when cannabis's legalized legal cannabis is regulated for consumer safety. I personally believe this is a big one I'm sure everyone's may be heard or seen a story or news news article on eighteen. That may be thought they were just taking canvas or it could be any drug for that matter and it ends up being laced with something else and they od or they die or they end up the hospital in the Er so a big pro. You could say for legalizing cannabis or drugs. In general is that it's the safety aspect of it goes goes way up. Movie on. Legalization of canvas is phasing out. Black market and taking money away from drug cartels and organized crime and street gangs so obviously when you're moving the economic growth towards a more regulated the white market. You can say a more regulated market. You take take away from the black market and take away money from the cartel Next up we've got the enforcement of canvas prohibition the original creation Asian of it was racist towards people of Color and was disproportionately impacted. People of Color Port came out that Black people in the United States is three point seven three times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession on average and I also know that on average the prison sentences are jail time that they did was also disproportionately higher than other groups movie on crime goes down. Actually went cannabis's legalized I think this can be talked about with the same. You're taking money away from cartels in the black market and when you have less people involved in that. Crime is likely to go down with that. Legalization of canvas would end the costly enforcement of cannabis laws and free free at police resources I guess that's debatable. Whether or not that's a more Or a more impactful use police resources but you would free those up. I'm to be used in in other things. cannabis is less harmful than alcohol and tobacco. which are already legal? That's just kind of not as much of a pro. But a a talking point you could say for legalizing cannabis Couple more taxes collected from guys in canvas for sale support important public programs so obviously it is a very heavily taxed industry And those can be used for good public programs and the final one. We've got this at the League. Legalization of canvas creates thousands of needed jobs. And it's a lot of jobs like farm jobs and stuff that people people can are. Most people are able to work in and they pay actually quite well okay. So now that we've got that out of the way I'm GonNa move over here and we're gonNA look at the benefits of just now legalisation or sorry my bad decriminalization of drugs in the United States Some of them are. You're going to be similar to what you just heard with cannabis. But we'll we'll move into that now so save money by reducing prison and especially jail costs by reducing the population size. There is a huge huge number of people that are in jail for drug crimes. I believe it's eighty five percent of them are just for possession and A big majority of the other fifteen percent is for very minor sale So crimes moving on a You free up law enforcement likely we send the last one prioritize to health and safety over punishment for people who use drugs And I think this next one is a big one. You reduce the sigma the stigma associated with drug use. So that problematic drug users are encouraged to come out of the shadows and seek treatment and other support the also re remove barriers To evidence based harm reduction practices such as drug checking heroin assistant treatment and medical medical cannabis the best And now now we'll move into the cons of League keep saying legalization decriminalization to be clear. There is a difference between decriminalizing drugs and cannabis versus legalizing drugs and canvas. Okay so a con on of decriminalization as it may encourage experimentation both teams as well as adults If they do have the option to do it without getting arrested. Let's say it may encourage people to try that and that could have negative impacts on society also the cost of Incarceration Association and treatment would be reduced. The cost of treating addiction in general populations would rise so so the current infrastructure that we have for treating drug addiction election or people with drug problems may not be able to support the added number of individuals who come and seek out help. So it's kind of the supply and demand the more demand there is. The price is going to is going to rise in that industry. Okay so now. Finally we're GONNA be taking a look at Portugal and they're radical drug policy. That's had some pretty positive effects on on their society and it's something that's brought up a lot in in the drug debate in the US. I'd like to I say before we get into this at obviously it is a different country and you can't say for certain that about these effects would apply to any country that enacts their policies. But I think it's something interesting to look at Caso poor Portugal's decriminalization drug drug possession. They decriminalize in two thousand and one and more than a decade later drug use has remained about the same okay but arrests incarceration our solution disease. Overdose overdose and other harms have all gone down so Portugal's drugs rates remain below the Europeans average and are are far lower than rates of drugs in the United States between Nineteen Ninety eight and two thousand eleven. The number of people in drug treatment increased by more than sixty percent so not only are the drug rates. Just kind of staying the same and they are like they say below average More people are coming out and seeking help because it becomes more societally acceptable to do so The number of new HIV diagnosis dropped dramatically from fifteen hundred cases in two thousand and two seventy eight cases in two thousand thirteen. Now of course there are other factors that could contribute to HIV diagnosis just INCR- better Medical Procedures But that is something that I think is pretty astonishing and the number of new AIDS cases decrease from six hundred word to seventy four cases in two thousand thirteen Moving on drug overdose. Fatalities also dropped from eighty in two thousand one to sixteen in in two thousand and twelve the number of people arrested and sent to criminal courts for drug offenses annually declined by more than sixty percent following the decriminalization and the percentage of people behind bars Portugal for drug violations also decreased dramatically from forty four percent in nineteen ninety nine to twenty four percent percent in two thousand thirteen So that is all the facts. I have on Portugal again. I would really encourage you guys to look at all of these Sources that I have and one thing that I will shout out something that I've been starting to get into is a book called chasing the streams and the the subtitle of it is the first and last days of the war on drugs. It's a really really interesting book. I encourage all of you guys to check it out by Jonathan Harry H. H. A. R.. I check it off guys want and yeah. Let's wrap this episode..

