19 Burst results for "Oxford Vaccine Group"

Scientists cautious as England set to end COVID curbs

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

Scientists cautious as England set to end COVID curbs

"Scientists are warning the British government not to weaken the country's ability to monitor and track the coronavirus off to prime minister Boris Johnson plans to end the requirement the people in England to self isolate Johnson's living with coded plan treats the virus like other transmissible illnesses such as flu the legal requirement to self isolate for at least five days off to a positive test is expected to be replaced by simple gardens and must testing for the virus will be scaled back however some scientists say it's a risky move that could bring a surge in infections and weaken the country's defenses Andrew Pollack director of the Oxford vaccine group says it's essential to maintain surveillance for the virus an early warning system if you like which tells us about new variants emerging Charles river that's my London

Prime Minister Boris Johnson British Government Andrew Pollack Johnson FLU England Oxford Vaccine Group Charles River London
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:13 min | 7 months ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I think A bit of dancing ensues Solar implications of Brexit will take time to emerge It's all still in motion That was the BBC's Jessica Parker there reporting from the Netherlands You are listening to news out from the BBC I'm rob young 2021 was again dominated by COVID-19 There was more disease more death and more new and concerning variants of the virus But the year was also filled with hope Hope that mass vaccination would allow us to live relatively normally again So countries have been racing to try to jab their populations But in some countries that race went far more quickly than in others In high income ones third or booster doses are now being rolled out to face the threat of the omicron variant while some lower income countries are battling to give people a first or second dose For example the current vaccination rate across the African continent stands at around 7 or 8% The original plan had been to vaccinate 30% of the African population by the end of 2021 So what has gone wrong with fair and equitable vaccine distribution in 2021 And how could this be rectified in this new year NewsHour's Julian Marshall has been speaking to two leading figures in the fight against COVID when he be a nema the executive director of UN aids and an undersecretary general of the United Nations and to professor sir Andrew Pollard director of the Oxford vaccine group He was the chief investigator on the trials of the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca vaccine First why does he think vaccine equity is important Well I think there are a number of good reasons to have vaccine equity which are very clearly based in the science of vaccines work extremely well in preventing severe disease So there's an absolute imperative to make sure that people everywhere are protected but those of us who have the means to produce and supply vaccines have a moral duty to make sure they're supplied to those who need them everywhere because they work They prevent severe disease and death The second reason why it's important to make sure that people are vaccinated everywhere is that it does have some downward pressure on transmission and we know that's more difficult to do variants emerge But any reduction in the amount of viruses out there reduces the chance of new variants causing disruption to lives and livelihoods So I think those are two initial reasons The third reason which I think is quite an important one is that disruption to health systems anywhere in the world threaten everyone because they impact on the health of populations they disrupt economies but perhaps as a pediatrician the thing that bothers me particularly is the disruption of immunization services and therefore the risks that children will develop diseases which should be vaccine preventable like measles and we are seeing that now in some countries where the health system is so disrupted that measles outbreaks are occurring because children just didn't get vaccinated over the last year And would he be on Yemen This for you is more than about science There's a moral argument for vaccine equity as well isn't there Yes of course We are coming to the end of 2022 that is still a huge battle between humanity and a dangerous disease And that virus is winning because of the failures of our leaders First failing to see these vaccines that science gave us as global public goods the leaders particularly rich countries have made two important errors of judgment First the put self defeating nationalism ahead of what is needed grabbing for themselves not realizing this is global And secondly allowing a few pharmaceutical companies to defend their profits and their monopoly instead of sharing these vaccines with the rest of the world I think we first saw the first person given a vaccine about a year ago it was a grandmother in Manchester in the UK and that was great news around the world At that point science was winning But since then vaccine apartheid inequality is what we are facing and that's the result of bad political decisions Professor Pollard what has gone wrong in your view with the equitable distribution of vaccines in 2021 Well when we look back to 2021 and both the national governments and the World Health Organization said we should prioritize those at risk of dying and of severe disease And we knew right from very early on in the pandemic that those groups were older adults people with other health conditions and healthcare workers to some extent And if we heard followed the policies globally that were made right at the beginning and when we first heard vaccines by about May of 2021 we would have been able to vaccinate almost all of those individuals in the world that really means that most of the deaths that have happened since May or June of 2021 could have been prevented not all of them but most of them could have been prevented that happened in the second half of the year And so I think that really sets an idea of just how we failed in our distribution of vaccines to get access to those who needed the most And the reason why we did that is that we prioritized the national policies of making sure whole populations were protected and particularly with good intentions to make sure that there were no individuals who might develop severe disease in anywhere in the population Whereas the much greater impact would have been to focus on those greatest risk wherever they were in the world So I think that's where we went wrong The difficulty in how you do something differently is that the decisions are made nationally politically And they're made by political leaders who have an absolute responsibility for their own population and naturally prioritise that So I think we need a different view that's taken from a global public health view about how we should manage these things in the future because it really doesn't work if things are focused nationally Will it be an email Is it simply though as you have stated to rich countries hoarding vaccines or other things such as the logistics of distribution in less developed countries and vaccine hesitancy You don't reach countries have behaved appallingly holding billions of doses of vaccines while even doctors in my own country like Uganda were on the front lines trying to save lives and protected themselves and where dying What we have now is the companies like Pfizer and Moderna with the latest technology the.

