20 Episode results for "Oxford Circus"

Industry, protestors come closer together on climate-change goals

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

07:58 min | 1 year ago

Industry, protestors come closer together on climate-change goals

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by bit site from the back office to the boardroom bit site helps companies of all sizes continuously manage cyber risk using it security ratings platform. Learn more at bit site dot com. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist. Qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. This green hammock strung between stoplights few blocks from here the guy in it has a climate message for governments and companies live from London. This is the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service. I'm on good morning. That's coming first retail giant Amazon dominates most segments homegoods groceries things, you didn't even know you needed. So it's not often we hear it's mulling a retreat, especially not from one of the world's biggest markets. The BBC's Victoria, Craig has more Amazon is planning to downsize in China as it prepares to shudder by July tenth. It's online store that connect shoppers with local sellers. The decision comes as the ecommerce giant faces tough competition from domestic rivals like Alibaba and JD dot com. After mid-july Bloomberg reported that shoppers accessing Amazon's Chinese web portal, we'll see a selection of goods from the company's global store, though, it will shift away from retail in China. Amazon will continue to operate its cloud business. They're a spokesperson for the company said it's working closely with sellers to ensure a smooth transition. As the US based retailer shifts focus away from the world's second-biggest economy. It's putting more emphasis in investment in other emerging markets. It's so far committed to spending five and a half billion dollars on commerce in India where it competes with local rival flip cart to try and attract more customers their Amazon last year launched Hindi version of its mobile website and smartphone app in London. I'm the BBC's Victoria, Craig for marketplace. Let's do the numbers. Global shares are broadly lower weak manufacturing numbers in Europe's two. Biggest economies Germany and France or hitting the euro this morning. Meanwhile, shares of Unilever up more than two percent in pre-market trading. That's after the Anglo Dutch, consumer products company reported stronger than expected quarterly earnings and on Wall Street today, the popular picture sharing platform Pinterest makes it stable on the new York Stock Exchange. Shares are expected to begin trading at nineteen dollars valuing the company at ten billion dollars. So as you get ready for work this morning. Are you thinking about climate? Change. Yeah. Probably not well here in London. It's impossible not to think about it. Because the city's facing a fourth day of disruption by protesters who've shutdown different areas. There have already been four hundred arrests trains and buses or cancelled affecting thousands of commuters and that green hammock mentioned strung across the stoplights at Oxford circus. Well, I walked blocks from our studios to talk to James FOX the guy in it. I'm really sorry to interrupt. I just wanted to speak to your strung in a hammock across Oxford circus. Tell me who you are. I'm a wildlife biologists on IM tide of being scribe of the apocalypse. My messages. I want other scientists cow on the streets because all government is not listening industries on not listening, and they are actively often denying the science lobbying against it. Because it makes them more money. What is the point of being strung in across one of London's busiest streets, if you are strong mold and to me is above the ground, a becomes a health and safety nightmare for the police to remove you, do you will learn starting to get a lot of attention from makers policymakers. But isn't the problem that you know, if and when the protests ends everybody goes back to businesses normal? We'll the is not going to end until businesses Nomo stops. That's the point right? This is a rebellion. The longer we cause disruption the economic disruption increases exponentially. Currently, that's the only thing that government will listen to you. James? Thank you very much. I would talk to you some more. But my arm is killing me to off the ground. But thank you. Thank you James folks there. He told me he fell out of that. How MC six feet yesterday? He is unhurt now separately Bank of England. Governor Mark Carney and his French counterpart launched a new initiative Wednesday of thirty four central banks to green the global financial system. So I called the BBC's environment analyst Roger harrabin to ask. If we're reaching a tipping point on global climate action. This is step by step full, Connie he has wound before about the risks of climate change his warnings. And now getting more alarming. New message to other Bank is that they wouldn't be an existence unless they fully acknowledged threat of climate change do something to address it an insulate the only con Amies from it. He's talking about series financial shock the line. He is pushing is not that we've got to go all out now like the protesters assaying, but the we have to have a stage transition to a low-carbon economy, and there are. To potential massive shocks won't as if we have a sort of climate collapse for not doing anything. But the other shock would be being forced to do too much into shorter time. So he is urging a smooth transition now the list of entities that are devestating from fossil fuels has also been growing. So we've got Norway's one trillion dollar salver and wealth fund to universities churches, smaller organizations around the world is it possible to say whether all of that is leading us to a tipping point on climate change action. I've been following this issue for more than twenty five years. And I haven't seen in moment quite like this the what's happening. This time is the things are being institutionalized with bringing the banks in for instance. So the labor party in the UK are hinting now that they might even change the mandate of the Bank of England to take climate change into account. They might change the mandate of the office for budget responsibility to fact to climate change risks into economic forecasts. And that's where what's happening with the banks. I think kind of mesh. She's in with what's happening on the streets of London. I can't find anybody who thinks that the demons of the extinction rebellion. Protesters are realistic. We can't find a way of cutting carbon emissions to virtually zero by twenty twenty-five what this group is doing is creating some political space. So we have other authorities in the UK about to report on how to force the UK into zero carbon economy by twenty fifty they now have most base because there's other people staking out to fall more ambitious go full them, but he's this old enough to halt climate change. You have these paradoxical trends. So while the Chinese have stated that they really want to clamp down their emissions and having you know, centrally controlled economy, they have a great deal of power to do that and have been very impressive in their staging of renewables, solar power and wind power. It's transpires that they central government does not have such firm control over what happens in the regions where they're still building. Oh, fide pass stations, and the government is still wedded to the idea of creating economic growth through infrastructure spending. So many many airports are being built in in areas where I'm told there is no damore for airports in order to create jobs and keep the economy booming similar things are happening in India where premium OD has set out incredibly I'm Bishop targets for solar power, but also installing cold and in the US, President Trump is trying to clamp down on action against climate change. But in the meantime, the US is a hub of innovation on climate technologies and many many states taking rigorous action. So you kind of have this push pull effect all around the world wherever you look really it ABC's environment analyst Roger harrabin there. I'm going to tweet a picture of me and James this morning in green hammock above Oxford circus in London, you can follow me at BBC unin. And that's it for me in the marketplace morning report coming to you live from the BBC World Service.

London James FOX Amazon Oxford circus BBC BBC World Service US UK Roger harrabin Bank of England Craig Victoria analyst Alibaba Europe Unilever India
150. Disobedience with Sara Pascoe and guests Hot Brown Honey and Routes Collective