cannabis United States marijuana drug overdose Portugal medical cannabis drug possession League allstate HIV Lille Lille Jonathan Harry H. H. A. Color Port Incarceration Association heroin AIDS
"p. policy" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Yeah no no and really I mean. A lot of these programs require face to face contact right and they're the social workers and the administrators are actually typically overwhelmed. uh-huh I'm so so you know if they tell you you have to be here on next Thursday. At two o'clock you have to be there next Thursday at two o'clock but if you're working in a low wage job you can't just not show up to the low wage job or you'll get fired like those are the kinds of things that people on. Yeah that are are. Are we know affect enrollment. And and we're again I mean it's not Like an unsolvable problem to like you could hire more staff ride. So they had more flexibility. The office could could stay open later hours but a it would cost money and be you have to want to do it right. You would have to be Plagued by the fear that people who need assistance instance are not getting it and that's often not the case and a lot of states. Have I mean particularly around. One of the things that they did with the passage of the guy is actually very they deliberately. Try to reduce these kinds of burdens on the Medicaid Program. So they did things like reduce the number of times theoretically in most states that you had to requalify I for example or eliminate the need for an in person interview. Yeah I mean there's real variants and the degree to which states require that don't require that the genius if jeff federalism you can imagine the cumulative effect of these negative experiences right so you have to go somewhere two PM on Thursday and you can't get time off works so you may lose your job if to pull together a bunch of documentation at heart get And how that makes people feel about the state right. The do you think the state the government is there to help you or do religious experience a true this lens of hassle all of the time. And there's another sort of irony aren. The donor lies that that fact. which is that? We have this conventional wisdom in politics. which is that? Progressives are the people who are quite comfortable with the use of state power and conservatives are really concerned about the state reaching into your life and affecting your individual liberty when across a series of policy programs as we talk about in the book and in Healthcare Voting in abortion and welfare policies you see Republicans having a very high degree of comfort with using using administrative power to make people's lives more onerous. So is there is there any Is there good news here or there there places that have done like exciting exciting new things to make make people's lives easier. They're like hot best practices that should spread around the universe so there are some examples. But unfortunately it's sort of polarized tissue so we talked earlier about a registration you see those adopted in blue states in some states. You see them get adopted and in vetoed by Republican governor like Chris Christie Cristea in New Jersey. You see some countries so Estonia's to sort of constant example of this technological of nobody very to Estonia one time with Finnish people and they were just looking to buy cheap booze recommend about stolen the Abboud Little Estonia has really invested in technology in their in their administration and they have what they call a once only principle which is at once you give information to the government then the government has it and you don't have to provide that again now. That would be nice. That would be great right. requires some investment in information technology in government but it also requires a philosophical approach. Where you think about How you WanNa make life easier for citizens and mostly mostly we? Don't I guess mostly we don't or at least not for low incomes as right I mean this is what were your telling you. It's it's a polarized topic but it's also it's a particular particular segment of the population right but really targeted for this. But I do think it's important to to to keep in mind even twenty years ago. I mean it's not entire entire today. It's very polarized. They're very much have been periods for example under George W Bush he dot administration did enormous enormous amount of work actually in reducing administrative burdens. And the snap program. It's why we this huge increase in take up Tommy Thompson in Wisconsin had a big impact. Packed on reducing administrative burdens on the Medicaid Program So you know I. I guess the optimistic view is that there are points at which there is this consensus around doing this. It does go across the political spectrum on. Although it's fair to say at this point it's definitely with Bush and sat though. Actually it's interesting because I think most liberals like don't know that this half now but he's a huge turnabout in -servative circles right because this this was like the A guest like it was a compassionate conservatism thing and also Like farmers and Walmart liked having people sign up for snap and so they they really changed a lot of stuff and made it a lot easier and that got a lot more people on the program and and then it became characterized by a new generation of Republicans as like Obama had done something terrible. Yeah but but it was actually Bush assche. They had just like they. They changed their thinking. Yeah Yeah so so we talk about in in. Snap the Bill O'Reilly using snap as is this example of abuse of the welfare system where it's really being handed out these surfers in California as opposed to the truly needy so the truly linnea has become this subcategory of people who are defined as a sort of semi deserving now in conservative politics whereas does neither that does a lot of people. Who aren't that needy? Shouldn't be getting these benefits