COVID rob young Julian Marshall sir Andrew Pollard Oxford vaccine group AstraZeneca vaccine First BBC Jessica Parker nema University of Oxford Netherlands severe disease United Nations UN Yemen Pollard World Health Organization Manchester
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"More from House managers closing arguments after right from them. Hands was rushed from the Senate floor and just before vice president Pence was further evacuated for safety President Trump decided to attack his own vice president on Twitter. The undisputed facts confirm that not only must President Trump have been aware of the vice president's danger, but he's still sent out a tweet attacking him. Further inciting the very mob that was in just a few feet. Of him inside of this very building acquittal still appears likely underscored by news that Republican leader Mitch McConnell plans to vote that way again. Former President Donald Trump is accused of inciting the fatal riot at the U. S Capitol on January 6 of vote could come as early as five o'clock tonight. We will definitely keep you posted A top aide to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, telling lawmakers the administration delay the full story about covert deaths in nursing homes. Let's find out more from AP correspondent Jackie Quinn after media requests, pressure from the Trump administration and finally, a court order. The Cuomo administration was recently forced to admit nearly 15,000 people died in nursing homes of covert 19 about double what was reported the secretary to the governor explain this week they froze with concerns that Information would be used against them. After the federal Justice Department in August demanded the information. Lawmakers from both parties are blasting the Cuomo administration for the secrecy. There are now calls for Governor Cuomo's resignation. New York City police are investigating two stabbing deaths on a subway line overnight. The incidents happened two hours apart on the A line, authorities say a man was found on a train with stab wounds to his neck and torso around 11 30 Friday night at the Matta Avenue subway station and Far Rockaway, Queens. Just two hours later, A 44 year old woman was found with several stab wounds aboard a train in Manhattan at West 207 Street and Broadway. Both victims were pronounced dead at the scene. It's unknown whether the two stabbings are connected, and no arrests have been made so far, but the investigation is well underway. Also in New York, officials say they've settled a lawsuit. Over the fatal shooting of a man by New York City police officer in a road rage incident. The city Law department confirming Saturday to the city has paid $125,000 to settle a claim by the girlfriend of Del Ron. Small officer Wayne Isaacs was off duty when he shot the 37 year old small in Brooklyn in 2016 activists and Smalls family had criticized Isaacs. For not taking steps to defuse the situation, and they also demanded that he faced charges while a jury found the officer not guilty of murder and manslaughter in 2017, it's 1 49 Children as young as six are said to be tested in a new clinical trial of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine in the UK It's the first study to assess the safety and immune responses in Children and young adults. The trial will enroll 300 volunteers between the ages of six and 17 Oxford Vaccine Group director Andrew Pollard spoke to reporters today in London with all vaccines that people can feel a bit unwell in the first few days. And so we just need to be able to establish that profile in Children and so that if the vaccine that was authorized for a wider range range, the parents and the young people can be a full knowledge of exactly what side of actually might expect. He also says widespread use in Children doesn't seem necessary to prevent severe disease and most Children, he says, however, it is certainly possible that wider use of vaccine to try and curb the progress of the pandemic. Might be considered in the future. The US housing market is rising at the fastest pace on record field by many Americans searching for more space during the covert 19 pandemic. Let's find out more from a B C's Deirdre Bolton seven. Green and his wife recently sold their home in Medford, Massachusetts. It stayed on the market for less than a week. Right. One offers were do we received around 29 offers? The Northeast is seeing some of the largest price games. Bridgeport, Connecticut up almost 40%. Pittsfield, Massachusetts, up more than 32% and the coastal resort town of Atlantic City, New Jersey Rising 30%. Compared to a year ago. The housing market has been one of the hottest part of the U. S economy as it digs out of the pandemic induced recession said Let's go..

Jackie Quinn Manhattan 2017 New York Mitch McConnell 2016 Pittsfield Wayne Isaacs $125,000 Brooklyn Saturday UK London West 207 Street January 6 Andrew Pollard Bridgeport August Republican AP
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's a few days late, but we made it ourselves from scratch, and we put a lot of care and hard work into it, and we really hope that people are happy with it. Now the British prime minister recommending his post Brexit trade deal to parliament. Predicts a bright new relationship with the EU. With this bill, we're gonna become a friendly neighbor. The best friend and ally you could have we hear from an opposition MP who disagrees and New Yorkers remember the loss of loved ones during the year of the pandemic. As the holidays have started to roll around, it's really dawned on me. So many memories are going to go on made. That's all to come after this news. BBC News with Sue Montgomery. The British government says that plants to inoculate millions of people against coronavirus in the coming weeks after the vaccine developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca, was approved for emergency use. Britain is the first country to authorize the Oxford vaccine, which is cheaper and easier to store than its rivals. It comes as the country struggles with the surgeon cases. Professor Andrew Pollard is co director of the Oxford Vaccine Group. He says its approval could make huge difference. It is a really great moment in what's been an incredibly difficult year for assault. It's also critical turning point. Where we now have a authorized vaccine here in the UK, which can be very easy distributed on a critical part of getting ahead of the pandemic is to be able to get the vaccine after people quickly. And in a timely fashion. The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is called in parliament to bank his pro spread exit deal. Speaking at the start of a debate that it's that is expected to secure its approval within a day, he said Britain intended to be the U. S best friend and ally, Mr Johnson said the agreement would open a new chapter in the national story. Reasserting Britain is an outward looking force for good on dim control of its future. The central purpose of this bill is to accomplish something that the British people always knew in their hearts could be done and yet, which we were continually told was impossible. That old we could not have our cake and eat it, namely that we could trade incorporate a zwei will with our European neighbors on the closest terms of friendship. And goodwill while retaining sovereign control of our laws and our national destiny. The EU's leaders in Brussels have already signed the deal. At least 16 people have been killed in an attack on the city of Aden's airport in Yemen. Soon after a plane carrying the country's new government landed as passengers were about to leave the aircraft. There was an explosion. The Cabinet ministers are all reported to be safe. They've blamed Houthi rebels for the attack. This report is from our chief international correspondent leads do set This was meant to be the first step toward at least the political unity of those forces fighting against the Ruthie's who are lined to Iran, and the hope, of course, was that The fatigue, whole traing efforts. Halting efforts to try to get political negotiations underway could possibly be started course many fear it would just be the chapter before an intensification of the war. Either way, This is a very bad day, indeed bad most of all for Yemenis. World News from the BBC. This is w one. My see in New York. I'm David. First, the city is changing how it conducts the annual count of its street homeless population. Due to the cove it 19 pandemic. Instead of sending a few 1000 volunteers to conduct a survey over the course of a single night, the city will canvass the five boroughs over several nights utilizing teams made up of city staffers and workers from homeless outreach organizations. Katherine for Pani is executive director at Homeless Services United, a group that represents the outreach providers. She says the city should have canceled the count this year. The teams are already stretched fairly sin and the idea that the paid outreach staff can do the same work as an army of volunteers just seems a little bit strange today. City officials say the survey allows them to reach and help more homeless New Yorkers who live on the streets and in subways. It's been two weeks since some health care workers in New York began receiving their first doses of the covert 19 vaccine. Last week, Community health centers started vaccinating their staff now. New York City Health Commissioner Dave Choksi says URGENT Care workers are on track to start getting vaccinated, according to a new state guidance released this week. We're seeing that expand on that will mean come January will have a much broader set of faces that will be able to administer the vaccine. Nearly 60,000 people have received the first dose of the vaccine in New York City. Statewide. That number is about 140,000 health care workers and nursing home residents and staff are the top priority group. Really 30 degrees in New York City, looking at high around 45 this afternoon with mostly cloudy skies today overnight we're expecting some rain will drop down to 38 degrees and then tomorrow Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain in the morning. A high of 51 degrees tomorrow night for New Year's Eve. Partly cloudy alot of 34. Hello and welcome to news hour from the BBC World Service. We're coming to you live from London. My name's Paul Henley. The Oxford University and AstraZeneca coronavirus jab.