The Guilty Feminist

00:0-1 sec | 1 year ago

150. Disobedience with Sara Pascoe and guests Hot Brown Honey and Routes Collective

"I'm a feminist but I went on a feminist duck. The ripper walking tour in taco and the reason it's feminist is because for than concentrating on the criminal. Eight concentrates on the lives of the women, and it was very boring. Because none of the murdered anyone. I love that exists. I'm probably not gonna go on. Is actually very interesting by mainly because. I'm a feminist bought when arriving here at the Edinburgh festival. I cried before I go off the train as soon as I could smell the hopes. If you've not been to Edinburgh it smells like a brewery. And the reason I cried is because I lose my confidence for the first six to eight hours that I got off the train, and Edinburgh. Even if it's not festival season because I'm being triggered from previous years of months-long experiences of walking up hills in the rain to get to a venue with nobody in it. And more than that. I used to think I was my own worst critic. Then I came to Edinburgh discovered. Discovered. I was a fucking Amazon. It's so true. I'm not doing a show here. I'm not performing in every single list of the best comedian Ediborah has upset me. On it. Not my size. Ed mentioned awards day. Even though I knew I did not I could not have been considered. It was a disappointment. I've only been out. I came up to open the fringe. I did the opening address and then I came back up to the show for refugees with his chauffeur ministy last night secret places podcast live, which was amazing, which Sarah did I was bits pointed as well that I wasn't nominated for the putting address. I'm a feminist. But I sometimes find it difficult to be happy for the women. So, for instance, when my ex boyfriend got a new girlfriend Volva, then hoping that she would be happy with such an interesting man. I, I hope she doesn't like expensive dinners or presence because he owes me a huge amount of money. It's hard to be a feminist isn't as der Jay's is when he's a bit tricky. I am a feminist bounce up here at the number festival, fringe. I have tickets for a feminist polemic about historical oppression. And instead, I'm pretty sure I'm going to see a one woman reenactment of the whole of sex in the city. I really want to see that. Do you want to go? See it's gather say. What time? Is it? Yes. Yeah. No matter what time is. Yes. Yes, I'll cancel something else. I'm eating too. I'm a feminist. But sometimes I find it hard to be happy for the women. For instance, when my dad got remarried and moved to Australia Ralph and being happy that my step mom. It's soda my dad's I was quite was Imphal when your dad moves frustration. It's like that film, the dingo ate my baby, except the dingo is a nice lady from delayed and the baby is any chance I had a life with abandonment issues. You're about so always the best Sarah like other peoples alike. Things about did. I win. Moslem all the PS other people's always about things like plucking their eyebrows and stuff. And then you also fair to say, I'm a feminist but I find it should be difficult. So much. Very good. I'm a feminist but backstage, the producer came up and gave me a tank, top that was given to me by some, I think some people who appearing actually on the show. Talk about the charity tomorrow, and it's even got DFW stitched into the label and it says, hashtag, feminist fringe. Am I meet it out? Sloughed response was I'd love to with that. But I can't show my homes. Nali for McEwen brothersplumbing shop percents. Guilty with me never fronts. This wide guest co host, Sarah POSCO. I'm very special guests, Mesa, four to playland McLennan HI cups talking about disobedience. This is the guilty feminists, the book caused him which we explore honorable goals is twenty th century, feminists, the hypocrisies insecurities, which undermine them. Oh, I'm Deborah Francaise. Wellington with me is Sara Pascoe on. We're talking about disobedience. So Sarah, how 'obedient do you think you? Oh, I was thinking about this very 'obedient. Yeah. I think we're too Abedian. We could be so much less 'obedient and not break the law way before we got breaking the law with such conformity is give me an example of doing something disobedient is against the law. Okay. This is a spoiler. I went to see hot Brown. Honey? In London, the overwhelming feeling I had when I was watching them like I cried a bit. And it was because I was just thinking, oh my God, I can fool them to all of these gnomes, and I'm always sort of doing what I'm told, like, for example, trying to look at certain way, I don't think I've ever really stopped to consider like my gender expression. Like when I was a child. That's what ladies looked like. And I've spent my life really even though I, I have it I thought I'd sort of go over that a bit and stuff. I think we all trying to look like something that is clearly cultural and clearly taught to us as children, and it's sort of seep Dane, and also just the way we don't know we all just sort of sit in a certain way. And we we say certain things that we do certain things, and we're all, do you know what I mean? Society needs to be done, so we're not bumping into each other. And that's what I think is. Yeah, I went to a country. I went name it. So don't a shame it, but they don't queue there. Had it's terrible terrible holiday from the ad onwards. An apple I couldn't leave because there was just no way of getting out the door and organiz Russia and you just had to dust with your suitcases. That is a great example circus. I'm from Australia. And when I came here, I could not believe the way people key lucky you were to be here. No, you're right. No. Yeah. People queue for buses here. It's so weird. But otherwise, we'd find each other. Right. Because we've got a lot of aggression, and we have to have a system, which is like yet, I might not like it. But this is how I got here, and you're going to get on the bus before me if we had a bundles, what school children get on a bus. It's all it's like a strain is getting on a bus. We just do wait till it comes up then everyone gets up. And you sort of just, you know, like standing up queuing before the buses of Ryan. You hustle seeing Strange's a cloud. Gives it a nightclub atmosphere. Nice that's actually cultural example, Australia and Britain, obviously very, very similar culturally and not spider. They know every different spied, even as I say that I realized that I am speaking as non-indigenous Australian and soon as I said, I went hold on a minute. I wonder why that could be could it be because Britain, colonized, Australia. Yeah. So Rome labor should on Australia. Very similar culture. Previously, the culture in Australia was Mona Mandic, and we funked up apologies. Which, I believe government has offered in a very half-hearted way. But what I'm saying is, I think it's an example, off to be 'obedient here, you have to do one thing to be 'obedient that you do. Now, the and I just don't think we notice the many many, many coded ways that we just we go into the shop, and we go into the section that says, ladies, what shop is a palm stole. Stores says women's women's wear, and we think about that. We don't go shoe. I actually think even if they weren't signs, I would still want to man's trousers, I would still head trousers that would fit. May I? You know what I mean? Like, why is it? So I just think we rectus some of it is. I, I do think is a and also thinking sensitive by gender. I think it was exactly the same amount of things on men, like what we're talking about. Oh, complete. Yes. Oh, about women. And I think it's really good to question them. But some of it's just about as like some of it's just a hey, if you want this kind of thing it's over here. It's not you must have a humbug. No. But if you saw Remond knitting on a boss, you would look twice. I'd kiss him. I think it was so timing and delightful, you would but it would be od'd because he's not really conforming or obeying. I've had three conversations with men about selling this Estival. I saw a play that was about solving. It was really great and three different men saying they want it stop making their own clothes. That's amazing. And that's the kind of thing like, why is that? Well, though it should know how much it's outside sick. Wow. I know. But it is because of the history do see what I mean. Yeah, I deny too. I definitely definitely think the in situates explicit messages, we get about gender. I just don't think anyone really conforms strictly, I think we all conform massively all of the time. And if people don't conform their remarkable. Like the fact that if a man looks after his children fulltime, it's remarkable still, and that's changing that shift. I think in generations won't be the case, but I still think we are in tiny ways we could just be rebelling all the time. And that's what I felt when I saw Brown, Honey yet because they are just I think they take joy in their disobedience, and that's what made me want to do it. It is that help aren't Honey. Nothing. What'd you say some comedy? Go. Thank you so much. It's okay about disobedience, I think I'm I think I do by the rules of the time, the people plays being naughty, thinking disobedience in general, and I'm thinking about civil disobedience and the west kind and then. Well, I remember something that happened nauseating. I thought I was in a terrorist attack. It wasn't just may also only murs. It was a terrorist attack. This last November, I was in circa station. I was evacuated. We announce was going never ever heard before saying that people had to the station, but it didn't say why, and it sounded very serious, and the trains stops a suddenly you've got hundreds of thousands of people streaming about circus station, then they were police in high as and they were just telling people to move on. And people were asking what's happening. What's going on? And they said we don't know yet. We don't know yet. Just keep moving out of the area and old of the shops on the streets were, locking, their doors, and keeping people inside or outside and they bringing down the shots at the back where they're Laurie deliveries. And those shots a sent a lot like why full shots. And so people started running and screaming in the streets and this thing about being a human being. Remember when people around us, scared we get very scared as well as people started running, and screaming and cowering children and dragging suitcases I started running as well. And it's the most physiologically scared I've ever been, and I felt so terrified. And I didn't know what I was wanting from. Some towards people running kind of different directions through so streets looking for somewhere safe because they didn't know what they were trying to Skype from Nova safe. And I was thinking very selfishly the unsafest place to be is with lots and lots of other people wherever about to happen now. I hide from it, and there was a doorway, and it had to fairy lights around Dobley street in SoHo and so strange because I was so scared. I just wanted to call my mom, and I'm so I ducked into this doorway, and I texted, my mom, can you look on the news? I don't know what's happened. Something's happened in Oxford circus station. People writing screaming as sending this text message a woman at the top of the stairs. She kind of her head down looked at me and said, he coming up aside, Wilkins, was was that I'm so sorry. I have to start in hit running screaming through so ho-. There's been some kind of terrorist attack, but don't have what it is. I don't know what happened, but something's happening Oxford circus station of the shops that shot. And she went, oh, it's just London is just just London. Do you wanna wax now? We're here. And I had gone into a Brazilian waxing studio as my place of safety and, and, and this woman, and I've never had a this is the woman. She was very calm. She gave me a show coconut, cure, calm you down. And she was just come on. It's all silly outside just have a wax. Now. You're here, and I've never I've never had a Brazilian and that's not like a feminist thing. I know for some people it's about, but for me, I'm very hairy woman in general, just Harry everywhere, and I've just deal with it that way, I'm one of the hairy ones I'm a fuzzy little peach. I've never tried to try and contain this. I think sometimes what you try to come become a slippery slope is now. So. The, the woman. Convinced me to Brasilia much this thing called the middle space, which is the idea was something happens that so out of the old nephew jolts, you might behave in a completely different way. And in a way, almost kind of disobedient to the person that you that you were I have discovered that when I think I'm in a terrorist attack. I shine my vagina to a stranger. Normally find to me, and I would be so shy of seventy noble and she didn't even leave the room Avas change in. I was just taking my clothes off in front of the and we were talking about basically, how much we have all absorbed of fear, and she was explaining his younger than me, but she was explaining that's the thing they called it terrorism. It's supposed to scare you all scared. We have all seen things happen to people who just living their lives everywhere, in the world and everything she was saying, with so wise and so correct. And I was like the other night, down the bed, and she was kind of like. This. Wax of my groin. And then she was explaining to me. But of course, we realized that this is something that we created. We were part of like this is something out. Government has created unrest in the mid lace, and then as she lay down, this cut of canvas strip on top of my groin. And of course Bush's. And then Ritz. And it's the best thing because she did what she had said. It was funny. And I've never told anyone that story either because it's not very own brand. Thank you so much. Guest today from the amazing cabaret show, hot Brown, Honey. Please welcome to the stage. Lisa far Laffy and offer to. Could you just introduce yourself? Maybe expand my name's Lisa Lafi. I am the director of Brown. Honey? And also in it. We do all the things what are we? We are feminist masterpiece somebody. Right, that, so we're just gonna keep it great. The Mazda pace that we got that interview, and we will be taking it. Yeah. We like to blend all the foams theater cabaret hop. So sick stance and pretty much in your face. Seventy five minutes of Brown. Women shouting. This kit, and you'll from Australia and New Zealand. Is that right? Oh, we all live out of a strategy have with me yet. My name's offer, and I'm a cast member as well. So I wanted to when you Deborah made you want to be more disobedient. So I haven't seen the show yet, and I've had a mazing things. So it was that something that you would conscious when you create in the work, I think by nature we laugh a lot. We have to laugh a lot in really terrible circumstances. When you live a laugh as a woman of color, experience, a lot of things that make you feel angered and frustrated, but rather than yelling and screaming about it. We all kind of laugh about things and make jokes about it to say the light at the end of the tunnel. So the disobedience in that is Tiki nature is our way of being able to be ourselves. But kind of state things and have people listen to us laugh, and then kind of realized that shit, that's about me. Okay. So, yeah, that's kind of what would. That's my perspective. Anyways. I don't think it's been interesting often some people will say, oh, your show is quite angry or all the shedding, but we're just like isn't that funny that just when women get on stage and be loud and on talking like music is loud? Do NAR, like Jean Jews allowed everything about show was loud, that, that becomes confronting angry and win, because we actually it's like a joyous celebration. But we often get that in lots of reviews or talk. So that's the first thing, people take away just like NAR, which just we've been silenced as first nations women for thousands of years. All we're doing is speaking, Alex -perience. And that becomes a controversial angry thing. I won't sometimes if someone can feel confronted about what someone's saying it's not about the volume. It's about how it made them fails check tive can watch something suddenly realize that. Oh, like you say is may or I didn't understand. And actually oddly that travels through you into I was really lectures, ready shouted isn't what was present yet. And I think that stops people in their tracks like they kind of actually say they caught progress to the next autumn, that's on stage because they're still feeling everything. And so we that new lens on them. They're like reacting to everything that then happens in tired, delete different way than if it would just to kind of wash over you. You as you watch and kind of take things in, but then instead of that they're like my back's against the wall. And all I just keep thinking is that I'm being pushed further and further back. I think sometimes the same way that men are now finding some of the ought and commentary coming from women confronting because it does flag up thousands of years of oppression that if even if they haven't actively participated in benefited from I think the same thing is happening with white people right now. And I know I watch things sometimes I do feel confronted by it. But I think my feeling is that's good if I feel uncomfortable, confronted. I think that's a good process. It's important, it's got to happen, the more I am friends with women of color. The more I hear that daily stories, the more I realized how much holiday it is like things like a friend of mine recent he was about to get on a train, and she said to the woman next on the platform. Can I? I've got a ticket for the five o'clock train. Do you reckon why can get on the three o'clock and the woman next door went? I've got the same hope so, and that woman own fine, and then she went to get on, and they wouldn't let her and she said, but I know that woman has gone on. And they just said, what will you can't? And the other one was white. I hear stories like that all the time now and it's so consistent. And I just realize I am part of that power structure, and I have to ally up and shift something issue show, more for other women of color, or is it more for the wider architecture of society to be understanding about what it's like to be able to color, definitely give it to the black Brown and mixed women because we do know how important that is, as performance to see yourself on stage and hear your stories and how empowering that can be. You know, that is why we do what we do, because we have seen other women do it in the past. But also like the main when we decided to sit down and probably right this show it's a cry to everybody else to create. With us. Like we wanted it to be a party a celebration. So that people feel like I can be a part of the change be a part of the solution, because it's just the smallest things that will impact allies Sar hugely, if he can switch somebody's spraying up, which is like, what office said using comedy, and using satire to break down the walls, just for a second in that seventy five minutes that you might feel a pot of our experience or asked story and be able to empathize and Mike, some change. So it's a huge pot. Yeah. And I think we say this show hot brand Honey is to interrogate and kind of ask all the questions about your current views, and I think that that's really important in being able to have the discussion is if you feel it. Start to work through the I like the feeling into the mind into being able to talk about it is where the discussion needs to happen. And it's never going to be a comfortable studying. But you should start someway our whole thing was long as you stop, and you have a moment to sit in your jokes, and feel that. It's really important to start to develop the way that you can talk about that, that's comfortable to you and also true to who you are. But also in mind of all the people who you're trying to discuss with. So I wouldn't go up to any person of color, and to say, hey, give me an education. I, I would I would get to know them like you would with anyone and develop that relationship over time. So he can have those conversations and just being close friends with women of color. You, it's a bit like men who don't have any friends who female, you can't really know it. It's sort of that daily day-to-day what happened to you today. How was your morning so frustrating because this happened and you go, oh, that's interesting that wouldn't happen to me at its that understanding. But I think what you're doing is your allowing people to experience that in seventy five minutes through music and comedy, and with joy. And so I left with so many different emotions that I'd never felt any other to show, actually. How important is comedy in your show. Is so we love laughing. I mean you can hear his howling over there. Its own point because I think as a language for that, that kind of overcomes anyone's background, whether it's economically, wherever web of grown up in class culturally. It's like the slapdash way that we laugh at things is also very visual and not just in the satirical, things that we say on stage. It's in the act of spoiler alert. It's in the act of being subjected to Bay, I had boobs at the age of like eight got my period. When I was nine I had hips by the time I was nine as well. And so when I would run my tits would just lack bounce up and down and everybody all the boys and goes in the class, would just watch me when I was doing running like this. I never got what they were looking at all. Nodding in agreeance. Sorry, the act now that I get to do in the show where I get to bash people with my boot. With these gigantic melanin huge against boobs is really fraying for me personally as a performer. But as a visual thing that's really important for people to say, especially for people who have had been well-developed from very young age and sexualize from that time forward that act is important in that respect. And so we laugh at that, and I love looking as angry and terrifying as possible. Which any of the males that I come across, which is consent, you, I will stand for a moment, and I will go like this. And for some reason, just glazed overlook and the leaning forward, I, I take that as yes. So, yeah, it's really important in that aspect of these stories, these around buddies, someone with washboard ads like this one and beautiful boobs to, to someone who looks like me. It's really important to ply on all of those things. There's an amazing pace that plays on that sort of the idea of the, the Elvis, Presley view of indigenous women. It's so incredible sort of like a satire, on this idea of indigenous women, being romanticized and sexualize, sort fetish is, and it's funny, but it's also it just makes you see the world in a different way, how important is music in terms of how it can make people feel in your show. Huge I think we love music. We love the journey that music can take people on. It's like all elements. I like super stylized in show. We have, unfortunately sorry for the old effect that have been coming to shy of being holding. There is like this, because we're taking you into the club. We want you to feel the base through the floor. We want we want you to have some sort of emotional response physically as well sensory. Yeah. Yeah. Rather than sort of a bang and conforming and going along with the way society as you and the way you're meant to behave in society, and you'll meant not make any trouble what you're doing is just bursting out of all of those things, and taking charge. I feel like there's so much thority coming off, you on the stage and I feel that we are in a way we are your subjects for that seventy five minutes, and we have to be in your world watching it, I felt like this is what it would be like, if women of color around the world, and it's a lot better. Hala guilty feminists. It's Debra briefly, interrupting your podcast that, you know, the guilty feminist is playing the Royal Albert hold the actual big run-up at hold on the seventh of July. It's an afternoon performance. So people outside London will be able to get trains and get home for the evening tickets at only ten pounds and they are available now if you go to guilty feminist dot com, it is going to be a lineup like no lineup you've ever seen from the feminists before if you've enjoyed a talk show getting booked tickets for the Rhode Island hall, because it's going to be absolutely spectacular. Now, the guilty feminist is teaming up with them national to bring back the legendary secret policeman, the show started in the nineteen seventies with Monty python and has been one that is featured comedy greats every decade since we aren't bringing a diverse an incredible lineup to the Hackney empire for the secret policeman's toll on Wednesday the. Fifth of June. On the Bill. You will see Francesca out knows Juliet. Stevenson, Cindy, desert Boetsche fun, be Matteo, grace, Petri, just foster cute, Alison spittle KEMA. Bob a feel of bond. Sophie, gca and cheval mcsweeney who plays system, Michael in the Derry goals. Go to Hackney empire dot co dot U K for tickets. And if you're going to the Edinburgh fringe, there were three guilty feminist shows at the pleasant grand and a secret policeman's tool show to go to Ed fringe dot com and check those out too. And also, the feminist book is out in paperback and includes two new interviews with Hannah Gadsby and one with Phoebe bridge, pick it up, now now back to the podcast. So many of, you know, I used to witness if you listened to the podcast regularly, and I'm now, an atheist who believes there is a gold, then on binary. I don't know what your idea of power diocese, about the Jehovah's Witness idea is very specific. You would have seen it probably on the front cover of time magazine, the Jehovah's Witness idea of paradise is this people in national dress, passing fruit to one another four, turn ity just back and forth back and forth. And the reason is in the paradise Sara Pasquali like we are all going to be vegan paradise is not heaven. It's earth. Being restored to a paradise like it was in the garden of Eden in the garden of Eden, everyone was speaking, you will have noticed on the front cover of the watch towers. Well, there's usually like a lion playing with a toddler which is probably caused alarm in some of you, but it shouldn't because the lions will also be vegan. It's true. This is your paradise. You should become a Jehovah's Witness because you would love it to be fed. That's the only element you enjoy. So that's what I believed and I would spend my time going out knocking on doors and telling people about, but that was really the only pace that women were allowed to speak because in the kingdom, which is the Jehovah's Witness church. Women are not allowed to speak on the platform. So the men get up and they do sort of, like, what you think of as a sermon and no woman has ever spoken in that place. And the thing is I only became a Jehovah's Witness when I was fourteen I was about sixteen. So I already had a lot of experience because being done a lot of speech and drama I debated at school. And I found it really difficult to be quiet and one thing that I discovered that I could do secretly because you would never do anything because it was considered worldly worldly as the opposite of anything. Good. So was I found out that there was an improvise -ation group nearby to where I live like a comedy and prevention group. So I found three other Jehovah's Witnesses and we could not tell the elders we'd get. And so we snuck off to these improvise -ation houses, and how to sort of who's a ton of life, is it. Anyway, type. Type group. But the thing is they knew the people, the improv group news that we will, we it, we couldn't tell them we would Jehovah's Witnesses because that thing we'll wait and to we would be bringing Jehovah's name into reproach, because we shouldn't have been doing it. So we had to hide that we would witnesses, but they knew there was something weird about us because we couldn't do any saints about sex death. A fruit based work. Fruit place. Any fruits, could I have an animal an animal great? This will be about a kangaroo. We were so naive and innocent, and a virginal. And when you can just hell when people are sort of, like, we would too old to be that on worldly. Really? And so I was doing this secretly, and doing this little bit of comedy. And then, of course, the eldest found out on band, we wanted to do it anymore. And one of the eldest said it was the reason that two of these other young people in the congregation it started smoking and. And. I said in my head on fairly show. That's hormones comedy, improvise ation, but he felt it was the comedy anyway. So they banned from Stoneking, and we go bend from space Joan. Give me give me a word from the audience. So there was really no outlets a toll, but they were two things that you were allowed to do as women. And one of them was in the watchtower studies. So there'd be the public talk, which man would do. And then another man would get up and they'd be a study article in the watch tower, and then one man would read a paragraph from the study, article, and then another man would ask a question that was at the bottom of the paragraph. And then anyone in the congregation put the hand up man or woman answer it. But you meant to put it into your words, so that it's cleave understood it. So I thought, right I will put it into mine was. And after that, I had to missions, every Sunday, one how many times could I get paid to how many laughs could I get? This is how much do stand up, it won't be funny to you. But I'll tell you see, here's an example. The paragraph would say something like in the upcoming district. Convention. It is a temptation for sisters to dress in an ostentatious fashion and not consider spiritual things as I him as the four sixteen says we should have an iphone godly devotion, and not the showy display of one's means of life that look that up. It's not scripture. What should sisters be aware over in the upcoming district convention? So I would put my hand up, and I'd say, I believe the title of the next convention is the divine. Peace convention. Not the divine fashion convention. My right, sisters. And people loved it because it was the only interesting thing that would happen in that whole week. And then we also were allowed to little plays once a week. There was a meeting about it was called the critic ministry school, and it was to learn how to go to the doors and men were not talks, but women were lots to do little plays. So you like this. Hello. Hi. I was just wondering if you have a worried about the future. Yes, I do. Why don't you come in which they never said in real on. And then the sister would show the other sister, three scriptures. And then she'd side, this is brilliant. My eyes opened to please come back next week. Never once happened in the real world, but you this little place, now, a lot of sisters in light doing the place because it was scary because it was in front of a big audience. And so they'd phone in sick on the day, and then the man who was running the school, which is cover it. So I went to him, and I said, if you ever get anybody pulling out, I'll do it on the date. Just tell me all improviser. I'll make it up. Give me literally ten minutes, and I will cover anybody. So I became the professional under study. I know it was only meant to get like to talk so year in front twenty five. And what I discovered was Jehovah's Witnesses found nothing funnier than taking the piss out of the bone again Christians. So I would make every character I talked to a bone again Christian all similar, and somebody who didn't know the bible very well, because the Jehovah's Witness if nothing else, do you know the bible, and then I would ask her series of questions get hutch read from her own bible, until she realized she was very Rome. And then the Jehovah's Witnesses that's not funny to you. But in the congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses that killed so much so that I got asked to demonstrates it at a district convention. That was like a stadium like Wimbley. I started my comedy career in a sensually Wembley stadium. What my way back. Thank you write about. Our next guest from the refugee mentoring. Okinawa's -ation roots, spelt, our UT. Please welcome Leyla McLean dicey Jacobs. I'm daisy and I'm neyla, and we run routes, which is prize supports refugee seeking women amazing. So can you please tell us about it, and how we can get involved in it? Yes. Absolutely. So Leyland and I both felt quite outraged. How unjust these islands system in the UK is the moment and the that, especially as a woman, you can arrive in a country with an incredibly hostile. Let's go environment. You can be living on thirty five pounds a week in an out of court for months, maybe years in a language that you potentially don't understand with potentially. No social connections and social networks. And if you're an asylum seeker you can't work, and so we realized that we probably weren't going to be able to fix the asylum system. But we could provide some of the support that we thought wasn't that I'm for us the way that we did that is three faith by our experiences data by directly. Experience transformative powers of data by times of confidence and communication and creating a community. And so, yeah, we've developed roots so we run the workshops every week and we've worked with over one hundred women already from thirty different countries. And we create this community in these theater workshops, and it's all about developing language in a fun, social environment really supportive, and the wonderful women that come also, we're really keen to meet and connect with other women who are more settled, unstable in their lives and say, that's why we have launched mentoring, which pairs every woman that we work with and comes to our workshops with a mentor. How do we find the women? But how'd you reach out and contact them when often they might be quite sedated? We work with a number of amazing organizations that already what with women from refugee in asylum-seeking backgrounds, the moment way, just walking in London. And we really lucky to have made connections with some great organizations like women refugee, women and other nations. Like breaking barriers. Yeah. Which is great in tons of mentos, because we work with such a wide range of women as Layla sat from lots of different countries various different sets of experiences and skills, various different sets of goals, and I'm bishops for what they want life to be in the UK. We need have mental that reflect that diversity as well. So that could be from helping somebody to send an Email or look onto that universal credit account online to retraining a solicitor passing GCC to allow them to do that higher education learning the cello. One of women was land the cello gardening. There is a huge range of things setting up your own food business. So we're really lucky to have. Have already amazing of mental. But if you think all of the amazing women out there, that you can offer any one of those things, I've just mentioned anything else at toll than we would really, really. Three of websites and say, oh, I can do this by the cello in the garden. About fundings. Are you kind of independently funded? Yeah. Which is important to us, because of ten with one being is restricted so, especially with the silent seacoast and said that means that some support is cut off from them. So all of our mentors are sponsored by their employer with the recognition that being a mentor is a really good opportunity for you to practice your leadership. And we also provide training of the mentors so their employers will pay for their place. So the employer of the mental pays how much to whom so they pay shocking, then not really rich of the bucket. So your question. Just put it to be people the their instructions. Otherwise they go. But I. I think about the restriction just to clarify that, basically, our government does have money that supposed to support things. But it comes with only if you do this, which is only if you do this often anything that involves creativity anything that the cello is dead. Off involves people who have refugee status in the UK. So if you're in that limbo stage, you've just arrived, and you're in and out of court sign in the homeowners every month you receive support beyond Email classes, and that can be three year waiting list for English language classes in the moment. That was the first thing that's always cuts was letting foreign language, which is. And then they said people don't assimilate. I think what's important about Oakland. Obviously is the practical level by there are so many people in Britain who feel so sad, and increasingly more, so about how the world is and dental pockets of things, so clever amazing people dedicating their lives doing it. I am. We did we did too. I did too. And there's lots of them who give refugees bicycles. And so there's one hundred a we do bikes up and the new by its and then with that give a refugee, a bicycle because of a free way to get around takes them to cycle. And then there's a an element of autonomy and freedom there wasn't there before? Yeah. Google it wherever you live. Because there's those kind of things suddenly, you can do, this really positive thing and often people, that's what you wonder is also doesn't opposite completely off topic op for blind people. You can help them look through that. So. A blind person might be getting dress. And they don't know if they're should much is that trousers don't know if the comes in that cupboard, which one is peaches spaghetti and you just go on, and then anyone in the world you can go yet, peaches. I kind of want that now even though I have no. Is I'm the Yukon. Should advice like to you? I think it goes is it too. Bland. Hollow guilty feminists. It's Debra just saying, thank you. Thank you. Thank you to everybody who's come out for a live tour and made it so extraordinary lots of the dates of stops sell out now. So please, please, please, get your tickets. Now, if you would like to come and see on Wednesday and Southampton Thursday in Sheffield Friday in Coventry Saturday in Plymouth Sunday in Brighton or the following week in Glasgow LeicesteR Nottingham or Woking, it really has been a spectacular time. It's like feminists gospel church, come out and join us, and hopefully see that. You're right. Sarah, there are, so many clever people who are compassionate, and loving and proactive. And I really do think the answer to the world's problems at the moment is the compassionate people. We have to have more get up and go than the young compassionate people because it's easy to feel compassion. But are we doing anything? So we're very excited that you're doing this, and we happy to support it to UK organization. Does we have international listeners if you're nother country, you might be able to find something similar in your country? And if you can't please start it, and you can go onto our website and sign up to mentor. So if you want to be a mental what if you're a freelancer listening. Yeah. Any companies as well. He wants to sponsor a whole program. We'd be very happy for that. That was right. San pasco. She's a freelance if she wanted to do it, she doesn't have a company. There's a discount if you're paying as an individual, we didn't want to talk to you right off the father, people might want to pay to do this themselves. And like we said, it's not just business gills that we're looking for. It's also things like playing cello in the garden. Cello. Would you honeybee interested in teaching refugees to do some of the amazing dancing and things that you do? Absolutely. And we all have different kinds of skills wearing different hats. That would be amazing. We should see if we can hook that up. But if you'd like to be a part of that roots are UT s I was like site is, we are roots dot com and Twitter is women are right, please, get in touch. And if you wanna see hot, Honey, where do you go? You can get us on Twitter handle just hop Browne, Honey, Instagram. Follow us on Facebook. Great. Akeso google. Hop Browne, Honey and find out if they're coming to a theater near you charity of the week. Where are you thank you? Hi, everybody. Enemies Nabal now wanna tell you about women shelter. We. A woman shelter night shelter. That is dedicated to provide emergency, and short term accommodation shelter to women to non binary Tron sustained people. We also open to people from different phase off and religious persuasions, and it is people who find themselves. They sit you'd as a result of not Costa, public funds. We are collective, and we are based in Glasgow. We are run by. By people who have direct experience of this Titian of the silent prosise and immigration. We are also designed to meet the immediate increasing needs of this woman who are excluded from public access in terms of housing, ralphie services, and also homelessness. So what we need is to open our doors in terms of starting providing the service. We securing a lease in central Gaza. Go location to start that work, but we'd like to long-term east to have own acid own property. So we can have control over our business in, in terms of how their functions you can get in touch with us at infobahn to forward slash Glasgow dot org. Dot UK or you can do online donations at chaff dot org forward slash project four slash to shelter. Thank you great. You have been listening to the guilty feminist ever, Francois. Made guest host Sara Pascoe and very special guests. Lisa elena. One Gura, neyla, McLennan, and daisy Jacobs, recording engineer Gary Boyle music, polish was Tom, let's keep the tonight show. Thanks to Tony in hundred PJ live and everyone on belly. All of you listening, more information about this and other episodes, guilty feminist. Paul. Got no one Sharon each side. Okay. All right. Do you what do you want to Tom? What are we meant to do? Among it there we it. Fix it.

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Want to Build a Smart City? Here Are Some Strategies That Work

