17 Burst results for "P. P. P."

"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"That i covered in this episode. If you don't see links in your podcasts player go to the show notes at the episode page at the a p professor dot org slash ninety nine. And while you're there you can claim your digital credential for listening to this episode. And i invite you to be like jerry. Yes inquisitive and thoughtful and otherwise awesome like jerry but also a caller to the podcast. Time at one eight three three. That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or send a recording or written message to podcast at the a p professor dot org. And you're invited to join my private. Ap teaching community way off the social platforms at the ap professor dot org slash community. I'll see you down the road. The a and p professor hosted by dr kevin pat an award-winning professor and textbook author in human anatomy and physiology. Please keep this episode and all other sharp objects away from your eyes..

"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"And i'll get to that later on. They just too much better. Because it kind of primed the pump. It gave him an idea of what kinds of things are important to learn in this module and another thing i did besides the pre-test night start either of these. At the same time. I started to online randomize toss and i didn't start them at the same time as each other. These are just things that evolved over time. The other thing is cumulative testing. I had read a lot about you. Know the fact that if we keep going back to previous information and sort of interleaving that with new information so yeah. They're different topics so the cardiovascular test might have questions it came from previous topics like skeletal muscle and so on and we know that a lot of those actually have something to do with cardiovascular. Anyway right 'cause you know skeletal system. It's a place. Orange store calcium. We know calcium's important in the cardiovascular system at least in the pumping action of the heart the myocardium and of course that leads us the muscles to so knowing something about muscles in general italy's going to help us understand cardiac muscle but even if they weren't as directly related. It's still helpful to go ahead and review that stuff. 'cause you're doing more retrieval practice and and there's a lot of research it also shows that if you interleave what you're learning with other topics that aren't as closely related that enhances learning as well and of course we were doing kind of a space like an extra long spacing meaning that you know we were coming back. After allowing time to forget those previous topics were coming back in reviewing them again. So remember how we said that reinforces learning. I ready had the test bike so it was easy to do. All this for the pre-test. I just sat up another single attempt of the test as a separate test. I just copied it over made a separate test and then for the cumulative testing what i did was i just took The questions from the previous test banks usually not all of the questions. But i i pull out some of the Question sats from the previous test banks. And i'd put that in. There are actually couple times what i did was. I just took all of the questions from previous ties. Put it in the new test but had the But muslim all together into one giant pool and i told the the learning management system to take two items out of pool in in.

italy
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"That started happening more and more. That is that students. Were getting things into the long term memory in taking things into their next course and eventually into their careers from amp much more so than they used to do before now kind of built in there is this idea of spacing. The you know if you ask me that question. And i get it wrong. Okay in s me. Mcginn three seconds later and i get it wrong in the national league in three seconds later and then another three seconds and got it right okay. That's not going to really stick in my long term memory that long. I mean it's not really. I wouldn't even call that long term memory right but if i give him a little time in tomorrow you asked me that question or in a couple of days you asked me that question. Then yeah okay. That's got some spacing in there in a lot of research shows the poor little space in between sessions. So retrieval practice. So you don't have like one long. Massive retrieval practice. And then you're done but now you space it out then. It's going to be more likely that that's going to get into your long term memory. It's more likely that you're going to be able to retrieve that information when you need it. Okay so that's why. I allow students to retake their tests over and over. Because i want them to do that. Retrieval practice and they can't do it if i only give them one test one time and that's it we're done. That's not retrieval practice. Not yeah. I know that. We can hope that. They're doing retrieval practice on their own. But after a lotta years. I realized there are handful of students. That do that in you know. Half of them would have done it anyway. The other half do it. Because i told him that that's the way to do it. But that's still only a handful. I want all my students to be successful. I want all of my students. Well i'm gonna have to force them if they can have to push him into it. I mean it's from when i was a kid night. I played soccer in. I don't want to go do practice all the time i just workplace soccer games. I just want to play soccer. I don't wanna have to practice dribbling practice heading the ball boy especially didn't wanna practice that. Oh man i could feel a right. Now you know and all the other things and practice passing okay pair up and we're going to just pass back and forth on k. Are there some fun to that. But it's not the same as actually being in a game. I wanted to be in the game. I don't want to practice in. Our students are like that too. You can tell them practices necessary and the ones that ended up being good soccer. They practice on their own anyway. But if you're the soccer player guy was as a kid you have to be kinda forced in into practice unique got. The coach really has to say okay..