New York Britain New York City prime minister EU Oxford University BBC Oxford Vaccine Group Boris Johnson AstraZeneca BBC World Service Professor Andrew Pollard British government Paul Henley Brexit Aden UK assault
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on AP News

"Of finds her and violent text. Corona virus vaccine is that it's strongly protected against the virus and appears safe. Emergency use. Approval of vaccine is expected later this week. The AP Soccer Madani reports. The Trump Administration faces questions over how much of the vaccine will be available. The administration has a contract with Fizer to buy 100 million doses, but sources say over the summer, the White House opted not to lock in another one. Three million for delivery next year. That could delay delivery of a second batch to the US until Fizer fulfills other contracts. The doctor leading the government's vaccine effort tells ABC the administration was looking at several vaccine candidates and nobody would reasonably by Maura of anyone without knowing which would work. President's expected this afternoon to tell defies her vaccine and plans to distribute it. Nobody from President elect Biden's transition team, which will oversee much of the vaccination program, was invited. Saga room agony. Washington New results in a possible vaccine from Oxford University and AstraZeneca suggest it is safe about 70% effective. There are questions about how effective it is for people. 55 older Andrew Pollard with the Oxford Vaccine Group was asked about that 70% effectiveness number. I think we have to note worry about these individuals sent itches. The important thing is who's vaccinated? Not People who run vaccinated and waiting for a particular product. Personally, I'd be happy with any of these in my own vaccines are being distributed for the first time starting today. In Britain, Acting Defense Secretary Chris Miller announced the delivery of nearly $30 million worth of weapons to the Philippines, which faces military threats from Islamic state group linked militants. China is lashing out at the U. S over new sanctions against Chinese officials and the sale of more military equipment to Taiwan. This is AP News Chuck Yeager has died. Chuckie Yeager, the first person to fly faster than the speed of sound once called himself a lucky kid who caught the right ride that was the 1947. He was a World War two fighter pilot and test pilot. He pushed a bullet shaped rocket plane past 660 MPH to break the sound barrier. He said. The ride was nice, just like riding in a fast car. He was 97 when he died on Monday, his wife, Victoria, saluting what she called an incredible life well lived. NASA calls his death a tremendous loss to our nation. I'm Rita Foley. Experts are baffled by a mysterious illness that has left more than 500 people hospitalized and one person dead. In southern India. People started convulsing without any warning symptoms ranging from nausea and anxiety. Toe loss of consciousness have been reported in patients. Many have recovered in India and returned home. I'm a Donahue. AP News Hey, Mom here to drive you.

Trump Administration Chuckie Yeager Oxford Vaccine Group President Chuck Yeager India Fizer Victoria nausea Andrew Pollard US Oxford University ABC AstraZeneca Donahue Washington Rita Foley NASA Biden
Oxford Covid vaccine 'safe and effective' study shows

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Oxford Covid vaccine 'safe and effective' study shows

"Suggest it is safe about 70% effective. There are questions about how effective it is for people. 55 older Andrew Pollard with the Oxford Vaccine Group was asked about that 70% effectiveness number. I think we have no worry about these individual percentage is the important thing is who's vaccinated? Not People who run vaccinated are waiting for a particular product. Personally, I'd be happy with any of these in my own vaccines are being distributed for the first time starting today. In Britain, Acting Defense Secretary Chris Miller announced the delivery of nearly

Andrew Pollard Oxford Vaccine Group Acting Defense Secretary Chris Britain
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And its partner, the University of Oxford, announce that their vaccine was 70% effective in preventing cove in 19. This vaccine uses a different technology from the ones made by Visor and Madonna that have already been shown to be effective. Joining me now is NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka to talk about the news. Joe, What is this technology? How is it different? Already the Fizer by on tech and modern of vaccines, or what's called M RNA vaccines. They work by injecting a tiny snippet of the genetic material, the coronavirus directly into someone's body and that material Contains instructions for a protein that can prop someone's immune system to make an immune response to the Corona virus. So are you with me so far? Yes, that's that's sort of vaccine is as we know it. Well, it's a little different, but this one is even different Still, because the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine also contains genetic material from the Corona virus. But instead of injecting it directly into someone, it's carried into someone's body using what's called a viral vector. This has certain advantages, not least that it's cheaper and easier to make this vaccine. So in the study were hearing about today. One group of people got two doses of the vaccine, and another group got two shots also, but those injections didn't contain the experimental covert vaccine. Andrew Pollard is head of the Oxford Vaccine group. And he says the vaccine worked pretty darn well. We've got a vaccine, which is highly effective. It prevents severe disease on hospitalization on Where we saw 90% protection, he said, Intriguingly. And how does that work? Right? Half a dose being better than a full dose? Yeah, the 22 full doses are the all the trial showed 70% effective. This 90. Well, it's a bit of a puzzle, and Sara Gilbert is a professor of vaccine ology at the University of Oxford. She developed the vaccine. And she says puzzles are fine with her, where a group of academics so we're delighted to have something more academic to study on this, and it could be that by giving a small amount of the vaccine start with and following up with a big amount. That's a better way of kicking the immune system into action and giving us the strongest immune response on the most effective immune response, But We'll work to do on that. Yeah, sounds like work to do on that. And it seems they only came up with this result by chance when researchers realized they had underestimated the potency of the first injections in one of the groups of volunteers What happens next in this process? Well, AstraZeneca says they will take this data that they've gathered these data and to the UK and European regulatory agencies and discuss getting approval for some sort of, you know, discuss with them some sort of approval provisional approval. And they'll also talk with the U. S. Food and Drug Administration to see if this data will satisfy them for a emergency use authorization, And they'll also be talking to the FDA to see if they can modify the vaccines thing that's going on in this country where they've already rolled 10,000 volunteers in order to switch it to that same regimen where you get a half dose and then a full dose. And the storage. How is it different? Well, you might remember that the Fizer vaccine used had to have ultra cold freezers, and this one does not. It doesn't even need a freezer. It can be stored safely at normal refrigerator temperatures, and that makes it easier to distribute globally. Which AstraZeneca says it's committed to doing, And they're also planning to keep the cost down to about $3 a dose making more available in low resource countries. That's NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka. Thank you. You're welcome. This'll is NPR news. Coming up. We'll hear from.