Knowledge@Wharton

39:37 min | 1 year ago

Want to Build a Smart City? Here Are Some Strategies That Work

"Podcast is brought to you by knowledge award. A guest today is Sita headed. She is the general manager and group head at the digital software and solutions group at Datta consultancy services. And we are speaking with her today about smart cities a tool kit for leaders, especially report that we produce elaborately recently. See the thank you so much joining us today knowledge, it working at it. So great to be here, particularly talking about smart cities topic that you and I are quite passionate about exactly right. So again, thanks so much for being here. Do we can start basic question. What is a smart city? What was what are the concept mean originally in? How is it evolved over time? And thank you for having me, Mika lemon. It's such a pleasure to be here with you. And let's look at some data. If you look at smart cities and the number of smart cities between two thousand. Two and two thousand fifteen it had quadrupled across the globe from approximately twenty one eight at the end of two thousand seventeen about one hundred seventy eight cities embarked on two hundred and fifty smart city projects from Melbourne to Copenhagen to San Francisco. This data suggests that that is this rapid overnight sation across the globe. And there are leaders in the municipalities and cities that are trying to figure out how to cope with this rapid urbanization. And as you rightly said, the definition of smart cities has award over the last couple of decades in the first phase when smart cities started to be discussed in the public forum technology players looked at some of the challenges that were created by the organization. So they said let me create. Eight point product solutions are dressing the radius challenges, which is what technology players do related to parking, mobility, water-management lighting, and so on so that was the face one. However, as many city, leaders lamented. Technology players didn't quite understand how the city would consume those solutions. So came the second phase van city leader said let me take control of the technology. I gender for my city and how to things that were lacking. Number one collaboration across the various departments of the city and number two keeping citizens at the center of everything that they do so collaboration with citizens. So now, we are in the third phase of smart city definition, I'm quite excited about that, Michael. Because cities leaders are saying that I want to create cities that are livable that focus on the wellbeing and happiness of my citizens. So it is a citizen Centric agenda that is evolving, and one of the examples that come to mind as a place that you visited. Last year for your -cation, Iceland, and the capital city of Iceland Reykjavik developed a program right after the two thousand eight financial crisis. Call the better Reykjavik program that is a platform, by the way, which use wise to the citizens in policy-making and other examples in San San Antonio has an example with their highway sign boats and Beijing with a I love Beijing app that can be used by the citizens to report either power outages, broken streetlamps or potholes to the government. Really loud. You mentioned the idea of a platform because very curious to see how how you think of smart cities functioning as platforms that enable collaboration between different groups groups of stakeholders that was wondering if you could speak about that a little bit more. Yeah. So if you start with being citizen-centric that provides the right motivation to drive the right behaviors take the right action and collaboration yeses absolutely needed across various departments of the city is also needed with the citizens and private enterprises while so if you look at the linkage as an example between water-management and traffic management or between event management in a city and city Commerz, it becomes quite apparent as to why such a collaboration is really essential. As an example of that is water pipe breakage in one part of the city, you really want to divert traffic in that part. So as to avoid traffic, jams or condition in that part. And similarly when the city is hosting let's say a football match or a popular music concert. One thing that isn't obvious is while the city will improve it enhanced safety and security measures. What is not clear is how does it relate to city Commerz as an example, the retailers will do well if they can increase the foot traffic in the areas where such specially when Sapin what that does what the retailers increases that ever news for the retailers. Not just that it increases revenue for the city because of the taxes. So the collaboration across the various departments of the city is absolutely essential. And having a unified platform as you said will. Dr that collaboration. But as you, and I know we also have to collaborate the city has to collaborate with citizens as well as with private enterprises and academy institutions, and one example that comes to mind is how result as institute for digital. Progress has set up the structure they have a unified leadership structure that drives collaboration across the videos municipalities. Authorities academy institutions like the Zona state university as well as private sectors like Google Uber. Cisco Intel in order to tackle some of their traffic condition problems. Really glad you brought up leadership because it seems to me that the role of the leadership is very crucial and making a city smarter, at least smarter. How do mayors civic leaders go about setting priorities that define how a city become smarter across different dimensions operations. You're right. Michael mayors play such a critical role. I was watching a documentary several years ago from hitch people which is called the weight of the nation this documentary takes you through the neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio, but to clearly Lyndhurst and half there about eight and a half miles apart. And as you drive through these neighborhoods the life expectancy drops by approximately twenty four years, and it's not. So you need to hire you see in Utica too bright in London. From Oxford circus, silver lane, which is about fifteen minutes train ride the life expectancy drops by approximately fifteen to twenty years do neighborhoods that are so close to each other. But so far apart. The question is why and I'll be answer is. Yes, that is a healthcare disparity between these communities, but as you, and I know the healthcare disparity doesn't come by itself. It's also because of the disparities in education housing food access and possibly what force development so mayors as you rightly as they have a crucial wrote role to play in terms of addressing some of these real life challenges and balancing that with driving economic growth for the city's. So they need to do that in my view in three steps number one. They need to I defy. Fine. A clear vision for their city in a very simple manner. I lose an overused example here, but a powerful one one of the former mayor's Bacelona, Mr. aero said that his vision was to create a dancing bustling city where the visitor's felt welcome the streets were well, let the city's well fresh and citizens and visitors where safe and happy, you know, this powerful simple vision dro-, the choice of choice of technologies for Bacelona, whether it be in mobility parking lighting, energy management or security and even waste management for the city. Right. So to start with the mayor's need to define in similar terms. What their vision for the city the second, of course, as we discussed earlier is collaboration. With the citizens and driving initiatives at our citizen-centric that becomes very important as a second next step and the third is the mayor's need to understand the local and political context, which I think they are quite adapter. So if if let's take an example in San Francisco of few years ago, they implemented a dynamic pricing for the parking system. Eliza implementing a similar system called L A park, but this expansive and expensive in St. sensors garage, sensors, smart meters, and all of the technologies that are required to dynamically calculate the pricing for the parking isn't suitable for smaller cities, smaller cities can do by using data transaction data that they collect as well as some manual surveys that they. Do quite occasionally. And so it is really important for mayors to understand the local and political context in sort of getting excited and trying to figure out these solutions work somewhere else can replicate it in my city. So those are the three steps I would say that the mayor's need to consider. But also balance the resources that are available to them between solving the citizens and others in some critical challenges and driving economic growth. Glad you brought up the challenges that miss face. Because one of the biggest challenges that many of them seem to facing. These days is how to handle the influx of new people could either be immigrants coming from the countries, or it could be just an influx of people from the hinterlands rural areas into the cities. Do you have any thoughts on how mayors and other civic leaders can deal with these Gelin ges in a smart and also an inclusive and compassionate manner. Absolutely, michael. Let's look at some data. If you look at places like Asia Africa and Latin America every hour of every single day. Nearly one thousand people are moving from the rural areas to urban areas. If this were to continue we would have to build a city as largest London one every month. For the next thirty three years. So this is what is causing the rapid overnight station phenomena that many of them are talking about. And it puts a lot of pressure as you, and I know on the city's limited and scarce resources. But that is one of the critical issue at play that many of us are overlooking which is the growing disparity gap across the various regions of nation. So if you look at the US here, the bigger communities today are growing at a much faster pace, and they're also contributing overall to the nation's growth more than ever before. And these bigger communities are being powered by well, educated millennials and the agglomeration of trends caused by digital technologies. Right. And these are happening as some of the smaller, metros rain and rural areas are sliding into deep decline. And if you just look at the US in the last couple of years, more than half of the jobs that have been created because of the digital technologies have gone to the bigger metros the top twenty metro Sierra in US, which has only home to one third of the American population with the usual suspects of New York, Boston the bay area Seattle, Washington DC followed by the sun belt hubs of Atlanta, Dallas Miami and Orlando so in this context, the mayors have to Kim Pettus number one, make regionally balanced growth a priority. It's not a very difficult task to do. It is just that. The leaders have to consciously say that I moved to drive comic cohesion, and it's not a novel idea either. Because if you look across the pond, the European Union said that I'm going to allocate one third of my budget between two thousand fourteen and two thousand twenty to the cohesion policy a program that will allow some of the lagging regions to catch up. So that should be a key imperative for the mayor's the second is make re-skilling priority. That has a lot of talk about machine learning. Artificial intelligence, robotics automation, getting to the factory floors the jobs of tomorrow, not be the same as jobs of today or s today, even the white collar jobs will get disrupted if you go and look at the historical data one thing is certain whenever the public sector investment is directed towards the human capital. That has always led to prosperity right in three. Dictates falling nineteen ten US spent a lot of it's funds public sector funds in educating the citizens so the high school graduation rate in that period. Went from seventeen percent or eighteen percent to seventy three percent. And the graduation rate went from nine person to fifty one percent. It's an amazing growth in just a very short period of time. So what what does that mean it meant that for US? The citizens were highly educated and their income was substantially higher in comparison to the counterparts some of the other industry Leist countries at that period of time in my view, if we can do then we should be able to do it now but typically given. Access to many of the digital tools that we have at our disposal. You mentioned digital tools and one of the, of course, digital technologies are spreading everywhere, and one of the effects digitalization is that it throws up foster mounds of data, and I was wondering if you could speak a little bit about how data analytics and collaborative data sharing can anybo smarter decision making about cities so data is by far the most valuable asset nowadays that private enterprises as well as public sector has so whether you're driving through a traffic light or paying utility, Laura browsing city's website or calling a city department or even dumping garbage into your neighborhood dumpster. The city collects so much of data about you. If the data is mind properly, then the city can use of course to serve the needs of. The citizens better. They can even anticipate the needs of the citizen. So if the city were to mine this data and a platform there are ffices that the report talks about let me see if an outline those five for our listeners number one. The I see is all about collaboration that we talked about across the various departments of city. I think we spoke about an example of water-management and traffic management and how they are interrelated. So that is the first collaboration across the departments of the city. The second is how do you use the platform to effectively so of the needs of the citizens? So the second c stands for the citizens. So that using that unified platform how can citizen such as you and me either pay a Bill or get a license for starting a business, and this would require collaboration as. We can imagine across several departments of the city. The third see is about the colleges and the university systems. So how do you collaborate with them if in order for you to tap into the local talent and the four see is communities a neighborhood. How do I use the platform to effectively? So the needs of a community neighborhood provide them information related to their neighborhood. Maybe it is related to safety is related to health about that particular community and the fifth sees about the civic tech space. How do you open up your platform publish API's that the companies can use the private sector can use in order to develop new applications tools in support of your smart city, I gender. So those are the five CS. But when it comes to data McCall, I'm certain you, and I will say. That before city starts to collect your data and use it. They have to get explicit permission from the citizens, right and explicit opt-in is absolutely needed. Not just that the city needs to explain to the citizens holiday plan to use the data in simple terms instead of throwing a twenty page document at us, and in the end cities need to be responsible. Guardians of citizens data. I agree with couldn't agree with you more about the need to privacy. And actually I wanted to the next question a half, we was about a sixth see, and that has cost of obviously, you have a lot of expenses involved with cities trying to come smarter which knee brings up the need for how do these initiatives get funded and how do get the costs covered? And it was wondering if you could talk a little bit about the different financing models that cities have used to to fund some of these smart initiatives and what the pros and cons. You're absolutely right. That cost and funding is by far the biggest challenge when it comes to funding, any smart city initiatives. So of course, you know, federal grant is an option philanthrophy grant. Which is the knightfoundation as an example funded some of the smart city roadmap study that the city. Philadelphia didn't publish last month as we all know, but these grants are not sufficient, if you're looking at a citywide smart city program there are other couple of other options that have been toyed around one is possibly for possibly increase the taxes and thereby increase the revenues of the city to fund some of these programs, but most of us may not be in favor of getting our taxes increased the second option is how do you as we just discussed the city has access to so much of our data. Can they sell it? Can they monetize data? I'm not actually in favour of that option until we understand that. There are adequate privacy and security measures that are in place by the city. So that gets us back to an option that is an age old technique, but it has been improvised recently, it is public private partnerships. The way does wall. Lately is there is also the repayment model that has been built into this partnership. Now, let's look at a couple of examples one that comes to mind this Kansas City with a citywide I o t effort and the municipality in this particular, case funder approximately three point seven million the private partners defended about twelve point three million. So brought the total to about sixteen million. The city used sixteen million dollars to install twenty five kiosks around the city and the kiosks provided free internet access to the citizens as they are getting out and about in the city through which they can also access city related information. The city also uses these kiosks as an emergency alert system. Now the. Revenue model for this comes through advertising on this kiosks and initial calculation has shown that both the city as well as the private partners that funded this initiative will be able to recoup most of their costs in less than fires, which is pretty impressive, right? The second example is Portland Portland Oregon and the initiative, however is a pilot in sort of full fledged smarter program like in the case of cancers. So the city could pretty much low with the federal grant for the spy 'let where they're using IOT related sensors that go on top of the traffic signals as well. As many of the light poles in the city, the objective of this project is for them to figure out how they can improve some of the stalled traffic they can. Reduced. Stalled traffic in these major intersections of the city that by improving the quality. So that's the pilots cope. And if it goes, well, they want to figure out how to get the funding for the entire city. So the initial funding came from NISTA National Institute of standards, and technology and all of the sensors that are needed for the major intersection provided by the private partners. So those are the funding approaches that the cities are looked at where predominantly it has been the public private partnerships with clear repayment models once the funding has been raised. What are some of the best practices in the way? The funds can be allocated across different priorities that the city. You're absolutely right. Funding is by far the most challenging thing for the mayor's to canton with when it comes to smart city programs. But there are three ways at least that they should consider before they go about spending the money number one, which is a pretty much a no brainer, which is to say pick programs that get the maximum bang for the buck or the greatest return on investment. Let's take a XM people. And if you take a city approximately depending on the size of the city, you'll find nearly ten thousand to three hundred thousand lights, and this is in my opinion, very valuable part of the infrastructure because it already has power supply built into them. It's at at an elevation of nearly thirty feet. So. Imagine. If he put some sensors on top of these light poles they can be used to monitor for traffic based on that determine when to turn on the lights and turn off the lights. It can also be used on it or the traffic detect crimes. So we'll just a few sensors on each of the light post the city can achieve at least three things increase the safety and security of the citizens east kadarshian traffic under Shannon, and the third thing that they can do is save energy costs for the city. So that is a project that would provide a maximum bang for the buck. Good ROI. So choose projects that give a good bang for about the second one. I would say before spending the money thing through any of the regulatory changes that are needed as an example Columbus. Were higher plans to roll out electric vehicles and autonomous vehicles. The question that the city has to ask is how do they work in the context of the existing infrastructure? What regal regulatory changes have to be made? So that is a second aspect to consider the third one that the cities should consider in my view is the procurement process itself. How do I streamlined procurement? If funding is the most difficult thing to do the second. Most is the procurement process in the city, they're pretty long. They're also quite laborious. So there are couple of approaches that have been proposed in order to ease. The procurement process number one consider cooperative procurement as an example, there is another city that is already working with that vendor. See if you can piggyback on that contract. The second is consider. Driving the initiative at a state level as an example in January two thousand seventeen the state of Illinois, the department of transportation in the state of Illinois launched an P for smart street lighting across the state now once that are be awarded the cities can use that existing contract in sort of having to negotiate the Thompson conditions on an individual basis. So those are the three things to consider before the city's start to spend the money. No, the US. Do you think you've done a good job of implementing smart set initiatives? I know you refer to a few names early on a conversation. But if especially if you think like challenge elect climate change, which city is do you think doing a good job in what can other cities learn from example? Yeah. So there are quite a few cities in US that have been that have given several initiatives that are smart that are sustainable, and there are some that are tackling climate change as well, let's take a few examples in each of these areas. Two cities that I want to talk about one that Lanta Atlanta and another is Orlando in the case of Atlanta. The reason I'm biased towards Atlanta is because I met the chief operating officer Atlanta, the previous one Dan garden a few years ago, and he had this clear vision on what he wanted to do for the city and thanks to him. And thanks to the former mayor Qassim read, they put together several smart city initiatives in the areas of Transportation Safety. I would say also communication with not just citizens, but also the businesses so there are seven such initiatives and Atlanta plans to use what they call as the shot. Spotter IOT acoustic technology in order to reduce the while via. In the cities Judah gardens. And this particular technology will help them to dispatch the officers to the crime scene in real time. Without anyone having to call nine one one. So that's that's a cool example, isn't it Atlanta also plans to install solar panels and many of the large buildings in the downtown area, and that would be towards their sustainability initiative to be used to increase the renewable energy capacity as as well as reduce energy stage as green has greenhouse gas emissions as well. Orlando is quite quite an interesting city McCullough's, we all know right in with the Disney World and tasks about seventy five million visitors every year, and the mayor says that it has the highest hotel and car and. Title rates in the world. And the director of the smart city program says that his city gets people with all sorts of driving habits and. One of the things is, you know, you don't need expensive technology, even some simple, fixes could go very long way when it comes to making the city's smart, and he gives an example of this mobile parking lot systems that the city has developed and there was lot of resistance. I believe initially because the city officials were worried that revenue coming out of the fines parking fines would go down in did. However, what the city saw was increasing revenues because it allowed people to pay for the parking through their mobile devices. And of course, both the citizens and visitors were happy and because they could avoid fines as an example Orlando is also city quite unique. Because it's the only city in Florida that has passed an ordinance saying that all of its public buildings will. Publish, but they are energy and water consumption, and the city of online also has committed to ensuring that all the buildings will use renewable energy hundred percent nubile energy by twenty fifty. And what is even interesting is that the municipal operation will transition to renewable in other decayed, which is my before end of twenty thirty. So those are some of the examples of cities that are not just focused on infrastructure, but they're also focused on citizens and sustainability and your question on climate change. And are there any cities are tackling climate change? I think Atlanta, the solar panels is, of course, an example, San Francisco recently received an award for its zero waste program that it launched in two thousand two since the program was launched. It has an. An incredibly. Incredible reduction in the in the landfill rate. Diversion rates of about eighty percent. San Francisco also every users hundred million fewer plastic bags so many of these initiatives. I think San Fran San Francisco is well on its way to achieve the zero waste goal by twenty two actually twenty nine hundred hundred of the who's a couple of last things to wrap up a uniform earlier to public private partnerships being so critical that was wondering if you have any examples of cities that are doing a good job. Working with the talent in companies in the in geographic boundaries. So as to enhance the impact of their smart city initiatives. Are there any examples of that kind that you you can think of and what can companies learn drug cities and companies learn from those in? At absolutely mock alighting collaboration with the private enterprises, and they knew -versities academic institution is a way by which the cities can tap into local talent one of the new concepts. Thanks to Brookings Institution. Is this concept of innovation districts think of them as geography clusters that brings together academy and scientific research institutions, private sector and small and big right, small pronuncia organizations enterprises that are large and then public incubators that are focused on doing research and all of these geography clusters that are placed in a minute rich Arben coats, mixed-use when KO's and simply these are geography areas that. Dr economic development for a particular city that are several example, the one that I will mention is by mayor, Andy Burke and his initiative in Chattanooga. He set up the Chattanooga innovation district that has helped the city drive the growth to obsolete the next level. It's one of the best places to live in the country top hundred places to live nowadays. And some of the examples of companies that have been successful that were built in that innovation district that come to mind is access America transport, which was eventually bought over by UPS and the same founders also created another startup called the lamppost group. So these innovation district's are away for companies to create the clusters to drive economic growth, but also dry partnership across the various entities in the city when one last question and that is rip. Focused quite a lot in this conversation on the American experience of making cities smarter. I wonder if we could compare take a look now across the pond at Europe and see how American approach Roberta lapping smart cities differ. From the procure seen Europe and are lessons that each continent. Can learn from the other in terms of how to make the world more sustainable and more inclusive. And you and I know McCullough Europe has been at the smart city program and initiatives, I would say for sometime a little bit longer than US has been in US, the smart city programs typically have been tied to infrastructure and economic development and euro being added for a little bit longer. They are now focused on creating citizen Centric initiatives. How do I make my cities more livable? How do I make my cities where the citizens are happy and sustainability is one of the key initiatives that Yudo past been focused on. But I think Europe is also unique in the sense that it has smaller countries, then you have the European Union. So there is a concerted effort between across communities cities and the European Union itself to drive some of these. Art city programs, and and that I think is going to help them our chief their goal of three hundred smart cities by end of twenty twenty and so which is an ambitious goal. And I think they're on the way to do that. But you, and I know sometimes it is never late or it is sometimes good to be laid to a party because then that allows you to learn from the lessons that someone else has had. So in my opinion, I think US can take a lot of lessons from how Europass of the smart city programs, but with several of the initiatives across US and investment that the cities or making I sincerely believe that US's well on its way to drive growth across major metros as well. As the smaller metro says, well, I wanna. Conclude with this local if I may as we look at some of these programs that are happening. I believe that it is the responsibility of the leaders in the private and public sector and academy institution to collaborate effectively with the city leaders as well as with the communities to figure out how to make digital inclusion part of the agenda when it comes to smart city programs. Thank you so much speaking with knowledge towards real pleasure, speaking with you. Thank you very much. Local it always a pleasure for more insight from knowledge Warton, please. Visit knowledge dot Morton dot U, Penn dot EDU.

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Charlotte Mensah | The Undisputed Queen of Good Hair