Mcginn national league soccer
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"In the abstract of the joint international consensus statement for ending stigma of obesity published in the journal nature. We find this statement. Research indicates that weight stigma can cause physical and psychological harm and that affected individuals are less likely to receive adequate care for these reasons weight. Stigma damages health undermines human and social rights and is unacceptable in modern societies. Welcome to the. Anp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor your host kevin pat in this journal club episode krista rem game a paper on how attitudes about the large body. Don't may contribute to weight stigma among health profession Okay well we're here. Once again with another journal club episode with crystalline polski. Welcome krista kevin nice to be back. It's been a while. Yeah it has and there's a reason for that just a new addition to your family. Tell us about that. Yes my son. Noah was born eleven weeks ago four weeks early though so that was a bit of a surprise in through my winter and spring. Into a bit of chaos. But it's good for your right to build that kind of tolerance in life for the unexpected Especially for a obsessive planner like me. So i've joined the throngs of working mothers in academia and just trying to figure out how to make it all work as we all do so. It's been great aura. Congratulations that's great Even if it did causes to do some of our practice resilience in in get going and You know we had kinda already schedule the this conversation before that all happen in in i went back and reread our article. Which i'm glad i am. I'm kinda glad. I have more time to let it can kinda subtle in and that there is so much like most of the articles you bring us in the journal club. There is so much here uh so much unpacked that maybe we better start unpacking so as usual christa has provided us a summary of the article. The so that we're all talking about the same thing and know what the essential elements of it are and And then after that. We'll come back in Dive right into it great. You'll hear krista summary.

Noah christa eleven weeks ago kevin pat krista krista kevin four weeks early polski
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"So what. I'm going to talk about now. Is animating pieces of a slide or items within a slide in the simple approach to teaching with slides. That i advocate but have yet to completely master myself we would not likely have very many items on a slide we may have just a single illustration and we use that to tell her story or that part of our story orally like when the narrator is the oral storyteller in. Ken burns documentary. You don't see a bunch of tax to you. you're getting the story from the mouth of the storyteller and visual media is dramatizing and reinforcing that story. But you and i are not peter. Coyote earns i thank. Hey peter or ken. if you're listening why not call into the podcast hotline to give us some storytelling chips in our teaching slides. It's just fine to have some concise labels on or near that image but not too many and we may also or instead have a few bulletin phrases to many and almost never will we have any complete sentences and never ever ever a paragraph but you know sometimes we really wanna have a few more than just a few things on side. Well we can use the built in animation functions of our slide creation software to have it both ways or at least the illusion of having it both ways and allusions are just as good as the real thing in this case the easiest case is if we end up with a bunch of bulletin phrases or terms on a single slide but we want to simplify the slide and thereby making it easier for students to understand and more likely that the even try to engage with the sly of course the first step is to consider splitting the content across several successive slides thus chunking the tax than the smaller bids that are easier. Follow as we tell our story a useful next step is to find ways to use an invented outlined style the group terms into logical subgroups a sort of graphical organizer after that another next step is to apply animations. So that only one term. Or perhaps only one subgroup appears at a time. This technique is nothing new really in the olden days..

ken Ken peter first step Coyote one subgroup both ways one term single slide single illustration a
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A. Here's the first in an intermittent series of tips for creating effective teaching slides in powerpoint or google slides or whatever presentation creation program that you're using this tap which is really a collection of many. Tips has to do with animating different items in the same sly now before i go any further. Let me explain the kevin's idiosyncratic world. H- you know that world in which kevin sometimes refers to himself in the third person and refers to his imagination as if it's an entire world well in that world one or more microchips. Makeup a mini tip and several mini. Tips make up a single tip. And that's what we're doing. And also before going further i need to reiterate might idiosyncratic distaste for the information packed bullet ridden kind of teaching slide. That many other faculty seem to be so enamored with. I subscribe to the philosophy of simple teaching slides. As i mentioned way back in episode sixty six among others in which we try to have very little taxed on a slide not too many concepts end at least one but not very many images on anyone slide. One can't always stick to that in every slide. I know that. But that's the general rule and we avoid packing information into a slide. But there's always that odd instance here and there where the best choices to do. Just that pack. A lot of information in there for example in a review slide or a summary slide yet. Another thing. I want to get out there before. I get to those mini tips. That make my. Tim is that. I'm not advocating for teaching only slides but slides to have their place right there but one tool in the toolbox and before i forget i'll be using powerpoint as my example but most other slide making platforms such as gogo slides have essentially the same functionality. So i don't think anything. I say can't be intuitively in easily adapted to any of those and finally rounding out my lengthy introductory notes which will the tip itself seems somewhat anti-climactic emphasize. My strongly held opinion. That none of us. And i mean that literally not one of us has completely mastered the skillful use of slides for teaching my series of tips. I'll be sharing as we go. Forward are my feeble attempt to get us all start thinking about how we can increase our mastery of teaching with slides while at the same time. Start thinking about using what we already know a bit differently..