Oxford Vaccine group Joe Palka Sara Gilbert Andrew Pollard University of Oxford NPR AstraZeneca AstraZeneca Oxford Madonna partner RNA UK FDA Drug Administration professor
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KCRW

"You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. The third Monday in a row. We have good news about a Corona virus vaccine today, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca and its partner, the University of Oxford, announce that their vaccine was 70% effective in preventing cove in 19. This vaccine uses a different technology from the ones made by Visor and Madonna that have already been shown to be effective. Joining me now is NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka to talk about the news. Joe, What is this technology? How is it different? Lottie the Fizer by on tech and modern of vaccines, or what's called M RNA vaccines. They work by injecting a tiny snippet of the genetic material the coronavirus directly into someone's body, and that material contains instructions for a protein that can prop someone's immune system. Making immune response to the Corona virus. So are you with me so far? Yes, That's guys sort of vaccine is as we know it Well, it's a little different, but this one is even different Still, because the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine also contains genetic material from the coronavirus. But instead of injecting it directly into someone, it's carried into someone's body using what's called a viral vector. Now this has certain advantages, not least that it's cheaper and easier to make this vaccine. So in the study were hearing about today. One group of people got two doses of the vaccine, and another group got two shots also, but those injections didn't contain the experimental covert vaccine. Andrew Pollard is head of the Oxford Vaccine group. And he says the vaccine worked pretty darn well. We've got a vaccine, which is highly effective. It prevents severe disease on hospitalization on and intriguingly in the results. We do have a subgroup that you've got a half dose is the first does And then a full dose does the second days where we saw the 90% protection, he said, Intriguingly. And how does that work Right? Half a dose being better than a full dose? Yeah, the 22 full doses are the all the trial showed 70% effective is 90. Well, it's a bit of a puzzle, and Sara Gilbert is a professor of action ology at the University of Oxford. She developed the vaccine. And she says puzzles are fine with her, where a group of academics so we're delighted to have something more academic to study on this, and it could be that by giving a small amount of the vaccine start with and following up with a big amount. That's a better way of kicking the immune system into action and giving us the strongest immune response on the most effective immune response, But We'll work to do on that. Yeah, sounds like work to do on that. And it seems they only came up with this result by chance when researchers realized they had underestimated the potency of the first injections in one of the groups of volunteers What happens next in this process? Well, AstraZeneca says they will take this data that they've gathered these data and to the UK and European regulatory agencies and discuss getting approval for some sort of, you know, discuss with them some sort of approval provisional approval. And they'll also talk with the U. S. Food and Drug Administration to see if this data will satisfy them for a emergency use authorization, And they'll also be talking to the FDA to see if they can modify the vaccine state that's going on in this country where they've already rolled 10,000 volunteers in order to switch it to that same regimen where you get a half dose and then a full dose. And the storage. How is it different? Well, you might remember that the Fizer vaccine used had to have ultra cold freezers, and this one does not. It doesn't even need a freezer. It can be stored safely at normal refrigerator temperatures, and that makes it easier to distribute globally. Which AstraZeneca says it's committed to doing, And they're also planning to keep the cost down to about $3 a dose making more available in low resource countries. That's NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka. Thank you. You're welcome. Thing is NPR news. Now's a great time to tap into some of Kcrw's best work here in depth interviews with the creative minds that Dr Hollywood on the business and the treatment Break away from the.

AstraZeneca Oxford Vaccine group Joe Palka Andrew Pollard NPR University of Oxford Sara Gilbert AstraZeneca Oxford Madonna Fizer Lottie partner RNA Kcrw UK FDA
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Resident Donald Trump's administration. President Trump has directed his team to cooperate on the transition while vowing to keep up the fight. Administrator Emily Murphy made the determination after Trump efforts failed in Michigan, with commissioners their voting to certify Bynes victory in the state. Trump advisers, Sebastian Gorka says both time and options are running short. The legal remedies have to be exhausted to the ends degree to the ultimate fruition of that process. But the larger challenge and the more important one is the political You look at the time crunch. The capacity to prove thousands of instances of voter fraud across the nation is almost impossible to do in the time given before the Electoral College meets in December. Drug maker AstraZeneca says that late stage trials show it's covet. 19 vaccine is highly effective. At a news conference. Andrew Pollard, head of the Oxford Vaccine Group, says the AstraZeneca vaccine is affordable and Morris accessible because of its storage requirements. We have a vaccine that can be used At fridge temperatures that can be stored in frigid temperatures for us in Oxford. This was really important because we want to be able to make sure that this can be distributed. Not just in a country like this, where we could manage any form of distribution but around the world, the results announced Monday, or based on interim analysis of trials in the U. K and Brazil of a vaccine developed by Oxford University and manufactured by AstraZeneca. No hospitalizations or severe cases of covert 19 were reported in those receiving the vaccine. AstraZeneca's the third major drug company to report late stage data for a potential cove in 19 vaccine. On Wall Street. The Dow up by 327 points more on these stories, town hall dot com. What can help you take advantage of today's low mortgage rates and save money Rocket can.

President Trump AstraZeneca Oxford Vaccine Group Oxford Sebastian Gorka Emily Murphy Andrew Pollard Oxford University Administrator Michigan Morris Brazil U. K
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Audie Cornish for the third Monday in a row. We have good news about a Corona virus vaccine today. The pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca and its partner, the University of Oxford, announce that their vaccine was 70% effective in preventing cove in 19. This vaccine uses a different technology from the ones made by Visor and Madonna that have already been shown to be effective. Joining me now is NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka to talk about the news. Joe, What is this technology? How is it different? Nobody. The Fizer by on tech and modern of vaccines, or what's called M RNA vaccines. They work by injecting a tiny snippet of the genetic material the coronavirus directly into someone's body, and that material contains instructions for a protein that can prop someone's immune system. Making immune response to the Corona virus. So are you with me so far? Yes, That's guys sort of vaccine is as we know it Well, it's a little different, but this one is even different Still, because the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine also contains genetic material from the coronavirus. But instead of injecting it directly into someone, it's carried into someone's body using what's called a viral vector. Now this has certain advantages, not least that it's cheaper and easier to make this vaccine. So in the study were hearing about today. One group of people got two doses of the vaccine, and another group got two shots also, but those injections didn't contain the experimental covert vaccine. Andrew Pollard is head of the Oxford Vaccine group. And he says the vaccine worked pretty darn well. We've got a vaccine, which is highly effective. It prevents severe disease and hospitalization on and intriguingly in the results. We do have a subgroup that you've got a half dose is the first does And then a full dose does the second days where we saw the 90% protection, he said, Intriguingly. And how does that work Right? Half a dose being better than a full dose? Yeah, the 22 full doses are the all the trial showed 70% effective. It is 90. Well, it's a bit of a puzzle, and Sara Gilbert is a professor of action ology at the University of Oxford. She developed the vaccine and she says Puzzles are fine with her. We're a group of academics. So we're delighted to have something more academic to study on this, and it could be that by giving a small amount of the vaccine start with and following up with a big amount. That's a better way of kicking the immune system into action and giving us the strongest immune response on the most effective immune response, but more work to do on that. Yeah, sounds like work to do on that. And it seems they only came up with this result by chance when researchers realized they had underestimated the potency of the first injections in one of the groups of volunteers What happens next in this process? Well, AstraZeneca says they will take this data that they've gathered these data and to the UK and European regulatory agencies and discuss getting approval for some sort of, you know, discuss with them some sort of approval provisional approval. And they'll also talk with the U. S. Food and Drug Administration to see if this data will satisfy them for a emergency use authorization, And they'll also be talking to the FDA to see if they can modify the vaccines thing that's going on in this country where they've already rolled 10,000 volunteers in order to switch it to that same regimen where you get a half dose and then a full dose. And the storage. How is it different? Well, you might remember that the Fizer vaccine used had to have ultra cold freezers, and this one does not. It doesn't even need a freezer. It can be stored safely at normal refrigerator temperatures, and that makes it easier to distribute globally, which AstraZeneca says it's committed to doing and they're also planning to keep the cost down to about $3 a dose. Make it more available in low resource countries. That's NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka. Thank you. You're welcome. For people who talk to work colleagues by zoom or use it to catch up to family and friends. It is easy to take the platform for granted. But zoom will not host just any conversation. The video streaming platform is being accused of censorship after it blacklisted a controversial speaker at a public event. MPR's Bobby Allen reports, and we should note Zoom is a financial supporter of NPR. Controversial speaker is Palestinian activist Layla Holiday Holiday is a member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. The U. S considers that a terrorist group holiday is notorious for hijacking a plane in 1969 and trying to do it again a year later. So when Rob Bob Abdulhadi invited Holland to speak, she knew it would set off a big debate. Abdu Holly, a professor at San Francisco State University, says it never happened because of zoom. The company said they were legal concerns. We might be implicated and criminal activities off material support for terrorism, and that might include a imprisonment and a fine. Abdulhadi didn't fear those consequences. She sees solid as a feminist icon who should be able to speak at a public event. Some 1500 people had planned to tune in on soon as a platform. They do not have the right to use their being a platform in order for them to veto the content of our classroom and thus actually impinge on our academic freedom. Legally Zoom can't tell Abdel Hadi what to teach. But it can kick speakers off its platform and the pro Israel Law Fair Project had been pressuring zoom to do just that. Brooke Goldstein is the project's executive director. So if your interest isn't having an academic discussion about controversial issues, go ahead. But that doesn't mean that you have the right to assist a designated terrorist group in carrying out their mission. This wasn't the first time zoom face this kind of heat. This summer Zoom shut down meetings Commemorating the Tiananmen Square massacre. At the request of the Chinese government. Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have been in the middle of debates over enforcing content rules for a while for zoom. It's new Welcome to the party Zoom. Daphne Keller is a former Google lawyer who is now it's Stanford Cyber Policy Center. Zoom started as a corporate video service. But now with the pandemic.

