34 Burst results for "Oxytocin"

How your brain responds to stories -- and why they're crucial for leaders

TED Talks Daily

04:36 min | Last week

How your brain responds to stories -- and why they're crucial for leaders

"Maria walked into the elevator at work. She went to press the button when her phone fell out of her hand. It bounced on the floor and went straight down that little opening between the elevator in the floor and she realized it wasn't just her phone. It was a phone wallet that had her driver's license her credit card her whole life. She went to the front desk to talk to ray. The security guard. Ray was really happy to see air. Marie is the one of the few people that actually stocks and says hello to him each day in fact she's one of these people that knows your birthday and your favorite food and your last vacation. Not because she's weird she just genuinely likes people like some to feel seen she tells ray what happened and he said it's going to cost at least five hundred dollars to get her phone back and he goes to get a quote while she goes back to her desk twenty minutes later he calls her and he says maria i was looking at the inspection certificate elevator. It's actually do for its annual inspection next month. I'm going to go ahead and call that in today and won't be able to get your phone back in. I won't cost you anything the same day this happened. I read an article about the. Ceo of charles schwab while turbine injure he's describing his straight a career at university going into his last exam expecting ace it when the professor gives one question. What is the name of the person that cleans this room. And he failed the exam. He had seen her but he had never met her before. Her name was dottie. And he made a vow that day to always know the dadis in his life. Because both walter and maria understand this power of helping people feel seen especially as a leader. I use that story back. When i worked at general electric. I was responsible for shaping culture and a business of ninety thousand employees in one hundred fifty countries and i found that stories. Were such a great way to connect with people and have them think. What would i do in this situation. would i have known dotty or who are the dadis. I need to know in my life. I found that no matter. People's gender or their generation or their geography in the world the stories resonated and worked but in my work with leaders. I have also found. They tend be allergic to telling stories. They're not sure where to find them or they're not sure how to tell them or are they think they have to present data that there's just not room tell story and that's why i want to focus today because storytelling data is actually not this either or it's an an actually create this power that connects you to information differently to understand how we have to. I understand what happens. Neurologically when you're listening to a story and data so as you're a lecture or you're in a meeting to small parts of your brain are activated. We're an again broke his area. This is where you're processing information and it's also why you tend to forget fifty percent of it right after you hear it when you listen to a story. Your entire brain starts to light up each of your lobes will light up as your senses and your emotions are engaged as i talk about a phone falling and hitting the ground with thaad your in your temporal lobes are lighting up as though you're seeing that fall phone and hearing it hit with the side. There's this term neural coupling which says as the listener your brain will light up exactly as mine is the storyteller. It mir's this activity as though you are actually experiencing these things. Storytelling gives you this artificial reality if i talk to you about like walking through the snow and with each step. The snow is crunching under my shoes. And big wet flakes are falling on my cheeks. Your brains are now lighting up as though you are walking through the snow and experiencing these things it's why you can sit in an action movie and not be moving but your heart is racing though. You're the star on screen because this neuro a coupling has your brain lighting up. Though you were having that activity as you listened to stories you automatically gain empathy for the storyteller the more empathy. You experience the more oxytocin is released in your brain.

Maria Charles Schwab Marie Dottie RAY General Electric Walter
The Benefits of Baby Wearing with Hope and Plum

Babes and Babies

03:32 min | 3 months ago

The Benefits of Baby Wearing with Hope and Plum

"What are the benefits of baby wearing? There's so many benefits to be wearing like you said, it really helps. Babies transition to life outside of the womb. And it's a really great way for parents to bond with their kiddos whether you know it's a father whether it's a grandmother mother's adopted parents whoever it may be a really great way or kids to feel safe in close to whoever is taking care of them You know if you are a mother and you just had a baby skin to skin can be done while well, baby wearing and it's actually a great lakes and you can be hands free while doing skin-to-skin getting oxytocin boost There's there's. Just, so many benefits to it and it is a great way to be hands free. No one thing that. A lot of new parents especially struggle with is. Your life kind of flipped upside down and you have this this little anything that that needs you and you are used to. You know getting yourself drink when you want to grab a drink of water grabbing yourself some food or snack, and it's hard to put down a crying baby and so baby wearing is also a really great way to again he baby close keep them calm. They can feel your heartbeat, they can feel you breathing. It's a great way for you to be able to pay to go about not your not your normal life, but daily life, typical life and so. That's another great benefit. Another thing is that Yeah they. Don't know bigger is amazing I? Think it's great. Yeah. Yeah. I mean it's I. I've read about some of those benefits and I know that I've also heard that it can help. Like, stimulate the baby's brain to develop to their full potential, and there's just like other developmental benefits that it has for babies. I'd love for you guys to touch on that as well. Yeah so The idea is a that when babies are warn or your bb wearing is generally cry last. So that gives them a little bit more of an ability to engage with their environment also just sort of. To your caregiver I, mean, I know my kids were super observant when they were in Aslan's camp looking around and actually uniting some people think, oh, the holy the day. Walker, they won't develop an both my girls walked early. Crawled early sort of did all those physical milestones pretty early and so I think again when you're taking baby with you all the time. So you know when I was during maternity when my youngest. Was in a sling all the timing with sleep during something like this she would be part of you know my normal everyday interactions with other people and so her seeing sort of social interactions for hearing my voice engaging with other wall and not only being with me when I'm. Kind of babying her joins I think that's really a big positive for their social developments and then as well as you know, they're physical Lakers side as long as you're doing properly, there's no week you know it's physically it's not gonNa Impact, your child your child will walk a promise and then you'll cry. Stop growing so fast. It's too. Yeah,

Walker Lakers Oxytocin Aslan
What is love?

Tai Asks Why

04:12 min | 6 months ago

What is love?

"King is my brother. He's eight years old, and he's feisty and energetic, but he has some really good ideas. Hi, it's me He. was talking about. The question is what is Love Like one of your brain, it like someone and the their brain like like you in some. Kind of like that. Have you ever been in love I? Love My mom and dad knew yeah, so guess. What is what's that like? When I kinda love, you guys because Moiseyev Blink. Relatives and also I just live with you every day. Where have to adjust to you? Do you know why People Love Each Other? Because look the needle we put us. Yeah that that makes a lot of sense. If there was like there, there's probably a part of your brain. That's like I. Have to pass these genes on. Yeah, what do you feel when you feel love? What? What is it like well I. Love You, but it's hard to. This guy is just like someone that you just like. Uncomfortable comfortable around talking to and like. Don't get embarrassed about crime. That's Lov. Yeah, 'cause. You known them for a long time, and we also have to kind of stay to go because what bothers. By and I love you I. Love you. Bye. My brother said something really interesting there about how love actually is in the brain now I'm a science guy. I really think the brain is cool. So I did a little bit of research, looking at love, and how it works inside our brain, and what I came across. Is this weird thing called oxytocin? It's a hormone. Would in your brain that makes you connect with people? A lot of people even call it beloved hormone. And I came upon this really awesome psychologist Dave. Jennifer Barks Dr Bart's is an expert on oxytocin and how we build. In general I'm a professor of psychology. At McGill University I want to be honest. I! Looked at who you are in did a little bit of research about your work and it? You're pretty awesome. Let me say that. Thank you. Now I know this is a big scary. To tackle question, but what do you think is love so I guess? My preferred definition of Love was one that was put forward by the developmental psychologist Mary Ainsworth, as an affectionate tie that one person or animal forms between him or herself, and another specific one a tie that binds them together in space and endures time a Thai. Thai. And just getting, but I really think that definition is awesome. It's like we're floating time space, and there's just a string that keeps us together that transcend space and time. I like that I'm gonNA use that from now on. Greg. Why do you think human love? We know love plays a role in procreation, but it's way more than that. It's really there to ensure that the caregiver stays in close contact with the infant for warmth protection nutrition, just keeping the infant safe in contrast to other animals in the animal kingdom, humans are pretty unremarkable, lacking physical strength speed, big claws, big teeth, so as a result, humans really evolved to be very social animals, living in the group was their defense mechanism strength in numbers, strengthened numbers exactly, but like nowadays off to worry about getting eaten by bears not trite. No you don't, but you still have to worry about you. Know Illness, and when we don't have those social connections, we don't do as well. Lack of closeness increases risk for morality.

King Oxytocin Dr Bart Moiseyev Blink Dave Mcgill University Mary Ainsworth Professor Of Psychology Illness Greg Jennifer Barks
The fear of coronavirus is changing our psychology

Smart Money with Bryan Baker

08:20 min | 10 months ago

The fear of coronavirus is changing our psychology

"Syndrome psychologist nationwide report people having nightmares and struggling not just with uncertainty about now but with many jobs possibly never coming back struggling with fears about their future Dr Jennifer Hart seen as a child adolescent and family psychologist in New York City many of you have seen her on TV and she is a young who mental health contributor Dr Jay good to have you with us how are you I'm well thank you for having me we could do an hour about each and every item that we're going to go through here but let's start with something basic the idea that out of no where our assumptions about our lives our jobs and our safety are thrown in the chaos and how does that affect people it is gonna affect people in great ways you know I think there is safety in the numbers of us that are affected so it's very validating that we're all experiencing this together and at the same time we're all in a place of anxiety and nervousness and worry in a way we've never really been on this level so I think there's so much uncertainty and things changing so much day to day that everybody's just on edge and you don't have to have a diagnosable mental illness to be on edge all of us are experiencing in different ways people who have had the disease I guess a lot of other people think well they should be at ease but we know that people who have survived potentially fatal diseases conditions accidents whatever often suffer depression afterwards and are we seeing that yet you know I I don't know if we're seeing entirely and I think the truth is still it's too early to tell on some levels I think there's a lot of relief and then the worry comes back because just because I'm okay doesn't mean that my friends are gonna be okay or my families are gonna be okay are we still don't know whether or not there could be a recurrence of this we believe no we just don't know so I think the unknown still creates a sense of uncertainty and for many of us sadness and like what we are losing verses what's to come in because we we can't predict it we're just kind of floating in that emotional rollercoaster people react to all this so differently for you for psychologists they're working online now because you can't have somebody in the office we have zoom facetime Skype Google made it seems to work for many people but I would think for some it might just underscore that feeling of being separate and alone yes and I I think that that's a really important point you know one of the things that we're seeing is the level of isolation and for those of us who are in the field we are working virtually and and it's great but but not I don't think it takes the place of talent you know of in person relationships and doesn't take the place of being in my office and you being able to see the whole person not just kind of their chest in their head and and we're missing out on things like touch of other people which we know triggers oxytocin which is the feel good hormone and all of these really important things that that physical connection gives us we're lacking right now and that does add to that sense of worry and anxiety and depression if people are experiencing the psychology of those who may have been the transmitter of this disease to somebody they love how do we live with that especially if it proves fatal especially for people who may have taken chances not believing this was a serious as it turned out to be a financially just felt they had to go back to work and took chances how do you deal with that you know survivor's guilt is real right and and if I am someone who had it in them in advertising I don't think anybody's doing it on purpose you know I don't think this is a I knew I had this and I went and I infected other people and we know stories from years ago where those kinds of things did happen with sexually transmitted diseases and stuff I think that it because it's so silent and so a symptomatic for so many it can be such a silent moves and and we do have that guilt that comes with it so we have to check whether or not our guilt is reasonable and real and and kind of work through that first thousand we can say like I wasn't intentionally it means that I was doing the best I could and and work to kind of let go of any M. justify guilty maybe zero I mentioned at the beginning Dr John that you were a child adolescent and family psychologist we talk about adults a lot people don't talk about kids that much because they seem for the most part kind of sailing through this in terms of illness but no school can't have friends over no after school extracurricular activities mom and dad visibly worried about themselves and their jobs very worried about grandma and grandpa as far as we know how are the kids doing you know kids are are kind of pushing through and struggling I think that so many young people are losing their normal too right so they're seeing the worry in their houses there normally is no longer there they're not going to school depending on the age of them are they losing files store moments rituals that they would expect to be having this year so there's a lot of loss and grief for them as well and I think we need to cut them a little bit of slack they're learning how to do this new normal cold I'm cold and and and we all have to help them navigate it to anything for appearance it's a challenge because they're struggling with how do I work from home how do I make sure I keep my job how do I make sure my kids are doing their school work how do I make sure my kids are okay and all of us collectively kinda need to exhale and take a brash and recognize we're just doing the best we can and and be supportive of one another what we tell people in relationships because even people believe they have great relationships sometimes find them tested by the twenty four seven this of this and find that assumptions they had about what the other person likes doesn't like it's comfortable with all of that may not be quite what they imagine we are definitely learning more about our partners and family members that he may ever have wanted to know that is true I think you know and that could be a really good thing you know it could strengthen a lot of relationships it could help work through a lot of relationships I think we all need to give each other a pass at different times that any sort of argument you know we might have an argument over who's doing the dishes tonight and could it be about more than that right arm morbidity the illness are we all gonna be OK so there's so many multi layered issues going on at the same time and I think what we are seeing that's of concern is you know increases in domestic violence increases in child abuse and it's very important for people to know that resources do still exist even if shelters might be harder to get to your and to reach out to those resources when needed nightmares I'm hearing a lot of course this is anecdotal at this point is it's not that anybody's I've tried to do a study on this but a lot of people are having more nightmare stranger dreams a lot of the things that maybe we don't want to think about during our conscious ours are working themselves out at night it has consequences because a lot of people are not getting a normal good night's sleep especially since they're not exhausted by work but maybe exhausted more by psychological things are you hearing any of that I am in and and was just reading about this to that although we are home more and you'd think contentiously could get more rest because we don't have a long commute so we don't have those kinds of things we're not getting great and solid sleep so we're just feeling more on edge in to your plate we do kind of quiet our minds we lay down or not distracted so a lot of our anxiety comes down the second we can't get into that we have some racing thoughts and then anxiety comes out in our dreams all the time so kind of part of this I like to recommend for people who really get worried as are getting to that because it's the first time they're quiet is to take a couple minutes and kind of run through all the worry thoughts and you like there's not you know what can I do about any of these things right now if the answer is nothing do some meditative breathing and allow yourself to go to sleep and you know the rules are different if you're really tired in the middle of the day you can catch a fifteen minute cat nap then allow yourself that as well final thing is there something that people should be on the lookout for or something that may especially help people in these times that we should be hearing about I think that we use the term social distancing and it really just means physically and I think one of the most important things we have to look out for is loneliness and in isolation loneliness bikes and we know loneliness can be a huge trigger to anxiety and depression for many people so even though you cannot be close to people you need to be connected to people and I think that it's however you do that calling them using any sort of video conferencing whatever you know doing a drive by in a wave whatever it can be to make that connection in person really can be a protective factor for all of us do we really should call it physical this insing shouldn't waste social distancing probably the last thing we need right now exactly it's really the wrong terminology and we get what they mean but I think it it implies nothing you know not connecting when in fact this is the time connection matters more