kevin first one one tool Tim third person single tip more microchips One least one episode sixty six google slides gogo
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Episode. That is episode eighty seven features a segment about using micro credentials such as badges and certificates and the whole notion of gamification as a teaching and learning strategy. That game ificationbut in a course is a lot like the board game. Monopoly are like almost any video game with a seemingly endless hierarchy of levels and that is it seems to go on and on and on but the thing is we do play such games that go on and on right. Why because we're motivated. We're having fun. Achieving rewards are brain's reward centers are being paying again and again and that keeps us going. And isn't that what we want for our students to make it through to blonde grueling semesters of amp so game vacation can be one of those magical ingredients that we add to our course design. I'm coming back to this topic of gamification because there's a bit more want to say about it. But before. I do that i wanna ask. Have you listened to the previous episode and earned your badge for it. All you have to do is click the link in the show notes on your device or at the episode page at the ap professor dot org slash podcast and then click link. That says claim your credential. I think if you start doing that for these podcast episodes or the books that you read from the amputee professor book club. You'll start to see things from the student perspective and you'll start to see that it's not just me being silly again and proposing yet another non traditional harebrained idea. Well yeah okay. It's partly that but also is because it works it really is magical ingredient and the only way to believe in that magic is to experience it one of the things i want to add to the game of vacation story now has to do. With my example of using badges from the micro credential platform at badger dot com the to be a d. g. r. dot com..

Monopoly one com ap professor dot episode eighty seven org amputee professor book club
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"On in an ap courses it's an online test that opens up. The first day of class might online tests usually run for a week or so and this one for about that long sometimes a little bit longer in an p. one it's mostly a review of what students should have learned before coming to amp for example basic cell biology. what an ion is chemical bonds and other basic concepts. They'd have learned in high school biology. Nobody and i mean nobody ever remembers all that. So some retrieval practice helps pull it back out of memory where we can start to use it in real life in an p to test zero reviews the main ideas from an mp one. I mostly use questions from the task. Bank that used to make the final examination. P. one so they're basically taking their ap wanting sam all over again but this time it's online and open book on time so again more retrieval practice and now they're more likely to remember what they need to remember from a. P. one for those who didn't have my p. One course it may fill in some gaps. If there are things that i'll be touching on the other amp faculty don't always cover in their aim one course in both test zeros. I also have a few questions from the syllabus regarding important policies and what exactly i mean by academic integrity and where to go when there's a fire tornado and so on what my name this and how to connect with me outside of class. Hey why not call. The podcast hotline. And let us all know what you do for a refresher activity or what pitfalls you've encountered or i don't know a question you may have about refresher activities a searchable transcript and a caption audio. Graham of this episode are funded by aaa the american association for anatomy at anatomy dot org as i mentioned in the previous.

Graham both first day one course aaa a week american association for anato One course zero p. one p. test zeros
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hey let's get more folks to join us on this journey. There's an easy way to share this podcast with appear and also earn yourself a bit of cash simply go to the a. p. professor dot org slash refer to get personalised share link. That will not only get your friend. Also set up in a podcast player of their choice. It'll also get you on your way to earning cash reward. Refer to friends and you get five dollars. Refer ten friends and you get twenty five dollars really. If you don't see links in your podcast player go to the show notes at the episode page at the ap professor dot org slash eighty six. Where you can explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast. And you're always encouraged to call in with your questions. Comments book club recommendations and other ideas. At the podcast hotline. That's one eight. Three three a dan or one eight three three five four six six three three sunday recording or written message to podcast at the professor dot. Org and you're invited to join my private. Amp teaching community way off the social platforms at the ap professor dot org slash community. I'll see it on.