but yeah the the famous. The famous people are buying steak with their is not there after their lobster before they go to the casino right the good life that you're living on snap right So I think that there has been this turnabout. Were for a while. You did. See this bipartisan effort. And partly within the Bush administration it just had some very good people within the Department of Agriculture. So sometimes I think it's partly Hartley in administrative story where they had an under secretary who really took this as an issue and and was successful with it and partly. It's this broader our politics story where these political principles decide and late in the Bush administration. You start to see that happening. especially with Medicaid that may be the programs have become too generous in to to easy to sign onto. We need to ratchet this back a little bit. And it's I feel like one thing that's happening with with trump in this is that his legislative record is like fairly meagre so tax cuts right so I mean so they're trying to show to like the conservative -servative universe deadly that they're doing something whereas Bush. I mean. Say what you will about him. That was a very eventful. Like eight year span in the United States Congress Congress there were multiple tax cuts. That was a big education bill. That was a big farm bill that was wars like the slack on nobody. Nobody was has ever challenging him like well. What are you doing here right? Whereas with trump like they passed one tax? Yeah no that's exactly right so this is something thing that we do talk about. Generally in the book which is that This has been the main mechanism by which the trump administration has been able to enact. Policy changed certainly with the right like a huge failure to overturn the Sei. So they've used this really effectively. It's also important to point out. They've used us most most effectively in certain agencies where they have competent leadership so so CMS Centre for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Seem like she's competent competent. I'm less so in agencies where there's less competent leadership But yeah it's it's very much the main way in which they've been able able to get change. Yeah so if you were interested in social policy change you should be looking at the rule making process and you should be looking at the administrative burdens. That are being in and betted in the big policies like Medicaid and snap all right at Dimona. Han Pampered up. Before I let you guys go. I do like to close out asking guests. What he you wish I had asked you about here? What did we miss? I think there's a question about like. What do you do the solve this problem? Yeah how do we saw So so there's a bunch of answers here. I think one of it one of these answers is about just training people who work work in the public sector to think about costs and benefits that that individuals and citizens encounter so we teach some of these students that go work in agencies and we don't really use this language of administrative burdens terribly much and so it's it becomes easier I think than for bureaucrats generate these negative externalities finalities or at least not be conscious about them in a way that they would be if they had a little bit more of a sense of boy. That's really going to hurt a certain population of people who won't won't be able to get through the process people yeah people. I think it's partly right about helping getting people to shift their perspective towards thinking about. Okay what would this actually be like if I was trying to navigate this program right like getting them to perspective shaft. Yeah Yeah And then I think I think there are. You know as we talked about some of the tools already already. Using administrative data. New Technologies can be useful along those lines in terms of capturing who would be eligible for programs But a big part of one of the things that we talk about just sort of given the reality of our healthcare system health insurance system and social welfare system system. We have a lot of private public mixing which is inherently complicated and so sometimes really the best mechanism to reduce burden and just to to provide more help to people. So Elizabeth Warren actually around actions has this proposal to basically fully fund public defenders to help help people out with affection. That's actually a great example of that kind of help. There's the fast the example. That Duncan talk about yes. Oh so there's there's been. Experiments FAFSA is the bane of every high school student parents who are getting ready to go to college. Because it's this famously. Complicated process sign up to get federal delayed and has been some experimental work done to figure out what makes it easier and in one treatment of people are just told. Hey you're eligible for this and here's how you sign up. So it's like reducing learning. I'm going to give you the information and has no effect. There is another treatment. Were someone helps you fill out the form and pulled together. The documentation and that has a very big effect. It increases enrollment rates in college actual enrollment rates from about twenty eight percent thirty six percent. That's a that's a big sizable sizable effect. So that this is part of the takeaway message for the that. We're trying to convey to people work in. The progressive of side of the aisle is that this is a form of politics and conservatives have gotten very good at this as a form of politics. Progressives have been left by the wayside so progressives really fond of rolling out new programs standing eligibility like Kamala Harris got sort of ridicule on social media because she Loan forgiveness program. Where if you started a small business community were there for three years? You might get like twenty thousand dollars back and at the same time we ha- we already have this public loan forgiveness program if you work in the public sector..