AstraZeneca NPR Joe Palka Oxford Vaccine group University of Oxford AstraZeneca Oxford professor Rob Bob Abdulhadi Mary Louise Kelly Audie Cornish Madonna Andrew Pollard RNA Sara Gilbert partner UK MPR Liberation of Palestine
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KCRW

"Elect Biden's pledged to lead an administration that reflects the nation's diversity begins with people who've spent a lot of years in the diplomatic and national security trenches to serve on his Cabinet. Biden says he will nominate longtime confidante Tony Blinken to service Secretary of State Alejandro New York s a Cuban born lawyer who will be the first Latino and first immigrant to be nominated Secretary of Homeland Security. And Linda Thomas Greenfield to represent this country at the United Nations. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports Thomas Greenfield spent more than three decades as a foreign service officer. In a Ted talk last year, Linda Thomas Greenfield told her personal story. How a young black girl from Louisiana ended up in the Foreign service. We're in the deep South. Men, a segregated town in which the cake regularly would come on weekends and burn a cross in somebody's yard. She says she studied at Louisiana State University. At the same time, David Duke was on campus preaching white supremacy. Linda Thomas Greenfield went on to represent America abroad, serving in Rwanda during the genocide. And later as ambassador to Liberia in the Obama administration. She was assistant secretary of state for Africa. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington, A source tells NPR the Biden has chosen former Fed chair Janet Yellen to be his Treasury secretary, if confirmed by the Senate, Yellin Be the first woman to serve in that position. For the first time, the National Security Council will include an official focused on climate, Biden is creating the new role of special envoy for climate and NPR's Windsor Johnson reports. That person will be former Secretary of State John Kerry shortly after the announcement carried tweeted, the nation will soon have a government that treats the climate crisis as the urgent national security threat. It is Fighting had made climate change one of the cornerstones of his campaign, proposing a $1.7 trillion plan to transition to 100% clean energy sources by 2050. The incoming administration is also expected to reverse many of the Trump administration's policies on the issue. Windsor Johnson reporting Ah third experimental vaccine for Covert 19 appears to be working NPR's Joe Palikot Reports of vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford appears to be 70% effective at preventing illness. The vaccine was administered in two doses spaced a month apart while the overall efficacy was 70%. Andrew Pollard, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, says they saw something intriguing in the results. We do have a subgroup that you've got a half day says the first does And then a full day's does the second days where we saw the 90% protection. The Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is easier and cheaper to manufacture than the two other covert vaccines shown to be effective..

Linda Thomas Greenfield Biden NPR Michele Kelemen Oxford Vaccine Group Windsor Johnson assistant secretary Louisiana State University Tony Blinken Trump administration Louisiana United Nations Obama administration Andrew Pollard David Duke
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Their results show the vaccine is up to 90% effective with an average efficacy rate of 70%. Andrew Pollard, head of the Oxford Vaccine Group, says there were no hospitalizations or severe cases in the trial, so the results imply the vaccine could stop people from getting severely ill. The Trump administration invested up to $1.2 billion into the development to secure up to 300 million doses of the vaccine. Of the 19 magics remain high across North Texas, this two largest counties, Dallas County added more than 1800 covert 19 cases for the fourth straight day, with health officials reporting Sunday 1862 new cases and one death, Tarrant County reported 1537 cases and six deaths across North Texas more than 300,000 have been, in fact dead more than 3300 have died and more than 238,000. Have recovered and that trend continues to be seeing in nursing homes, according to Dallas County Health and Human Services. There's been more than 850 cases reported from 84 separate long term care facilities, including over 300 staff members in the last 30 days. That's the highest number of active outbreaks at nursing homes reported in the county since the pandemic hit and March taxes business will time numbers on Wall Street. The Dow is up 271 points. NASDAQ Up 67 points on the S and P 500 up 26 points from the W B A P News desk. I Nicolo say your next update is at 9 30. 24 7 coverage at WB. Ape calm This.