"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Can <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> take words <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and phrases from <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a source that they're <Silence> <Advertisement> plagiarizing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and usa <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> fa source <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to find alternate <Silence> <Advertisement> words. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The idea <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that the passage <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> will mean the same <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thing but <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with different words. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> So that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the plagiarism detectors <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> similarity analyzers <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> won't pick up on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the fact that <SpeakerChange> it's lifted <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> directly from <Silence> <Advertisement> another source. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I've actually <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> run across this a couple <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of times <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and what tipped <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> me off. I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> think it is <Speech_Male> always going to tip <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> us off. Is <Speech_Male> that a student <Speech_Male> already. 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I mean <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as i've heard <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> many of my colleagues say <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and which i <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also believe <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in the end <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> cheating <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> mainly harms <Silence> <Advertisement> the cheater. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Cheaters <Speech_Male> eventually <Speech_Male> get to a point <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> where their incompetence <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is so great <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> because they haven't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> been learning all <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> along <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> they just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cannot finish <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the course <SpeakerChange> or their program <Silence> <Advertisement> successfully. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Male> like many of my colleagues <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> spend <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> most of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> my anti <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cheating efforts <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on setting <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up some <SpeakerChange> processes <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that discourage <Silence> <Advertisement> cheating <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but mainly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on <SpeakerChange> creating <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a maintaining <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> culture of honesty <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and trust in our course <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> will <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> never eliminate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cheating. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> All we can do <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the best we can do. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> While <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we put most of our <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> focus and effort <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> into helping our <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> students learn effectively <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and for the <Speech_Music_Male> long term. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You

"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"It <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> addresses some <Speech_Male> of the necessary safety <Speech_Male> issues that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> might be discussed <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> anyway <Speech_Male> and in doing <Speech_Male> so we can <Speech_Male> give students a <Speech_Male> header way to estimate <Speech_Male> a safe distance <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but <Speech_Male> not only that it <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> gives us a chance <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to discuss how <Speech_Male> anatomical terminology <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is not always <Speech_Male> as clear <Speech_Male> and straightforward <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> as. <Silence> <Advertisement> We'd like it to be. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We could ask <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> them. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> What if <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> anything is <Speech_Male> an arm <Speech_Male> when discussing anatomy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> although <Speech_Male> the term arm <Speech_Male> usually applies <Speech_Male> to the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> part of the upper extremity <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that extends <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from the shoulder to the elbow. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It's not exactly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wrong to apply <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to the <SpeakerChange> whole upper <Silence> <Advertisement> extremity. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We often do <Speech_Male> that in both anatomy <Silence> <Advertisement> and medicine <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> or lease. <SpeakerChange> Sometimes <Silence> we do that <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> just the segment <Speech_Male> of the lower <Speech_Male> limb below the knee <Speech_Male> or is it the whole <Silence> lower limb <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tell me you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> know i guess. It depends <Silence> <Advertisement> on context right <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> because <SpeakerChange> both are used <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> even within <Silence> anatomy. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Just don't get <Speech_Male> me started on <Speech_Male> whether we should <Speech_Male> insist on using <Speech_Male> only <Speech_Male> superior and <Speech_Male> inferior <Speech_Male> and never upper <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and lower <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> when discussing <Silence> <Advertisement> enemy. <Speech_Male> It'll give <Speech_Male> me a pain in the left <Speech_Male> upper quadrant <Speech_Male> and i might <Speech_Male> end up <Speech_Male> needing to have an <Speech_Male> upper gi radiographs <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Music_Male> diagnose

"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"In the radio series hitchhikers guide to the future serreze. Douglas adams said this about digital books. Lovers of print are simply confusing the plate for the food. Welcome to the professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host heaven episode. I discuss arm length digital textbooks and a new book club pack. We've been in the age for quite some time. Now and aibo have been around quite a while including the textbooks notice that i just used the terms book and digital textbook. I haven't even had the chance yet. To drop in e textbook electronic book online textbook e taxed nor have i had the chance yet to address the variations of spelling involved in each of those is the book lower case upper case is that e hyphenated or just added onto booker taxed or whatever were pre pending to. You're anticipating that. I'm headed into.

serreze Douglas adams aibo
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"We want to hear from you so take a few notes and call the podcast hotline at one. Eight hundred three lion dan. That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or send an audio file or written message to podcast at the professor dot.