George W Bush Estonia Medicaid Program Tommy Thompson Dimona Kamala Harris United States New Jersey Chris Christie Cristea jeff Obama Wisconsin Bill O'Reilly Elizabeth Warren Walmart Hartley under secretary
"p. policy" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

14:37 min | 1 year ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"I mean I think that's kind of what Amazon's banking on right that. You're just so often that you're gonna go to any other sites 'cause I mean I don't and we end this season and by pondering. The question is Amazon too big. You know and we just don't WanNa be the United States have Amazon. We just really don't land of the giants has been recommended by the The New York Times axios wired and more. It's a candidate. Look at the state of Amazon today. How we got here and what the future might look like? The entire entire first season is out. Now find out more and binging on apple podcasts. Or your favorite podcast APP. We were talking earlier about social security right and this is a program where you know. The documentation problems are in principle challenging but the the government sort of took it upon itself to solve them and that's because it seems like there is a fairly robust consensus that it would be sad ad for old people to not get what is coming to the right and you think the same thing right if somebody were to story in the newspaper about hundreds of veterans. It's not being able to get care at the. Va Hospital because of some paperwork shenanigans. Everyone well we got. We got to straighten this out whereas there's a a big question around the FCC right it's like when it is conceptualized at least by Republicans as well. This is a form of of welfare. Then it's it's good to make it hard to sign up because welfare dependency is is a bad thing There's a lot of questions you know. Suspicion of the undeserving. Poor right and and that sort of drives some of the thinking about do you want to treat these. Burdens is like problems to be solved. Or you know you're you're on your own it's okay it's a little bit more complicated in some ways. So for example Social Security the truth is that when they were implementing the program in figuring out how how to effectively do benefit administration. It was really politically contentious at the time. Like they actually didn't Congress actually cut cut their budget so they had no budget initially to even implement the program And so really it was like a real political battle and you had these progressives in the FDR administration station who were just super aggressive about figuring out a way to design and implement the administrative portion of the program to ensure sure it was politically popular. Yeah it was definitely on. The program was really contested at the time. So it's you know design. It was a progressive design choice to facilitate its political popularity in some respects. The contrast between that or Medicare right in the in the sixties and the affordable care act which was done in by Democrats But it's quite complicated to sign up for those those. ACA subsidies right. I mean that's a change in sort of Progressive Jeff thinking or at least the leadership of the party. Well Yeah I'll just say briefly about the sat rate like that is in part. The complexity reflects the desire or to include private health insurance. Right in some ways. It's like a policy feedback. act like if you're going to have this like weird mix of public and private insurance combined with federalism fifty states and it's really hard to make that administratively simple the UC is also good. Example of sometimes uh-huh burdens are not intended right so the the website rollout was disastrous. Because the wasn't because the Obama Administration wanted us to fail but then you look at Republican governors who were tasked with their own a part of the implementation process. They did things like make it much hard for federally funded navigators advocators to help people to sign up. That was an example of the politics coming into play. When the trump administration came in slashing the outreach budgets reducing juicing the amount of funding for navigators providing some sort of communication where they released videos for example telling people about how terrible it was to be on high Seattle? Yeah right Those are examples of where there was this released deliberate effort to increase the lowering costs and the compliance costs associated with the program right. But I mean he does as you were saying about the inclusion of insurance right. It's it's to an extent baked into the design of the program. Graham that part of its launch was this huge advertising campaign that there had to be navigators because it was it was conceptualized as one of the benefits of this. Is that what you're going to shop for the plans right. I mean that nobody wants to. Do you think that was an explicit program goal so there's no default enrollment and Then you decide to to reduce the explicit budgetary costs that it's going to be at sliding scale and come type thing so you need a lot of verification of that. It has to be redone every year because people are supposed to be switching right and you can look back on and say You know that's crazy but you know before four trumps started trying to sabotage it. They deliberately created a fairly high touch kind of program. And you know we. I just have my private health insurance. It's the same thing each year. It's like you gotta go pick again and like that's a it's a pain in the ass. Yeah so you could imagine if we lived in England last year where it was much simpler right. There were no choices that you had to make Nafta re-enroll look fifteen different plans every year. You didn't have to carry some sort of insurance card around with you when you went to the pharmacy everything. Everything was much simpler because it's universal system so that's one model and other models we have the US system which is far more complicated lots of public private actors state state and federal actors and then with that system to make it work you have to provide people a bunch of health. Sorry help help and then there's a third model which is that you have an incredibly complicated system and you don't help people and then they're really screw right. which is our version? I mean there are are ways to be further. USA right like there are ways even with these fairly complicated ed kind of private public structures. There are ways to simplify to regulate to reduce kind of burdens. And what you did see through the gradual imp implementation of the across states. Some states are really good at figuring out how to help people to Right so it's not. It's not impossible but sure the design. The varying designs of different policies are going to inherently increase or decrease the level. We're more optimistic about it right. You would say okay. You continue to have elected officials. Who want this to work? Well and then there's there's an iterative learning process right. We're the government learns about how to give people the help that they need and by the time you're in the fifteenth year it's like it's running smoothly but in the additional problem is that you have political disagreement about like. Should we even be helping people do this. Do we want this to exist and you create a program program that's much You know a a lot of what you're talking about is other means