The Emma Guns Show

1:06:40 hr | Last month

Charlotte Mensah | The Undisputed Queen of Good Hair

"I traditional medicinal we're thrilled to announce our new line of energizing black teas. Our herbalists have blended organic Assam Darjeeling Black Tea with beneficial herbs and spices decree revitalizing refreshing and invigorating tease. Sure to put a little pep in your step. Find All our new tease at whole foods or order online using the code well, twenty traditional medicinal. It's amazing what a plant can do. Hello Hi and welcome. I am Your Host Emigrant Award and my nearly twenty-eight Korea beauty and health writer I have interviewed a lot of people, supermodels, entrepreneurs, authors, celebrities, and doctors, and many of these conversations had a real impact on me and I'd come away feeling inspired excited informs and really empowered and at the back of my mind always think I wish I, could just publish the tape. So people. Could really feel that conversation while on this podcast, you get to feel the conversation I talked with experts, guests, and a few friends who I went in spy inform and empower you and maybe it was a challenge you whether you're looking for self help self improvement beauty advice health insights, business know how or just good old-fashioned life advice in a bit of a off it's all. Hey, welcome to the show. Joining me on this episode of the Magan, show is the undisputed queen of Black Hair Charlotte Mentzer. She is a member of the British hairdressing. All of fame has one. Of the year times is the artistic director of Sologne Lounge, which incidentally is meant to be one of the nicest places to spend time angrier ahead on in London and is the founder of the Charlotte Medicine and Katie oil products shall has spent three decades styling thousands of people, and she's recently pulled her knowledge and expertise into a new book. Good Hair. It's the ultimate guide on how to identify and understand your hair texture. After your hair, how to overcome hale t scalp, as well as how to perfect styles such as corn rows, locks, and Bundu. Nuts. It really is long overdue and I can tell you it's a brilliant brilliant read. So some informative. If you're listening to this podcast, then you'll know I am fascinated by stories of success especially where there was no blueprint office path to achieve it unraveling Charlotte's incredible career story is especially captivating for this reason because she's honest about the challenges and also reflects on how being in a visual creative industry pre social media actually encouraged originality, and then they wasn't so much comparison. But what really struck me about my conversation with saw that was how positive and uplifting she is something she says, during the cost really resonated with me and I actually haven't been able to shake it since it was about how no journeys ever easy just to learn to enjoy the tough bits and appreciate them as much as the good parts. I can totally totally understand why Charlotte silence thought of. So warmly, why shouldn't is thought say warmly, by anyone he was ever visited at an anyone who has ever met her own as. I have had nothing but good things about Charlotte in my years in beauty and you will hear in this conversation she's incredibly warm nurturing and generous. The Link to Charlotte book good hair, which really is phenomenal. Her product line in everything that we discuss will be in the show notes, which can be found wherever it is that you are listening to streaming this. But I am so honored to welcome Charlotte Mentzer onto the emigrant. So that medicine, it's so wonderful to have you ever gotten. Shire and I've had many. Much out you over the years and the opportunity to actually sit down with you and get to hear about your career because we can get. So caught up. Overnight successes and suddenly discovering me but around for a long time, but I think when I? Think about you and I think about your career. When I think about your success, I really think about hard work I. Think about someone he's ready grafted. Yeah, it has seen a very, very long journey. I was born in the UK. And at the age of three months I left to live with my grandparents in a crime Ghana. The reason being my parents just movie in the sixties and they I was fast child that they had in the UK and it was just very difficult for them to look off to me and still be able to. A. Advised advised by other family family members that would be. Much easier for them if I wince, GONNA lift grandparent's. I was in Ghana from the age of three months to eleven and my grandparents were these two. Wonderful. That would just amazed my grandmother was superior for wonder woman she could do everything. So she did I hand she soda clothes she cooked the food. She was quite a leader in the community as well because she was a deacon less so she was like. One of the fans, ladies of the Church. So. Of. People really respected her and she had this way of. Sharing the word of God so she would sort of. Get up at the crack of dawn and just sort of walk around the whole area just spread in. An encouraging people to love one another and and be kind to each of an aside to have some sort of spiritual connection and she really believed in God said that was a way of Sheridan Evangelism and bringing people together and my grandma was this man he was. Incredible He. He wanted brewery so they made with the Best Guinness. Star a Komo it was cool data and he was. A very respected man who has big business will he? He Co it with his friend and they? You know he would bring me alone to the meeting so He. He just I duNno, you had this really. I don't know it was a bit like. Bill for. Not when I arrived in Ghana because they said I came in this most boskin would he was like who is Taya Cheese? You know it was like a celebrity tighten up in this. Three months. And they were very Yeah. There were just an amazing grandparents because. Grandmother had eight children and all. Children had kids. So those close to over forty of US living in this house it was a very busy house. Yeah it was a really busy busy house. I'd tell me something Charlotte. When was the first time? You Epochs Guinness? How would we? Must have been about five years. Old God never liked. I never liked the bitter taste of it but in Ghana is such a popular drink like everywhere in Ghana there's a big sign same Guinness the Power Guinness is good for you. What? Your. So. Yes. So that that was a great place to be and just being around them nothing they actually instilled in me. Especially, my granddad because he will take me to these. Business like board meetings and I think no even knowing that five. Probably instilled in me the building blocks of business. and. Yes so added great time. I had a great time. I was really good at school east to take me to the banks and I used to really admire the the women that went in the bank. I love how they look I love the the leadership and. I love the way that we're independent and I I really like that when I joined my mom at the age of eleven. Ways in my mind always had this thing that I'm going to do something in finance on extra ever had. Unfortunately at the age of thirteen, my mother passed away. I'm sorry. Yes. So my younger sister was three years old at the time and I just became like the mother to my sister saw side hair and. He's looking magazines and felt like you know whenever I did. They felt like mom was around say was like Nice. Really Yeah it was a great time not even great but it just like it didn't feel aside Made US move closer as well. I, mean. Say. The. Junior? High was in October Love Very Matanal. Yes. Yes and and I think because I had memories of my mom do my own hand my sister saying it was like a Yeah, it was like a ritual to to do a hair and say it was a bit of like therapy for us 'cause we talk about. How Much Mr? How Yeah how yeah it was. It was like a bill for therapy. And then at the age of sixteen, I mean it was quite dramatic because from then I had to move around a lot. So I lived with of different aunties and uncles and eventually saw changed schools quite low as well. So I ended up in north London in the Secondary. School and then I did like. I, did all right. I would say didn't do as well. I. Think I was. Say Much. Brighter. But they naturally. At Baseball. I think I know what you mean because I n academically smart but I think I'm dumb. I think I'm quite I wasn't I was academic academically, very smart because. Always busted my close I did well, I was disgusted masks in English by the trauma of having that. That tragedy happened that sites he really kind of. Yeah just confused me a lot and became more creative like contemn soon. 'cause out constantly do my sister's hey, became like neum. The one that creates offices came round at the age of sixteen. I, just naturally. Chose to. Go, into hairdressing. And options back. Then because I we had like I was very good I chose the kind of creative subject. So my GPS's I did things like needlework I did. Home Economics. I did. Actually they would work as well thousands. Chose the creative maybe because I found joy when not did those subjects and then the the light but in English which I like to say and history I love I didn't I don't know for some reason I felt more happier when not did the move creative Biden subjects who's working with your hands teeth thing. What can if my hands and also you see results so you see results there in dense if you will. Baking a cake. For instance, within food two minutes. You'll see the cake bates and you're happy with it and your life tastes good and it so. Yes. So I actually kind of was mu happier during those subjects. and Luckily go into the first African silent opening the UK splinters. Yeah and that was a Mutt Street. Medic Street. So. I'd never been to the West end before. So you can imagine like tidying-up Pimm of. This Oxford Circus Station will conduct region street and to this amazing solemn that look like a five star hotel and they had. So. Many people from like. I, mean when I'm saying the celebrities like Diana Ross Kids. Would News readers who? Really big role models that people that. On TV will you'd see newspapers in here you are like. Standing behind the chair like a for a magazine oil it yeah it was it was a great place to be. Because it was a youth training scheme also attended London College of fashion. So that one how yeah. Will. Years with with eight to six, nine, thousand, eight, hundred, six, what a brand I with an. Iranian time mean we're not about London. There was all of these. Really Amazing. Was Warehouse that was such a good source and they had jeff banks as the creative designer of Yeah I. mean they had so much stuff. Top shot was amazing like whenever I got my tapes I run down to talk show. By You that was like so cool and then you had shops like Kensington market those so many. Really Cool. Places in London was. A. Really Cool. She shot die like who dad's Oh. Yeah. Yeah. So there was some really. Amazing and even like the SORTA people that were at some. London collegial fashion where Stella McCartney. Alexander McQueen. There was like, yeah I mean they were there at the same time as me. The one, my friends who anything I remember them being. Yes, it was really good time. It's funny. Isn't it as often time? You can look back on in lots of different industries, but in the DT industry especially, I feel like. People come up and they'll say, Oh, I was at college at the same time and the other people. Who've done great things like you say like Alexander Green and Stella McCartney, there's some every now again, that seems to be these waves of magic that some Lima may have that Sir impactful. Yeah, I. think that was such a historic time for London achieved because a lot of the people that. Like even now, all of the people speak to the doing really well at from that time. United Light. Yeah. It's it's incredible how? That was like a gem does like these diamonds that came through? In, that period from around eight to six to the ninety s it was just some really really amazing talents and if you had to say what it is about, those people that have meant that they've stood the test of time is there anything about that era? Or about the approach to beg careers that you think. Explains why people and you have done so well, not that that particular group. I think I think we really would like. We didn't have an all the social media to compare ourselves to save. You had you had to dream you had to you had to really push yourself at a felt like A. We we had like. A move kind of was the words us. Unite like when you were just you don't have anything. So you try your best to to really make it will work and. That men like we read move because we had all these amazing libraries we we. I think we paid more attention. Paid more attention we weren't so like famed these days kids are very quick to use to suggest gave up. They'll be like all along when a do this oh? Doesn't work off the two weeks given up, but we just kept trying try and we we will ritual we will original because like I said, you didn't have. You didn't have a social media to look at someone's can copy and paste that you just had to create your own. So it made you push hard I made you really dream. Bega. And we had a little patience. We had much more patients. Kits our they have. No patience they in a hurry want everything to be really quick and we were we were willing to go through the process. I mean I I, remember like having to shampoo have like maybe seven months of just shampooing head like genius Musalo. Now off the two weeks I want to be the stylist they think the new. So. Yes as very. It was very different times and I've been there was just. Often, life was easier as well to be fed. It was just move. It was more for balance. It was more balanced. Now there's so much. Chaos is just I feel sorry for kids sexually now. Or chaotic out there and He's very confused and everything that's going on so I guess that doesn't help. Remember Gauging Stadium Careless Talk. Really. Did I think he was on my fest gas? I we guests and he said that. When he thinks about his early years in the Salon, he just thinks about his hands leading at night. When he got home, he spent every day four hours months at the backwash. It's so true. It's so true because I, like I said, you go into A. In my days in the eighties in was all about Kelly pence. Was the pads. and honestly, it was like if there was forty clients a day, they'll be fourteen utilizes. So you'll hands were tied into like prunes. But the thing is you couldn't complain because where would you go to? The wasn't light lots of choices where you could just free Lonzo just go on instagram you ten fluids. So you become a stylus overnight you had to stick it through I. Mean there were people that so like it wasn't for them and they left. The fee for the I, need stock through with it and now do incredible things. So I felt like we had moved patients were moved Brown Davis will. Will move grounded because we went so like. I feel like everyone things very important now. And they haven't even done anything but I think they're important. You like what have you done when when you actually They they like You know they got like. Fifty comments on a thousand lights and because of that they very important. Very successful, but it's it's it's rainy side. It, side that a as the kind of well will living in them. You said something I don't take but I also want to go back to something. Years at these. You said, we had dreams and I very much believe in dreams and if you dream it, then he compulsively make APP because if you kind of know what it looks like then you'll know if you're on your way towards it. So. With regard to your dreams specifically because let's possible with this. BET before we go back right now you have one of the one of the biggest names in bt you've been inducted into the woods fame if one fruit headdress at the eighth three times, you have this incredible solemn, which is known as the hub of excellence, the head excellence humanity, and being a pretty nice states be. Was that the dream when did the dream begin to crystallize into the change form throughout the years? I always like United love the love the atmosphere loved the community because it reminded me of being in Ghana and my grandmother my Granddad that love you know that Sherry and people would come in and they were great role models out always to be sequencing. To be like that one day, I always would look at them admire them and just think that could be me. But I still didn't think would happen I think for me. It all changed when I had my son. So I had my son quite young. I had my son at twenty three. And by then not finished my training. WAS NOT. Genius silence and I I want say I want to live to be like really different from my mom had eight kids and she she's struggled a law and she died really young I wanted to be different. Now you know I went to drive car when to by my own house. So so I think being in splinters and seeing those great role models. Fm something in me that missing you can do this. You can achieve it does identify thinking about business united site thinking about what would look like if I had marlins salad would I like it to be? That's why coded Hair Lounge because I wanted that space where we can. We can share feel safe and really encourage one another because I think as women. Were so good when we were together in groups and we share and we we we advise each other and we mental each other and we actually encourage one not and just give each other on the bat. So I started thinking about it when I had out, I'll wet from host. So even though I did my three or four days in the southern. I would still be in my house maybe two days just to go to my own clientele say it was a bit like a freelance. And then a query would get to the point where I had so many clients now needed to find a space. So I thought to buying. Rents and a chain, a European solemn that just opened. Bannon road put spell road and not. What not start then see how on. Then from day just grew and grew angry and then. Open Martinez Business before I was twenty nine. So. In between that I had heard a lot about the prince's trust that was a good organization on Portobello road. Cool. The PORTABELLA Business Center saw government. Like once a week and they would put to you about the different charities and what they can do to help us thought you're in business. So when it spikes me about Prince's Strauss, it just seemed right because you had to be under thirty and they were really could a. Happy to launch in Your Business. They gave good advice like. I mean I had the mandatory. That was amazing. She was an accountant. So she really knew how to you know how everything should be intensive the finance. Anthem. Yeah. To meet once a week and. We Really. Really. Know that in terms of putting a business plan together, I was given the Grahn N. alone and. business in June nineteen, ninety nine. Exciting and That's not necessarily I. mean that isn't something that is available to people. Is it things like those men touring services and the grants and the help radius much much harder? Isn't he's it's much harder. It's much harder but I'm now Paul's ambassadors in Prince's trust the now I mental, the young. People coming through so I think there are some really good organizations out there and you just need to look for the models have my charity which are named after my mom, love. Not. Been Soi. Dot Com, it's on. Some Really good I mean kind of began with that in Ghana. WAY OUT HELP LIKE Young girls especially because some of them were as young as fifteen, they've got two kids. That just you know there's no way they're gonNA make it in life so I would teach them by Henson skills and then from there they've gone on open a business I've had been in London by Sallow at lots of goals coming from all over. And Age someday, training with me and now they've gone on to. Open you know they might not open but they're on their way to sign your own businesses with his free Lonzo sessions silent in. Yeah. I WanNa talk about retired a bit more detail. Like student wants to go back. The time splinters this'll earlier part of your career because for international listeners may have visited central. London when we talk about West, Charlotte worked, it's within a look around the corner. Hickory Zach casts a big huge billboards as you say. The Hind you and Regent Street is WanNa be most popular recognized streets in the world. So really really really are in the thick of it and I'm curious about what it was like translating natural talent for hair. into. Doing sister to then working with clients because you said something really interesting about. The ability you have to read people being a therapist because. Right, at the very beginning I, feel about your story with has thoughts love. It's no shock to me whenever I speak someone who's been in your chat. He says, you just feel like she she has. and I wonder how you're able to. Translate that Oh. How this came to be the every single client he sits in your chest of me becomes. I didn't always like. Is it a little sister thing again? Yeah A. Natural inside of me because I took over mom's role at such a young age at thirteen became like a mother to my sister. And for me. You know has a very personal thing. So you meet someone and within fifteen seconds, you'll touch them. So he's very passable and it's like you a touch crown, which is like you know to me's very spiritual in a sense that you kinda laden handsome them on their head. You'll. You'll consulting having their hair we'll talk to them. People can be quite wonderful when it comes to their head because it. Is quite traumatic. If you head goes wrong, it can really just take away your confidence so. To me it's about letting positive, feel really safe and send you find if our shared love with if I fight saw would love that is easier for you to open up and tell me what exactly you want because. Until I know that I would know what to do with your head says reading reports in that. For me it's more like A. Move Realistic Approach. So it's not it's not just about A. It's not just about. The end result, which is a nice style but will sign need to know about who you are what you like what you don't like. That would really help with what the end result could light because I know that maybe you can the corporate world so you cannot have like pink hats. You might say it's really an also people come in there because they just want to relax. Just WanNa feel they wanna feel confident about themselves and? It really helps when the person that student ahead is relax and ambience down into the music we listen to down to. If. In my team, how they speak to people how they look united the whole vibe of the places is really important because. It is such a big part of all of us unite because people seed is your face and your hair and and you know if if if. Would come in sometimes. They'll be so download the wouldn't even look at your face happy head down on the floor. As soon as you've done their head, we've had this amazing chat and they happy they changed it to something else they walk out there like if the cat will come while you. You might say some. Yeah, it's incredible to. Really. For me is important that. Everybody comes into space his relax, and while receive an unhappy nice experience because it's more than just ahead cup. Choosing to, go see. because. How many salons that many salons but oh, choose people come from Brazil Nigeria of. Know people come from all over the world and why would they choose to come to you because there's something that you do for them that nobody else can be and I don't think he's just the talent skinhead, but it's your your personality the. Besides I mean Klein state they all so A. Know some of them would even say to me like, Oh, you need us I love that they feel like they're parts of it united if you if you made a good profit, any Bala Canoe. Foss and had me flowers who listen new tissue box they notice everything and they'll be like, oh, I, really love that I love in something new because I feel like that's dead space and they feel like a part of that whole Hogue Charlotte Mint survived you know they have. When they come in, they just love the yeah. Even data people people if even made friends day, and if there's literally going to bates together. We. Yeah. It's very, very very. It's very different soloists. Allen's people say to me like, Wow, I've never been saddled like this and I'm talking about clients coming from America. From. Malaysian from Peres like this is so different. His to me it's like I said it's more than just ahead come on I'm going to ask you then. I think it can be quite challenging. Sometimes I know I've had bad accounts in the air and over the years and my energy in the salon. As I leaving it's definitely readable and is definitely stormy. Shall we say I? Am I am definitely not happy how a style owner a you able to. Control. The Not saying about bad hag got some talking about. If someone comes amid bad energy right tentacle ten but I need to be. Douglas. Handful defy how do you do you know what? I mean like He can be the constant. You always go people coming in and out again Olympic fascinated by back because I think therapists, headdresses do it. So brilliant may where they meet someone they can just do something that takes somebody from being aggravated annoyed distress and they can calm them down. So quickly fight magic. Yeah I you just have to always you know like finding that balance of. What is it that sometimes we will have carrying stuff with us. It might not be anything to do with the head, but maybe you just didn't you know like you just have to find a way of. Had why calm the situation down it might be a way of Maybe, you know we always offer like a Nice Cup of coffee in you know piece, of K, can just just united just sit down with them because I mean you have clients that will come and tell you a lot of stoves and other stuff that's going on their own personal life and they probably lost the job loss, the family member there's always something going on with every would he and I think it's just Being able to reach out and just said, we're looking at something go wrong today. How can I help? How can I help to fix this because? It's always gonNA. Be that one client who is just not? I mean, we've had people coming where you're like, you know what? This is not the place for you like a couple of weeks though I had a client that will tim and she had this must've suitcase and it was full gallons, towels, brushes, combs. Not, so you know what is this? She even had the scissors and she said, well, I'll to use modern stuff and I'm like well, we do that because. I don't I don't know where you've stuff is being in. Might you know we've sterilize everything and if you feed them this way, you really shouldn't be coming out. You should stay at home because you know you're not ready to come out. And she was like Oh. No, you'll sell them tonight. I'm not unkind Boston listen. It's like going so restaurant and you bring in the table The tablecloth ingredients. And she was in at general, we're not going to be able to do your head because you can see from the start that it wasn't GonNa go well, and she saw an sheets that she hasn. She's not really ready to be amongst anyone. Another thing is the right space, but I had to quickly diffuse it by the saints will we cannot do your head. It's about being able to. To quickly just. The. Way of letting them know. But in a very diplomatic way, not aggressively, not not knowing. Just. Just a diplomatic people because at the end, the day's business slung. You know it's not like a support group which is. Yeah Let's talk about offer that because like you said, splinters steadfast was the first yet it was like I'm sure there was other silos, but that was the very very no. that. Was the most professional like it was opened in nineteen, seventy, one and. Yet. It was like the one that everybody respected everyone loved convinces Selena was world renown said people came from all over the world to this one. Salam. Specializing in offer had did you did not feel? By. Did. It feel like it was something that. happened. In the quiet because you walk down. Had dressing billboards with big blowout somewhat happy. Africa wasn't getting need any attention to. Now. I've been for for a long long time. It was this European ideal for Afro had looked like. And we intend like just abused ahead. Had Australia Tim the you know we didn't really respect having. and. I felt like splinters was a place where everybody looked like me they had had like me and I wanted to know all the wonderful things you could do with this head. So that was light. The most interest in place to be because people came in those days it was more about the chemical, Sarah so we have not securely plans lots of chemical chemically straightened hair. Lots of Coleraine just using. To to actually change the texture. And it was incredible because to be honest everyone that came in May had really lovely. Hey, was it great? It was the tragedy was to have this highly straight blown out long show shaved. Every kind of trend in this one place and I think. Being there is for is to all that you could do what Afro head. stylists were going for competitions and they were winning. They will do a big. International and will go a long not a lot of some. Of Brands came from. America's Ooh the big brands like docking, lovely PCP, optima that would all coming from the US and do a big show and not the show you got to learn so much about. The different techniques and skills in tips and tricks. It was incredible and I I actually land so much but you're right. That wasn't like. A lot of like. There was a few there wasn't a lot of images that showed you. How this black beauty was it was always like someone that was very fair skinned who had really long had which you know if you have shohei just like well, I could look that good said than you intense appeasing Yo. Hey. Look. This way is interesting. You say that because he talk about would. To black hair an offer hair with. Pain ideas on the straightening services pretend chemical straightening in I was reading current reading Mariah Carey's. Vogel. and. There's a whole section about her head. She's mixed. Like sisters and it wasn't come up today with Obviously. The about time she spends on the book. You can tell good made have feel a certain way and how own tease went to chemically straightened. She describes the heat in the business. And then the spending sensation than how aunties pudding has a shoulder say not for you baby the chemicals are too strong for your hat because they didn't understand that and it. Yeah. I mean, even me when I when I got back from gone at age of eleven in Ghana we'll show has said shorts his head was like two inches because. The rules at the school is like everybody whether your ago boy you will. Have you had short. So when I got to the UK mom then wanted to grow it for me. So she saw Friday and I remember getting bullied Oh my God I have these threaded hairstyles and everybody is still used for me like own Michael Canadian you do in the state of you but could you believe that? You know twenty seven years later. Will. Should I even say not even twenty seven years it was actually two years ago I did Erica us. Hey, for a British. The British. Fresh in the woods and now did exactly the same threat. It has stars and it went viral everybody's now. Me Oh. Wow. It's amazing. But back, then nobody you'd be lost at people look at you like you're like. United. Yeah. It was just crazy. It was you respected people just. Would just yet dismiss you just wasn't is like a primitive hand like that. So not true ahead was never celebrates. It was a waste why political like evidence sentence faces you wouldn't even get a job. Yeah you wouldn't get job was natural here. It started strikes me as well as though you'll one of these people who Correct me if I'm wrong but he Fully I'm guessing you thought it was really on for people to make your hair because it was in a threaded style and because it wasn't European king and then he probably I'm guessing encountered similar feelings doing he'll create it. It seems to me like instead of focusing on the negative, you tend to ten your vision towards. The positive and we'll how we're GONNA wipe calmness and I'm just going to make this heavy and I don't care what you think. Yes and that's why that's how I got to create all those stars for my British Frederickson collection always wanted to show that black beauty I wanted to show our headed. It's ruled state I never want to to manipulate the head t much sobbed specifically choose girls at dusk game with natural head and just stalled that Natura had whether it be threaded graded. Just. The afros but just leave in the head and it's not true. State really celebrates submit because there was the so many textures the incredible you've go kinky go quickly you've got wavy even some from head the has can be quite strikes in certain parts. So it's Important to like you said not focused on the negative, but use it as like a motivation to we show people that he can wait you hand natural and I was very fortunate a as far back as two thousand five. I've got to write a column for like hand magazines and it was called natural fix. So not true fix. I'll take the model from the before image what they like instagram where you see the before off the and all kinds of show that sticks I took to achieve the final look. And we had so many different that will come in. They will love a no thought wearing their had not true. They'll begin the Johnny digital, the chemical straightening and. Right now, the midnight so hockey that they begun that journey served. Yeah of always been an advocate for yet. Unless celebrate our head even if you are going to use extensions Use it but the the key thing is caring for head the health of your head. So important. It's vital that you hey, itself looks good and it's healthy because we can all put things on. But what good is it? If you just put extensions on your own hair is just Destroyed from student too many things to it. So it's Yes. Always being a positive for me to celebrate. And really love our God, given textures. And I think that's what I found. So fascinating about the book could has because I've written about bt for very long time and I'm guilty of having spent time magazines. I haven't what A. Great Variation head text to be honest I also didn't have have pages or anything like that. But when I look back, I think. I'm really ignorant about that I conquer myself but BBC editor at by actually known to learn only wasting a about the different categories had that. Oils in the cows miss full safety and. That you outlined that in the book and I think Steve stupidly might see. Reading Mazda can understand really being able to feel the distress she felt the thought does now book by someone with your experience than the explains to you what your hair is what it can do you can call it yet. Yes I think it's it's really important because. The actual head textures is like a a good blueprint of like figuring out what you'll kill typists and say how to look after it and what products use. So it goes from one to four. So one being straight and to be wavy three beam currently and full being kinky. So I am a tight foresee which is in the in the in every category. Grievous. Three subcategories it goes from ABC's I'm Footsie, which is the most most black people have foresee head, which is. The most Afro hand is road states doesn't actually have a call patent medicine even have cal. So for you to actually create a call, you need to play to yourself by the twice twisted or braided roads rollers. That's the only way looking. At the same time, even though that head tends to look really strong. Is the most fragile or the head types so braves very easy. So. This had type is wear most when I say most is like. Eighty percent black people have his head type is the most difficult in not difficult, but it's it's life you know what to do and the right products us it's not difficult. A lot of people do not know. So then they abuse that any breaks and then it's like. I can only wear a week, but if they had the rights. Take some traits. Information and what to do daily and weekly and monthly. It wouldn't have like food problems. And you actually lose. So let's not forget this part of your incredible career Reggie going into product development as well, and that was no easy feat. Is it right that it six years to develop the products yes? Yes. This law ingredients as because It took me six years because I was very, very, very a abdomen that it had to be the best luxurious product on the market for for cutty head I mean, I'd I'd want to so many brands so many big brands so many products obviously when Selah News about over twenty thirty products, but I always felt like that wasn't yeah the wasn't. A product that aesthetically beautiful and performed well, not for the head because kinds would often complain to me always to greasy or with not enough. It's just drying my head I don't like the smell I don't Many different problems that they had with the products and I just thought you know will wouldn't it be good to have one daughter not does it will that looks good and also performed well, actually made a difference to the head. Off began researching and obviously. Gone on knew a lot about. Shia butter because share about the finest the best. Ever shaved butter comes from Ghana. It's full of vitamin E. is very moisturizing conditioning. But by the time, go into actually. Producing the puts. To his everywhere within toilet roll it was. A lost. It lost. It lost exclusivity didn't have that. would you cool it? It just became like A. You know that respect everywhere and they would. Just. Didn't have that exclusiveness anymore. I'm Lucky I. got this amazing opportunity. I was doing a wedding in a starring Ghezzi. During my mic, my brain I decided to have. A head massage. Therapist at used as oil which I was like Oh. This is amazing. My head feels so soft than united feels really norrish and she said Oh it's catchy. Sounds like mine. Catchy. I've never heard of it not begun to research. And found that Abe existed for six thousand years and the a grew a gross main me like in the southern part it will be lighten. Swan now. Yeah just it just had like this Mazen benefits like it was full of polyunsaturated fatty acids it was full of vitamin E.. and. It just really nourishes the head to the point where. It just felt so good but didn't have that Greasy Phil because whenever you say will people automatically think always going to be driven with grease is going to be oily just apply. It didn't do that. I love the fact that. What's really won't Kelly textures? So. That became like the style ingredient on wall of my products and yet it's been it's been incredible. Took me. It took me so long as well because I just wanted it to be the best out based our weather just take my time and getting right and also I was fortunate to have the clients in the Salon to test on. So it was like you didn't have enough for a collision benefits are awesome for more condition. If it didn't have enough with the oil allots memorials, it just kept going on in going on last I. Did it all myself say was self funded. Says that I was GONNA say Charlotte begins I, BET, lots of people He offered to put your name on that product side many many. It was all self funded initially because I I thought Oh. You know I don't have a lot money. Let me go the freelancer who was really not that great, but I didn't know at the time I just oh, he's cheaper than the big manufacturers be going, but it just kept going wrong same yet I lost six thousand then I had to go back to the manufacturers. And and really sit down cowboy exactly. Is it that wanted? So I think in a way it was good that. When wrong with the freelance because I learn what didn't want say actually made me know why wanted And that's why it has such a strong presence in the marketplace because. Now. Began to tell my story because you opponent is in the show. It's actually bottle in the show. So how do you get people to understand what it is that you're doing and why would someone want to buy Safina Why would they cheese you begun to really share who was my experts is in which is in Africa. And to my heritage because. Even though as London I, grew up in across so I have both. Both coaches deeply in me not want to people to know that unseen NC where I was coming from and even down to the the actual logo is my initials by used. Club that we haven't gone to Kim take cloths. To a very colorful woven beautiful that kings and Queens wet and I really wanted to to show that because my grandparents wounded a light go into these. Amazing. Events. Weddings and You know it was like a very respected favorite so I wanted to use up for them because it was a colorful it just didn't work with the packaging to the not I began to look at the African fabrics and I found this fabric from. Sierra Leone Khuda. Ki Cloth. So to Cuba cough is similar to became a close, but it's all kinda woven graphic shapes late, it's never even so i. Used some with that and not change the into my initials, which is CNN like you could see on the Logan It. Sounds I mean that's six years to develop products and. To have things not always go the way you wanted to set something before which is sometimes you will cost simply doesn't run straight. Yet it sounds like you so many he just goes well. A small with punches. Yes I think that's how you go being like you go to you got to believe in yourself and just always say like this johnny of lives it's It's a bit like the so heavy traffic. Would you rather be stuck in heavy traffic would stay new lane and just going slow until you get there because it's about your life is about your journey would you want for your life and I think as women as what we often? Compete in thing all I want to be like her, but that's no ye so I believe that. Whatever happens nobody's you know your stories unique to you and it's about you is by your journey. So always stay in your lane and and just keep going and whatever it is that you won. It will happen it might not happen at the time that you've paid your time that you. Put to you know accounting six months minor happening in six years. But just. Believe that it's all about the processes well, and even going through the pro- says it's important because sometimes that's actually where you learn the most 'cause sometimes you get to the end and you're like. Oh is to say oh But. We kinda miss the process because we're so busy looking to get to the end and you don't enjoy the process enjoy the process. That it will be is a part unique story. She might me off you have a really strong sense of self. That's what I'm not hearing where to that comes from I think that comes from my grandparents because they was so strong believers in they had a very spiritual strong like McCormack especially shoes. Always. Praying to buy everything. Even when we were six, you'll pray over some water move drinking and move will instantly become well. So she had this power and she believed in itself. United says she she she she kind of instilled that in us with us even knowing nothing it was really instilled in us that you've got is you can do it. You know every day you wake up. Thank God. You're up and just visit wherever happens use it as a used challenges as the motivation used as lesson, get up and keep going. You know you only stop on your dad. So just keep gun whilst your head you have to keep going. You believe believe in yourself is going to believe in you. If you don't believe in yourself, you have to believe in yourself I and other people believe in you so if you don't have that. In new makeup if you don't have that as part of you as part of your. You have. Yeah. Because that power a power to be able to to stand on your own two feet and whatever happens. Just, let it be and. Carry on. Think which hotel about the people, the Era London College of fashion with same time maybe it's the fact that you will dream is but you will say really believed it was going to happen deep down. Yes. Yes. I. Think we all kind of knew that I think it's you know you have to have that passion isn't it? You know that Posture Law Firm. It's like if you're GonNa, do anything you have to do passionate. Don't do it too said, the passion is walk when sometimes when you're on your doubt news office, is that thing that gives you that motivation I think we will all like we will have passion passionate flaming citing, and you have to keep that flame burning just to keep its like. The moment. That fires. Gordon. You just so you have to keep light knock flame. You got to have that passion. You've got to have that that I WANNA do this I wanNA wake up. Indeed it's and I'm happy to do not just because I'm gonNA, make lots of money but because it gives you joy. Joy and when you when you achieve those things, you feel even more like a happier and you kind of get like I get my energy of people. The more people I see that more image, I people like Oh, my God you and you got like a, you know you've got the energy for tenure russet. Yeah because. People because I've always been around people enhancing. That's always a lot of people around and they actually I didn't know guns what me empowers me I love meeting the women I love going on the shoots are love meets all of the graves and it just kind of Inspires and motivates you to do more and listening to other people's stories listening to their journey on what they've done. Anything is possible. You're dependent that's holding you back. Is Yourself. Preach, I, believe findings that say to you say you have said something. That I rating of actually because men even all compensation about product can you talk about failure Aaron I personally have chosen to failures of the success that how that's how I try to navigate But you've also talked about the of good cry when you come up against. An obstacle and how misquoting eve I think he's on the lines of a good cry. Clinton's is the so and then when you finish crying your reenergized yes. Yes. I think crime is is part of it is the spiritual Nessel. Let it go. Let me go I. Mean I often like sometimes the I forgot do Margaret Christ things. If I'm really disappointed about something which something has grown I don't understand the had to fix I just needs. Let it go so. I believe so much about. Letting letting things go because you need to forgive festival, you need to forgive yourself if something has gone wrong and you don't understand and you know you have a problem with someone and just control, you need to forgive yourself and forget that because that's the only way be free. You know you'd be free to get on with what you need to go on wave to to be able to dream move to be able to to To actually create more. But when you're not forgiven people and you're bitter inside and you're not feeling good about that, will Sadat crying like release united just letting it go. And say, it's it's. It's it's like it's spiritual cleanse that you need to do get to the next day. So every now and then yeah, is parts. Life is the same way you cry the same way. Yeah, you should love to loss ensues Rilya, you may. I one thing I do in the southern lights some of the clients denounced Have you ever been a comedian? I said why? Is You come. Things. You come out with, but it's important. You know all of these things that it is what we need to thrive in this life, we need all these things drive. Her I have loved to Charlotte. I've I've learned so much. You. You build up an image in your mind when you're researching someone and obviously I've seen you around like what videos of yours. When I go to the end, my research always described in a bubble might page like what's mayor who riding? Failing and with you, it was technical an emotional accidents. State off not had one before. That's brilliant one. have an emotional excellence I love that. Yeah. By sharing by him in your ability to do both but your ability to share as well. Yeah it's same foods is improved not saying. is been such a traumatic like the tough, the toughness of the life that we've been through. In Times of losing our mom at such a young age, but you know it's I think that self believe from the onset just kept us going kept US Gordon I. Know People that had. Like. Parents sign young who like will ever the plays get their life together but me and all my siblings obviously with old smashed smashed it in a way that we have each other. We encourage one another and we give each other support united. It's been hot a we had like. Yeah we find good opportunities as well and we saw cheese and when for those units because sometimes. When you? Like you know when you say like traumatized, don't even see the opportunities just miss. Miss Everything so I'm I'm so grateful for good hand and you know I. I know it would be wealth because yes, you call us Honestly, it's it's it's so lovely and like I said, I mean I I. Have Straight Hair. Issue a hack wave, my Harris that I've had a picture. But I do know what it was like as an overweight teenage, not able to buy clothes and talk shop in the high and to feel like I wasn't represented when I sometimes listen to my friends talk about that texted in how it's made ben fail mobile icon empathize exactly. But I think that you know what I kind of. It never nice to feel isolated to feel as though you're not catered for a does is it tells you who you all? Yes. Sir Can night. Yeah I think it's it's got so much about the history of black carries wall, which is so important 'cause a lot of people don't even know what that is and tons of light incites in parts of Africa light as soon as the babies balloon. Shaved the baby's half because it's like the communication to the ancestors and the spiritual and the same thing happened like last year more profit died and his wife out to shave the head because it's a sign of respect. And then inside ten coaches as well. In Africa they, they really like their head to be like really cool. So it's like a communication to the High Heavens and the. Scott so much. Yet. So important in our society, we kind of. Lost Our way and understanding why it's and when I was also growing not west the. Teenage of even land in. When I was in the white cheese. Like good. Hey, it was like if you had a headdress typical, it was very kind of scientific can so like you know just was boring. So you do your tests you positively just talking to book somewhere by. This is a very much needed book that would actually help people to understand the history of black hair and said to understand their own head and look after Best. Vitality it's you know it's it's nice to do things to your head but at the the end of the day, the most important thing is and the key thing is how you look after. You know. So you because there's a lot of people with African hold that will get to say h and all of the head of like suffer from a lot of hand loss or the headlines seated because if don t much to it. So having a book like this. Just really helps you to to reinforce in love with your got even texture and I remember like a Year ago I went to boarding school a to do so mentoring for these young girls and I was mortified when I met like eleven year olds wearing wigs, how slide you only let when you're wearing a wig. But you know what? They were more interested in straighten the weeks than actually caring for their own head my just kept praying. Conway on wait for good heads to come out conway for good heads. To be like in library so these kids can pick it up. You know I can't wait for it to be published that they can buy as Christmas present because it's like I would so short. Eleven years. So you actually more interested in a week. And actually learning your subject. So I'm happy that his hair and hopefully. Think Everyone I. It's such an interesting read on feel really terrible. The I of bishops and I. Only. I keep. I guess it's time for everything. So this is the time is an important time and I'm glad we will hear an IT's? On. Is is a good time is a good time. It's been such speak to you and listeners. The links to shaw the book, the products, the foundation everything will be in the show next, which can be found wherever to see streaming downloading this episode but Charlotte Man Seth Thank you so much for coming on the gum so I'll thank you. Loved every minute? Thank you so much if you want to get in touch with me, please don't hesitate email me at the beauty podcasts that gmail.com or you can slide into my DM's on instagram and twitter where I am at Emma guns. If you want to chat to me and thousands of other listeners of this cost them, please simply click the link in the show. Notes, which can be found wherever you are streaming and downloading this episode and click pulling to join the facebook for him. You do have to to a couple of questions and I do insist on you answering and agreeing to those forum rules but once you have you'll be welcomed with open arms and I can't wait to see that. Thank you so much. I will see you on the next one. Traditional Medicinal. We're thrilled to announce our new line of energizing black teas. Our herbalists have blended organic Assam Darjeeling. Black tea with beneficial herbs and Spices Decree Revitalizing refreshing and invigorating tease. Sure to put a little pep in your step. Find All our new tease at whole foods or order online using the code. Well, twenty traditional medicinal 's. It's amazing what a plant can do.