Dr Jennifer Hart New York City Dr Jay Syndrome
Understanding what is at the core of suffering with Dr. John Demartini

Anxiety Slayer

09:01 min | 1 year ago

Understanding what is at the core of suffering with Dr. John Demartini

"They. It's my pleasure to introduce you to Dr John De Martini. Dr De Martini is a human behavior specialist international bestselling author educator founder of the De Martini Institute and the author of forty books that have been translated into thirty six languages. He's been featured in films including the secret is appeared on Larry. King Live and regularly contributes to Oprah magazine. And he's so much more than that when I was reading his Baiocco at that. What like three sentences. I mean this man has so much experience. He travels all around the world helping so many inspiring so many welcome to anxiety. Sleep Dr de Martini. Well thank you for having me. Thank you in. Today's fast. Paced hyper connected society. There's an undeniable increase in people experiencing varying degrees of anxiety. We get loads of email from our listeners. About how they are suffering from all types in at the top of the list health anxiety followed by the fear of having an anxiety attack in social anxiety. I'd love for you to share your view about anxiety being a form of fear. So can I give you a snarl to kind of build out the formation of anxiety? Yes please let's imagine that a mother and father are having an argument home and there's a little one after two year old baby. That's having to endure and listen to the screaming and the baby had quickly crawls off runs to its room. Hide under a bed puts his hands over. Its years closes. Its eyes and just feels a bit shaken by the screaming match this this initial perception of pain without pleasure lost out. Gain negative out positive in the child's perception is stored in a subconscious mind as an instinct to protect away from that response and an impulse to whatever That child procedures. It's opposite of peaceful safe environment now. The next morning after the only match the father goes off to work. The mother comes and gets the baby out of the bed and goes and gets it dressed up and takes shopping out when the when they were screaming the night before the father was wearing blue jeans and a white shirt. Had Brown Moustache Brown hair. The mother was wearing a particular outfit. The child had taken this in an filter this nuclear of the Chalice and filtered information going into the corona before it goes into Cortex to be conscious so child's got filtered response there now the next morning. The mother takes the baby with her shopping to the grocery store. And the baby's fine and it's sitting in the basket you know relaxed in a time and all of a sudden they turn a corner. There's a man with blue jeans white shirt brown hair brown moustache. The baby has an association with those stimuli and the baby now has a reaction because she the baby will one of fight or flight response Eliezer getting further the mother protected turning. Its back on the mother to try to protect it or it'll get behind the mother and try to create a response to pull mother away from that thing that associated with the original night before experience. And so it'll have a what is called a an association with the primary one because of associations may with the blue jeans a white shirt brown hair brown moustache so the child is not even aware that it's actually a result of the night before but it just has this instinct to protect itself from this thing that's walking by because of the associations made while the the boy I walked by with blue jeans white shirt goes down the island at NAP. Feel safe and it gets backed. It plays the mummy wonders. Why did the Child Act out for just a second man walked by then it goes around the next quarter and there's a guy with a blue? Jean Yellow Shirt Brown hair brown moustache now. The child has a little less response but still a bit of a response. His now societas with blue jeans and Brown hair and Brown Moustache but now the child has a secondary association with yellow shirt. Now goes down the next aisle and there's a guy with a blue jeans red shirt brown hair brown moustache now. It's Gone Association. Red Shirt then it goes around the corner and sees a guy with a blue jeans. A white shirt blonde hair blond mustache and that associates blindness with that and all the sudden without even realizing it there is a hundred stimulus as stimuli in the environment. Triggering varying degrees of response to the original fear so these secondary tertiary ordinary pit Associations eventually have stimulus to our act a stimuli to create a anxiety response and anxiety responses a compounded original fear that's never been neutralized so now what happens is the child has started to having a hundred different things because now music is playing while they happen to see a guy with blue jeans and a white shirt. Brown Moustache now. That of mood music is now associated and after a while there's hundreds of things in the environment without even being aware of the original event triggering an anxiety response. This can be occurring in health because we could have a scare with some sort of a health response and then we can have secondary association to that it can be social. It can be learning at educational institutions. It can be fitness Exercise to every injury and it can create secondary injuries. Anything that is compounded an associate on top original event that hasn't been neutralized can create anxiety response triggered now if I go back and take that child to that original event and ask a certain set of questions. Make the unconscious conscious of the opposite at that moment and neutralize and balance perceptions. The cascading of the secondary church events dissolve. It's quite amazing how it's done. So there's a way of liberty going back to the original primary event and asking questions to make us fully conscious of the opposite sides. Let's say that you beat somebody that you're infatuated with their. You're a single person or married acting single and you meet somebody and you're highly attracted to him. You're kind of in a fantasy about them. And you're now conscious of the upsides. Things that are attractive. And your unconscious the downsides and as a result of you know you stimulate dopamine oxytocin Kevin's endorphin. Serotonin estrogen. And you've got an attractive response of impulse towards but now you're unconscious of the downsides. That's why you're vulnerable to that impulse or you meet somebody that you resent you. Perceive consciously this way more downsides because of previous experiences in Toronto. And there's no upsides and now you're conscious the downsides unconsciously upsides and now you create a nor peninsular never cortisol. Osteo cows in testosterone response. Now when you do that those chemistries get skewed. You get subjected bias as a as a protective mechanism to accentuate that. And now you split your full consciousness and the conscious unconscious hats anytime you store that you store all of those imbalances in the subconscious mind as impulses toward things and instincts away from it will run your life irrespective of time or space until they are neutralized right doing as you're now asking questions to make you. Cognizant conscious like. Your intuition is a typically do that? He'll you trying to ask you information. That would make you aware of the unconscious at the time. We're conscious of your infatuated. What's the downsides current at that moment if you resent the upside and once they're balanced you free it from the subconscious mind in its liberate into what we call the super conscious? Mind a of love and attitude when it's in love and gratitude is wellness. There's no response. There's no impulses there's no instincts. There's no anxiety secondary responses etcetera. So what I do is I go to the moment when you perceive the original event occurring and you go in there and you identify what you think is more negatives than positives with a father's yelling at the mother and go and find out what's the upsides because I you think well there's no upside. Its downside there's more negative than positive withdraw from it. You try to protect yourself etc. But at the same time you might find that. The mothers disempowered and all of a sudden yelling as she's communicating in a way that goes against his values She's maybe overspend money and he's now reacting or maybe that he's she's had an affair. You don't see the whole picture so you just respond until you ask enough questions to try to find out. What the real dynamical

Dr John De Martini Dr De Martini De Martini Institute Brown Oprah Magazine Larry Eliezer Founder Toronto Jean Yellow Gone Association Cortisol Testosterone Dopamine Endorphin Oxytocin
"oxytocin" Discussed on The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

"Your ability to learn and recall list of words but oxytocin had a detrimental effect on memory for people who are more willing to depend on others. This what's that about In any case these two studies were only looking at short term learning and recall. What about the long run? OXYTOCIN redeems itself here. We already know that too. Much stress is harmful to the hippocampus. A brain area that is indispensable symbol to memory formation. This is true for us and for rats but if a stressed out rats got oxytocin spray it seemed to protect the brain cells in the hippocampus which helps their memory health in the long run. So that's promising and there is even better news. OXYTOCIN oxytocin may be helpful for physical pain relief. I it's interesting to know that people with chronic pain like those with fibromyalgia Olga naturally have lower levels of oxytocin circulating in their blood the lower their oxytocin level the higher they rate their pain stress stress and depression and even among healthy people those would lower blood levels of oxytocin had lower pain tolerance so they became curious about whether giving people oxytocin would decrease their pain levels or pain sensitivity and it did specifically specifically for those with chronic migraine irritable bowel syndrome chronic back pain and even cancer pain for people without pain disorders Aussitot cin made them better able to tolerate acute pain. The really amazing thing is oxytocin potentially not only works directly directly on the brain's pain processing areas but also indirectly decreases suffering by relieving depression and anxiety. That's related to the pain. This is because oxytocin has many different effects on the central nervous system by working through both physiological and psychological channels oxytocin may be able to ease that vicious spiral that people get into when they're paying makes them feel hopeless and anxious which in turn worsens the pain. So how about for men. How do men act when they are highly rejection sensitive and they're in a relationship conflicts? We'll we'll come back after the break and tackled that issue and then get to some clues about how we might be able to overcome rejection sensitivity. Today's episode is supported by talk..

oxytocin acute pain depression migraine bowel syndrome
"oxytocin" Discussed on The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