than and there's going to fail dysfunction by design whereas like it's hard to undermine mine the social security program once it's up and running red there's not a lot you can. You can do administratively. You could pass it a new law so yeah no that it is true again though. Like if you it's it's really interesting. I mean if you look at the first fifteen years the program it was really precarious and actually the meanstested part of social social security old age assistance for the first fifteen years was a much larger social welfare support for older people than was actually the social security program and so it is interesting to look back because you see all these political battles behind the scenes that were in many ways playing out in the bureaucratic implementation of the program but there are ways. I mean one of the concerns around around social security right now is actually you know as the population on social security is Accelerating pretty rapidly right. As for aging and the boomers are aging the the Administrative Budget for the program has been shrinking so they've been cutting the administrative budget for the program. A lot of people rely on their somewhere around seventeen or eighteen hundred right field offices spread throughout the country to help people enroll in various parts of the Social Security Haram The wait times at those offices are getting longer or the call times when when you call in to the program or getting longer there is some evidence of sort of decay in the administrative structures and social security. That you know they're we're not incredibly popular. It's still relatively easy to use. But it's not immune basically from that sort of damage you're saying in particular Ziegler wasn't immune no in it's in the first thing. That was an early right. Yeah and so so that stability is itself like a political. Go out go. Oh yeah you know one of the most interesting things about the implementation of the program is when they were when the you know the the there was decision right off to have all these field offices. I'm and this was still at the end of the depression-era so there is still a ton of on employment and people got pretty worried pretty quickly that there'd be a lot of patronage right like your local field field office. Your local rap is going to want to put all these unqualified people like as cousins and political supporters in those offices and they wouldn't know what what they were doing right. which would be really bad for the program? So there was a ton of kind of internal conflict on and battles between the People administering the program and implementing it in Congress over ensuring basically that. Those appointments were non-political that there were only hiring experts for those offices. And it was a real battle at the beginning Donna because this was at a different time in the evolution of of the state. Right I learnt recently was bet back in the thirties was like being postmaster. General was it. He's like an important political job. Like I think it was. FDR's postmaster general had been the chair of the DNC. It wasn't like a postal administrative job right. 'cause that was is it. Was this like incredible. Sin Cows of patronage hiring and Social Security Administration could have been like that right and so the question is like what would it it be right and and I mean it's it's burn of its own kind at another area we're takes me aside from from social welfare but we're this comes up. A lot is voting right. Yeah that's absolutely the case and so earlier we're talking about sort of moral language sometimes see rolled out and we give examples in our book where you find. A politicians Titians essentially saying people should have to work hard to vote. It shouldn't be easy to vote It should be like walking through the desert to get water too right and so you should be willing to vote every year. So you don't get kicked off roles you should be willing to register twenty eight days beforehand if if you move You should be willing to have your ide- which you so that sort of moral language has infused what is generally not a very defensible idea right. I like Oh let's make it harder for people. Vote is when you talk about it like that. It's hard to really get behind that as a concept But it it. It's absolutely the case that when you look at voting very much like abortion there you can see the partisan divide very plainly in state after state where where they've taken legislative votes on these issues about issues like voter. Id about issues like a when people can register whether you can do it on election. They are not some aspects of this is still left within often secretary of State's office O- how often they purged rolls. What sort of people get kicked off But very very much it. It is the case that you see voting and registration as a venue where burdens have been put in place. And it's not a new the thing right so we In our book which sort of trace the history of voting in America and we start with the the reconstruction era and you see many of the same patterns Saturn's of these administrative barriers being put in place to limit The ability of newly freed slaves to participate in the political process. And it's really the only until you get to the late twentieth century that both parties for sign up to the idea of saying. Oh we should make it easier for people to turn out as a good thing and that agreement I'm and basically disappeared after two thousand and I mean this is like the United States is I don't know how to put executant. It's it's a really old political system. I'm in a Lotta ways right. And so we had elections from the beginning but not at all a contemporary vision of universal suffrage right good property property qualifications say nothing of race and gender so the idea that like there should be barriers. Voting was really kind of baked in as opposed to saying okay you know. We threw out the dictator yesterday. And now we want a modern system in which all citizens vote and you assume every country has some method to ensure that the people voting You know really our citizens or aren't voting seven times But so much of that responsibilities. He's put on you here right. You have to go register you if you move you have to register again. It's not You're you're right as someone who factually actually is an American to go cast vote. You need to you need to make it happen. Yeah no I mean that's absolutely right. I mean I also think this is one of the things we talk about in book two is sort of feel like progressives don't make enough of the issues around administrative burdens in terms of how actually important they are in terms of of Affecting kind of basic rights that we do or don't have access to and voting obviously a fairly basic right and democracy But you know for for example. We're spending a lotta time now arguing about on different Democratic primary candidates whose moderate or to progressive or the to moderate. Or they. This talk about you know the reality is. There's about three states. This is gonNA probably boil down to write one of those states in particular especially Wisconsin Michigan to some extent Florida actually three how really significant barriers to voting. I could imagine spending a lot of time and resources just making making sure that we have everyone on the rolls no matter how hard it is To just get them on the rules and that's probably.