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1179: "Vooden Sporks"

No Agenda

2:45:17 hr | 1 year ago

1179: "Vooden Sporks"

"Should media assassination episode eleven seventy nine this is no agenda reading the classics and Broadcasting Live from Opportunity on thirty-three Okay Progressive Rock and candidate is pretty good I rushed great band I loved them Adam Curry John's six twenty nine hundred and this is your award-winning give on is this on previous show the speed limit will be lowered in many parts of the country because that's really going to help the overall climate change situation and this seems to be a very low number compared to other countries shen well that'll data reverse it right there and so there so pissed off guess what they're GonNa do the farmers are not stopping in half not the actual individual life stocks but the total number of livestock has to be cut in half in order to combat this as well as I think we just jams which the Dutch population seemed to pretty much agree with here is the issue the Netherlands is is not allowed the real problem is in order to combat this they the governments are saying you have to cut your livestock a to have more than zero point zero five mole per hector of nitrogen fighting and they're fighting being being run by technocrats bureaucrats. I need you to do most chemistry you need to work in moles and so you need that number so he can calculate how to issue in the Netherlands which a lot of people have sent in emails and explained in more detail to me this is referring to the farmers who dreadful of math who gives a shit but but I'm not a chemist with this does come in handy to understand the nitrogen edition of UVA Guidroz number the number six point zero to two times one thousand twenty three indicating the number of atoms or molecules in a mobile of any substance as surrounding countries but the reason they're really pissed off on really short list not present it I'm sorry but dishes presented to us no no I never got a note guy actually was I've been mulling it over when I I knew there was a joke in there when I was reading it from the spreadsheet diverse time I know they were what a massive protest together and drove all their tractors to The Hague tying up all the highways six almost seven hundred miles of traffic on the twenty ninth of October they will be doing the same they will be taking over cable airport so there will be dry we need know how much to dilute something for example or to get to a certain number of moles to make a to re chemical and unelected officials I think people stand behind them will I do it's I do too second weekend which I think pretty unique for festivals so we have childish Gambino we have guns and roses with fat axl and we have the cure the cure the cure on my first my first TV correct only this is the festival version of it so they take over Tzilker Park big headliners and the headliners play on the first and the see but it's a it's a mess to traffic is a mess people and I'm glad we're not downtown anymore at least so cut this this was he's indeed correct it was a donation to someone seventeen with the Avocado said Kado number yes long yeah that'd be a frame with blue dye and we'll see what happens good on them good on them because they're not really fighting the EU a big draw but a lot of people have descended upon Austin to try and relive some of those good old guns and roses days which is funded reaction You may have to do that calculation to get to the point to add so much of something or this this actually bear to me it was always a it was always avacado Jesse d'Ivoire buzzkill I got a note about that I guess you got the same one weekend in Austin or it's I actually week 'cause it's two weekends that means what is this Austin city limits it's a very large on every Saturday on pbs Oh called the the God dro- number our constant is win was so what can you use this for this this fine of Gaudreau show ever I show I ever did and they were all then these guys sixteen k well and so who are the headliners will have three headliners cleave thanks do I thought it was the same that's right I think that was my mistake or maybe a bad source on my part the estate what what is he referring to I know what this is I can't come up with and it just dawned on me this morning so producer Dick sent in a No Curry your resident chemist should is to the green new deal I know you clipped it you talking about the baby and that's your update from Austin Texas Country Western act in their other may be the always have the brothers Peterson that's tons have tons of acts but these are the big ones these big headliners it sounds demand depressing no on I don't know if it's depressing S. Casey played everybody's hurting I I do have the whole clip yeah play the clip just to enjoy it allocate play the ban as this was in a town hall with Sandy Oh Cossio Cortez so it was is in Queens I guess in Town Hall so people are talking about Alzheimer's on the menu and a couple other things speaking of on the menu so once stood up and said this okay who are they you just heard them don't be obliged those are the headliners we'll try cello Gambino I'd say is I think he's Pinot K. E. babies for those who haven't seen or heard it it's worthy of setting up this I I saw the original you know get with a fossil fuel is not going to solve the problem fast enough uh Swedish professor saying we can eat that people but that's not fast enough so I it's not enough you know even if Bob Russia we still have too many people too much pollution so we have to get rid of the baby you you know you're pollutant too much to we have to start now please you are so great I'm so happy that you really support a nuclear deal next a campaign slogan has to be this we got to start eating babies we don't have enough time to much seal to all of you you it's just me I will I'm just expressing myself from depressed well then why don't you get yourself out of that funk and take much longer because of the climate crisis we only have a few months I love that you support the green deal but it's not getting luckily we have more than a few months we do need to hit net zero in several years but I think we wanted to address it in all seriousness and I and I think that's great this is a new category of that's a big problem just stopping we need to eat the babies thank you thank you call this falls under the activist category did anybody you figure out who this woman was and one of the things that's very important to us is that we need to treat the climate crisis with the urgency that it does presents yea acting troupe she's a part of es apparently closely related to the Larouche PAC. I'll yeah all needs to to to understand that there are a lot of solutions that we have added that we can pursue and that if we act in a positive way there's well the to me the joke of it and Nar when I was growing up in our house we didn't discuss the classics but what surprised me is the amount of certainly right wing conservative right-leaning youtubers etc irresponsive genius you have that too on this clip AFC's responsible hadn't a coup also took this seriously all they've gone insane the left is gone nuts much but inevitably there would be a point where my mom would go you know there was always about money in our house you know no money space for hope there's we are never beyond hope sandy oc later said that she really thought this woman was having a personal crisis moment in in uh-huh cat food they wonder even wrote about it on songs key life and so you ended up with a lot of publicity for it I eastern European rice sounded more like it sounds like someone trying someone trying to do it or maybe it was just Iraq said we really believed it they thought that this was real which leads me to believe that people don't watch or read anything just like a sound bite great let's talk about data with it she didn't ponytails but she had kind of the girlish look and I think the accent was phony was kind of trying to be a bit of a Swedish accent it it's a no no no thank you still think yeah no so it to be discussed about the performance itself I thought the accent was very I thought you know what she was doing here with the Baratz in her hair on both sides was a version of a somewhat older that was a nutjob whereas if anyone did stemmed from an actual professor who did recommend eating human flesh he see with this homeless crisis and that is a crisis I don't go too far I don't let me finish the thought I don't see how if reading dog food in the eighties the not eating a lot of dog food today okay you're taking it interrupted and they're taking it way beyond where I wanted to be and it was the story of Jonathan Swift and story of John a door by by Jonathan it was the proposal for preventing children of poor people from from what was it Swiss called a modest proposal which is from the seventeen hundreds and and the modest proposal was a joke it was very much the troll of its time and official to the public which they spilled ck back in the day and it was a the idea was for the impoverished Irish to ease their economic wikipedia than the they should add this to it modern day version so I was just surprised surprised how many people were Dan it used to be I think it was in the win was this during the Reagan administration perhaps to assault eating dog food where people will old my mom would inevitably wind up saying we'll be heating dot fo day and there's only one classic that we discussed in our household read the homeless I'm still at the stupidity of this okay I'm starting in my household back back back in my house any problems will be eating dog food that was always my mom's dog food Jay just won't yes exactly so I think there should be an wikipedia entry to this thing I betcha there is if there's an entry for it on troubles by selling their children as food to rich gentlemen and ladies yet it's a classic so when I heard that but people took it seriously as they did trump tweeted I think she seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future that to be patronizing so Putin was asked about the abuse of children to further a economic policy that all in on it and thought that this was the the nutty left we'll I like the way she played it in to the point where she's even heckling eos ain't telling it's great for our analysis people don't read Jack Shit Anymore they look at a headline they look at a clip were they well media the media was playing up sure the poor eating dog food look it up a modest proposal for preventing the children of poor people from being a burden or a burden to their parents or country and for making them fantastic fantastic well let's stick with the green new deal for a second that's a shame by the way that everybody bought into it that way no it it's very it's not. CBS Dog dog makes sense doesn't they actually even sounds like Lyndon Larouche sure they all have a weird accent but just for a moment because there's some things see when she saying well we don't know we we have plenty of time no we don't we have a couple of months piles and piles of trash in New York with Mayor de Blasio someone very special mayor house and get outraged and go for it it's completely it's it's sad people are outraged that don't even know what they are supposed to be outraged about be the green new deal and Specifically Greta turn with the President what did you make Greta Thunberg president she has an allegiance an alliance with another mayor and she visited this other mayor and stood two of them in front of banned plastic and no plastic straws and you know you know the drill it's it's it's your typical green stuff but now you mentioned and I think that's where the gag came from of course of course I mean that's what I would I say this let's take it a step further okay. ETA when children teenagers I used by someone in their own interests that only merits condemnation she seems very happy. I'd say that if you don't like that kind of material theft plan was not a leader in in in terms of protecting the environment but okay you guys discuss ahead of us came to getting plastic they have a mayor female mayor first female mayor ever and she's been mayor for a year now I guess FEM Kahal Samah she comes excitement about Greta. Tom humbugs intervention to me you know what the fact that young people and teenagers them in the Netherlands and mayor your city has been a leader in terms of protecting the environment okay just so you know entering and then it was like oh no it was just a a movie prop it was a disabled gun and it's just the whole she just lied her way through it to get her kid off who clearly vernacular in common parlance when they say huge they it's like an automatic trigger the Dutch go huge example huge council so you notice how she says huge huge scale she did it twice redundant well also she's I don't WanNa get into it but her kid was the one that was caught by the cops with a with a gun breaking it uh-huh his condemnation thank you Putin that he could see we never talked about the trump thing but I think it's worth discussing at least for a second what did you make at the United Nations should we just while frustrate you probably don't share everybody L. No on presidential is I'm President Ray killing a little girl she's sixteen she's not even a little girl anymore in Amsterdam nope plastic so voted in sports we try to do our best only sal you're following very quickly very quickly very very quickly as we're doing it on a huge short- since George I have to look at the problem mayor in was taken selfish with a gun and a houseboat that he broke into and that's been you know covered up so she but also Amsterdam is in disarray there is trash up is a problem they've embarked on this like every city we're we're not we're going to in and out of the city Oh yes we only use forks and sparks as you said this morning and you know von I've into favor mayor thank you so much thank you thank you thank you very much Oh yes thank you very much you give her the keys to the city proper the dam he of course and you know look at all the Dutch names Harlem Staten Island these are all Dutch names but it it truly was the color the Green Party and she's annoying she's always been annoying she's a she's a Green Party and annoying is if you go back and look at the true history of the United States we're talking it's very sad is my opinion sports you WanNa talk about Brexit I got a whole bunch of clips yeah I have I can set it up yes that's because the Dutch went trump I came on the scene he's you know you was a big thing he introduced the Ds yes and it is now Kamal scale so let's be little humble about because what you're going to do is really huge pressing between the classic out of and area lived in Amsterdam for several years before they even set sail and there was so the in fact the the really Manhattan in New York when read a book about this I have to find the title of this book it's something the islands support for what we're doing sports understands that we doing that problem with all the dirt does to our ecosystem with weapons came in with some pilgrims as a little more to it that is complete Amsterdam in the Netherlands but Amsterdam influence that's why they call it New Hampshire ah come to me the Dutch were very influential if a lot of the settlers that came to Manhattan in particular new the new court documents show Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson will comply with the law and ask for a brexit extension if there's no deal within the next two weeks but a senior government sure of the Dutch at the time in Amsterdam that created a lot of what we consider to be American culture and that's just very short one that really is says nothing so I think it'll be perfect for your barrage kind for a quick look now at some other news it seems the more I listened to the less I understand where they're at their report made zero sense that's exactly why I told the BBC that the law can be interpreted in different ways Mr Johnson has again insisted the UK will lead the e U on October thirty first without delay he'll need to check on line if you'll possibilities valid for travel to Europe if you're planning on driving you'll need to check the right documents to drive and take the keys Wli and the FRY plastic voting key the thing that saddens me and I just wanted to everyone out there we have to get plastics out of our lives and everyone can be a part of it we're today with our executive order take big steps Sudan and not too long ago John it was crazy I could only use sports I did not know that this was not happening everywhere yet the liberal kind of you know laissez faire attitude of the United States in my opinion if I look at some of the history not just three ships the we're gonNA pass legislation even farther but we have to do in our own lives turn away that plastic straws don't use plastic for community choice let's get away from this series of meetings going on inside the Palace of Westminster and around it and very little noise coming from a Lib Dem's over Labor Party loads from out of Subic William probably unless you would draw everybody's attention to the acute issues of the nowadays including the environmentally is a good thing and we should support them and late it's like what am I supposed to understand now I didn't get so delayed maybe no he'll do it something what no deal yes please J. C. D. help us out I've been listening carefully to the BBC or actually mostly and the I got a couple of interesting but that's a different subject and the reason is they simply can't agree who the interim leader should be because Jeremy Corbyn together to get rid of in garage tries to describe this in some detail lengthy is worth listening to this Farraj on the on the quagmire that have been an end now get the support of the twenty one booted out torres because he's kind of seemed to be a Marxist and other things that doesn't work I live dams went go with it because make sure your travel insurance covers all your healthcare needs to keep your trip on track check what you need to do a UK slash brexit get ready for brexit get one all more of the EU countries to veto extension embarrassing comes back to the House of Commons as right it's very simple it's running out fast because his big problem if your remain a- his you'll fat you will fare as Boris goes on the seventeenth of October Anthony what has been response when you said people hey let's get rid of plastics to something else everybody liked it of course it was well and then I have was this stuff about what their take is on trump which I thought was more interesting that brexit itself but let's there's somebody's taking it seriously because this is an official government Tom agree on anything or anyone a so that's the situation I think is a good would Ken Clarke is wandering around the place giving up his tie but he doesn't see this other work and they can't agree on anybody but time for them is running out I'm just reading to see what they're talking about now the other thing going on there is Boris Johnson still kind of the prime minister but he does have the votes deehan prime minister This is horrible this this is not even three hundred years later and I'll be sparks we're going backwards in time awesome Outta of the lives of everyday citizens of Amsterdam tell us about what you didn't need I'm just going to tell you everything she says is not true but a form of Brexit if you WANNA stop brexit completely from happening if you are a remain EAC you WanNa take that chance so ads the UK British ad for Brex for Brexit get ready for breaks eight on the thirty first of October this means the troubling to the EU will change they become 'cause 'cause half the either fired I think about twenty or thirty Tori's got kicked out of the Party for being boys and girls it's the treaty Mrs Maes with a couple of tweaks or we leave with no deal now I think Boris did that on Thirty Festival Toba Limit Gove DOT UK slash brexit not on UK slash brexit. I'm just go ahead frontier of Austin Texas capital the Jones Star stake in the morning everybody I'm Adam Curry and from northern Silicon Valley where I've realized it's odd the God dro it would have catastrophic consequences for the Conservative Party and types of division within it but the would be a form of brexit not a very good one KPIX which is pretty much party but in a number of them quit so there he doesn't have a majority of anything anymore but they nobody seems to be able to put anything element is going to be parade on Tuesday if they gonNA put in place unattended prime minister ahead of that summit Monday as their deadline and as yet is to Harold L. so I think people green and we need to change well I wanNA thank you for being a great example of change and helping us by us that it devastate won't be in Downing Street and maybe not quite as dangerous as some thought he would be I just don't agree Margaret Beckett's names being put for sundown gave us here's an idea why don't what isn't Jeremy Clarkson just run for prime minister he's got the right idea and everybody loves him to the BBC. Yeah so I so I'm listening to so there's also a funny situation that occur we didn't hear about the United States but Nick Ferrari and there's I got four short clip well one of them's long looks like but the rest were pretty short this is Simon Marks reporting on trial there is also in the early stages absolutely enshrined in law a strong you know law which says of Costa brother so tip so typical of the Brits having lived there it's like I mean even the whole con- The that is is not specific legislation that says you can I took this afternoon and of course legislation we have to allow protests in a democracy which causes a reasonable reasonable to pink boat amount of a highway obstruction. Yes of course there is one wasn't that Exercise Commission because there is also in the early stages are any who's a woman a police commissioner of London and he's carping about this big pink yacht that was apparently dragged down the street and op down the middle of Oxford Circus and so he's giving her grief about this and when you listen to her try to explain the situation you really makes you wonder if there's this country is maybe should be run by Brussels touted a pink yoga talk circus without being stopped I wasn't that I don't know to sit down do I did you notice back up just a little bit is you know she does this same thing Obama is one that started doing this and we've seen other cats option to have a license to you I don't but I can tell you that if we had tried to intercept the pink boat we wouldn't have had the power to do so nor as soon as was on the highway like that is there a specific piece of legislation that says you can take street furniture away like that and so these are the kinds of things we need to look at trump and what's going on over here from the British perspective at President Sorry wait wait sorry we talked about this before which is the picking up dirt on his likely opponent Joe Biden the former vice president of the United States and his son hunter who used to do business in both did the fact that they just pair at the worst of our mainstream media they wake up in the morning they look at the New York Times Dot Com Washington Post Hugh crain and China and today president trump returns to the lawn of the White House to justify what the vast majority of observers Liden and going after corruption that strains credulity not my opinion but the opinion of Mitt Romney a former Republican president absolutely enshrined in law a shown a great way she not going to say freedom of speech is she because then is this a network and I caught one of the news segments the actual news this Guy Simon marks is their guy goes out for China's investigation wrote Senator Romney is his political opponent in the midst of the Democratic nomination process it strains credulity question and I gave an answer what always in the form of corruption what I WanNa do and I think I have an obligation to do it probably duty to do it today's Stewart and she just did it which is you're talking away and now it's really important so I kind of changed the way I say it suggest that it is anything other than politically motivated Senator Romney of course he's one of those Republicans who may well end up determining that really against the law he Hebrew he broke the law and and ask them to interfere he didn't tell you about Oh in Washington believe is the president to break federal election law which prohibits him from soliciting support Oh can according to this guy is the Federal Election Committee wise by federal laws for us can you ask him for help how systems yeah whatever meaning silent at the moment and that's not necessarily good news for president trump who must surely crave voices supporting him from within his own party gain to convict him of high crimes and misdemeanors against the American Constitution the vast majority of Republicans in the Senate Senate where Republicans like Senator Romney are in the majority they will all have to decide are they going to vote to keep Donald Trump in power or the trumpers Little Marco during the twenty sixteen presidential election campaign was asked if he really thought that it was apt for the president of the United States intercept Pat Y'all know stops in the middle of Oxford Circle the old bill hasn't gotten a cow to say boy move that y'all sort of any kind or any value from a foreign government here's what Donald Trump had to say today about five campaign what I do care about reported on trump to some senators all speaking but very uncomfortably Senator Marco Rubio of Florida you will remember him excoriated by Donald yes and Aerobic Rubio looked as miserable as he sounded clip wow how nice editorial uh he's pretty good at getting everybody fired up and he's been doing that for a while and to media responded right on right on right on task blaming the media broke the law he called onto countries Ukraine and China to interfere in America's twenty twenty presidential election but stop options his campaign that's up to him politics and stuff to them I don't care about politics politics as I think I made clear and yesterday somebody asked me the how it got there we must have found out subs- boss so I don't know exactly how it got I genuinely cameras dot com park on red route without inviting China to investigate Joe Biden a real request him just needling the press knowing that we're going to get outraged by it The fate of the DONALD TRUMP presidency because if president trump is impeached by the house of Representatives there will then be a trial in the US Vo Ridiculous Pink Jolt Break So I'm listening to this on but it's the biggest whopper number three Another Republican is speaking out against the President Congressman will heard of Texas I think it's decided to retire rather than seek reelection and face a possible drubbing by voters in the lone star state areas with President Trump's record in office oh really that's why they all resigned okay I'm sure some of them did I didn't realize according to him Texas was something that I wouldn't have done and I can go today I think two days before that wishing China congratulations on seventy years of communism angel candidate who took to twitter shortwhile ago to describe the president's actions as wrong and pulling the only American citizen President Trump Singh thing you know we whenever I'm faced with the drubbing I retire that's the Texas the Texas way my friend yeah of course they saw I think the question is why didn't get intercepted earlier is partly back to what I just been discussing what you have soon and of course about highway obstruction of course there is a commission because yeah that's taking that's taking the show prep from the US mainstream media Bo he's got he's got overnight between three American ambassadors operating in the vicinity of Ukraine it is apparent that at least one of them raised questions about whether president trump was insisting on a quid pro quo asking the Ukrainian president to dig up dirt on Joe Biden INEX- G range for withheld military assistance and also a withheld invitation for Presidents Alinsky to visit the White House for President Trump The the clip he didn't look any different than he ever looks he didn't sound any different than he ever did but let's just take a look at what's happening when he right on right on task blaming the media and his robot Rubio looked as miserable as he sounded in that clip while Wow China you interfere in the election please people yeah mobile we'll get into that in the law that was is furious Texas outraged I tell you is furious at trump castle for his behavior yes orangemen bad we hated very the streets here are becoming more treacherous and the Democrats are becoming increasingly emboldened as their impeachment inquiry Andrew gets underway or clip in this this Texas clip but play this and we'll get into it hot president trump yesterday as you know in the grounds of the White House whenever you talk about trump you guys all ways all caps defend him no a listener and I think maybe a producer donor youtube disgust me on the no agenda Podcast with some support from some clips etc because we saw very early on it's only only three shows ago it seems like matter how disgustingly corrupting criminal his behaviors are you are diehard Republicans and it shows now that is quite insulting actually so of calls the President Exhibit Criminal Behaviors and claim that you love your country so I took this to heart and decided God I mean we've forgotten all about Cavenaugh we've got about Epstein everything is off the radar it's all about this and seems to be working whether he's damaging himself more in the process who knows oh all right I would like to make a case for our stance on this says this he's saying the media jumped on Q. he saying that to the media including this guy let's hear that last bit again that was good right on via tweet is not something I would do do either China is is an adversary he is one of more than half a dozen Republican from the state of Texas ord in after our pre show we discussed this impeachment bullcrap and I just want to share that so that we can understand where some people are coming from this person is to explain what is happening for broader for there is of course no criminal behavior and the thing is being unpresidential could be shown to be misdemeanor but the the trick to impeachment is you have to get the people yelling this they they kind of know that but that's not really what impeachment is about impeachment when we talk of high crimes and Mr Higher country behind it otherwise it'll just be useless I think everyone at this point knows house of Representatives files the articles of impeachment the and let me read this I got a note from a from someone who is clearly it is breaking the law I support impeachment the fact that you to see pasture crazy loyalty to party disturbs me how can you demeanor can really be determined misdemeanor by itself is a fantastic term and you can use it for any amount of things in I could even make a case that acted all this in because I'm I saw polls recently which showed Biden support was going down because all of this activity has failed prosecutors and the Senate that they are the judge and jury and you need to convince them and so we've heard already well you know there's thirty five Republicans if I said this is the machine is in full gear the machine is going one hundred percent Matt drudge part of the machine I'm sure he's partisan mentality it quite quite impressive actually so the Texans are they hate trump I didn't realize Texas hated trump we hate that and these guys would have faced a drubbing Serov multiple times president trump at that appearance insisted that there was a distinction between digging up political dirt on Joe Biden Joe reasoning we have to retire this is this I mean this isn't even the New York Times just MSNBC they're translating here yeah that's good uh-huh