"You know those warm and fuzzy feelings you get when you cuddle a puppy hug your friend or kiss your partner. That's oxytocin at work. You may already have heard of oxytocin what people have called the love. Hormone the cuddle hormone or even the moral moral molecule. This is because oxytocin has been in the headlines gaining a reputation for making people more trusting generous and even more or love it is a neuropeptide meaning that it is a protein like molecule. Your brain cells used to communicate with each other oxytocin. oxytocin is also a hormone meaning that the brain releases it into the bloodstream to communicate with the rest of the body. Clearly this little brain chemical has us some big jobs a place. A role in sex childbirth bonding social interaction emotions and many other functions is important to us mammals our brains produce it naturally but there's also synthetic oxytocin that is sometimes used therapeutically. Either their way oxytocin seems to not only nudges toward more pro social behavior. It can also play tricks on our minds. So let's take a look at some ways that at this complicated brain chemical affects the way we feel an act and how we can maybe coaxed the brain to release more of it for those warm Fuzzy Z.. Feelings so one thing we know. Is that oxytocin. Probably helps people to bond through more openness more trust and even more generosity oxytocin got its glowing reputation as the love hormone from the evidence that is seems to help us be more pro social and more more connected with others for example one really fascinating study found that one male college student Scott a dose of Oxytocin from a nasal spray. They were more willing to share their emotions about a painful memory with a total stranger. Then participants who got just a placebo spray. People not only seem to trust strangers more with their emotions but also with their money when they get a dose of Oxytocin a separate Chris Study had participants play investment game where they could entrust any amount of their money tokens to another participant. A trustee those who sniffed and oxytocin spray were much more likely to let the trustee hang onto their tokens. Most of this group handed over most or all of their money in contrast those who only got a placebo spray or less willing to trust a stranger only about one fifth of them handed over all of their tokens. Now what about straight up giving money to a stranger oxytocin might make a person more generous to yet another study found that when people got an oxytocin nasal spray they shared a whopping eighty percent more money with a total stranger than people who did not get that spray. So does this mean that we all should be walking around dosing ourselves and each other with oxytocin sprays if all the traders on Wall Street got sniff with their morning coffees would the trading floor be less cut throat. It may not be that simple. There have also been studies that failed to find find the same results and none of these sensational studies can tell us about Aussitot since effects in daily life or in the long run plus we should always be careful full about study findings. That seem a little too good to be true so for now I will say that things are looking promisingly warm and fuzzy for Oxytocin but the science is not quite rock-solid enough yet that we should be just going around sticking oxytocin sprays up everyone knows and besides oxytocin is complicated not all of its effects are perfectly positive because another interesting thing we know about it is that oxytocin has complicated effects on memory. It's possible that oxytocin can actually impair memory a study published around the same time as the trust that he just told you about found that when people got a dose of oxytocin spray they performed worse on a word recall test test than people who just got a placebo spray. Does this mean oxytocin makes us more forgetful..

oxytocin partner Aussitot Chris Study trustee Scott oxytocin.
Why Oxytocin Is Incredible and How to Get More of It

The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

03:06 min | 1 year ago

Why Oxytocin Is Incredible and How to Get More of It

"You know those warm and fuzzy feelings you get when you cuddle a puppy hug your friend or kiss your partner. That's oxytocin at work. You may already have heard of oxytocin what people have called the love. Hormone the cuddle hormone or even the moral moral molecule. This is because oxytocin has been in the headlines gaining a reputation for making people more trusting generous and even more or love it is a neuropeptide meaning that it is a protein like molecule. Your brain cells used to communicate with each other oxytocin. oxytocin is also a hormone meaning that the brain releases it into the bloodstream to communicate with the rest of the body. Clearly this little brain chemical has us some big jobs a place. A role in sex childbirth bonding social interaction emotions and many other functions is important to us mammals our brains produce it naturally but there's also synthetic oxytocin that is sometimes used therapeutically. Either their way oxytocin seems to not only nudges toward more pro social behavior. It can also play tricks on our minds. So let's take a look at some ways that at this complicated brain chemical affects the way we feel an act and how we can maybe coaxed the brain to release more of it for those warm Fuzzy Z.. Feelings so one thing we know. Is that oxytocin. Probably helps people to bond through more openness more trust and even more generosity oxytocin got its glowing reputation as the love hormone from the evidence that is seems to help us be more pro social and more more connected with others for example one really fascinating study found that one male college student Scott a dose of Oxytocin from a nasal spray. They were more willing to share their emotions about a painful memory with a total stranger. Then participants who got just a placebo spray. People not only seem to trust strangers more with their emotions but also with their money when they get a dose of Oxytocin a separate Chris Study had participants play investment game where they could entrust any amount of their money tokens to another participant. A trustee those who sniffed and oxytocin spray were much more likely to let the trustee hang onto their tokens. Most of this group handed over most or all of their money in contrast those who only got a placebo spray or less willing to trust a stranger only about one fifth of them handed over all of their tokens. Now what about straight up giving money to a stranger oxytocin might make a person more generous to yet another study found that when people got an oxytocin nasal spray they shared a whopping eighty percent more money with a total stranger than people who did not get that spray.

Oxytocin Trustee Partner Chris Study Scott Oxytocin.
Do Animals Get Married?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

09:57 min | 1 year ago

Do Animals Get Married?

"On this. Podcast we take questions from curious. Curious kids just like you all over the world and we find answers this week. We're answering questions about how other animals think and feel oh and behave and how those thoughts and feelings and behaviors are the same or different from humans to help guide us through your questions is Alissa asset airy. She's a graduate student at a place called Yale University but she doesn't spend all her time in a classroom or even in a research lab for my job August. I study animal behaviour and I specifically I just study monkey behavior site. Go out into an island. All the monkeys live and I watch chunkys behave and interact with each other and try to make connections about how those monkeys interact with each other with how humans interact with each each other to think more about how monkeys about the world. What parts of how humans think about the world are shared with? How lucky about the world doesn't that sound cool? And we thought her background would make her a perfect guest for today's show. Not only that. But Eliza says she's really passionate about making sure kids in particular no they can do the kind of job. I'm she does because she had no idea. This was even a possibility when she was your age. When I was a little kid I loved animals so so much and bless my mom? She just let me have everything in house like. Just let me bring any animal She is definitely a huge part. Definitely Fed got into my obsession with animals. Learning about animals like So I had all sorts of bugs and anything that I could catch outside in the house and it wasn't until I was a sophomore in college. I learned that people study in behavior for a living their whole job. That's now that's my whole job and I think if I could've told my childhood self I would have been so stoked. Okay here's the first question. Analysts is going to tackle high nine names Giddy. I live in Tacoma Washington announced five years old and my question is do any kind of animal get married a lot of people. Ask Me Discussion when I'm working especially because I work with some of our closest living relatives which ktar monkeys and People WanNa know like to the monkeys have relationship serve. They have anything that looks like marriage. When you think about what marriages it's it's kind of an agreement between two people who that they're going to raise their kids together and they're gonNA spend their life together And I think we do see some aspects of these things in other animals so there's a lot of ritual in or like doing different sorts of Behaviors ears and when you're trying to like core someone So there's like dancing and you gift giving and we do see that in some types of animals. I'M GONNA Pause Elissa for a second in here when she says there are a lot of rituals in how animals decide to pair up. Do you understand why that might be a similar thing to human marriage. A ritual is a set of actions or activities that people do the same way in a certain type of situation so when people get married they often follow rituals or traditions in their marriage ceremonies. Now there are all different kinds of marriages but sometimes for example. There's a first dance at a wedding where two people getting married danced to a song they've picked out that's meaningful to them or maybe a bride has her hands and feet painted an intricate intricate designs with Hannah before her wedding in some weddings one or both members of a couple might stop on and break glass other times a couple jumps over. A broom is part of their ceremony. There are tons of different customs or traditions that people like to follow or not follow when they get married. But let's get back to non human human animals Elissa is noting than in many cases. Different animals have rituals that they perform like one or both of the animals who want to get together engage in dancing for each other or one animal brings gifts to another animal. That's not marriage but it is a way that the two animals pair up and decide to get together and have this sort of communication about what their relationship is going to be and like with humans. There are a lot of different decisions. They go into two animals deciding whether or not to get together In terms of marriage the agreement to spend your life with someone. I think we do see that. A lot of animals. Also the term in animal behaviour it's called monogamy which means to share the same space over some period of time and for some species. This will mean gene they live together. Arrays babies together just for like one year or one season but there are some species of animals that live in pairs for their whole life. We see this most commonly in birds some birds you might recognize for instance some species of penguins like the Emperor Penguin they are thought to mate for life. I I spend their whole life with just one other individual and then there are some other birds. Say Even I had to look up to. There's a bird called the hornbill that meets her life. The Albatross is another bird that meets relief pretty uncommon and Infineon's and reptiles like snakes and Salamanders and lizards although it happens happens occasionally or fish. We don't really see it in fish that often either and then in mammals. It's pretty rare to so humans are mammals but also monkeys McKie's dogs cats horses and we see it in one species of monkeys. They think that the monkey is monogamous for their whole life again monogamy means. He's a pair or a couple that stays together and in many animals. It means that they have babies together. But don't make or try to have babies with any other the animal sometimes that just means for one season or one year and in some animals they share a partnership for their whole adult life or for many many many seasons or years. I think that's most similar to how people think of human marriage or partnerships. They often last for a very long time right more even a lifetime but not always human marriage is a very complicated thing and you should talk to the adults in your life about the values that your family holds around marriage. Marriage is often about love but the actual act of marriage is a contract a legal or a religious document that two to people entering a marriage sign agree to and certain rights and privileges go along with that document. The government is sometimes involved. If you have a religion login and you follow that religion sometimes religion is also involved. So it's pretty clear that other than humans. No animals signed documents and have have actual official marriages so the literal answer to duties. Question is no animals. Don't get married but marriage isn't isn't the only way to love someone or to form a partnership so another way we could ask about non human animals and how they pair up is do animals love each other in terms of love it gets tricky because you break it down to something very boring and biological and not very like loving at all. This is true when you speak to someone who studies like what you would call love in humans to because one way scientists study what love is is by looking at human membranes and the changes in our brains and our bodies when we say we're feeling love so we don't actually know for sure whether animals feel. I love the same way. Humans do for one thing. Animals can't talk to us to tell us. And there are so many variations of love love for your family love for for your friend love for a romantic partner or someone you might want to marry or have children with love for your favorite hotdog. I'm joking that isn't really love or is it but also what you think of as love and what I think of as love might be totally different in our brains means so scientists have to use research to make an educated guess a hypothesis about what animals might be feeling so they study things. It's like brain activity. What kinds of hormones are chemicals in your brain and body change when animals or you do different activities or think different thoughts and and they studied those kinds of changes in animals to try to interpret things like could an animal feel love or feel different emotions? There are many animals that get a surge surge of a hormone called oxytocin sometimes called the love hormone or the love chemical when the animals are doing something like cuddling or playing and we certainly we have examples of animals doing things that look to us like love caring for their babies forming partnerships that looked like friendships. Maybe feeling very very sad when another animal they've been with dies or goes away now. It varies from species to species. I don't think anyone has done experiments to see if slugs slugs feel love but people have spent a lot of time trying to figure out if elephants love their babies and if dogs love US and again and while we can't say for certain that they do feel love we know that for some animals their brain chemical signal that they're feeling something and that that something looks similar to the brain changes in humans who are feeling love so I guess the best we could say is maybe animals feel love. Probably they feel something that feels like closeness or connection to each other.

Yale University Alissa Tacoma Washington Graduate Student FED Infineon Elissa Eliza Oxytocin United States Government Hannah Partner Mckie Official
Does Your Dog Really Love You?

Short Wave

08:36 min | 1 year ago

Does Your Dog Really Love You?