Tarrant County Oxford Vaccine Group Dallas County Health and Human North Texas Dallas County Andrew Pollard Trump
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Growth and cash flows, you could get away with buying companies with limited soft line growth as long as you have you have Cash flow, sustainable cataracts or growing cash flows. So I mean, if you're looking at some of the massive Texas yes, they've been growing very fast. But we don't really like companies that have that 30% growth rate if they're not generating cash, because quite often, you see companies like that. Buying market share by especially losing money across the across the board on with those companies. We have not been interested in a tall because we don't think that is the standard also used. The word standing advises me there. We need to see sustainable. Returns on capital will give us a generation. Give us an example of a name. This generated revenue growth but hasn't brought it down the income statement. I mean, no one's listening. I mean, give us the name. Yeah, well, E could name several. I mean, I'm not going toe pull out test because we could have a row about that because everybody's very excited that they generated profits only by selling selling. Well with tax credit, especially for a period of time. Netflix is a great example. They burned cash to producers much content as they can to take market share over lift. These companies are also having a Growth taking market share disrupting industries but not generating any cash. In fact, they have to come to the market. It was amazing to watch back in the spring has announcing a quarterly profit, hoping to get the SNP. I know it's there now. Have been offering a sneaky rights issue the next week. So it's Zoe's of the source of cos We don't like now I'm not saying we're shorting those guys way put out a notice crossing. Cos We all show singing that space there mostly their companies who and weak market positions. I'm going to talk about companies like Flag, perhaps take up against Microsoft. I know who I'm betting on to win that we talk about Dropbox drug like fashion does high free cash. That's because it's under invested. So in our forecast, they're actually going to have to spend Ah, lot of money to sustain that cash. So those in the areas we wait. Don't like Those guys that way. Think you're actually going to lose through this, even though they might have So you've said revenue. Greg. This has been really informative. Hugo Rogers. Thank you so much with Deltek. We really look forward to doing this again and soon as well from Ireland today, not from the Bahamas, where Would surveillance crew's surely this and surveillance. I mean the price just to see me and floaties. Sure, but absolutely We could get a little drink. You know, little umbrella, the umbrella. It certainly wants umbrellas. I could see it now. I mean, it's a don't brainer. Uh, Up 207 points. I would say market action here open Yes. Better than futures. Yeah, I mean, seriously. The vics comes in 23.6 negative 0.64 points. If it's all very nice tape to start off this Monday with feelings Oh, I think it's interesting timing, but Mr Bars to say with that is lying. So you're all we already covered that with our news in New York City, Michael Bar go back to the floating. Thank you very much woman. It's another promising development of the question in the pandemic, a covert 19 vaccine. Developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca prevented a majority of people from getting the disease and a large trial. According to early analysis. The vaccine stopped an average of 70% of participants from folding ill. Professor Andrew Pollard is the director of the Oxford Vaccine Group. Because the vaccine can be stored in the fridge temperatures it can be distributed around the world using the normal immunization distribution system. He said. If people were given a half a dose, followed by a full dose rather than two full doses protection rose to about 90% close to 257,000 Americans have died because of covert 19 all eyes on Michigan and Pennsylvania today. Who have vote scheduled to certify the election results. Michigan is preparing a vote on whether to clarify the election results or delay the process to allow an audit. With at least one Republican member of the state's canvassing board expected to delay the certification If the other Republican forces a tie, the issue could end up in the court. Michigan's Republican House speaker, Lee Chatfield spoke to Fox News There were to be a two to split on the state Board of Canvassers. They would then go to the Michigan Supreme Court to determine what their response would be what their order would be. Also today, some counties in Pennsylvania are planning to certify their election results. President elect Biden is expected to nominate his longtime foreign policy aide, Antony Bilkin of Lincoln, rather for secretary of state. He's been a close adviser to Biden for decades and official announcement is expected tomorrow. Global news 24 hours a day on there and on Bloomberg Quick, take power by more than 2700 journalists and analysts and more than 120 countries on Michael Barr, and this is Bloomberg. Tomball, Michael Barra. Thanks so much greatly appreciate that post pretty. That was a great discussion of rotation. Yeah, I don't think you know. I don't think the media talks enough about it. I mean it. Zlata harder to execute. The process that it is chat about it. It is because those big names Tom have been such great performers really, since the financial crisis on there just the bedrock of most portfolios right here and to get out of those names which have worked so well for so long and his fundamentals. Are still very strong. That takes some competition. There are to say the least, Tesla all time high hit today, Tom. I did not know that. Yeah, that's incredible going higher, and Pharrell bought it at the bottom. Yep. I mean, big dog. Where is it Here? Are you giving up your ex symbols? X bt for those of you with a terminal in your car, I mean, we even heard from Matt Miller. Like in what? Like two weeks. Yeah, he's a little busy. You know, Sometimes I'm gonna Mike McGlone on Bitcoin because Mike he's the first one remember saying it's a store of value like gold and he was the first person I heard. Term it That was several years ago. Miller's up like 90%. Yeah, he sold all the Kruger Rands and Bob Grip coin. It's right. He's on the Big island, and he's like large. I mean, I think you know. You know, we'll buy an island and You know, off of North Germany or something. Maybe if shall I knew? Munich?.