okay it's clear there is no lou that trump could stoop to that you guys wouldn't be supportive of and praise I've come to the conclusion is being played here for whatever reason maybe there's thousands of sealed indictments everybody's running scared they gotta do whatever they can't I dunno I I'll believe it when I see it you were both hardcore trumpers and will no longer be listening to this podcast I stand for country and moral values over party and when any nice won't L. VC good to go so this guy's a liar so let's go onto the one I think this is the this is this is a short stake that people on twitter make is they go back and forth with the with the liberals call what aboutism absolutely correct about that say well but they got this the Texas yeah all right that's rob this idiot more damaging more damaging issues for the president of the United States to release of texts yeah pump it up a little bit he they're not just top it's reading from a script please saga's own opinions let's go to right that's LBC's US correspondent Saima marched in the latest dramatic twist in the fairy Joe Biden I wonder still if if trump has NBC CNN and right just rewrite it we don't have to do any kind of shadow little flair some gems not in this first agents somewhere in his background I mean have we ever doubted this of course not so the machine is trying to put into people he's going for need to push this and and how do we tell people this we have to continue we hammered the message and we are from Ukraine on trump and Christopher steele was a foreign agent he did this on trump but of course and even the people yelling this person I'm not too sure even from hearst quite strong strong John did you hear that last statement from her it was so strong I can't remember it because he reparable dammit interviewed the speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi who would be the one to actually a call for a vote to file for the articles of impeachment which means it would be at then is the judge and jury with the Supreme Court justice the head just as the big one a big cahuna presiding over a real it's like a court drama really and you have real lawyers but when I even saw the drudge report and a buddy of mine in Holland the robot GNC called me up and said what the what why is drudge turning on trump in the election but I will say this have you said all of that separate from that re election of Donald Trump would do irreparable real this is all just talk until until they actually vote on it it's nothing but listen to her own words in the Clinton Cases House passed all the feeling that this president has to go in fact George Stephanopoulos of ABC's this week a Clinton insider an operative still damage to the United States this we have some serious repair and he'll into our country for what is do you pay for I don't I'm not sure that two terms television including well Nancy Pelosi herself when they talk about the transcript and what the president said and what or what the transcript is we may go to that place as we go just because it's a Republican talking point but it's not necessary so what she just said there is vote in secret then they will get e five percent need to be convinced yep so they need the threat but that doesn't matter the concept that shift the head of the intelligence committee actually said it's a parody Nancy I guess forgot this you know you support chairman shift but wasn't right for him to have that dramatic interpreter the resolution to set up the inquiry why not take that step we don't have to be afraid of that vote come out the Republicans because they're interview Kency she wants to take it step by step but she is completely committed to this right now I'm just GONNA lead to a real showdown whether it's weeks or months it's common but that last I don't know who said what what the transcript read that they're all basing this off of even she denies English Truth Being reparable so you can see he wants to take it step by step two terms might be irreparable that could that could ruin the country and here's Stephanopoulos talking with ABC crew after the your head what we just discussed earlier even the journalist didn't know not reading the articles that reading headlines Listen to sound by Bitchy does now I bet she doesn't cause I watch the whole interview but again no one actually goes back to the transcript most people on waiting to get further evidence as we go forward doesn't hinge on whether Michigan has the guts to really do what the constitution requires or what the impact because he actually said no those weren't his words well those weren't the president's words interpretation of the president's words saying he made this up he didn't make it up and where he did this whole thing with you know made stuff up made it sound like a like a Mafia don movie and he got criticized and then he said Oh no it's a parody could act as a attention on his son and Biden's business activities and coast if trump wants to dismiss him in cut to the constitution is not going to slow down our or impair our ability to keep the republic sad is using the president's own words so if those weren't the president's words interpretation of the president's words there saying he made this up he didn't lights go no reason I I asked the question because that's the question if I was stepping off lease if you play more of the really doing real impeachment we're just doing inquiry unless I misheard that so it's just generally accepted L. if we don't really need this let's just get everyone talking about it that's what she nation of the president's transferred the phone call the hearing last week I want the American people to now but that phone call was about I want them to hear it so yeah it's there yeah that's Hertel I've now decided when she's going to tell you well it's always a look and then I wanna tell you something that's her television host And she is a strong leader for people who love this type of thinking about getting rid of the president if he if he if he if he has a second term what proof that she had that Oh stop forget the proof it's not about the proof the whole idea is to put in plan and some people take it rather far Rachel motto is is very fairly successful podcast a very successful yeah this is this is the leader of the House of Representatives Guy He's clipper the day for that cat show sees on the view with the ladies of the view and they just roll out a doozy my question for you is just not I think he's a half to decide wouldn't that make the process even more airtight you see it's not necessary we're we're we feel that there is firm ground as we go forward and we and it's worldwide it's worldwide that's why you're hearing the same copies everywhere you just played from l. b. c. and that is the and as my colleagues have done as well I did not say I will do this as long as the Republicans can understand the constitution so the fact that their loyalty is to report chairman shift but what is right for him to have that dramatic interpretation of the president's a transfer the phone call at the hearing last week this this is about shift you remember look at all the show the cover all right we'll talk about that later and they never do they just promote don't talk about what's in the book they all WanNa talk about trump impeachment and she is a form of authority the Constitution requires you and if the country's honor requires you to teach somebody I notice the country's honor not the not really the the law vote if the senators could vote in secret than he would definitely be impeached and kicked out yeah that's the way we like democracy vote in secret this is all good now so we're gonNA be angry nobody can figure it out nobody can predict it we haven't done this enough was looking house it's working his unraveling already because of working he's impeached and in which she got sucked into a conspiracy theory which was just beautiful and wanted y'all to hear it because you'll be hearing more of it actually contains my favourite bid about the Sea Moscow Mitch is in charge and he's not going to do it I think that's likely you know that's the way it works we've only had two presidents impeached one in the eighteen sixty s read it but that's not that's beyond the point it's not about what's true or not the idea is to get the entire machine the machine is the m five m the machine is the social media happens it looks like the vice president pence what become president pence but it looks like vice president pence knew about this phone call with the fishy yeah right in as much trouble this is sort of new reporting from the Washington Post which is that pence basically did it too tells interpretation of the president's words there saying he made this he didn't make it up and I'm GonNa tell you something absolutely oath of office to support and defend the constitution ritual Manno is promoting her new book called blowout which I'd like to read could this about pipelines every appearance he's done about this book has not been about the impeached one in the eighteen sixties in the nineteen ninety s and in both cases they were impeached in the house and the Senate didn't throw him out that's sort of the way we've done it it doesn't mean that you shouldn't finish it up because she literally says he didn't make it worries me becoming from daycare they get rid of this woman I have to give Stephanopoulos some props here are you one of the talk show guys on they'll be C- London's Ben Chatting had the police commissioner but making it contingent on military aid is just that much worse pence appears to have been the guy who connected those things explicitly to the president his defense is now I didn't know that script at least twice he'd been given as part of his briefing materials before that so the whole idea that he didn't know seems really flimsy and impeach Tunes Nancy Pelosi or Constitution it's the honor and that's what they're talking about it for that from their perspective I say Okay I get it and that's what they're going after for the honor of the way we've done it lawyer saying Oh yeah so let's say that happens she just like that will happen like we'll have a secret vote for impeachment in the Senate this is the the residence need that you shouldn't if the constitution requires you and if the country's honor requires you to somebody I feel like trying to game out what the political consequences that pence as soon as trump had this call this Alinsky went over to talk to the lead skinned person to say you're not getting any military aid and we need you to do those investigations and the whole defense pets which is exactly what trump is going to be impeached for I mean making telling another country to help us in the election is both illegal and impeachable rainiest president because he had an aid that was on the call however he seems to deny that he knew trump was going after the biden's but then explanation seems a little one thousand nine hundred and in both this is very interesting way of answering the question instead of saying Yeah Bill Clinton was impeached she just does some dates so we don't really think about the was telling him to do these investigations that it was necessarily about Biden but the president had already had this Biden discussion with Ukraine pence just top aide was on it he'd been given the train talked about this already that we talked about after the show actually we don't think we talk yeah I don't think we've talked about it on the show which is the danger bad whatever she said but she's full of it because it's not exactly what was in the transcript at all it's not what she said it's almost as if she did convicted bright let's just say because you only need let's say twenty Republican senators side with you you've quoted something that's at maybe thirty five Republicans you know it's like two guys and we're like a whole guy ago where longtime something back and then who knows you know that's the way it works we've only had two lawyer of the show but it's something that's me thirty five Republicans undercover Chat Flanking Jeff Flake or wearing secretly the secret so let's say that undercover frank and Jeff Flake Secretly seagrams Vo. Let's say that happens okay she is a lawyer I'm to be impeached yeah yes you are you are you against it I it's not my job okay yeah well what's your read on the fact that you know he impeached convicted in the Senate because President President put this how nuts it's become I we Dario that they picked up from somewhere from the views that's we're all we're all intelligent journalists guests this weeks ago this talking to the show we shouldn't talk danger we shouldn't do that but I will say this a couple of weeks ago the Lib Jokes are going back and forth at each other and this was there and that is that the media's power over the public has been screwed up by the Internet yes and I don't know if it's enough I think that the that at work I I don't know well you actually you have gone on about about this saying you do know to impeach Obama why didn't they because they didn't they couldn't get the people on board the people loved Obama despite what he was doing it ultimately wash us with with with nastiness from television radio and social media that's that's the plan that's the whole plan act this is happening the way it's happening which can happen to any president at any party shows you that it's the our system has become shit it's not a single playbook the playbook is shut up he's not misdemeanor impeach him everybody agrees everybody's on it's it's question it to one blend weak minded individuals listen I don't care either way it's good for the show but it so I'll give you an example of how is no ideas and this is why they're going to lose again to trump because all they're doing is focusing on trump it's you can't win by hating the the opponent it's the people who forced the representatives to do it without that buying they'll never do it it's not going to happen so they're trying to Jedi mind control tricks trying to just which is to get trump boasted after the first term using any mechanism they can and they just try everything they can try but it worked so well in the mind you vote for me because I hate the so the troll the troll room says they guess the troll means the Republicans had eight years don't look over here focus on the no president ever done whatever focus on him that's the game that's the Game Ladies and gentlemen the let's focus on this on this man what he's doing that no president has ever done no president focus on this man yeah of course that's why we're doing a podcast but that is the system and it it's a it's a big big big system and it's been running that way for a long time who I didn't even know she had a kid named Paul did you John Hill okay well yes how how the how the right is countering this because of course we've dug up some shit on Pelosi in good shit too about her son Paul doc is very possible trump meghan impeach I don't know it's anything could have no and he may get kicked out but that's neither here nor there the it's just shit with the media and there's no way no way talked about the the the long-term schemes when they are developing desirable efficient cars that get more than one hundred miles per gallon my son call very exciting day here in Washington DC A lot of focus on innovation and technology to help solve a lot of the world's energy crisis both oil spills yes Paul and he has very interesting job at a science science science and science breaking crippling addiction to oil you made a long speech about it I think to episodes ago if not that's still holds true but I don't know when I see this note for man overboard I started in corporate finance expert and also happens to be the son of Nancy Pelosi the minority leader of the United States House of Representatives Hello Mr Pelosi welcome the which will be participating in cars and efficiency which is represented today and space in different adventures and using technology from space to make human here in Ukraine speaking with represents from the government investment bankers discussing certain things related to soccer exactly what the Corporate Governance Initiative occur for young people you know Ukraine's got a great history in soccer and we hope to share in that tradition going forward the first of all it's a wonderful time of year in Kiev flowing it's steamrolling even Biden listen you're vice president Ukraine your son jogging six can get tricky but sports area where people seem to have a good competitive healthy relationship and conditions mentor here so Paul is management at the time of the speech at Visco oil group midterms who so the get back that they're not gonna let up on this because this is their only way of winning votes they have in Ukraine oh no and they interviewed him on TV. I'm Alex Gupta with you ATV Today I'm speaking with Paul Junior he's a San Francisco based investor I love being in the springtime the blossoms are so great after that Chernobyl deal and I'm here to talk about soccer run in court you have a corporate governance business talk about soccer recently endorsement from the World Sports Alliance and we've spoken with the UK government about collaboration that's all that we talk about this but enforce he puts I feel bad that it put some of our former listeners men overboard Dan puts they seem to have been bought into the whole thing I just it's it's futile it's the stream I mean it could be up or down but when it's up just kidding we had a problem early this morning when it's up there's always some great shows live shows as well can interact live troll the hosts as they're speaking it's fun to do no agenda Stream dot com also big in the morning to net ned coup art in the past you study did some I don't know I mean I don't know that he did anything it was picked as was I think he's a virgin it just GonNa go on for another year but the way I see it they should either imp- ibis when you're with me tells me that that is par for the course and not to be overwhelmed by that prospect will be considered the normal all and some overboard some troll and hard and some just here for the fun and that is available to you every single day twenty four hours there's always something going on with the with good morning to you Mr Adam Curry also all morning hole on in the morning all boots on the ground feet in the air subs in the water the dame's what we do is we work with people to kind of bring people together spirit of operation sometimes religion and that now it's not a company to there's been no indication of any conflict of interest from Ukraine or anywhere else but even I'm not gonna I'm not gonNA stunned a pleasure to be here and to the people of Ukraine into the young kids and that are very enthusiastic about their athletic futures so I don't think that's bull crap you have no idea so really thank you feel much better qualified now what that be thrown about on Fox News and then Nancy is she's a hypocrite and it's just going to go on and on and on and it'll spin right back to trump and and it was the the Dutch farmers on their tractors blocking the highway and they were proudly displaying their no agenda podcast banners as one does during a protest ATV thank you Alex Pleasure to be here what brings you to give now what do you think he was in Kiev forwarded to me with some oil executive of work I feel like like an art judge you are but I'm not really qualified they'll tell you what would that it's time for me to thank you for your courage and say in the morning to you the man who put the sea in corporate governance John Barak Nice Job yes if you want the category for the win gives a wonderful time of year here with the Corporate Governance Initiative and today where he issue must impeach I beseech whether it's been new I'll I'll tell you why which is he was an executive at a at a gas and oil company which is okay and I was like oh well I guess I mean you know but oh he was also the probably that same corrupt company that Biden got involved with was that the answer you would give on television if you were there do I have to ask it in a form of Oh to thank for today's episode eleven seventy nine starting with guests who finally showed up areas he's back who and if not then they don't put anything back in sometimes it's a Yin Yang and in my opinion if you don't put anything in your hate to show writing those nasty we've we've we've popped his albemarle Chart Cherry in this case as we selected his art for episode eleven seventy eight the title of that was snakes and spikes for value and we also like to thank people for their financial support which is eight an actual real value that you can measure and we have some people does that make the show remarkable I would like to correct request a correction to your show notes Oh eleven and very happy that he did that was in very nice piece or other good pieces to look at his well and you can hard show to it was a hard one to do that me all return Christie's call promise let time no agenda are generally dot com is where you can see all of the art work and also you can upload your own partic- sat there and the water and they say that yeah he did now well in the morning to the trolls in the troll room good to see y'all eleven sixty two he gets top billing so please correct I use snail mail and my donation delivery variable but the amount of my donation is not a mistake we looked it up I think net net has didn't he have a one or two art selections in the past he did a few easy to be has done this episode Lebanon Sixty seven shows my name above Sir Euchre of this of Sandy Ridge he donated eleven sixty seven in I donate oh no it's not part of the job is not avocado take for your great analysis and deconstruction from the m five M and thanks to all the producers he knows is great entertaining when he resigned because you basically just contributed to the show in a very good manner so you can't get away from our system incorrect information on this is important to me okay so today's Eleve- ten sixty two wait wait wait let me just think hold on one second ten sixty two you said yeah okay so it's that's not a Godhra thanks we have to discuss before we go on with this note first of all there is no real it's not really by order of when you put two Asian that yearn for donation delivery is variable but the amount of my donation is not a mistake poor anonymous of dark patch also came in with the ten sixty two tate in this grand experiment because this is our value for value system we have a network of people everybody put something in they get out of it what they want to get out cre of sandy rich as as per his request nice it's very now so I wonder what was his amount on Levin Sixty seven getting producers in associate executive producers in the list it's not the highest mountain money goes at the top it's just coincidental particular episode why was it what was the problem I don't was almost good yeah but it's also is difficult you selecting someone's created that is any art judge there is there's that you look at a lot of art been doing it for ten years you're judging it your judge what Beata ten years experience want to be a deal that it has to be in the correct order but now going on from there his appearance that which we and that was the I have no idea but there's a string of numbers involved here well what I've done in the meantime is I have honored his requests and I have gone by the and correct information on this is important to me what what how what episode was that led us sixty seven and was it was eleven sixty two he donated eleven sixty seven accuracy and political vote gathering efforts but offering altruistic incentive to workers unfortunately volunteerism and L. terroristic motivation is being displaced by politically motivated big money donors source that make it a governmental it has high priority yes I've gone back to the show notes for eleven sixty seven the title of that was nine Dash Line and I have put him under Sir you serve Sandy Ridge and honest was eleven sixty two five bucks less okay quest and I I gotTa tell you when we receive something from Dog Patch I'm always delighted not I mean that's right especially the Hams John is load shedding a new reality in California I am used researching the loaves and fishes housing the US is unique in its religious and volunteer infrastructure that this place is wasteful government bureau done that way because it comes straight off the spreadsheet and sometimes it might not be in that in the correct especially especially if someone sends a sends a note it goes through different processes cert- anyway onward sorry for the delay this month getting to a place to print and mail has been hard recently Adam thank you for your what other are judges do you know that have county fair judges don't have that much experience usually in there for ever gone to account Pharisee with some of the picks or business oriented five Oh one C. three effort this is not a good trend and a true breakdown of US values no you answered it as no Zero Panic NJ and K. and he says I use just declared and I believe this is the note from him well how anonymous is this guy in determining that there's some sort of code involved here yeah and when he said he gives it away very slowly giving away some of the infant which now I'm just racking my brains for this clearly he wants us to figure it out because he's hinting no idea who he is we don't know where he's from we don't know what country he's in I'm just I'm usually travels a lot and he's a Muslim the anti likes code numbers who at in have generators in my developing country abodes but no power silicon no power silicon valley panic in the streets fine I use nj n que to tighten the donation section and not because I don't enjoy wonderful combinations other producers measurably and he becomes an INS- two nights today with one thousand dollars and he's from Yarmouth Maine I think you mentioned that Hatching Lowest Lebow via and you will be on top of today's executive producer list where you belong in this case thank you stars our world but it's the fact that he keeps doing it that he is he you know we hadn't heard from for what six seven weeks I was worried I'm like I hope he's okay and it's not the first response is not because of the amounts he donates which are astronomical in in in our world podcast terms not and Rachel maddow's world all right onward to not animus than Yarmouth Maine anonymous dude named Ben to be exact it he's anonymous but you have is not yes thank you so much thank you so much for no agenda the two of you of enhanced my life fantastic thank you so much anonymous dude named Ben yes and I'm going to order the cavity for you right away and as far as I know that name is available Adam from head bangers ball and the early MTV days then Meteo there's pod show in the middle and John from can I please take the name Sir Hashtag blessed if available and I'd like cavity to be added to the roundtable refreshments and and you play the twenty thirty on apocalypse and it's real jingles Why did I mean I'd see anonymous dude named Ben and his email visit begun some time back I personally traced this l. a. you can trace it further back but I trace it to the Hurricane Katrina the one that knocked eleven tale which I have in front of me printed out will old school and it's got a big fan of both you guys he's down and there was all these volunteers and then down in that area there's a lot of Hams lot of volunteers lots of people and get your job done and the US government kept them out how anywhere in the world people can connect their own radios and repeaters him of what some of these had an issue with the something recently we have to we have to work on what's going on tell me what's happened here let me read the note you'll your damn takeover I found that it's moving to all star and ECO link I'm a cw day where am I finally finally well I think we've mentioned it before but just to make sure that we try to figure it out well we have code busters at our the US not the code busters here well thank you very much asshole seventy three's neal N. G. Five engine can I add some content to the donation segment talk about this for a moment I would hope pitch for Ham radio and I'll do that here in the donation segments since it's never that long yes so we've set up an all radio is the public service network of last resort when the apocalypse comes where the guys are GonNa Save the World Right PC magazine and Cranky geeks always saved inside track in your editorials to read last they were the best okay so I've listened for a long time so it's real it's real you've got we are this is like twitter but with civility it so civil you actually have to take a test to join the club we don't have pronouns love is you know sounds like like bruce parents would say we've played this a million times here we have ham radio guys we switching network it's based on Asterix which is you know using the largest corporations in the world it's it really is a voice Dr Node Actually Canine molest Mike in Minneapolis and his And Paul K B Nine T Y C I think people they don't know on twitter this is not any weirder than that think of the weirdness of people going on twitter and yelling at each other I don't even know who they I'm in never contributed value for value isn't covered with this donation so more will follow I only have one beef I finally got into d start to participate in the missing a different when we're putting it together you by skip one you put it on the May be at the end it won't be in correct order necessarily it's not the guy over h f anyway like divorce I keep my h. t. in the glove box and then he has his Request is China is in fact I would tell you please get your sons and daughters into this particular oh I'll call it a hobby whatever you want if you want to call twitter hobby will call so no this that's the old ham radio now it's Ham Radio two point Oh what we're talking about here is actually a very sophisticated it'll go out to a and this could be Australia could be in the Netherlands it can be East Coast West Coast everywhere and that is now ready to go and actually this is hammered so you see something different and I I think we should err on the side of cars that was confused because they had the wrong email open okay so I mean I just two in a row hurt someone else talks it forces some people to do something incredibly strange to listen to the other person it's very interesting or just your whatever something old you have laying around to each other and you create this large network where if you hit the MIC and you start talking but more importantly when people say oh Ham Radio Bunch of gay you it's no weirder than people yelling at work of great quality and it's and it's ad hoc no one controls it you can really connect anywhere you want and make your own bubbles of networks and they sent it to me and it's the whole thing like almost turnkey either was plug it in configure port on the router and up it goes and the okay to point Oh and I think that's the part that I wanted to mention for a second the old ham radio that we know of it's in with complete civility so if you WANNA learn more about this if you wanna connect and you can do it now in fact if you don't have a license you can even listen to yeah we everyone's like who's GonNa go configure John's radio to get on this like no no one's raising their hand believe me so livestream what the no agenda Hams Doing Two K. Five ACC DOT com and it'll show you how to connect if you have a twenty five dollar Chinese radio this towards women or women towards men you took you took the test you got the ticket you belong in the club we'll talk with you it's like aviation where people were only true the Ham two point Oh is people having nice fun conversations with each other it's very much like no agenda meet ups you identify by your call sign there's no outrage and because it's it's not full duplex in most cases you're talking over suspectful to each other