"Clive's new book is called dog is is love? Why and how your dog loves you? It contains a bunch of different dog. Oh Research and take away his client. I discussed a few of those starting with the work of a scientist. IENTIST named Gregory Burns. Who Manage to study dogs in a way that few people had before inside an MRI machine? So Gregory Burns work is quite pathbreaking. Half breaking in this direction the brilliance lies in being able to train dogs to lie still in the scanner. Only humans had ever the had their brains scanned in a scanner while they were awake. It's one thing to a needs to ties. An animal placed in a scanner. But of course then not seeing the natural brain activity that occurs when an individual's awake now the trick is to train an individual animal to lie perfectly still which it costs. You know anybody who's been in an MRI scanner knows. It's quite a a challenging environment. It's very loud. It's somewhat claustrophobic right. I've never been in an MRI machine and be like you know who love this. My dog well right exactly so so. It was quite genius to be able to train the dogs to do this and having got them to lie still to show them signals that indicate the different things are coming along along the different things that imminent and I they just showed them signals that indicated. You're gonNA get a piece of hot dog. You're not going to get a piece of hot dog right and then train the dogs. Another signal means that you'll beloved human is just around the corner and is about to appear what so interesting there. Is that the reward center of a dog's brain lights up to both of those signals. And in most cases all cases in most cases the center lights up more intensely Ashley when the dog is given a signal that means your human is just around the corner the when the dog is given a signal that means a piece of hot dog is just on. Its Way to you. But what was so interesting. He was after Gregory Burns and his team had done all this work in the MRI Scana. They took the same dogs out and place them in a very simple scenario where the dogs were given a choice between the human being sitting on a chair and a bowl of food placed about ten feet away I feel like I know what decision my dog would make but it really. I don't know oh you gotta try this try okay. It's not the least bit difficult to set up. And what they found was just as for most of the dogs their brain reward centers lit up more intensely for the person than for the food so those same dogs chose their a person more often than they chose the food and there was a very strong relationship between how they brains have been activated by these two different rewards and what choice. They actually Z.. Made when they will let out of the scanner and just given a free choice to go where they wanted to go so basically their behavior mirrored what they were seeing in the MRI machine. Exactly okay so on top of the MRI stuff. You also talked about some brain chemistry studies out of Japan right there where researchers discovered something kind of cool happens when humans ends and dogs look into each other's eyes. Tell me about that. So this is research from a group in one of the suburbs of Tokyo and they have equipment so that they can measure Israel levels of hormones in dogs and people's bodies and in this case. What's interesting is we're talking about a hormone oxytocin which has the nickname nickname the love hormone? Now no hormone is exactly the same as a psychological state but there's enough commonality between how a hormone in response and people psychological experience that it's not entirely unreasonable to call oxytocin the love hormone. Certainly we know that when people who have a very he's strong loving bond look into each other's eyes levels of this hormone spike in their buttons. So you see this mothers with their infants. Newly enamored a couple of old married couples but new couples. You say this spiking they both partners when they look into each other's eyes and so what this group were able to do. was they brought people in their dogs into their lab and from video analysis. They look how much they looked into each other's eyes and they found that both both partners but the dog and the person when they looked lovingly into each other's eyes their levels of oxidation spikes. So that you see the exact same hormonal response in people with their beloved dogs as you see when people who have a strong loving relationship look into each other's eyes so now the line of evidence that this love the dogs have and indeed we have for them is coded into our very biology. So whether or not you know the word love is appropriate appropriate which I think you believe it is. It's a very similar thing to what we see in humans that are quote in love potential right absolute right so it comes through between gene the two species dog and human the same way that the signal comes through and we look at people loving each other. Okay so let's talk a little bit about genetics you are working with the geneticist trying to find genes. That were specific to dogs. That might explain some of this behavior that you had seen you were comparing dog genes too wolf jeans jeans and you came across this kind of interesting group of genes. Tell me about that so there really isn't very much genetic difference between wolves and dogs and yet behaviorally aviary. They're quite different animals and we were looking at trying to pin down. What was the nature of that difference? And then it's a few years ago now. A young geneticist at the time graduate student. Ucla Bridget von halt published paper where she went all the way through the genome of the dog and and competitor to the genome of the wolf. Looking for where were the changes. Where was the evidence of recent selection of genetic changes jude you domestication? And in her publication. She pointed out that there was some evidence in region of the wolf and dog genome. which in humans is associated with a very rare syndrome called Williams buren syndrome? I'm just GONNA call it. Williams Syndrome okay. Williams Syndrome affects twenty twenty eight genes so people with Williams Syndrome they have hot deficits and circulatory deficits. But the really intriguing thing to me is that they are described in the medical literature as showing exceptional gregarious. Notice like exceptional gregarious nece so happiness and and in and interacting with other people exactly Mattie so they're described as being completely open to making friends with anybody of really having almost no concept of stranger. At all so this sparked my curiosity and together with my Past you collaborate right on Cue Dell. We go together with Bridget von Hall. We decided to actually get some DNA from some dogs. Get some DNA from some wolves. Carry Out our behavioral behavioral tests of sociability. All friendliness on these dogs on on these wolves and focus in on the twenty eight genes that are responsible for Williams Syndrome in humans to see if we could find a genetic. Signature of dogs exaggerated gregarious. NECE dogs desire to perform friendly relationships with other individuals. Okay and what did you find out. We found we identified three genes. Three genes came out and two of these three genes were already known to be responsible for the sociability component of Williams Syndrome. So we totally found the signal for dogs. Friendliness Gregarious nece love ability in the genetic code at the deepest level of biological analysis super for interesting super interesting. Okay so you could die. I totally agree. Maybe it's always the work that you've been involved in yourself always seems the most exciting in but knowing that I for me it's made a big difference in how I look at searfoss. I used to take the view which I play my mother for that. Our dog's apparent love for us was was just covered. Love you know we feed them so they act like they love us at so I was always. And I'm a skeptic by nature so I was always a looking at my dogs of apparent affection for tell me rather skeptically and it. It's just changed my heart if you will to accept her love as sincere you know. I feel better about her to think that that she really means this in her simple way. She really loves me.

Williams Syndrome Gregory Burns Oxytocin Ientist Clive Scientist Williams Buren Bridget Von Hall Ashley Tokyo Ucla Bridget Japan Dell Mattie Graduate Student Israel Ten Feet
Nurses Are A Mom's Best Friend With Maternity Nurse Katie Verbesy

Mom Brain

09:44 min | 1 year ago

Nurses Are A Mom's Best Friend With Maternity Nurse Katie Verbesy

"Lena. Mom is the toughest job there is and it doesn't come with instructions so it's okay if you don't have all the answers. We'll figure it out together this. This is mom brain for the LARREA Baldwin Daphne us. Hey guys welcome back to mom brain. I'm ILARIA and I'm Daphne and today we have a episode for you where I am on maternity leave but Alario is having an amazing conversation with Labor and maternity nurse so today's Today's acne. We talked with Katie Versi who is a nurse at the hospital that both you and I delivered at I've had for I believe three out of my four our kids you know I have to say the the experience of giving birth is just because I'm the reason I'm not in the conversation fully today's because I'm actually home on maternity. Leave and it's funny because people keep asking you know how houses pregnant pregnancy been different than others and you know. Are you nervous for to give birth and all of this and it's like it's weird. Policy just does not let you fully remember all the details of any process of any part of this I wish I was more diligent about journaling but I just don't have time so could someone get me a third and fourth and to please stay there by journaling and a few extra hours during the day hours during the day although I it was really good for a while but voice notes to myself which which had helped but in any case you'll hear in this episode how soothing and Calming Katie Gruber See who will we hearing from is but she is just. It's just an example of how important the the great care around you when you're giving birth is excellent art guys this. I hope you enjoy this conversation with Katie. Silly Mommy got the gig okay. Can you please introduce yourself. My name is Katie Verb. AC- and I've been a maternity nurse for ten years in New York City. What exactly is maternity nurse so a maternity nurse. Their maternity nurse is on the different stages of your Labor Labor and delivery nurse which is the more common nurse it was heard of the nurse sets with you during the Labor but then after you have the baby for the two to three days that you're saying at at the hospital you have what we call a post partners and that just means that's the nurse takes care of you in the period after you have the baby so we help you with breastfeeding and teaching and just all the stuff that happens after baby that you don't know anything and you need someone to be there with you. The entire twenty-four hours doing all the teaching and helping thing just make you be less scared. Now is so funny you're so stressed and focused on the actual delivery any idea everything whoever whoever like no one told me any event always tell your friends or I tell my patients. Tell your friends about after stuff because it's the stuff you don't know and it's the stuff that's going to be what you need for after es tell your friends and then they won't feel alone when Carmen was born. I was so focused on the delivery and then I'll say everything will be find when she's out and everything is like how exactly to keep this thing alive. Oh my God all right so i WanNa talk to you a little bit about some of the things that you Komo women will experience as say it's my first my first child and I have my my baby and everything goes as planned but what are like really common surprises that that women have after you know giving birth. I think one of the biggest things that mom's experiences not understanding. How difficult breastfeeding is that breastfeeding. Yes it's natural that your breasts produce milk but short of that so much of it is a learned experience and based on how the babies are and how the moms are and feeling comfortable. That breastfeeding takes time. There's a reason that seventy five percent of my job as a nurse is helping with breastfeeding. There's a reason we have lactation consultants that come and visit you in the room and breastfeeding class but I think the biggest thing is understanding that if you do want to breastfeed that it more often than not can take a few weeks to really get established tablet and I think everyone has this idea in their mind for movies and seeing their friends when the babies are months old breastfeeding with absolutely no problem and people I think as baseline from what I've seen is that mom's always are going to feel like they're not doing everything right because they see everyone else doing it and everyone else seems like they're doing it easy but it's not easy for everyone. It's my first experience with breastfeeding is that breastfeeding was more painful than all of it. Avi I opted for an epidural with all of them with all of my births and I did a lot of the laboring until the last one you know without an epidemic in the last one. I was induced but I I have to say that those like contractions that you get when you get the letdown. breastfeeding are like no joke doc really really really. Yes and that's another thing that moms will say to me after is that they're in so much pain so with every after you have the baby has to shrink back down to its original size so that that you're not bleeding so with every baby every pregnancy recipient stretched out that many more time so your body has to work that much harder to shrink back down so I've had people that have had certified six seven kids that say the Labor at the contractions after the Labor is worse than the Labor itself. I completely agree with you. That's got an amazing thing. I mean people talk about. How breastfeeding helps you get back to original size. I think one of the reasons it is is the contractions that the uterus is having you'll this is I mean. This is mom rain so we get. Berry you know into the the gruesome for parts but it makes you really bleed and get rid of you know the blood that you need to get rid of so when every single time that your your body will have a letdown. which is you know for? Those of you. Guys who are pregnant and you know thinking about breastfeeding or you know didn't breastfeed one time around and next time so basically you know once. The milk starts like squirting. That's what it's called. That's what the letdown is that that is a contraction in the uterus that there's a there is a relationship relationship between the letdown and your uterus that am. I saying this right you yeah. You're the what the the like the science behind it. So most people have heard of Potosi. That's often given to you while you're in labor. Tell Labor progress shooters contract so when you breastfeed after the baby your body releases a natural form of Potosi called Oxytocin so every time you're breastfeeding oxytocin is released in your body. It does three things it makes you crampy. which is the body's natural way of preventing you from hemorrhaging because here we have chosen to give to patients after but in third world countries in places where that's not available? That's the way of preventing MOMS from hopefully not hemorrhaging it also makes you thirsty when you breastfeed because that oxytocin leaky thirsty and that's the body's ladies way of making sure that you're drinking enough because seventy three seventy five percent of breast milk is water so you. WanNa make sure that you're drinking water because if you're not hydrating yourself you're not. GonNa get yourself that full supply and the third thing that makes you sleepy and that I don't understand the science behind that because like you don't need help being tired because you only something that you watch Evan feared. evolution has figured if you don't even more reason to be tired but like. I'll literally be talking to MOMS while they're breastfeeding. I can literally see them haze over. We're and they don't realize that it's because they're literally drug okay. This is the thing that would drive me crazy with. That's after having the baby. You're so tired. ABC's up and you're like alone in in the room and then like nurses will comment. I Love Katy. She'll come hang out for a while and you feel like you're not alone but I'll be like holding my baby and I co sleep with my babies at home but like that's like a big no no in the hospital. You're not allowed to do that. I know goes goes holding one of my babies and like you're literally like you is just as you literally. Can't you can't because you're sleeping with the baby yeah so so you feel like you're getting in trouble a lot of your there which is always another reason. I mean as much as I love my X. I actually really love my experience in the hospital but you know you're excited took a homeboy yeah. I also just wanted to like sleep. Feel you really feel not. Nobody's yelling at me when I'm sleeping being with my baby in the bed but that's actually interesting what you're saying about and I wonder if I want to tell you what I do from pumping schedule because it's a very p you guys ask all the time time and it's very different from what is recommended as very different from what a Lotta people do but I have four gigantic freezer meals else full of milk and then fed the baby on top of that I don't know what I'll do with all the milk I you know. I don't think you can donate milk. That's already frozen. I think has to be fresh rush on. Somebody told me that I don't I think I'm not positive so check but I think every like they're different. People that receive milk. There are different ways of doing it okay if it's like the milk donor bank. It may be different but I know that like on a lot of like group chats. They're like there's Dulas that like we'll put you in contact with other people well. You know what for next time I will remember that because I literally through four. Oh milk. I just threw it away. I was like you know what it's pass the six months more and so and I've been holding on its own it not so because it takes so hard. It's like it's hard. I told Alec this time around. I was like I don't want to push gift. I don't I just want another freezer. Ya'll I want in. My life is another freezer. I had a patient that was we. We were talking. I I think your second or third kid and she was telling me she was going. She was let go on a trip to Europe or something.