United States Amazon Social Security Administration Congress Seattle apple ACA The New York Times Va Hospital Obama Administration FCC Jeff thinking FDR Medicare Graham England
"p. policy" Discussed on Policy Matters

Policy Matters

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Policy Matters

"The trump administration has released its budget proposal for fiscal year twenty twenty which begins on october one it contains substantial cuts to scientific research and reduces the budget of agencies like the national institutes of health and the national science foundation presidency can we draw any conclusions about the science policy of donald j trump welcome to policy matters points perspectives for mice universities baker institute for public policy i'm joe barnes baker institute fellow and today's host our guest today is dr kenneth m evans he is postdoctoral fellow in science and technology policy here at the baker institute thank you what's new in the president's twenty twenty budget for science and technology well it's two different from the previous two years we're seeing again historic cuts like you said to all of the science related agencies pretty much across the board there are several new initiatives namely related to quantum information science and artificial intelligence but as far as anything new much the same story that lasts two years just steep cuts for all science agencies i know you're not a political expert but how do you anticipate the proposal will be received by congress which in the final alice's has to make the appropriations sure i don't think that science will be a large part of the congressional debates them debates will probably be about the budget caps so historically one thing interesting about the d- budget is that it's been roughly ten percent of the discretionary spending budget for the last forty fifty years and through all political battles all RND programs together over twelve to thirteen agencies it still managed to wind up its ten percent so we don't really expect that to change what would change would be spending caps related to the discretionary budget and so trump has proposed a budget cutting many of the signs agents sees that would then likely reduce the total RND budget by a proportional amount so assuming that the RND budget maintains its ten percents proportion from the total discretionary budget then we would expect to see a a ten percent decline in our spending which is exact really what trump has proposed these caps are they existing caps under a congressional legislation so he's proposing this year he's doing something different with defense cap which pe- which is controversial so for the non-defense discretionary budget he is pretty much picked favorite programs that he wants to axe he's done the same thing the last two years so that's nothing new what he's doing this year is using a controversial overseas contingency operations budget to skirt around the defense caps so under the current law which is an amended law from the two thousand eleven budget control act the budget caps should go for defense it's supposed to be around six hundred fifty billion to five hundred eighty billion instead total offense spending increases about five percent a seven hundred fifty billion along those lines there's a six point four percent increase to defense already so unlike non-defense r. and d. where there's about a fifteen percent cut for about a twelve billion dollars defense season increase so the fights will be over caps they've had to increase caps pretty much every year in order to meet the spending needs for discretionary budget now kenny what does the budget tell us about the broader science priorities of the trumpet ministration and how do these parties compared to previous administrations both both democratic and republican so it's getting that the way that the RND budget priority-setting processes worked in the summer every year before they released the budget in february the office of science and technology policy which coordinates federal science policy across all these agencies gets together with the office of management and budget and they released join memo and that kind of lays out what they expect from agencies the agencies taken in consideration they're planning when they go say this this is what we're expecting the budget next year so that budget memo looks very similar even the first donald trump budget the language is very similar to obama aaron bush era budget memos it's more just the the top line budget numbers that are that are very different so they say we're going to you know ah us are indeed and secure the national defense that's usually the first bullet and then the second bullet is usually we're focusing on basic free search and emerging technologies basic sciences and science technology engineering mathematics education k through twelve and postgraduate work the best comparison is reagan i so reagan's nine hundred ninety two and nineteen eighty-three budgets look strike kingly similar to trump's proposed budget the last couple of years they've seen.