otherwise people get hurt in aviation and this is digital these raspberry pies are dino's satellites I mean this this interesting room and it's except it's on voice and you're forced to listen and you might learn something interesting and no agendas going to lead the way of Ham two point Oh as far as things going on and the only problem is the stigma that it's a bunch old dudes who are talking about how will you receive me and while that is concerned k. five eight C C DOT COM to learn more they go maxine waters gravel. You know you didn't get to note under what was suggested because maxine waters gravel actually has an email Carmont by the way you can you can also get on eco link and you can use APPS and itself okay I did not know yes maxine waters gravel and that's what you'd look it up as and so the ground it's I believe that there's a big future for this new ham radio if we can just ignore the old trappings of hey how you doing great I receive you where I'm over here well good signal no this is you know it's like it's like an Irish C. Chat you can become a part of this that's all that it takes and your and your license which is ten dollars and sixty questions you have to get forty right a hobby it did tell them I'll give you all the stuff you need to become this kind of this network also respect there's no no nasty gravel writes in JCD I'm humbly requesting the title of Sir Maxine Waters Gravel night of the cheap labs armlock Neil Gardner comes in next week four five six seven and he actually said you would okay so thank you very much above all for your support of the show I want to make actually WanNa make it you always learn something in donation segment yeah that's why people always give it and I'm going to give a neil his his ass and little carnival kinds of things so there's tons of ways it's all at that website sorry didn't mean trump maxine waters gravel comes with three hundred thirty three dollars and thirty three cents did you ever notice but the point is is that the reading from the same playbook yeah but but what's the play because I played the plate nine okay maxine waters gravel will become Sir Sir Sir maxine waters gravel night of the Oh my goodness I don't believe this was on the list was it light how could it be nobody got this mail but me you go ching China China a whole and don't laugh and go Karma what is Oh let me tell you about the weed Mug is defective have you tried the weed mug no I use it as decoration why arise and I happen to have a copy in my hands right here yes curious you sent you one came to the Po box the like not only to make a donation but give back with some research I've collected over the last year for paper I've written named Global Glacial activity and Sea Level Prepare skillets and meant tulips for the roundtable was it maxine waters gravel who sent me John airy Maryland three thirty three thirty three another notary today's note Reading Day with John Couple months ago I saw my business ooh good enough onward to David Kyle who is in from Oh turn me around about climate change and I've and I had to create this paper to have any credible conversation with my m five m brainwashed changing that helps we'll do trump goes trump was one of those little noisy things he does when he's used to make sound the liquid inside defective isn't it supposed to the handlers supposed to be cold as opposed to insulate you retired from the company that had a lot of dudes named ban it's been awhile since I have donated and I thought it would be a great opportunity to start my next career I can think of no better place to begin the sources demonstrating how we're not all going to die from this bullshit pumped up by the media is not a great paper but is more legit and most of the other crap we oh you all opening up you've got I can do and I have set this paper to add him for his review it is a collection of evidence from NASA the IPC in Oa and others you know when you pour scalding liquid into the weed mug the handle quickly assumes no quickly assumes the exact same temperature as okay don't as whole and don't laugh plus go Karma I'm trying to think what top todd I guess it's a it's it's not just micro-cracks or something in the in the cruel joking all right I've got the skillets forum and the he wants to he has a jingle firstly says love you guys know Homo and then he has a Jingo requests which I could have given earlier Chong the Mug is have a gripe that's the weed mug correct no the Wheaton came from weed is phase of my life as an executive producer for the no agenda show excellent their story thirty three hundred zero the show is giving me many years of education enjoyment turn Chongqing China I think that trump going Jing John John China John Trump I I really don't know what that is but get shoved addison the news please D- Douche me different awesome jobs Karma for the working stiffs out there gene Kyle Maryland jobs jobs jobs and jobs that's it together and publish it as a no agenda one off well that's a good idea I mean it's in a binder it's it's it's it's nicely put together ex- I don't have it I'll do what I have and I and I have what I do I'll be gone aw should consider publishing this publicly this is the second draft put it together held twenty twenty five pages it's also in my po box from Sir Mark Hall a Nice Book We never went to the moon I only got yesterday I went to the Po box yesterday or the or Friday and so I have to still go it's not that big it's only one how many pages is it like you see meet up framed picture goes laughing go yes this is from Tig Hawker looking forward to hearing seven up become the owner of become the owner of your very own screaming goat with this desktop companion press the tree Taniwha goats screams which means you must have one as well well I have a goat this is you get this remote it's fun facts okay what is a large group of goat's called go teas rated book of Fun Facts and Trivia about these famed farm animals okay were off the rails America's thirty billion dollar swindle by bill casing and Randy read I mean I I have a great po box gotta laughing goat and I got the the no agenda De this is a little little goat in a box I don't have a goat in a box this it's small it's ages stump button to hear the high pitched bleats that caused the screaming goats sensation to go viral kit also includes a thirty two page Johnnie nervous so I thought I better step up thanks for all the work you do supporting the mental health of the nights and the many producers out there we depend AH team be a horde see a pack or d a heard attack no it's a herd anyway got me stumped all right onward David Von Sunder than the Black Knight of the Pacific Okarma Regular Youth Got Karma a wooded the growth in guess where Pacific Grove Two hundred fifty bucks I realize it has been way too long since I supported the greatest podcasts Baron Austin of the puget sound puget I'm requesting these jingles don't eat me Hillary Clinton you might die so Joel gets a call out and everybody else is just a click cumulation of small donations he says Get fantastic saying he says Saturday evening meet ups in a Brew Pub minneap North Northeast Minneapolis to be specific. Okay well one hundred seventy nine do we ever delay am I coming through delayed for you or is it sounds like it's like we have delayed no when I say something sometimes this show Levin Seventy eight seventy nine actually today seventy nine eleven seven hundred seventy nine one thousand headed by way of show organizers want to do this I think it's fine and he sent a check and he's got a bunch of only Joel Nelson is about fifty bucks I should reread the essence misrouted Dame Laura of Cou- snowy cascades and I we love discussing not last but almost last is two September Minneapolis meet up which sent in a two hundred and four dollars accumulated nder and writes in this donation brings me the title of Baron after recently downtown sorry I said Nice I said Nice they had one hundred eleven dollars which will be listed later but having another meet up on the twenty fifth so I don't know if that's on the list Oh Hillary Clinton you might you've got Karma you got it together the two of them I'll let you just like talking about the show for no reason to conclude our list of associate executive producers executive producer and it's true thanks for keeping up the great deconstruction the M Five Am Dame Laura of the snowy cascades and I love discussing your show aw after recently moving into downtown Seattle from the ritzy little suburbs of Semaj I will be changing my title from Sir Austen of the snowy cascade it's impressive and you should use it to your advantage and we thank you above all for your courage and participation in this grand experiment we call the no agenda show with our value for `value network more in in our second donation segment you've course can always help us out for the Thursday show all you have to go to our website conveniently jingled he's in New York two hundred two three four five six one of my favorite donations and he says no jingles no comment jingles Carmen. Thank you thank you Gaz neck I think I can't pronounce his last name I'd have to look it up on one of those pronunciation thinks it's Z. I. E. L. E. N. E. C. Zeleny areas in New York we go up people in the mouth it takes a while and then you go what will I don't know you know I think it's fine I interrupted when middle is something caught my eye and I stayed up late for Saturday night live which luckily does come on earlier in our time zone at ten thirty then I really wanted to watch for two reasons one is oh chronicle where he's promoting Hillary really run anybody but hillary she's got the most brand recognition she should have won the last well she's back did you hear that sound like she's back is a funny article there's no clips but Willie Brown back dot org slash and a now you know all about Pam's propagating is this Friday the twenty five people showed up about every other where where was this were these Minneapolis oh Phoebe the woman from fleabag I was hosting and I think she's pretty funny but also Taylor swift was the musical artists and I she is nudging Jennifer Aniston out of my favorite spot I think team Jen is hurting because of this anyway uh the her performance last night she just fantastic she's she's a great performer she is in fact online list of favourite celebrated women Jennifer Aniston is Austin no yeah no yeah Yeah Boston matter of the airport and she's flying oppressed by any executive producer of anything they're not GONNA no one's GonNa go and listen to the show believe me they don't even they even people in media don't give a shit about what they're doing but it's not even close to Austin she lives he has a place in Austin that's what I was told by the locals I think I would -secutive associate executive producers these are real credits as you will probably know by now not everybody does it can be used anywhere that credits are recognized and these credits usually are and people are in Oh cool so there you go and he came they came in with two hundred four dollars in Austin Wilson in Sammamish came in with to hunt genzer local girl for you yes she's from Dallas isn't she originally no Austin Austin really no I met her in the Austin airport once incre- pretty much my essay which is wrong plus McSweeney my essay going on and on and on about it never mentioned in Camden the thought that Biden's fading and Birdies can't win this is divisive this is interesting last night the major major players in California cameras life yes with Alabama to buy in California Politics Speaker that and then you get condescending you become patronizing and then you insult me because of some just minor thing I said Uh John's but Adam Curry John's episode eleven seventy four so when you hear somebody say we're dependent on Saudi oil as mistakes I want to go to this one this is a where you just jump all over me for making just the mildest of commentaries and I'll think so mimi sent me the whole list and we have two other meet up reports to do in our second report but now I'd like to thank these a yellow means you but you said you Sir David von Sunday night the to give she was standing right next to me at the ticket counter looked over and I said born in nineteen sixty nine in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Sherman Oaks what is your problem guards were asleep so big nothing burger spending to see yeah now we're stupid I don't know how many people there want to tease people show up to these things If has five three Saturday how mayor of San Francisco very very powerful he came out with a with a negative not editorial apparently they given a column in the San Francisco I you introduce me to Taylor swift in the very beginning of the show and I thank you for that although we didn't make some fun ever you always liked her and I would psyched up pretty much with the net result is nothing exactly nothing burger as you'd like to say no I don't say that I've nut hiss which is the competitor I you can take either one this one actually may be better but it may be not eating babies inning babies we don't no one killed him he hung himself the camera was broken two cameras to cameras broken some of the footage was unusable. You're supposed to stop me from doing the impossible this is you in and it's the imperfections that make you perfect all right in the last eight episodes I presume good John I cannot tell you how sorry I am yeah okay that's insincere but I'll I'll take it now I do have to ISOS for for consider hey the clip challenge one no wonder I knew something was wrong with you today like what is what is up Joe's Joe well there you go four shows find it finds eight eight finding then we'll count the Times you go so I figure it out I do want to have a meeting at least one more meet up note which look Colorado local seven nineteen and the Phantom Canyon brewing you know what do you want me to say I was I was in the middle of setting up a clip and now all of a sudden I'm being excoriated ration- and by the way you should remember it was only five shows earlier that you said nothing burger and you had said it before really bad about this especially since on the last show I told everybody how how much I wanted Hillary Clinton to come back in the race just for you I know all right well I'll look into it and I you made mistakes before so of you my friend yeah I know that's what you like to condemn me for so let's go to the someone did some work for you and went a I can hear you can finally put that Koreans place you should be apologizing instead of condemning me we got to start eating babies I think that one's batter although I kind of like the well there's a lot of famous people live in Austin so you've said so at least four times barest I'm embarrassed you're right I I cannot believe that I use the term nothingburger the way let's listen to the challenge I so it's a big nothing burger I'm yes and then the other one this is the one that I kinda like but I don't know well anyway yes you're right I'm I feel and Jones launched it I feel like a heel and and now that I hear that back I'm embarrassed by that and I'm embarrassed that I that I that I was so adamant that I would never used I feel the shame could everyone please chance shame because I feel bad shame shame shame still said taint though this is actually a good point 'cause this go on and I'm going to I'm going to confirm what you're saying l. now who's who's it's bullcrap where he get his check from is the first question spiked up and then it did ramp down as fast as about what they said a lot and this will give you an idea of where the real money is betting so I don't know what Willie Brown is thinking about with Hillary. Although Adam Curry d'Ivoire active Epstein has a ranch in New Mexico this Zorro ranch shell cashier Orissa's stuck in my my brain you don't say it much abut I'm shocked that you would would condemn me for pointing this out and I did I only did it casually donald trump hasn't been handling this impeachment news well I mean he's been on twitter rampage he's openly called for China to investigate Joe Anyway Jennifer Aniston is Has a place in Austin apparently I have no reason to not believe it other than living here for nine years never heard so Taylor swift as I was saying has pushed Jennifer Aniston out of the top spot for me but as I'm watching what I'll do is today okay are you is anything else you'd like you have no idea my Tarazi's in high gear right now I'm glad there's no video fucking trap we know of course what's really happening but NBC did a great job of positioning their favourite candidate the whole thing was way too long to cut it down to a couple of minutes you'll hear them slam in succession they slam trump of course that most of the show is about slamming trump or active I've never know finding bullshit I'll never say anything writers recently what you want again to show so I'll I'll give you then Biden then Bernie they don't even talk about Kamla but listen to this trump came saying there was no quid pro quo which can and then he did what any seventy eight year old do after winning twenty eight million dollars he had a heart attack Senator Elizabeth Warren has raised over twenty four million in the past three months here to comment is Senator Elizabeth Warren Okay so this is how it works and this beautiful the way they executed this slam everybody else go into Elizabeth Warren and this is I think expertly done if you want to promote a candidate as a show as a network and in this somewhere or other and I we both were sitting I actually sat across from the chat with their little bit wearing sweatpants I didn't recognize her I go after Joe Biden in the third quarter of this year Bernie Sanders raised twenty five million dollars as you've held onto it so but I understand that my my oversight completely taints taints my good feelings Elizabeth Warren who will then address them in fantastically humorous way it's it's what any candidate dreams of it happened during weekend update you know where they sometimes have guessed so in this case the guests will become apparent but they and I cut this down yeah hi senator retired romantic so you raise all of this money without any corporate you for doing what you challenged me to do a headache challenged me I gotta find that five shows earlier my goodness donations grass roots and guess what Mama loves to Guardian I it's like Oh like no corporate donations told me when he took me to avengers infinity war this ain't freeze is towards you and I I'm sorry you took it that I know I know I put tainting their Arou- which of course is just again you just that's how it works discredit Clinton at the same time coming from NBC that was beautiful work that they did let me just skip Wisconsin and changed my name's emails Benghazi I'm in really as a financial backing thinking about what NBC represents they're now going to throw all of these horrible things that are said about her to the fake it but then again taking big checks from Wall Street worked out great for the last lady running for President Right and and also came out that trump suggested adding a moat filled with alligators snakes to his proposed border wall comes back to what we were talking about the machine that Saturday night live their audience isn't as huge but it's culturally very important and their their videos go viral and people then talk about the money though they never mentioned how much money the Republicans and trump race were there scam ish win red which was a hundred and twenty five million but thank you have said nothing burger yes you're correct and you didn't do it ironically you know I grew it in there as I am I feel remain there was mad could from whenever a guy will go thirty word vocabulary starts quoting the law in Latin because he breaks that law unwind by calling all my small donors to personally thank them I just wanted to know there's been some big money donors for Democrats who would said they would rather vote they are removed an anti Joe Biden nickelback meam that was posted by the president which is a sense that if you'd said it in any other yes we're on video so would actually probably pack them in I mean my eyes my eyes are barely opened their so squinty right now it's just trip in me all right there Liz Warren is there bitch right now well we spotted this before that they seem to be on the list worn band way and it won't last op doing this I think we talked about this after the show because it came to me after the show and I said it was a little different I said no way in hell if I if I really feel the need to watch Saturday night live I will not go any longer than weekend update and like okay so I've seen the artists perform see weekend update weakened update and the awesome sauce that's why every day I spend four hours taking selfies with every worby parker customer in America and then I then my essay is the one thing I should put in I might add it Hillary Clinton remain anonymous for example I'll never literally cannot remember who it was a trick but once in a while it gets to me so wants Hillary shows up nine no but still well done as was it you that said this or what have yet to identify this person is one of the things have a selective memory I won't remember certain things from certain people who won feels entitled to such an extreme that she is not going to let Elizabeth Warren Oh yeah I'm the first woman president you think again and we have to in history would have meant that you were in the middle of a stroke I also Wanna point out that nickelback is Canadian so trump was still technically using foreign so I said so and now my maybe my wife it may have been you I know it's not J. C. checked with other people but somebody pointed out this really Oh yeah are trump and you now this is the next thing that everyone's been talking about Oh yeah wait well listen to how she does it ought to say this but I wish shore it's okay to make fun of this guy me I don't like oh no I'm gonNa tell them the same thing my grandson cheap laughs you also get depend out don't leave the Pan I won't leave the penalty is not too short a notice I'd like to ask the Schefter it stop Eberstadt who's playing Elizabeth Warren Has Kate McKinnon yeah of course would Hillary Clinton ever let any other woman become the first female president before her way probably was you it makes sense now please keep me in automous too late now but the the point is that if that's true if we're GonNa take let's let's adopt a lot now when is the next debate the fifteenth of October okay so that's next what does that next Monday Tuesday house one of the places I well somebody sent me the flier our there's a flyer for it oh yeah is it possible that they're promoting they pushed warren up to the top and NBC is behind to Lure Hillary in became the nominee This of course was not the real is worn and not a guest host spot but let's see I mean what why would fundraiser for what's at her house at the New York House or is it the at the Hampton Day under the guise of promoting her book why wouldn't they have hillary come in and do a do a hosting episodes she ever hosted SNL. I can't recall sweet the picture of Hillary when she was like thirty smile and I don't have much on the on the candidates although I did pick up a great clip you know I threw Meta but why the hell not yeah it's very met but his makes sense because in the October fifteenth would be taxes than it would be Tuesday I've always said we should make we should make election day on April fifteenth when people have or April the Dutch farmers have you can protest all you want and these two countries specifically with the United Kingdom there's actual laws Shoygu somebody somebody in the chat room the troll room can look it up because they have a list of host on Wikipedia it's possible that she has a I know she thinks he's done cameos on the show Real Elizabeth Warren She's done that she may have to but the beside the point of the idea is they didn't put trump what's the spread or doesn't work like that no it doesn't hurt hey we're gonna I got it why would NBC take a chance on pissing off all the other candidates and then being start extolling and we've noticed this before extolling Elizabeth Warren when she eighteenth people have to actually do their taxes not this great idea do during the day after you have to pay your taxes let's see how you vote for the next day Hillary is doing a big abundance shoulder so he can become president let's faces of course not of course not but he was on NBC. I like it I like that the gum and she's back to that one one of our roles made a good point and said if you recall SNL had trump guest host a year before He the great clip from Beto Beto Robert Bobby Francis O'Rourke as you know he is a quite explicitly against your freedom of speech you all you can say anything you want as long as it doesn't cause a dividing the social discourse will what's the point of speech then it's actually legal punishable I two years in the in Gitmo Lowlands the United Kingdom you can't even say anything disparaging about a politician you can go to jail so it's incredible yeah my argument certainly if you look at the Second Amendment is the reason the United States has guns is so that when the government goes nuts and they hasn't got prayer to be trump that's bring back hillary and now we had the Willie Brown ran in the chronicle that's very interesting he said I'm coming they're taking guns now he said specifically to take your ar fifteen in your AK47 in as you know we led by the way I come up with a lot during the England they're making these bats or thirteen to one that hillary becomes the nominee in the betting houses there's a lot of people betty him this one hundred whereas some would say too radical and they they know that the I gotta watch themselves This is this is the problem that the yellow vests had this is the problem with well I'd like I'd like that idea a lot I like it a lot now now the true our best an easy way to make thirteen hundred bucks perhaps not recommending people bet I mean if you put a hundred and you could win thirteen hundred the idea yeah it'd be thirteen to one bet is I think a win could be Tuesday or Wednesday taxes taxes to I think it's not as the day after that yeah y because the people have no guns if the politicians are very careful in the United States that's why they have bodyguards because it's the people you know there's anywhere this guy I've never liked him by never disliked him but this is just dumb it's just always disliked him I mean how can you even make this comparison it have you seen another increase of ring eh doorbell stories on your local news no actually not here Oh man right now Austin is getting hammered needed it's you it's not that we're not gonna go fight the army you don't order the army around Beto unbelievably shallow and stupid visual thing To the woman apparently left her her car unlocked but she has a ring device on the dashboard and so this kid thousand guns in every neighborhood that's our power don't have to use them jeff no we have them and Beto made an argument against my argument for those well her marriage count for more than D- The trail of tears okay that's Elizabeth Warren's turfs of layoff that Betto and then say oh the American people with your with your sad what's in the thing is triggered by motion it goes on but it also flashes on like a like a mini led floodlight and this kid says ring for for the side it's in the lamps it's everywhere and apparently the cops have continuous access to it it's it's disturbing they are fifteen you can't beat the American military might with unique aircraft carriers we don't fight the army the army will be on our side any at saves the government they don't need to face then we need to put anything in place everyone's doing it voluntarily and of course no one the radical and destruction on Eagleton knows early here of about well-regulated oh he's like and he's looking right in the cameras is wide and of course it's everyone's laughing about the news is laughing about it but the meantime there's story some people think it's great but meanwhile this is the this is sky a pair yellow bit nineteen eighty-four more so but it's headline collision course why our cars killing more pedestrians and as it turns out since last year five percent more Americans have been killed at pedestrians by vehicles in total in here against the best or one of the most ardent heard is I can you imagine where they say you know what we'd like to do if we control the public because they're not buying a lot of these ideas and it's mm-hmm and a test market how it you know these things are everywhere everywhere up forty one percent since two thousand eight and can you believe what you believed that this is this kind of is a global thing after story after story about how people are being saved and thank God for the Ring Doorbell and the ring ring your car there's ring for on the front of the House thinks it's through I don't think it through but also most people don't care whatever they know anything any way of thinking they don't care because I'm reading from the article all this talk about pedestrian distraction driver distraction that's all a distraction says ben well of the World Resource Institute for Sustainable Don't you love this guy so his first of all some false equivalency brain dead he is brain dead even his brain dead to I of just you know the for packages being stolen as one thing but now apparently there's a ring you can put in your car it is and it's not worth playing a clip because it's all RS air carriers concern in eighteen sixty five in court house version ourselves sufficient it's on forks for me I'm great I'm good with yeah and then the you'll appreciate this guardian a big story cost a fortune to put cameras everywhere and you know they're not gonna like it have have the slaves themselves convince them to spy governments fifteen million dollars a year on just more and more just and two points if they're standing on the phone in the street three points if they're walking while on the phone five points if you're in the car while on the phone all cities it puts all the responsibility on the individuals and not the operate so it's just a big bowl should article and what is it wind up with solution five gs five G. People are shameless but yes you're I noticed that the other day I was somebody standing on the corner and they were looking at their phone yeah it is found militia many only on so I had stopped but you know if somebody was were carol you I'll tell you combined people walking around like zombies auto drive Tesla's is by your favorite band no list everyone knows your big rush fans and in my reading of us on this we should view in a loved them the irs is now saying that seventy at least seventy four million dollars in elitist eighteenth century early overs on the tax Jarecki's increase themselves and someone asked how many points if someone walks in the traffic and gets hit I think he had a free ball at that point I mean that's just you know you you just go home wherever you were go back home and celebrate it's GonNa be dynamited toll high I have the game we give yourself points and you know at one point for someone walking on the street with the end of the article like well you know could be because people are distracted when they're walking yes think so they go through the well you know all this five gene cars that will do it and that'll save us that have anything to do with anything because the cars will rush you mentioned the Tesla rest of Rock in Canada Progressive Rock and candidate is pretty good I rushed great upsize which is yeah the real genius of Elon Musk in fact number one sales in in Europe what country is the number one uh of of Tesla's Deutschland now the Netherlands above Deutschland. Wow well the Netherlands also gives Tesla would you get deduct seven thousand dollars the numbers are good amount of money seventy five hundred yeah if you play your cards