Labor Lena. Mom Katie Versi Katie Gruber Oxytocin Potosi Katie Verb Hemorrhaging Daphne Katie New York City Alario Komo Carmen Europe Alec ABC Berry Evan
"oxytocin" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"How is knowing this side of stress going to make you healthier well? Oxytocin doesn't only act on your brain. It also acts on your her body. oxytocin helps heart cells regenerate and heal from any stress induced damage. This stress hormone own strengthens your heart and the cool thing is is that all of these physical benefits of oxytocin are enhanced by social contact and social support. Your stress response has a built.

Oxytocin oxytocin
News in Brief 09 July 2019

UN News

04:45 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 09 July 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations nations are not doing enough to ensure that every child goes to school and stays there by twenty thirty a k commitment of these twenty thirty global goals agenda unesco set on cheese day according to data from you ends educational scientific and cultural organization one in six youngsters aged between six and seventeen will still be out of plus decades time attendance levels are best in primary school with information from nearly one hundred and fifty countries showing that eighty four percent of children completed this fast educational taryn twenty eighteen up from seventy percent in two thousand with an extra push end investment uscca believes it getting old children into primary school is just possible civil by twenty thirty but it warms the as children get older attendance levels are much lower with four in ten children globally expected not complete secondary education by twenty thirty this figure is likely to grow to half of all youngsters in sub saharan africa forgot where the school age population is growing faster than anywhere else unesco says new cancer treatments and drugs that can be swallowed rather than injected adjusted some of their central medicines that every country should have the world health organization unsettled choose day more than one hundred and fifty countries you see you and agencies essential medicines list which contains around four hundred and sixty by to drugs deemed essential detroit public health needs the latest update adds twenty eight products the adult's at twenty three children and it will say specifies new you just put twenty six already listed products based on value for money evidence and health impacts according to w h o the five counts of therapies added to the list are regarded as the best in terms of survival rates just treat skin melanomas lung blood and prostate cancers they include to recently developed immuno therapies naval you lab and from brazil map that have delivered up to fifty percent survival rate for advanced melanoma skin cancer but until recently with incurable all the updates to the list include new oral antique arguments to prevent stroke hasn't alternative to wolfer and treatment of deep vein thrombosis these up particularly advantageous for low income countries at unlike well friend they do not require regular monitoring the issue of life threatening bleeding off the child was also addressed in this year's essential medicines last update with proposal to use champa tyson rama's dandy counties therapy oxytocin doesn't need refrigerating in related development wh as also updated it's essential diagnostics list in recognition of critical life saving importance of finding out what is wrong with patients before it's too late while the first this issued last year concentrated traded on priority diseases hiv malaria toback he likes this and hepatitis this year's list it covers mono communicable end communicable diseases and finally old grievances linked to violence perpetrated against sudanese protesters test is by security forces across the country should be investigated independently and justice must be served atop you and writes officials say don't choose day speaking at the human rights council andrew gilmore assistance extra general human rights welcomed and last week's reported power sharing deal between the transitioning military authority and civilian representatives he said you instead ready to help the country strengthen the protection of human rights as it embraced civilian rule after mass protests beginning in december last year that led to the playing of precedent alba shift for months later we encourage all parties ensued on the continue to resolve any outstanding issues through dialogue i wish they jar welcomes the agreement reached last week includes a commitment to conduct an independent investigation into the violence perpetrated against peaceful protesters more details have emerged about casualties doing the math protests that took place across their down on the thirtieth of june two thousand nineteen it's important that investigation of contribute to justice and dignity for all victims of such violence in reply sudan's osama have made a express gratitude for regional efforts to resolve tensions inside the country while also acknowledging djing be heroic and inspiring popular revolution lead in particular by young people the sudanese representative duncan fundy imminent release of all political prisoners and many others who've been arrested under a state of emergency lows along with an end to the calf you he

United Nations Eighty Four Percent Seventy Percent Fifty Percent
Scientists Explain Puppy Dog Eyes

Morning Edition

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Explain Puppy Dog Eyes

"Are, you know that mushy feeling you get when a dog looks at you with the sad or confused face? What does that happen? Why do they do that NPR's, Vanessa Romo reports a group of scientists say they have figured it out? We all know the look, and it turns out there, actually is something to what we call puppy is the big round is the eyebrows raised up in what looks like a why is everybody always picking on me kind of stare, an inside we get that feeling and become total pushovers. Well, according to Ambrose the lead anatomist on a study about the phenomenon that was just published in the journal proceedings of the national academies of sciences. The sad expression on our canine, besties is the result of tens of thousands of years of evolution and something called a leader muscle. It seems like the an. Ancestors, of domestic dogs or quickly, domesticated by humans, and as part of that process, human, or selecting for this, I'm movement, which is produced by this leave muscle, essentially, those tender looks are mirrors of our own facial expressions, specifically to help dogs better communicate with humans and get what they want. Things like food and a warm place to live. It's also almost entirely absent from wolves the ancestors of dogs burrow, says she and her colleagues don't have concrete proof just yet. But earlier studies they've done suggests that this relatively small inner eyebrow movement in pooches, that makes their is look larger and more baby like evokes, a protective instinct, and people just anecdotally when my dog does that I think, oh, my gosh. She worried she fat. She needs me for something. And so. We, we pay attention to them. So I it seems to trigger some kind of caregiving response in most human, and that desire to peer into one another's eyes is apparently mutually beneficial. Researchers found that dogs like humans experience a surge in oxytocin levels what's called the love hormone as for. What's next Burroughs says while future? Studies may seem like their dog focused, they're really about understanding ourselves because we're just weird BC's that decided to bring other species to live with our inner house. So there's something to be learned in all of these factors of dogs faces to inform us about why we evolved like this. Maybe they'll finally figure out who's a good

Vanessa Romo National Academies Of Sciences Ambrose BC NPR Oxytocin Burroughs
How Spain Listens to Online Audio

podnews

02:55 min | 1 year ago

How Spain Listens to Online Audio

"AB in Spain has published a study about internet audio listeners, or website, called to you to me reports that forty percent. Listen to podcasting. The study also compares live versus on demand. We linked to it from our episode notes. And from our newsletter today, just in time for the European elections. The Acosta app has been translated into an additional four languages. French German Spanish and Swedish, or expires has launched a new feature called episode assembly. They tell pod news, quote with the press of a single button oxytocin gathers up all your role recordings prepares them adjusting levels. Trimming silences tuning them ranging them, according to your episode setup then mixes in your music and the result, you're finished podcast in a matter of seconds. The product is currently free for trial, period. Pod finder is a new conversational way of finding new podcasts to listen to it uses human curation and is available on the web. And also on Facebook messenger podcast day in London have announced a ton of female podcast. Speakers, including reality TV star, Lydia. Bright, a producer from game reply all gives advice on a useful framework for producing great sounding podcasts stories that willing to today, also waiting to a story about clothing store, a brand in San Francisco, which hosts weekly live, podcasts, in store reports Forbes, apparently, does very well for them. The hosts of my favorite murder have a book out called stay sexy, and don't get murdered. It's released next week and press coverage is featuring the story of how they met. Meanwhile, actually flowers from crime junkie is working on a second crime podcast working with the Indiana police Latin-American website, lead Doby asked its readers to recommend podcasts. So today we linked to twenty two podcasts with power in the Spanish language, and we built this tool for ourselves. But if you want to link direct to a podcast episodes are episode link pages. Now, use magic links that open directly in apple podcasts on an iphone Google podcasts on an Android. Or a web player for example, in our show notes and in our newsletter. We linked to an episode about a haunted school in Brisbane from the Brisbane is weird podcast is one example. I just thought I was imagining things. It's real it happened, and it is terrifying. Just search for your podcast pod news. And choose linked directly to an episode from the tools at the bottom to find a list of episodes yourself. And we linked to, to new podcasts today. We explain what trap music is. It's a type of hip hop. Apparently, who knew the folks behind the nightcap built a studio above a famous restaurant in Stratford upon Evan in England and. The top chefs in the country to come and have a nightcap.

Brisbane Spain Facebook Acosta Oxytocin Indiana Lydia Murder Apple Producer Stratford Google Forbes Evan Doby San Francisco London England Forty Percent
"oxytocin" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