ten percent two years twelve billion dollars forty fifty years fifteen percent five percent four percent
"p. policy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And then what's you have the visibility? After the catalog we allow you to define smart policies on top of that. So this will help you actually make sure that all of those policies that you want our auto Matic lean enforced. So then you don't need to configure anything you. We will automatically forever repository that you have for every pool that we is being open. We work with Geeta checks, and we automatically trigger upon any change and it will run according to our policy engine in. We will very fast give indications to the developer. Whether he or she a working within the best, practices and policy or not in Rick and actually block emerge of code. If you so desire in then they will click to find out more like what's the problem? And then they will see up here committing secret keys, you should think that or you don't have a version for a package and. Mpm back into the to put here. So basically every time you build this code. It's like going to the casino because it will generate a different version every time so you should pinpoint version, and we held the developers understand like what is the problem? How do I fix it? Then they fix it commit the changes back to the floor requests. And then the engine gives them a thumbs up and they can merge it into production. Let's go into some of those details of it. You said you extract meta data from getup? So we're I'm on boarding with Detroit because I want better policy management. I want better can fig management. What meditate a is there in get hub? Can you talk in more detail about what that meta data is? And what you're getting from it. Yes. So first of all there are two options of deployment one is full SAS. And the other one is like a hybrid mode where the analyzer the thing that actually scans your code runs within your envir-. -ment, and we only send them at the data. Now, what is a meta data. So we if for every repository, we read all of the history, we rewind all of the commits, and we actually understand which person did which commit which changes to which file in. We know to understand and read different formats, for example, a all of the major programming languages. So we know to extract from package as soon, which modules are you using and in which versions, we can see that. For example, we can scan all of the different files and a dentist by whether you have a Docker filed basically anything that has a code footprint inside your Git repository will send that method data only like which package which version which file name. And so on we will never send your code and which person actually did interactions with. And then when we send all this data from your hundreds of repositories, it will then allow us to create this tree you will have the tree of all of your different modules. And we where are you using them in which repositories in which person is using what and where and it will have a I- bird view. So you can ask yourself where am I using mongo the driver, for example longest, and then he will see the information cross all of the repositories. So this bird's eye view of the different tools that are used in different areas of my get repository. Why is this useful to me? So this is useful to you. If we go back to the example that they gave. So let's say we know that the specific version of a module is not good for you or you in a transition. Now, let's say you want to have one hundred percent of CIC. The within your organization, you say guys, we're using circle CI or Travis or called fresh or whatever you're using we want that. Let's go we're going to go one hundred percent CIC. Now, you're asking yourself. So wait, what is the coverage that we have? I don't know. So you need to go repo by report checking whether you have a circle CI file or not or Jenkins file or whether are you using a specific package. Let's say is a vulnerability in a package you need to make sure that you don't use this version of a package or the package itself. So how are you to know?.