Michigan Pennsylvania Matt Miller Mike he Biden Michigan Supreme Court Netflix Deltek Hugo Rogers Texas Tom Mike McGlone Microsoft Big island University of Oxford Professor Andrew Pollard Munich Oxford Vaccine Group Ireland
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Trials proceeded early in the UK and across the world. It fell behind after an illness of one participant and Madonna and Fizer appeared to steal a march on producing results. The Oxford results show 70% protection from the virus, but with some interesting additional results, lots of questions about this latest development. Let's speak to Professor Andrew Pollard. He is director off the Oxford Vaccine Group. Department off pediatrics at the University off Oxford and the trials. Lead investigator Welcome to the program. Hi. Good afternoon. Good afternoon. Let's sit. Let's get you first of all, just to outline what the trial showed. But what we found in the trial was that the vaccine was able to induce overall 70% protection across both the U. K and Brazil. The It's interesting that when we looked into more detail in theme, the trial groups that we had one group who had a lower dose is their first dose and then a full dose for the second dose. And the efficacy in that group was 90%, whereas in the other groups who got too full doses, it was rather lower at 62% so fascinating results and quite intriguing about this group who had a higher efficacy. Is it clear at the moment why there's been that difference? We think it's probably some differences in Prime ng the immune system with a lower dose on then falling is out with a full dose afterwards that somehow generates a better quality or quantity of antibody. We're looking into that. I'm in the moment, but I think importantly, though, in the trial would as long as people were vaccinated. They didn't end up in hospital. I'm always severe disease. And so I'm feeling really positive about the vaccine. In terms of what we really need around the world of the moment is to stop people ending up in hospital, putting a burden on the health system. Um and actually suffering themselves from severe disease. I suppose in in from from what you're saying, you know, we're looking at 70% protection. And then there's that additional interesting, intriguing result that you've outlined. But people will, of course, be comparing this to the 92 90% efficacy of Madonna and Fizer. Yes, I mean, we're not really in a competition. What We need two doses of vaccines, which we can assume as possible protect people with And the key thing that we need to do is to try and to reduce the serious disease and hospitalizations and that's what we seem to have a very effective vaccine of that on the 70% is a great figure. In itself. It's better than the flu vaccine is in in most years, So I think we feel very positive about these results on the 90% effectiveness when when the volunteers were given Two doses one low and one high. That suggests what to you because presumably, that means that the speed of manufacture will be impacted as well. Well it it means that the doses that we already have that air in 10 days files could potentially go twice as far for the first dose. So I think that that is another positive, in addition to the fact that this vaccine could be stored in frigid temperatures, which means that it can be Distributed around the world, much more readily through the normal immunization. Cold changed, in other words, around fridges. And of course, in our partnership with AstraZeneca, which is not for profit. It makes him very affordable for distribution to all corners of the world. And that's because this vaccine is has been made quite differently to the other two. Can you just explain the basis of it? Well, it is both them the way the cost is both the way it's made, but also the university's view that we should not be profiteering from the pandemic. And so we wouldn't make a partnership with the company unless they shared that same vision, so that that's a key driver of the cost that there's no profit in it. The way that is made is by producing a virus, which is actually a common cold virus. Which has been weakened, so can't cause any infection in humans. But we insert the gene for spike protein inside the common cold Bharat and then that that virus acts as a vector of shuttle to take the vaccine into our bodies. It is extraordinary how quickly All of this has come about when, when you look at how long it has taken to make vaccines for other diseases in the past. I mean, I think there's been an extraordinary effort in some ways the processes that we've gone through exactly the same as we ever would in the past, and we haven't been able to cut any corners because you have to follow all of these stages of development. But we have had an enormous help from government in the UK by providing the funding to allow us to move without pause to wait for more funding for the next stage of the trials on also by a very flexible environment in the UK, which meant that, like in three weeks were able to set up 19 trials sites, which normally would take a year to do so. It's been lots of aspects of this because everyone pulled together that we could move so quickly on it. Talking about moving quickly, people will be Wanting to know how soon they might be able to have access to it. Well in the background. Now, both here in Oxford and the testers Annika people are very busy and preparing documents for regulators submissions, so that's the next step is to put all of the information in front of the regulator. That process started some time ago now with a rolling submission to the regulators in the UK and some other countries, so that that's already Advancing along that path. Once they've got the data that they need, they need to do an assessment. Check. Everything's in order and decide whether or not we should be granted a license. And then after that is, you know over to the NHS who are well prepared for roll out, so I think a very positive moment talking a positive moments. Your reflections when you first saw the results. Well, it's it's ah, in some ways that both a relief to finally get to that point of exciting moment to see the first data from the trial. And with these intriguing aspects of the results, it's scientifically very exciting as well. There's lots more to do to understand the immune response in humans, and this is going to be a great opportunity to form or work and understanding. Thank you for making time for us today, Professor Andrew Pollack, director off the Oxford Vaccine Group and one of the trials lead investigator. Thanks for joining us. So how great a challenge is it going to be to roll this out, and the other new vaccines to allow the countries that need them, or radio ingredient is managing director off the Kovacs facility at the Global Vaccine Alliance. Gabby. This has never been done before..

Oxford Vaccine Group UK Oxford flu vaccine Madonna investigator director Global Vaccine Alliance Professor Andrew Pollard AstraZeneca Fizer Professor Andrew Pollack NHS managing director Gabby U. K Brazil Kovacs
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Results showed the vaccine is up to 90% effective with an average efficacy rate of 70%. Andrew Pollard, head of the Oxford Vaccine Group, says there were no hospitalizations or severe cases in the trial for the results imply the vaccine could start people from getting severely ill. The Trump administration invested upto $1.2 billion of taxpayer money into the development. To secure up to 300 million doses of the vaccine and go over 19 metrics remain high across North Texas Largest counties. Dallas County added 1862 new cases and one death Sunday, Tarrant County reported 1537 cases and six new deaths, and that trend continues to be seen at nursing homes as well, according to Dallas County Health and Human Services there been more than 850 cases reported. From 84 separate long term care facilities, including over 300 staff members in the last 30 days. That's the highest number of active outbreaks of nursing homes. Reporters in the county since the pandemic hit in March, and the covered 19 situation in El Paso is reaching a breaking point Taxes National Guard has sent a 36 member team to the region. To assist morgues in the border region. With the number of dead from the virus, the city of El Paso's offering up to $27 an hour to morgue workers willing to move the bodies and jail inmates are voluntarily helping for $2 an hour. The WB AP News Desk. I'm Nicolo say your next update is at 7 30 24 7 coverage at WB ap dot com. Little left. Now back to the right play. Action for Dalton Passes caught Man Wide Open Touchdown. Dallas, It is Dalton Schultz with the old gotcha play. There was no buddy near him, And that was all she wrote yesterday afternoon where the Dallas Cowboys wait for it. Win a game. Yes, You heard that correctly. Cowboys win 31 to 28 in Minnesota. Good morning, Scott said way here and for Steve Lamb from the WB AP Sports Desk As you heard right there on Fox, and he dealt Dalton capped off in 11 play 61 yard drive with a minute 37 to go in the game. The Dallas defense held the Vikings from their out, man. What a difference that by a week made for the Cowboys, who for the last few months really couldn't get anything going on either side of the ball just so happy for players. You know, it's been No year through a lot of ups and downs, so just so gratifying to see cities men get the victor today because they damn well armed it That's for sure. Definitely more downs this year's than up, but you know it's okay. They're still wait for it half a game out of first place in the NFC East, which is just ridiculous with how this year is gone. The Philadelphia's in first with 36 and one that's their record. After that, all three teams including your Dallas Cowboys, or three and seven. So by the end of the week after they play Washington how on Thanksgiving, they could very well be in first place, and we could be. We could be a sitting here in a week, saying what the Cowboys air in the control their own destiny. They could still get eight night. Like you had. Technically, they could. They could get to nine and seven to get there They can. But it's Zsa such a weird year for the Cowboys, but we'll see if they can keep that momentum going. The other weird story over the Weekend is in college football. Where Clemson and Florida State were set to play Saturday morning, and I think it was the 11 o'clock game, Okay, and They've going through their covert testing throughout the week. There's one player on the offensive line for Clemson, who was sick all week. He continued to test negative for Cove in 19. Until Friday. He tested positive. Medical officials met Saturday morning and Florida State decided to cancel the game, so he's sick all week. Been tested all week. And the day before the game. Some reason he test positive. Yes. He was negative all week. His symptoms went away. So they thought, Okay, we're in the clear, but Friday there was a positive test. No one else on the team tested positive for the conspiracy theory. Here's which is not as big as the JFK one. But the conspiracy, which, by the way, the anniversary was yesterday. How about crazy? Yeah, I was reading about that and looking at it and remembering From all those years ago. I can remember the announcement over the school speakers anyway, eh? So what we have here is Davos Sweeney thing. They backed out because they don't want to play and that's what the Clemson coach is saying, and he's upset because They? They've got rules for testing, and everyone followed the rules and they've got rules for what it takes to cancel the game and one player testing positive. Isn't doesn't fit the standard to cancel the game in their conference, but Florida State canceled it anyway. So Clemson's out $300,000 for traveling all the way to Tallahassee. And Clemson's ticked off saying, We're not rescheduling in this game unless you pay that tab. While so a lot of drama in college football, the cove attacked by though I think it was 14 games were canceled this weekend. Including a and M didn't play this weekend. Right Text from Texas didn't play this weekend because of covert stuff. So a lot of lot of games impacted that Z real quick to the back to the Cowboys. Yes, just a second. The tight end. That's Cowboys are now relying on Dalton Schultz Dalton Schultz Dalton. She also Andy Dalton threw it adult in ships. That was the game winner. Lot of Dalton's in there, but the puts strangers I believe adult and Schultz yesterday's game. May have come out and shown something. Because he's had to replace Jason Witten. And a string of cowboy tied heads that are just I mean, they're the standard of the NFL. Yeah, and so maybe hopefully alive. He's had a few good games, He'll continue. Yeah, he's had a good season, and he has a good connection with Andy Dalton, the daughter of the Dalton connection. That's your check on sports. I'm Scott said way..