Therapist Uncensored Podcast

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

"Gets us back to the point of this episode which is I knew that I needed that kind that source of support and care for me to ride with me in the car to you know soft for all the good things that is associated with and I was really torn about like this is really sick. It's almost like taxidermy. 'CAUSE I was looking for another golden doodle. I went back and forth went back and forth ended up finding a litter that those dogs were born on the day that Jackson died. Actually it was they had just been born this had just happened and I find my person again. I always call Jackson my person parkway. I'm wanting to share this like like I know like. It's not healthy. What I did wasn't healthy but I literally thought I'm going to go purchase some oxytocin because I really really needed so go ahead and you can judge if you would like to. It's better than crack and it's better than a lot of things that people can do but I really needed that experience and it has turned out have a new dog now. His name is Cooper and Cooper is incredible. I didn't have any problems bonding with them. He had no problems uh-huh ponding and I just think that Jackson would want me to have cooper in my life so I feel as close or closer now to cooper and I really actively I use him as a source of comfort and companionship on these drives and it's really made a huge difference for me so this is half confession half story of being able to manipulate an totally worked the oxytocin flowed. I was really scared. I wouldn't be able to bond but we're gonNA keep describing the things that turn on the oxytocin and the bonding and the social connection but it worked and when last thing I want to say about this towards the end. I may give have a little bit more detail for those that WanNa hang around for that but it's not that I wasn't using people I have a lot of supportive people in my life and had an outpouring a pouring of care and comfort so it's not that I was deprived in that way in any way but there was something unique about the connection that I had with Jackson in particular and then later cooper that was different in some ways better than in some ways. Obviously we need people but that's how powerful of a bond on that a is that it can make and that's how healing therapeutic it can be that I put it on that level. It's such a meaningful beautiful story and we especially that time of the life I finding out about the critical endless of your family member and how painful that was as drives and how important in you knew you needed that it's a different kind of support. You can have people bringing you dinner and calling you and loving you but somebody that sits holding you and everything yes but heavy some of it sits on your lap during those drives you knew you needed it was a very difficult time in your life and have that major of a loss was just overwhelming. Honestly you needed a new dog to help you get it over Jackson not not replace him. It wasn't a replace it. It's a you needed that soothing and that loving and the connection that Cooper gave you you and then -ticipant is arrival six weeks later and so. I think it's a beautiful story. I think it helps I think everybody can relate to it and I appreciate you know especially your vulnerability ability of saying. Yes people can judge you for not waiting and getting over Jackson before you got a new pop. That wasn't a time in your life you could do that. You were at a time in your life. You needed that oxytocin. You needed that connection and you knew you needed it right then and I think it's a really touching story and I think lot of people can relate to it yeah so taxidermy aside of it was very effective and again. I'm imagining everybody listening or most people. Listening have have some kind of story have been impacted in some way by what even if it's a family member boil as pets as family members now one of the things we know we're moving more back into the science of bit is that it really is species dependent. Well first of all the cool news. New thing that they have been able to prove is that this oxytocin does bounce across species sees. That's what I was talking about. Just a moment ago right that is not just with humans. Yeah it bounces across species into different in any any picture that you've ever seen even of chimpanzees holding each other. One of my favorite pictures is a of a dog with a cat rolled up into the collar. You might have seen that does Elizabethan collars dollars and there's a dog laying there and a little kitty rolled up and just the kind of connection that animals can bring to one another and to humans is amazing. That's right and so the mechanism for that is this neuropeptide called oxytocin. It is normally associated with childbirth and with nursing and lovemaking orgasm but everybody produces it men and women both produce it and the idea is less cultivated mourner lives because that's what makes us us get that feeling of open heartedness of bonding of connection and here's another quick story. After I had my first son I was back get work in when people would do a certain distress signal where I could feel their pain. I could feel on my chest like my milk letdown so it was an oxytocin flash. It was like yeah it was an oxytocin response and still doesn't feel exactly like that but I can feel. There's a certain opening that happens. When you see someone one with genuine tears that basically does the distress signal that basically calling for nurturance right in animals pick up that in animals will pick up your distress and anyone that has an animal cats will pick it up but dogs definitely pick it up where they feel your distress and they come actively to you and want to nurture sure you and vice versa when you're petting your dog or your cat and you can see how much they're loving it and enjoying it in that you're bringing them. A bond on that is having a chemical response to you. It's amazing it really is and know that I'm getting into the science of it but literally there's so many studies around how he can actually lower blood pressure decreases loneliness. There's having individuals that have had heart attacks have animals around increases their a long jetty in their healing so there's active healing aspects to it too oxytocin sometimes can be misunderstood as just all good like. I used to joke about about you know. We need a spike the city water well with some oxytocin. Everybody would get along and really fall in love with each other. You know like everything. There's not one answer her. One thing that can happen with increased oxytocin is more tribalism envy. It can make people more aggressive and a protective way so it's it's not just a panacea by any stretch but it is very high. It's a wonderful wonderful drug that you want to learn how to produce and learn how to produce another's. So how do we do it with people. How do we really facilitate oxytocin flow with people. One of the major sources the idea building trust the more that you can feel L. A. Trust in somebody. Wow this is related to dogs. The interesting thing is they've even shown that when you're out walking and you run into somebody that has dogs your trust trust them is actually higher than if they don't have it in so you're more likely to make a connection a wave or a stop the so building trust and people in general but even with animals if anybody's been to a dog park you know that you're GonNa know each other's dogs names and probably not the people that you're going to go in your converse and you're gonNA have this commonality so it's a really really wonderful avenue connection but building trust with people right in the big big big one is eye contact so gays is one of the mediators for sure and so if to human beings gaze at each other very long. Something powerful is going to happen. You know it's a soft gaze whereas going to say you're going to fight. You're gonNA make out something. Something is going to happen. That's how powerful it is and what the research is showing and this is what's been recent in the popular press is that there's a few conditions one. If you catch your dog looking at you so they're already looking at you and you catch them that gives you this big bump of oxytocin which is really cool but then also if you just if you go.

oxytocin Jackson Cooper L. A. six weeks milk
"oxytocin" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

Therapist Uncensored Podcast

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

"Everybody. This is a very special episode to sue and I we want to grow build develop security in your body's in our bodies. He's and we do that through bonding. We do that through connection. You hear that if you're a longtime listener you know that that's our Mojo and today hey we're gonNA be talking about. He's we can do that in a very active way and you can create a bonding experience variance and the neuropeptide that it induces in your body and your very own home right to that's right it makes me think of that book that you want to write called how to be around drug dealer basically consciously manipulating oxytocin which is our favorite neuropeptide through the use of beloved pets and there's a lot of important things that can induce in you. That's true so there's been a lot of I'm sure many of you have seen it and some of the local press sir the national press the popular press. You know they sort of proven that your dog loves. You and you love your dog that it activates the reward center in both of you so so that part is probably not very new right well. I think what is new is being able to actually prove it being able to measure reduction in cortisol levels and increase increase in oxytocin levels with deep. I contact with your animal. That's right so oxytocin. They have called it. The cuddle drugged drugged. Love drug the moral molecule. Anything reduce can be overly simplified but we assure you this really is a good one. You do want to promote for your wellbeing for people's that are close to you their wellbeing as well so this isn't just getting animals to get us to feel oxytocin since it really is a relationship that goes back and forth and we feed on each other from that perspective. That's really important because the research I'd love and and you can tell a lot of the research has been done by doglovers or animal lovers because they're also interested in how that relationship impacts the animal. You know we do know that the bonding especially actually the high. I contact made specifically this talk about dogs. Although this is relevant for animals they've even shown positive outcome with fish. Believe it or not but with a dog ah the humans cortisol level will go down but the oxytocin level can go up almost three hundred percents with the eye contact but guess what the dog depending on the breed goes up as well and you just mentioned fish and it gave me pause for a minute because I'm like. I don't know how you can get contact with fish but when I actually think about it it probably I think think as you go down the evolutionary chain related to vertebrates and reptiles and stuff like that. I don't know so much that the pet gains the oxygen as the owner but it's not as powerful as an effect as some particular kinds of breeds of dogs with their loving partners. I don't even WANNA say master ownersh. You know what I mean with their people. Yes and the reason I went back to fish is because I was thinking about my mother one of the things that she does in her time these days is she waits for her time to go feed her fish in the fish ponds and she talks to them and they all have names and she she cleans up around. You know what I mean. It's a very active loving relationship. It's the act of caring and that's part of when they've done some of work on it is the act of carrying in the routine of nurturing nurturing something that is actually giving something I think of the two monkeys grooming right that really will turn it on and so many people like for example I know one teenager who wishes she had lice because she loves the feeling of someone picking through her hair so that's grooming bonding and my guests there is again again that oxytocin is released through the grooming for all of you out there that have animals you can probably really relate to coming home to them and they're waiting for you and anticipating. I know for me. I really anticipate coming in and being welcomed. No matter how bad my day is so we could go on and on and talk about it from a science perspective but truthfully so much meaning and be with our animals are so much deep resonance with it so I think the heartfelt part is what's really important here and sued. Would you share. You have a really important story having to do with in which you share your story. Oh boy so I'm GonNa try to do that and and this is a story that I know echoes across many many millions of people because anybody who has loved animal has a story when thing before I get going in on it is that people message me the most post a post that I put up on facebook about a photographer who captured the last moments of people euthanizing their beloved. I love it dog and so painful and again so many people resonated with it but also there was some pushback of Don put that in front of like it was so traumatic even see see it so that's how powerful that body to body experience can be the I couldn't even look at the picture I was off right right right so this is not a morbid story like Morbid but it is directly related to our topic today okay so I've always been a dog person and have said that dogs raised me in some ways that they have been such a consistent benevolent reliable caring protective force and if you notice the all of those terms sir all related to attachment security so I will say nobody can tell us that they aren't as powerful sometimes more powerful than our human connections. It's not for everybody certainly but they've always played a big role for me so this leads up to the story. I'm going to share with you that does go back to the topic today about the chemical bond really so one day. I was walking with my son. I hadn't seen him in a little while. He's a teenager. We've got two dogs and here's here's a parenting trick. If you want to connect with your teenage kids do something if you sit across the table with them they probably won't say much but if you do some sort of project like walking dogs then we looking straight ahead and sure enough it's like clockwork he will open up and so he was telling me all this really lovely stuff about a girl that liked him and now he knows that she likes him and it was really touching because this is a sixteen year old boy now opening up to his mom and the sun was setting literally literally and he looks up. I know that he used to go to this. One location that was his sort of private spot thinking spot and so he said Hey Wanna go up there and I was so touched. I was like Oh my gosh. I get to go to your private thinking spot. It's at the top of this. Little facility is is basically as a parking garage but he was able to kind of sneak in there there'd be nobody there and he would hang out up there and look at the city so he invited me to go to a spot so we've got the dogs we go up there and that is like one of my highlights where he's opening up to me. He sharing his spot. All these things happen and I will just suffice it to say that a tragedy happened up there with my beloved two year old dog. His name was Jackson. Basically he died very tragically. Suddenly that same night so this is still hard to talk about this has been a year and a half ago but one of the things that I have to recover. I have to take care of him. I have a lot of responsibilities. I know enough about the brain so I'm like okay. This is traumatic. What do I do. What can I do to take care of myself and this is at a time when this dog would ride back and forth with me to a nearby city where I would take care family that is is critically. Ill so not only that I just learned about that about this critical illness but I also then lost. This beloved two year old golden doodle named Jackson so the very next today. I have no idea what to do to recover from this and I'm on my way to Houston is actually where I'm driving and I'm like I don't even know that I can do it and so this isn't good but even in the car start looking for another dog and I'm feeling really guilty because I don't you can't really replace a beloved animal but this again.

oxytocin cortisol Jackson sue facebook critical illness Houston Don two year sixteen year one day
What is Williams syndrome?

Curiosity Daily

01:46 min | 2 years ago

What is Williams syndrome?

"Our last story, we're going to shine a spotlight on a rare genetic condition called Williams syndrome imagine being born with a genetic condition that makes you not only friendly social and loving, but extraordinarily so that's Williams syndrome, which only affects one in ten thousand people worldwide, it might sound like a nice perk to be incredibly loving, but it comes with a few downsides people with Williams syndrome tend to be incredibly loving entrusting. But they can have plenty of different personalities. Just like everyone else they can be outgoing or shy positive or grouchy talkative or quiet little kids with condition are known to run up and hug people. They've never met. But a lot of them learned to control the behavior as they get older on the science side of things. The condition is caused by a tiny genetic abnormality. Just twenty six to twenty eight genes missing from a single chromosome. Because of this people with Williams syndrome or believed to have a surplus of oxytocin sometimes called the love hormone. They also experience abnormal behavior in the amid Daloa which is involved in processing, social cues. That's why most tend to be extremely social expressive polite and completely unafraid of strangers. The majority also have an intense love of music, according to the Williams syndrome association. A lot of parents say children with Williams syndrome bringing unimaginable amount of joy in perspective into their lives. Unfortunately, the condition comes with a slew of medical concerns that can include heart and blood vessel problems musculoskeletal issues hypersensitive hearing and developmental delays. And the challenge in processing social cues can make it hard for them to form lasting friendships. Still the warmth that comes with condition is something special with the right care and support those children and people like them can live long. Happy lives spreading joy to strangers. The rest of us might normally ignore

Williams Williams Syndrome Association Oxytocin
"oxytocin" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"So someone named Jose Walem a graduate student at the Caroline skit institute in Stockholm and his colleagues took advantage of Swedish twin studies that included thousands of participants their genetic information in their answers to questions about how affectionate they were with their romantic partners. And they found that women with a specific variation weren't as close to their partners as women without it a specific variation of this oxytocin receptor. So the said that they found that okay? The the women that had a specific variation of this oxytocin Niro receptor that they kissed their partners less than they didn't desire. Physical proximity is often these women are also more likely to report having had a marital crisis. So although researchers don't know exactly how this affects oxytocin system and may result in a lower number of oxytocin receptor. In the brain people with fewer receptors would be less sensitive to the hormone oxytocin effects. So in this time, this was back in two thousand twelve or thirteen when this article came out in a study that hasn't been published yet. So I'm hoping that it's probably been published years ago. Feldman found that the oxytocin receptor genes are also linked to empathy and couples. So she looked at variance in the gene that have been linked with an increased risk for autism. Which they say at this time a disorder. That's marked by major social communication deficits. She found that the more these risk variants person had the, less empathy. They showed toward their partner when that partner shared a distressing experience. They went on to say oxytocin has been shown to help people with autism improve their ability to recognize emotion, and while and found that the same receptor Burien that increases risk for marital crisis in women is linked to social problems girls. So these include trouble along with others in.

oxytocin partner Caroline skit institute Jose Walem Stockholm graduate student Feldman
Your Brain When You Are Having Fun

Brains On!