developer Geeta Detroit Rick Jenkins Travis one hundred percent
"p. policy" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"p. policy" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"One other news of the week thing. I want to ask you about. They were reports this week that major league baseball in the Cuban baseball federation struck a deal to let Cuban players. Join the major league organizations that affecting you worked on this probably specific deal. You works only worked on the Cuba negotiations. Like, what does that mean? And why is it important? Yeah. This is a total like passion project of mine because I like baseball, and I like Yuba so the pure problem. The problem is the only way under because of the us embargo and just because of the the frosty relations in the us and Cuba. The only way that Cuban players used to be able to get into major league baseball is to defect. Now, you know, the most famous cases of that are like, you know, if people in the US, and they like jumped a fence and ran but a lot of Cuban players get trafficked to other countries. Right. So they end up paying smugglers to go to Mexico, and there there's. Horror stories and major league baseball told me some of these horror stories, that's why they were interested of essentially, people forgoing all their travel documents and giving away all their life. Savings to be smuggled some place to be stranded there, and you know, it was a great source of danger to Cuban baseball players. And also if they came to the US, they kind of had to cut ties to their their families are still there. And and so is really difficult situation. Where you have these great baseball players in Cuba. And yet you have this kind of humanitarian risk associated with them trying to play baseball in the United States. So we started to we tried to remove all the policy impediments to Cuban players being able to sign them into the baseball. So for instance, we changed the regulations so that Cubans could take back their whole salary that they made in the US to Cuba. Right. It used to be that there were limits on that. And the embargo made it difficult for someone ironically for Cubans, actually. Do well and make money the United States and be able to take that money back to Cuba. So that was a regulatory change we made in part with an eye towards having it be possible for Cuban athletes to to go back to Cuba. Then the Cubans had to figure out a formula with major league baseball where in other countries, keep players go to play in Japan, and they just have to pay a portion of their salary to the government, and they can't do that in the in the US, obviously because of the embargo so the any any contributions acute employers wanna make back in Cuba have to be to Cuban baseball and disappoint like programs through young Cuban kids playing baseball the Cubans very much wanted it to be. So that if you play an MLB, you can still plan the Cuban national team, and we'll baseball competitions. And then there was his final question of like how many Cubans can be drafted in a year because Cubans Zona lose everybody in their league. So all this stuff had to be negotiated with the bottom line is baseball should be selling the brings people together Americans like baseball and Cubans like baseball. It should also be the case that if a Cuban player wants to play an MLB he shouldn't have to risk his life to do. So you shouldn't have to say goodbye to his family forever. And so we were trying to remove all these obstacles for MLB. And and it's great news that they got this done. I hope at some point there'd be a MLB teaming Vanna, it'd be solely awesome. Right. Yeah. That's really cool. Well, I'm glad I got this done. Let's hope that Trump and idiots like Marco Rubio complaining about it. Yeah. It's rubio. Like this guy says he wants to help keep them people in like all the protas. He embraces a while the popular in Cuba and fuck over the Cuban people, right? Like who incubus for not letting their players like play on the biggest stage like who who is Marco Rubio sending out for other than his his own hardline political interests in south puncture gives them enormous pride grace you've been baseball league in assessment as and has the season..

baseball Cuba Cuban baseball federation United States MLB Marco Rubio Mexico Yuba Trump Japan