Dalton Schultz Dalton Schultz Cowboys Dallas Cowboys Andy Dalton Dalton Schultz Dallas Clemson Dalton Dalton connection Dallas County Dallas County Health and Human El Paso Florida football Scott Andrew Pollard Oxford Vaccine Group Tarrant County Trump
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"This economic crisis by July thirty first everyone will be back to work of course not we need to continue to help those families and the bill that passed the house of representatives what the Republican senator calls crazy stuff what the bill did was to extend that federal unemployment benefit of six hundred dollars a week until the end of this year I think that is sensible and reasonable Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell said his chamber will consider new relief proposals next month the United States is approaching ninety five thousand deaths from Copa nineteen and more than one and a half million reported cases by far the most in the world with four percent of the world's population the US has about a third of the world's deaths Johns Hopkins University reports that worldwide more than three hundred thirty three thousand people have died malaria drugs pushed by president trump as treatments for the corona virus did not help and were tied to a greater risk of death and heart rhythm problems in a new study of nearly a hundred thousand patients around the world today's report in the journal lancet is not a rigorous test of hydroxy core Quinn or caloric Quinn but it is by far the largest look at their use in real world settings spanning six hundred seventy one hospitals on six continents Nick Harper reports ninety six thousand patients across six continents were reviewed by the lancet study to better understand the effects of hydroxy Corcoran but the drug pushed in praised by president trump is a game changer and who is also admitted taking it showed that patients suffered a higher proportion of irregular heart rhythms something that can bring on sudden cardiac deaths the study was the biggest so far to look at the risks of the medicine something that's usually used as a malaria drug the U. S. food and drug administration has already warned the medicine should not be used outside of hospitals or clinical trials I'm a copper in Washington British researchers testing an experimental vaccine against the new coronavirus are moving into advanced studies and aim to immunize more than ten thousand people to determine if the shock works last month Oxford university researchers began vaccinating more than a thousand volunteers in a preliminary study designed to test the shot safety there's results aren't in yet but the Oxford team announced they are expanding to ten thousand two hundred sixty people across Britain including older people and children Andrew Pollard head of the Oxford vaccine group said if all goes smoothly it was possible as early as the autumn or towards the end of the year that there could be results that allow the use of the vaccine on a wider scale but Pollard acknowledged there were still many challenges ahead including how long it will take to prove the vaccine works and any potential manufacturing complications a small study in monkeys offers a note of caution teams from Oxford and the U. S. national institutes of health I found the vaccine protected against pneumonia but did not eliminate the corona virus in the nose Pollard said it was still an open question whether the shot could make a dent in how the disease spreads the Oxford shot is one of about a dozen experimental covet nineteen vaccines in the early stages of human testing or toys to start mostly in China the U. S. and Europe scientists have never created vaccines from scratch this plants and it's far from clear that any will ultimately prove safe and effective today's British announcement came as Chinese scientists who are.

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:02 min | 2 years ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on AP News

"British researchers testing an experimental vaccine against Kobe 819 the moving into advanced studies an end to immunize more than 10000 people to determine if the shop works last month scientists at Oxford university began immunizing more than 1000 volunteers with a vaccine candidate in a preliminary trial designed to test safety neither team has announced the vaccination of just over another 10000 people across Britain including older people and children Andrew Pollack head of the Oxford vaccine group says the clinical studies are progressing very well initiating studies to evaluate how well the vaccine induces immune responses in older adults and to test whether it can provide protection in the wider population Charles the live as well London

Oxford university Britain vaccine London Andrew Pollack
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:34 min | 2 years ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on AP News

"Last month scientists at Oxford university began immunizing more than 1000 volunteers with a vaccine candidate in a preliminary trial designed to test safety neither team has announced the vaccination of just over another 10000 people across Britain including older people and children Andrew Pollack head of the Oxford vaccine group says the clinical studies are progressing very well initiating studies to evaluate how well the vaccine induces immune responses in older adults and to test whether it can provide protection in the wider population Charles the live as well London

Oxford university Britain vaccine London Andrew Pollack
"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"oxford vaccine group" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Canosa the director of the CDC says a second wave of corona virus could be even deadlier Dr Robert Redfield told The Washington Post yesterday that another wave could occur during flu season later this year and have a major impact on America's health system he also told the paper federal and state officials must be ready and continue social distancing as stay at home orders are lifted the British government is providing funding for two clinical trials of potential vaccine vaccines for the new coronavirus one of those trials is slated to begin later this week Andrew Pollard with the Oxford vaccine group says they have already been testing a vaccine for murders which was also a corona virus that help them jump start laboratory work on the vaccine for Kobe what happened was that the genetic code from the new coronavirus was discovered in January of this year and it was possible to go back to that genetic code and make these new vaccines very rapidly as a result Oxford vaccine will be trialed on people beginning Thursday the government will invest in manufacturing capacity in the event that either or both of the vaccines work investigators have pinpointed the likely source of a deadly covert nineteen outbreak at the symphony of Jolie get nursing home the home's parent company has hired an infectious disease expert to help get it through the crisis he believes the director of maintenance may have unknowingly infected residents when he built and installed tables to allow them to eat in the rooms the staffer had no symptoms at the time but he later died of the virus the nursing home in Chicago's south shore neighborhood reports that more than seventy percent of its residents have.

director CDC Dr Robert Redfield The Washington Post America British government Andrew Pollard Jolie Chicago flu