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Your Brain When You Are Having Fun

"What happens in your brain when you're having fun. Some other different neuro chemicals and brain structures devoted to different flavors of fun. So one key area recruited is especially for activities that are really thrilling is the reward system which is generally considered to be made up of dopamine pathways in the brain. And one thing about dopamine because we're an ultra social species. We've evolved to get a big dopamine rush when we're helping other people. So we can actually get a lot of fun from being altruistic as well. And a lot of fun can come from social bonding as well. Especially when we're doing these activities, just playing a game or sharing experiences. And that involves oxytocin, which is. Released in the hypothalamus and other parts of the brain all tour body to give us those warm fuzzies when we're connecting with other people and also with animals as well.

Van Moose Walgreens Walmart A. M. O. U. S. S. E. L.
Menopause and Divorce

Menopause Management

13:53 min | 2 years ago

Menopause and Divorce

"Hello, everybody is menopause Taylor really is say of menopause world today. I like to discuss everything about the depaz e cluding the socialist sets. And sometimes we get so caught up in all the physical stuff that we forget about some of the social things. And what are things that I wanna talk about. It's menopause and divorce. I know not fun topic. Everybody knows someone who's got divorce or is getting a divorce thinking about getting worse. But that's just not the same as knowing the facts about divorce, and I want to talk about. Some of the facts about Minna pause and divorce the two together. That's the key here. Everything in my world is about menopause. I live eat, drink sleep, minerals. I look at everything from the perspective of minimum. So we're gonna look at the force from the perspective of menopause. So. Do you know what the most common cause of divorce is at the time of menopause? I mean, what would you think? What do you think it's the man having a midlife crisis and wanting a younger woman. Do you think it's the fact the guy cannot deal with the woman's Nitta pause and all her symptoms emotional issues and disinterested sex? Or do you think it's because of the menopausal woman's depression, or do you think it's the menopausal woman's decision just to be independent or do you think it's sexual infidelity by the husband? I mean, what do you think it is? What do you think the may cost the most common cause divorces at minimum pots eighty? I'm beans. What is the prize you discover that it's the menopausal woman's decision to become independent. It is. I mean, does that shock you? Most people say, oh my God, I had no idea. Most people think it's a crisis for the guy. They think it's anything, but the one they most people say, it's not that it is that one that's the most common. So I always start with the statistics. I always start the basics. Really. If you look at the statistics on divorce, divorce is actually becoming less common for young adults for young people. Divorce is becoming less common. I think that's because we're getting married later in life. I mean, you know, they're not getting married when they're in their early twenties anymore. They're usually getting married them, mid thirties. So it's becoming less common. But the opposite is true for people over the age of fifty. So why that is. You know, there's even a name for divorce over the age of fifty. It's called great voice. That awful grey divorce f for great divorce. The divorce rate has doubled since nineteen ninety. Yeah, nineteen. Ninety five at a one thousand people over the age of fifty. Got divorce. And now in will actually two thousand fifteen as of two thousand fifteen ten out of one thousand people over fifty, give divorce and for people over the age of sixty five divorce rates have tripled since nineteen ninety. I mean, isn't that shocking. I don't know. There's something about seeking people being more stable or more committed as they get older. So I think most of us they, well, if we get through the earlier of marriage, the marriage spinner been going on for a good, ten, twenty years. We don't say much in terms of divorce the con- but the truth is if the ends

Menopause Oxytocin Joker Lake Interpol Cyprian Youtube Brazil Donna Fleiss Jordan SAM Abbasi Susteren Allen Thirty Years Two Day Milk
Heat-stable drug could save thousands from post-childbirth bleeding: WHO

Today

01:55 min | 2 years ago

Heat-stable drug could save thousands from post-childbirth bleeding: WHO

"From severe bleeding after childbirth in many countries mothers are offered an injection called oxytocin to help prevent theories hemorrhages but the world health organization says this lifesaving drug doesn't work as well in hot and humid places now a trial involving almost thirty thousand women in ten countries found another drug called heat stable competition works just as well refer basement works at buckingham palace of contributed to a thirteen percent increase in the amount of public money spent by the queen in the past year the ron expenditure is provided by the treasury punky in exchange for revenue from the crown estate sarah campbell reports the first set of accounts to be published in the start of the decade long project to upgrade buckingham palace shows that more than four million pounds was spent carrying out the initial phase of works including the removal of old dangerous wiring the cost is set to increase exponentially with renovations moving to the east wing the section facing the mouth and it's famous balcony the figures also show the prince of wales took twice as many journeys on the royal train as the queen including a trip from london to durham at a cost of twenty one thousand pounds costs relating to the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry have risen by up to forty percent over the past financial year a palace spokesman refused to be drawn on how much of the rise was related to meghan the new duchess of sussex the competition watchdog says it's concerned that the ranking of hotels on some websites may be influenced by the size of the commission they pay the competition and markets authority has also highlighted concerns about pressure selling and hidden charges here's our personal finance reporter kevin peachy seven in ten holiday makers who shop around for a combination us hotel booking sites such as expedia and booking dot com since october.

Oxytocin Buckingham Palace Sarah Campbell Wales Cambridge Prince Harry Reporter Expedia Treasury London Durham Meghan Kevin Peachy Twenty One Thousand Pounds Four Million Pounds Thirteen Percent Forty Percent
Driver accused of plowing into crowd at Charlottesville rally charged with federal hate crimes

All Things Considered

02:29 min | 2 years ago

Driver accused of plowing into crowd at Charlottesville rally charged with federal hate crimes

"Vital issue of our time meeting more republicans must be elected in the upcoming mid terms to ensure confirmation of a conservative judge we have fifty one we don't have enough we lose one it's a very tough situation we need more republicans especially in the senate we have to hold the house and maybe even increase it trump says he is honor justice kennedy chose to retire during his time in office because he trusts trump to choose the right successor to carry on kennedy's legacy for npr news i'm daniel webster in fargo puerto rico's representative in congress has introduced legislation the same day putting the us territory on a path toward statehood as npr's greg allen reports it has the support of some key members of congress some influential republican support the bill cluding rob bishop chairman of the house committee that oversees puerto rico the island's representative in the house jennifer gonzalez says the bill follows two votes in the island one in two thousand twelve and another in two thousand seventeen in which plurality supported statehood statehood opponents questioned the results of both gonzalez's bill creates a nine person taskforce that would study the cost and impact of making puerto rico the fifty first state it calls for congress to act on the task force recommendations by twenty twenty one while congress deliberates on puerto rico's status the bill says the island would become an incorporated territory and residents for the first time would begin paying federal income tax greg allen npr news from washington this is npr news the suspect in a deadly attack at a charlottesville virginia rally is now facing federal hate crimes charges twenty one year old james alex fields of ohio is accused of killing one person and injuring many others by plowing a car into a crowd protesting white nationalism he's been in custody since the incident occurred last august the world health organization says a new drunk could save the lives of tens of thousands of women each year as npr's mike lynn do cleft reports the drug has been found to prevent excessive bleeding after childbirth here in the us doctors give women a hormone called oxytocin to prevent him urging but in many poor countries oxytocin isn't an option because it needs to be refrigerated now scientists at the world health organization say they found a way around this problem they have developed an oxytocin like compound that can be stored at up to one hundred degrees fahrenheit in a large study with nearly thirty thousand women the drug was just as safe and effective as oxytocin at preventing postpartum bleeding who publish the results of the study in the new england journal of medicine mike do cluff npr news german ship carrying two hundred thirty four migrants has docked at a port in malta ending nearly week long standoff at sea the ship's captain says he's being investigated for breaching maritime rules because he did not turn over the migrants to thirties and libya where they were found floating in dinghies offshore multiple agree to accept the ship after seven other countries said they would also take in migrants deemed eligible for refugee status this is npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include visit saint petersburg clearwater home of thirty five miles of white sand beaches along florida's gulf coast and a daily sunset celebration on clearwater beach ninety minutes west of orlando at visit.

One Hundred Degrees Fahrenheit Twenty One Year Ninety Minutes
"oxytocin" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"And then so let's talk about oxytocin lives there there's so many of these the oxytocin is another one that people would like to pin down and it's related to satisfaction and was related to the bonding oxytocin is related to bonding the bond between lovers and the beloved in your life the the cuddle the cuddle chemicals some say chow childbirth and breastfeeding produces social bonds produce it sex produces it you actually right it's the it's oxytocin makes the love in love making very fair good turner fraser yeah i i like this thing i'd never heard this before you write that oxytocin affects women more than men but also has interesting affects in men that are a bit different than in women and in men it it encourages men to keep distance from other women or from potential mates it's sort of a creates commitment and the lack of it can break it so tell us more about that well this studies in this show that men were given in their emotional bums there existed parliament tend to be enhanced in some way it will come their behavior one also the county that these studies and tests that always kind of small cymbals is because they have to be in the works and you know this thing you have to replicate a few times and pretend certain that this is what happens but interested in the nest smaller effects but what one experiment brazil like showed is that if you have many would win relationships and put it in social situations where they have to talk with other individuals many of whom attractive single women give stills into full hatton they will stick close to their partner and keep a great distance from the single women.

oxytocin brazil partner fraser
"oxytocin" Discussed on Dear Sugars

Dear Sugars

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Dear Sugars

"Vantage is since then and extension of life and why shouldn't it be all those kinds of gifts that make us feel good as long as possible the fact is one of the gifts of sexuality it's not just intermission it's not just org is also all the endocrine the system being lit up like a christmas tree when you're turned on and especially when you have kids and you have an orgasm you both get a big flush of oxytocin the bliss hormone that still works you can still do that it's still wonderful for both you and for the relationship and the bonding sexuality is a little box that separated from our blood flow our hormones brain its own one big loop it's all wonderfully connected and it's doesn't turn off at age sixty or seventy or eighty it may become a little bit less intense it may be hard to achieve it may be more sporadic but i had this real feeling that she was using and they were thinking that maybe h has some kind of exploration note on it and and i don't think so pepper i'm curious about that because i will say that i think a lot of people think there is i think that and they have reason to because in our culture we neuter people over the fifty we d sexualize them and we do think there is an expiration date it becomes comic if they're still having desire or still having erotic life and i'm curious what you think of that pepper and talk to us about sexuality among people who are older well do you think should be divide and i think a lot of it is you know whether somebody is looking for a retreat within aging not gonna watch my figure anymore i'm going to retire and not push myself to be curious or interactive in the world or people who say i wanna stop dealing with these things and in particular body image becomes part of it you know i'm gonna just let myself go male or female in a way that they would not have done in their youth because they know.

oxytocin
"oxytocin" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Of sickle work dot com to register the new book tell us about the book it's very exciting that you've put the work that you've been doing for decades into a book yeah the book you know it's really the book is my voice but it's also interwoven into it are the voices of so many other women who participated in the circles and i tried to include a lot of stories because i think stories are really the way that we get the flavor of the work that incredible sense of transformation that happens the sacredness of it so it's a book that is full of stories and women have been telling me that even if they've never been in a circle reading a book they get the sense of what it feels like and they also learn to understand how circle work the practice that i teach might be different from other forms of circle gatherings that they might have experience we are longing i think we're longing for something we're just longing for connection and for this this deliciousness i call it oxytocin that you get from other women we're so longing for it yes we are and you know it's such a natural thing it's it's you know when women experienced it they kinda go oh yes of course where have i been where has this been it is such a very natural and beautiful thing for women to experience i also find that a lot of women have this underlying sense of there's something about me where i'm not good enough for i don't measure not smart enough not beautiful enough not this not that and it's so beautiful to see how in this field of of love that we create that just falls off and each woman begins to realize that she has her own very unique form of beauty her own very unique gifts to give to the world so all that sense of comparing ourselves and competence titian it's falls away it makes sense it really does and i think that this book is a is a uniter it it's it's an opportunity for all of us to become become together on so many levels and the book is available wherever books are sold the magic of circle work the practice women from around the world are using.