"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Moving along here. I have tip number twenty seven which is even less is even more now. I mentioned this idea of less is more in bonus episodes sixty four B but I really mean it this time and I'm going to take it a step further emphasize that even less is even more because yeah. I know it's hard to let go one thing I'm suggesting is to take that beautiful new remote course that you've just built and slash everything in half remove at least half if not more really in one online course. I did quite a while ago. I had a weekly discussion and two weekly assignments. It was perfect. Immagination it was perfect in real life. It turned out it was awful. The students were so busy writing the required discussion posts and trying to get those assignments. Done that well. None of it was good quality. The learning going on wasn't anywhere near where it needed to be. So I made the discussion biweekly and the assignments biweekly alternating them. So that we'd have a discussion week and then an assignment week. And then a discussion week and so on that gave them more time to work on their assignments and less pressure to say something important in the discussion and that has worked great for the past several years. So yeah cut what you have in half do it. Now you know students are having a hard time coping with their whole lives right now. They may have lost the job that supports their schooling. The routines and lifestyle been completely disrupted. They may be sick or caring. For Sick family members. They may be coping with deaths among family and friends and neighbors. They may be stuck living in an uncomfortable or even dangerous situation. They've had to suddenly shift doing things way differently for most or all of their courses. They may be trying to manage their kids at home schooling or just to working their job if they still have one in at home mode even if none of these things are true. They are still under a great deal of stress. We all our our whole society is under stress right now as you know stress affects things like. Oh there's all kinds of stress affects disrupted sleep inability to focus and all of those things at makes it harder for students to cope with a changed up way of working in our course another thing that gets mentioned too little I think but is the big elephant in the room in higher education. A lot of our students struggle with mental health issues on a good day. P. T. S. T. depression anxiety and many other conditions. That are going to likely be especially hard for them to manage during this public health. Emergency and there's also physical conditions of many types and addiction and well. They're just all kinds of things that students russell with all the time that are now exponentially worse for them the flip side of this that we need to be careful to keep in mind. Is the teacher side of things? Our side of things self care is now a much more important issue than it ever was and it was already very important keeping our workload light and manageable. We'll go a long way to helping us coke to another suggestion. I have which I learned the hard way when I retired from full time. Teaching and became a completely at home. Worker is to not act. Like it's snowed. Hey every day get trust. Not necessarily what you'd wear to work but don't stay in your pajamas. I wear jeans and a casual shirt for example socks and shoes actually. I'm wearing western boots right now. I live on a Missouri Farm Road after all and you know I wanna stay comfortable certainly but I get dressed. Something else I learned is that I should keep a healthy sleeping and eating pattern. The more I stick to a healthy routine an actual schedule but starts in knowing starts in the morning with my morning alarm wakes me up. I do my Taichi form. I had my morning smoothie I play with the dog a little bit. I make some tea. And that progresses in a usual way throughout the rest of the day the more I do that the more productive I am and the better I feel less stressed. I feel Oh and I take breaks to. That's very important. Now when I say get dressed every day I also mean I shave. I brush my hair. I put on my son block. I check my hearing aid. Batteries all the stuff. I do as if I were going out to work on campus. No I don't have to do all that if I'm working at home every day but if I don't that I don't get as much done and well just don't feel like my whole self another thing both our students and we can do not as part of course but as part of our Self Care Plan is to keep a journal of our experience of what's happening in our lives right now. A pandemic journal. There's a lot of research to show that this can lessen anxiety and help us process our thoughts and feelings and reconcile them with the lives. Were now living really. It can help us now in real time and of course they'll be valuable to us nor families in the future as well tip number twenty forget seat time have all gotten used to this ridiculous formula of having to be in class for certain amount of time every week certain number of minutes certain number of breaks and so on whether we need to or not and it's hard to get out of that well established mindset. We've been cracking it a bit over the last few years. I think with more and more online courses and hybrid courses and flipped courses. And so on. But we've not shut it completely. It's still trying to hang onto US whispering in our ears to not let it go completely. One insidious way our seat time demon is trying to cling to us is to whisper the suggestion that we need to meet with students at appointed times. Perhaps even with a standard length of time resist. Please.