oxytocin
"oxytocin" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Magic of circle work dot com to register the new book tell us about the book it's very exciting that you've put the work that you've been doing for decades into a book yeah the book you know it's really the book is my voice but it's also interwoven into it are the voices of so many other women who participated in the circles and i tried to include a lot of stories because i think stories are really the way that we get the flavor of the work that incredible sense of transformation that happens the sacredness of it so it's a book that is full of stories and women have been telling me that even if they've never been in a circle reading the book they get the sense of what it feels like and they also learn to understand how circle work the practice that i teach might be different from other forms of circle gatherings that they might have experienced we are longing i think we're longing for something we're just longing for connection and and for this this deliciousness i call it oxytocin that you get from other women we're so longing for it we are and you know it's such a natural thing it's it's you know when women experienced it they kinda go oh yes of course where i've been where has this been it is such a very natural and beautiful thing for women to experience i also find that a lot of women have this underlying sense of there's something about me where i'm not good enough for i don't measure up not smart enough not beautiful enough not this not that and it's so beautiful to see how in this field of of love that we create that just falls off and each woman begins to realize that she has her own very unique form of beauty her own very unique gifts to give to the world so all that sense of comparing ourselves and competition it's falls away it makes sense it really does and i think that this book is a is a uniter it it's it's an opportunity for all of us to become become together on so many levels and the the book is available wherever books are sold the magic of circle work the practice women from around the world are using to heal and empower themselves the best website.

oxytocin
"oxytocin" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

Mentally Ch(ill)

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

"Now that i've kind of gone a little off subject i figure we'll do some segments yeah i love it i thought this was really fascinating this happened in two thousand eleven where the doctor his name was dr greenfield he wrote this valentine's day piece on ken semen make women happy and there's the science behind it which is really real and he ended up getting like ousted from his position at the magazine and at the college that he was working at for this article but it was based in science he wasn't being he was using toxic masculinity it was science but he just wrote it in like more of a playful way women have more seamen right now yeah yeah so basically what he wrote about was that even contains hormones that have mood boosting effects and the seminal plasma contains estrogen oxytocin and a word that i really can't pronounce process to gladdock flu or precedent fluid or it's prostate gland us okay glenn's or something the estrogen and the word i can't pronounce have been linked to lower levels of depression while oxytocin promotes social bonding and because of the vaginal wall can pass through it right it will get into the bloodstream and so the studies that they did basically showed that women who have sex without condoms are less depressed than women who have sex with condoms and so then the argument is is there a fundamental difference between women who wear condoms and don't wear condoms.

dr greenfield oxytocin glenn ken
"oxytocin" Discussed on Don't Blame Me!

Don't Blame Me!

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Don't Blame Me!

"Sounds volume hormone oxytocin oxytocin of that before you not to be mistaken for osce cotton also very dignified oxycontin releases in your body you have sir guy i hope we health i hope we did too i'm in yeah and eleven will make you feel bad for being gay because it's not worth it gig under tonight's up high i am twenty five years old and i'm calling about a whole new thing of graduated college fell in love got started in my career got married on now a dog mom and i recently turned 25 and i just started thinking like what next for me i feel like i hit all my if actor already and i feel like i had an almost like ideas act and about what's next and it one in lagos joann molest and i kept my question for you is have you ever area order life i this chan what are some ways that you were at forward on the you're not like i thank you so much in advance for your help and and you go i mean all totally admit i am actively in a clearly a crisis i've been in an active corner crisis since lakes since the fall probably how old are you i'm four guys i'm enough thirty live gray's so her gave a figure to help i eight only get you know hopefully wicket ads were uh here's the thing he also much further ahead the yeah one hundred percent i am not married undoing 35 this year well how'd you don't have kids and i don't have like any plans like in the near future of this happening so she she's to improve good i i was gonna say that too i think you i forgive me if i'm wrong but i think she did a lot of this on hyper speed like the like having all of that like being like you have a good job you have all these other things i think right now as opposed to i personally i think the worst feeling in the world is feeling uncomfortable like i think it's worse than feeling in pain or anything like that because being uncomfortable and like unsettled it feels like it could last forever whereas you break your let you have a terrible pain this all came from the fact that like when i got my nose done i was like i'm not in pain i'm just uncomfortable and.

oxytocin lagos osce joann molest one hundred percent twenty five years
"oxytocin" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Bulletproof radio station of high performance you're going to love today's episode because you're going to learn how to make alzheimer's disease optional without resorting to drugs we go really deep on a bunch of different things you can do in the cool thing is it's not just about alzheimer's it's about what you can do to make your brain work better even if you're years away from even thinking about alzheimer's so if you want to hack your brain you wanted to work better you won't work better now this is the show for you so listen through all the way to the end and you'll just get a constant flow of new information that's helpful for you you're listening to bolger radio with dave asprey today's school fact of the day is that the same chemical that makes you happy when you're hug makes you attractive to dogs and researchers in in helsinki at the canine mind research project founded oxytocin makes dogs interested in smiling human faces and that if you have that cuddled chemical on your system it makes angry human faces seem less threatening seek a scowl at a dog if you're oxytocin levels are high and the dog won't be afraid of you but if you look mean at them and you don't have oxytocin though want to buy you and oxytocin is the chemical in your brain tied to affection and trust in community building and in dogs it's probably one of the reasons they can work with us the way they do and the test went like this each group of dogs were shown smiling faces an angry faces on a computer screen because yes dogs use computers in each dog was tested twice at once under the influence of oxytocin and once without and the dogs i gazed in pupil dilution was measured and this is the first of a kind tests like at it shows that our best friends dogs form relationships the same way that your actual best friends do and this is why you should never kick a dog dogs are nice i like dogs my dogs number lyn all right there that was just second cool fact of the day.

alzheimer dave asprey helsinki oxytocin alzheimer's disease bolger
"oxytocin" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

"Actually care how you're caring for yourself is community is being physically around other people who are there attentively agree help you and love you and we can talk about all the details of this and that that you know the structure of helping people but really it's just being around other humans join together for a cause and i think we're finding that this has not this is not just in terms of tragedy it's just you know were breaking away from this right now we're in this era of technology where the that is that's going away like that one on one like afghans touching a person hugging a person looking at a person in their eyes losing that in that is so important to us is it is and i actually heard some research on oxytocin which is you know that is kind of the feelgood hormone in the human body and you know oxytocin surges when we're having sex in it surges when we were breastfeeding a baby or even holding a baby and it's surges when we laugh in person with friends but the research shows we do not get oxytocin hits from screen online text interactions yup non we might get a dopamine dopamine hit yes but we don't get the oxytocin hit and that there is literally something therapeutic about gathering together with other people yes and i'll share a really interesting weird story around that but but the day that nine eleven happens you know i did the thing where i sat and i watched the new cycle and i think all of us did i mean that was just completely traumatising yeah and that evening we got together with some friends and it was the weirdest thing we gathered around a piano and we sang john denver songs together halt none of this was planned yeah but it was like so therapeutic his we needed to find some joy we need to define community and like i will forever remember that night of like.

oxytocin dopamine john denver
"oxytocin" Discussed on I Don't Get It

I Don't Get It

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on I Don't Get It

"Usually by twenty five or twenty six to develop and not always right so that person may be a late bloomer and you know he he may have over at least small prefrontal cortex really not able to put the brakes on on urges cheating though now yeah tony not cheating just in general idea that pre put prefrontal cortex isn't just and since the ending with cheating right doctor make it could be like not being able to commit maybe yeah absolutely and you know what's also associated with that is also we have to look at the hormone two drivers the brain structures but what's really interesting is that you know oxytocin the cuddling in bonding hormone uh you know we know that animals and human beings who have higher levels of or likely to form a longterm monogamous relationships but when we look at the differences in the sexes testosterone suppresses oxytocin production on women have higher levels of oxytocin mankind lower so you how women are if you're looking at the man threeyear lens you know you're female parade and high levels of the bonding chemical a year reign is wire to not only of form uh you know you would look at look at this from an evolution or point of view uh with her hunters and gathers it was in a women's best interest to be able to storm bonds not only with your child know oxytocin production is necessary to breastfeed a you have to be able to relax your volume bond and that hormone is released when you're breastfeeding in is also released in romantic relationships really happening again eu now that these you're getting comfortable and your leader bonding to each other tiger you're gonna do that really well with a strained islas legitimately thinking like yeah that's why i snuggle of jared fell whole time the he's been saying minutes i the picture you be like jerry cut jeremy like i lodged smoke football.

testosterone jerry tony oxytocin eu jared threeyear
"oxytocin" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"And if you take small amounts of oxytocin prior to sex or larger amounts prior to sleepytime you can some pretty cool results it enhances like you're feeling in your trust in your your sense of like love in connection during sex and then it can just like make you sleep like a like a baby now a kind of like the sarmas right like proceed at your own level of risk because there's not a whole lot of data out there about whether or not using it in that manner or internees ali which a lot of folks also deal do like international oxytocin sprays you don't like needles might shutdown endogenous production like your own production of i'll give you some tips here in a second about how you could increase your own production without injection objecting or sniffing up your nose but if you want like a really amplified effect and you're out there in your biohacking you don't mind trying out something new try some oxytocin like intranasaly injection before bad or definitely before sex it's pretty amazing dried up there with with a thc animas up your but if you haven't done that our thc suppositories anyways though i will put links to some oxytocin supplements intranasaly sprays are that type of thing in the show notes but let's talk about natural more sane lays to increase his lease joey is because her children in minivans listening and and so there's some really interesting research on ways that you can naturally increase oxytocin one is human touch shaking hands hugging caressing massaging anything like that you know just basic basically making sure the god of your way to touch those around you along with i gazing an icon tact so you know light for one of the best things you can do is like.

oxytocin joey
"oxytocin" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"oxytocin" Discussed on Business Daily

"Have positive interactions which stimulate the brain to make oxytocin so we actually identified eight building blocks somehow magically those have the acronym oxytocin now here's some examples why should start meetings with gratitude hit last week justin did this amazing thing to help my project you can start talking about what you don't know who can help us with this project so really being open in vulnerable is a way to induce oxytocin releasing help people connect you emily is on just about sedation is because they also ways generally on they to make people feel welcome and safe and trusting gasol media concrete example one of the factors that helped build trust is recognising highperformers that's not new but here's what the neuroscience says if i recognize individuals in particular ways i get a much bigger impact on brain of behavior in particular recognition that's goal focused in times when the goal was met that comes from peers it's unexpected that's public all those things make a bigger impact on the way the brain perceives this social reward so it's really using the are science ticket the biggest impact but has been quite a bit of criticism of the research underlying these claims of out of two tasted entrust trust you will one of a group of authors wrote a seminal paper on the subject but other researchers have had trouble replicating a work kevin they when you're talking about the oxytocin you should have is sure to use i wouldn't even use a spray for example to deliver the oxytocin that's exactly right tha that's a big sledgehammer that is not the way your brain works the analogy will be studying another chemical like dopamine which is social with rewarding risktaking behaviour why can get you a million times more doak menu raimo given you cocaine that isn't tell you how the brains out dopamine system works because it's a sledgehammer but what we're doing is looking their brains own production oxytocin so we found it really promotes prosocial behaviors increases teamwork and that results in a red located now and in the fifteen years since we start doing this work so i mean the study showed the oxytocin can build trust within groups but it could also exaggerate rivalry between groups of an isn't there a danger that you might find that you'll building quite competitive teams within a workplace.

oxytocin justin kevin dopamine cocaine gasol fifteen years