US P. T. S. Missouri
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Your students. Don't expect a Ron Howard film or Morgan Freeman voice over. They just expect you being you in fact the more you you can be the more comfortable you and your students will be during this weird adventure that we're all on right now or maybe a slightly more laid back and casual. You might be an order. You know to engender that all important. We're all in this together vibe that we want to create right now tip number nine. Do some audio visual courses such as anatomy and physiology. You probably need at least some images for some of your instructional media but consider supplementing with audio in remember your textbook into our lab manual or lab atlas probably has a lot of the images you need anyway now audio is often even easier than video and students love it. They're part of the podcast generation after all and they can stream it to their mobile device and listen while they're doing other stuff like organizing their survival bunkers supply of toilet paper and bottled water. You'll be right in their ears as if you're sitting on their shoulder and sharing your insights tip number ten keep things brief. The knee jerk response to switching from live video and audio his simply do lectures that you've given classroom into a camera and Mike you do that if you want. If your anxiety level is climbing that may be the best strategy for you but remember an earlier point about less being more. Consider just doing really brief media clips. It's easier to hold the tension into effect of instruction in short bursts when working remotely trust me on this one too if you must spend a lot of time on a topic then break it up into short clips but consider taking those. Long winded presentations and chop chop chop them into a simpler easier to digest version. Tip number eleven be nimble in the martial art called Tai Chi Chuan. One way that we practice being nimble is to always keep our knees flexed a bit sort of like cats do when they're on the prowl. Doing that one can quickly move with great power into any of several defensive positions swats do that. Let's be nimble by being ready to shift positions quickly in response to what's happening in our course ready to change directions if we have to expecting to have to shift some things around. If your regular listener you knew I was GonNa Work. Taichi analogy somewhere right. You're probably also waiting for me to somehow work in term carbon no hemoglobin. But you know what I just could not find an angle. So you won't be hearing me say carbon hemoglobin at all in this podcast because carbon me. No Hemoglobin just doesn't apply right now. Tip Number twelve teach by testing. Give a lot of low stakes open book multiple attempt quizzes and tests retrieval practice. Any I've been preaching this message for decades but even in face to face courses. This strategy is a game changer. Now's a good opportunity and try and prove me wrong. Tip Number. Thirteen testing is not always teaching. Okay wait really I think. The testing is always teaching something. But you know there's the formative kind of testing I was just talking about that. Is All about retrieval practice. And then there's the summit of kind of evaluation after students have had a chance to do retrieval practice in this kind of some of testing test. The final outcome of learning. Maybe for this emergency we could just combine them and call the formative testing summit of when I picture when I say this is that we could allow multiple attempts at an online test with only the best score counting toward the course grade that would allow students to do retrieval practice until they gain more and more mastery some links in the show notes and episode page at the A. P. Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. That explain more fully what I mean by this..

Morgan Freeman Mike A. P. Professor Dot Org Tai Chi Chuan Ron Howard
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Don't forget that initial the I found out just a couple of weeks ago. Somebody was trying to do that. And if you just put amp professor is not going to show up afterward the amp professor and then you just download it for free and put it in your vice. So what are they. What are the bonus content items that are in there? One is a little video showing you how to make flash flash cards flip in the air so that one was a silly one but the rest of them were a much more to the point in terms of actual teaching and learning one was the list of syllabus warnings that I include in my syllabus and we talked about him one of the episodes so that gives you a copy of what I am so you can use that is sort of a launching point for perhaps including your own warnings in your syllabus and along similar lines I also had a page a handout type thing that have my safety information. uh-huh called safety first. So that gives you the kind of safety addendum that I give in my syllabus. I have another resource there. That's called terms terms that are often misspelled or confused. Name P and I think that's a good one to revisit every once in a while just Ha- just print it out or save it on your disc or something somewhere and go through it every once in a while in that is useful for students because they can go through and see where they're likely to make mistakes but it's also good for us because we make mistakes stew but it's also good in helping counsel students and then another resource was regional spelling differences. So it I was GONNA say it spells out but maybe that's the the WHO said it walks you through how spelling is different between. US spelling and non you you asked spelling so it gives you some of the patterns and then gives you examples of each of those within anatomy and physiology so that you're aware of some of these different spellings so those are the regional spelling differences. And then the next resource was actually was published. Are Put out there before that one. I'm going in can reverse order. Here is a handout on the fishbowl model of homies stasis which I talked about in one of the episodes so it kind of spells it all out and you can use that handout with your students or just use it as kind of a starting point if you WanNa tell the fishbowl story or stories similar to it. I also had a video which was a seminar that I did at one of the half's meetings on running concept lists so you can go look at that and then. I had a little video showing when you a sorting folder that I use when I'm doing tests and exams in class and this is especially useful for a large class even a smaller moderate size class. What it does does? Is it Kinda automatically alphabetize student papers as they turn them in in a very simple straightforward way and the video shows you how it works and then I have a diagram that you can use in your course if you want. The chose the location of the FABELLA which is a bone of that more and more of us are showing up there showing up on our knees. It's increasing its frequency in the population. It was considered to be relatively rare anomaly announced becoming more common that was discussed and one of the episodes and then we have another table that you can use as a hand off of your students or just for your own years and it's a muscle name cable where a translates each of the major muscle named it translates them literally and we can use. That is the Monica device to help us remember characteristics risks of that muscle so shoe. Lots of stuff this year. And that's not the end of it. I'M GONNA actually dive into some of those groupings that I just talked about in later.

professor WHO
"p.  " Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"p. " Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Cartoonist and film producer Walt Disney once we keep moving forward opening new doors and doing new things. Because we're curious and curiosity keeps leaving us down new paths welcome to the amp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy the and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin Past this episode is review of the past year of this podcast. Just mentioned in the intro and also talked about out in the preview episode that preceded this full episode. What I'm going to be doing is debriefing? What went on in our podcast cast over the last year and I did something similar last year at the end of the first full year of the P. Professor podcast and I called that episode sowed a big year and so this episode of calling another big year? I should've called it an even bigger year because I was actually Kinda surprised as I. I went through my process of debriefing and Look what went on holy smoke. We covered a lot of stop. And I'm beginning to that in a minute but before I do I just want to remind you that. Debriefing is something that I've mentioned a lot. And that's because I really believe in it. I think that at regular intervals throughout the academic year and maybe even separate debriefings. You know at the end of multiple years like every five years or something like that. We should step back and really take some time and effort and really mindfully debrief and decide and review and reflect on what we've been doing because I think this can be really affirming. I mean it is for me that I can go back in especially in a year or a semester or even a half a semester. When I'm thinking that all I've been doing is putting one foot in front of the other and that really accomplishing publishing? Anything much. Not Anything useful. I often find that when I go back and actually like tally it up and look at it and think about it. I'm really happy about the fact that there were some things in there that I really did accomplish some things. So that's one of the main reasons so I I liked the briefing is because it makes me feel good but it also gives me some great ideas on things that I can leverage and maybe do better next time for or extend in and do more or gives me an idea to do something completely different and so I just WanNa spend a few minutes talking about the advantages of debriefing. It's a good reminder for ourselves what worked well and what didn't work well over the past period of time. It's also also a good time to bring our C. V. up-to-date our resume or publication lists. However it is that we're recording our life's work and we can do anything anything related to that so Chaz it some schools You need to submit a timeline of things that you've done committees you've been on projects you've done and how often you did pet sitting for your deans pats and that goes into your promotion package or it goes into your evaluation file or something like that so you you can really make that debriefing time you can roll a bunch of different tasks into it and make it a really useful thing it in many different ways and and it's also a form of spaced retrieval practice because it gives us an opportunity to identify in reinforce or concepts concepts because we're going over them again in recalling them again and pulling them back out of our brains so as I go through this episode and I mentioned past topics things things are going to get pulled onto your brain. You'RE GONNA go in there and start pulling things out again and that's going to help keep them in your long term memory when we do this in our courses. We could ask students to do that. Students always want in class reviews right for them. I think they see that sometimes as a substitute for actually really studying like let's review the test. Meaning I don't want to spend my own time reviewing for the test. I want you to review for me but might not be a bad idea if you have have class time to do that. Yeah they're looking for specific. Can't on exactly what's going to be on the test. They'd they'd probably preferred if you just gave them a list of the correct panthers or something thank by what you can do is just spark them a little bit and get them thinking about all of the different things that they have been learning all along long and that will help them with their retrieval practice. There are other ways to do it to The way I usually do tonight in class but in the form of online practice exams Right before the midterm exam and final exams so that gives them the way to do their greet debriefing and relearning stop. Because it's Kinda showing them wear wear and their study materials in their textbook. They need to dive back in and refresh themselves. So let's do it. Let's.

panthers Kevin Past Walt Disney professor P. Professor producer Chaz C. V.