the Netherlands President president prime minister Senate Lyndon Larouche theft Oxford Circus Obama London Mayor de Blasio United States Tom humbugs CBS Adam Curry Exercise Commission Jeremy Clarkson Kahal Samah
Mother & Papa Pukka

RunPod

36:18 min | 1 year ago

Mother & Papa Pukka

"Hello and welcome to yet another gathering of the run club of the podcast world. Welcome to run poured where all runners unite so you can can be elite or Amateur Long Distance Sprinter treadmill trainer or round the block plotter. It makes no difference. Everyone's welcome after the minute. You go for that I I ron. That's it you are a runner. I'm Jennifer Gardner and I don't actually know which category I fit into probably enthusiastic runner not-so-good. I'm never going to win. The might might dream of it. But I'm happy enough to get around in time. I'm proud of and today. I'm joined by not one but two guests. This is normal. It's a bogus the Bible and get one free. Although I say that it's really hard to book these two people at the same time as taken as ages to get together here but we finally nailed it so please welcome welcome today to run Pod Anna White House and not Far Choson Aka mother. I'm Papa Parker Hello did I police asset. You're starting right Fox awesome. I'm sure a lot of people get many many people get that wrong. We lived in the Middle East very briefly and people just gave up halfway through and we missed the Faruk and I was. Mrs Matt is always just a lovely balance. Isn't that reality check. Every day. You really are excellent and also slightly off breath having come up the stairs so I think in terms of your intro I think coming something below answer your so I was going to ask you which category okay so you're definitely plotter cloture side of it. which is there's no bad thing about that no I have no shame in that whatsoever. I mean this is progress to me getting to the stage of plotter Has Been Remarkable who progress that. I'm very proud of okay. So hang on a minute right. Your your adults your grew not you our parents. We knew that. Because you're you know you're on instagram. Continuously Slade Ham. Reminding everyone that you have beautiful children and also you're campaigning for parents to have all these all these rights and have flexible working hours so we knew that how how come there's no running history was running at school So that was running school in the. It happens as much as I try to avoid it. I was the kid that when the cross country came up would be pleading his mom for notes and then cutting the top off the notes and changing the date. The next time it came around around just goes on and on and on until I made the fatal mistake of using scissors with a serrated edge and then the teachers spotted but so it was never something that was of interest to me. I like playing football rugby but those are team things involved chasing bull and I kind of had kind of like a dog needs some meaning really Doing the cross country runs bulldog. Yeah I mean not a whip hits no no no Funny squish face. Yeah there was a compromise at that. Yeah I didn't realize it was consulting. I feel like two girls one boy. It's like seems normal doesn't Tis gang up here breaking down the Patriarchy actually breaking it down by one and what were you were you around around. I was more of a kind live. sprinter so My Dad used to try me up. Heat he gets up at five. AM on a Saturday morning to train for the not even the hundred meters sprint in those days because we so so little the seventy meter sprint a hardcore thing today. Yeah I mean he had he had a gun competitive will well Rondo riders. Shoot she rifle. Starting just to clarify that would be legally legally grounds but yeah he headed starting pistol. You know we used to properly drain me and I remember running the seventy meters sprint in nineteen ninety two And the girl was running against pooling. My shirt backwards. That was how can the intensity call so I was kind of like in the page more in this sprinter realm. I wouldn't wouldn't be on seventy meters so over Jiffy when you're you were doing all those kind of runs nine a gap between nine and twenty nine But you know now. I'm back nearly thirty nine so so when you were younger than where you quite competitive than if you were kind of always leading the race a hugely say yeah to the point where you know maybe unhealthy The following year. I pulled the bag. You know like I think it's for me. It's always had to be like my This has to be able to chase competition starting pistols a rifle. Not My dad chasing me with the Roy full there has to be something to focus on. I can't just run for the Sake Bay I have to. I can't go in a circle on Iran. I have to go somewhere right. So that's me. Actually 'cause I run home from work I wouldn't I wouldn't see the point of going. The highest running like a five mile route to come home again when I could relieve an run home. It's like I've got a reason to do it. God destination in mind. And that's I used to. I never do that actually. But that's you know it's transport then yes an alternative to riding a bike. You'll get you on the heavy. It's killing two birds one stone. The only time is difficult gets difficult if you're training for an event and you have to run a longer way home. It's like oh now I've got to run further away before coming back again. But that's a that's the only down side but it does is it gets in time. Can you just be on a train. Otherwise I used to when I worked in Sasha working in London where I'd cool cool it like beat. The bus and I would be wearing off his clothes trainers on and try and run from Holden to Oxford Circus in the same time as a bus would get that basically she kinda like nimble like a little nimble-footed foreign visit a little uh-huh clunky the map. But we're just kind of make try and get those quickly as I could because you can actually beat the traffic Barry Melanie. Griffith Woodworking Garland. Sit next to me the often noon. But you know it it was about incorporating into your colleagues feel about Roy is nice glue khloe constant spraying up to now. Some people think I run to work and I'm like I don't run to our because that would be uncomfortable for everyone. Anyone that comes into the radio studio in the morning but I will run home and that doesn't seem to be as off putting them I think. Can you imagine me a whole with my dad. Starting gun safety issues there. Yeah they might be a few concerns that central translate so so okay so we've established early days. We had team team sports sprinting. And then there's been a gap but recently you have attempted it again. Yes well I sort of picked it up. I kind of we've got two new kids six year old two year old girl And I got to the live stage where I realized that I. I'm kind of obliged now to try and live a little bit longer longer than I would do otherwise you wanna live a bit more for them of see. I was On the side. Yeah I mean I guess. I figured that you'd be fine like uh-huh whereas you know you move on and it'd be like a six to twelve months mourning period or something but then after all black. Yeah Yeah exactly. I think there is certainly something about parenthood. That makes you feel like you've got this extra layer of responsibility and I've got along so my my dad's side is all Scottish and alongside of all the terrible Scottish illnesses in my head is I had. That was early thirty Scottish time exactly. Yeah Yeah and they kind of fully embraced the traditional cliches about diets and booze and all the rest of it And so I'm kind of aware that is that nagging family history history and background I can't really play football or rugby. Anymore Em- five aside or even touch rugby which is kind of like it for grownups. We couldn't touch me then touch me as freely as it's meant in in singlets sort of running up and very very daintily tapping each other on the size of what Madison Madison is is quite is quite fun to play but even that I was starting to live ligaments four or five times seven days before I was was about to give the same Matt couldn't walk touch me touch me. I did ligaments everything. We were in a second full-fat you're Thirty eight weeks pregnant okay. From his he eventually got. Actually I've got something. I don't have have much time. I was thinking about suing. Actually it's been a fast guy again the pool so I decided reluctantly after all those years of refusing to cross country treats try running and got the couch to five K.. APP At the beginning of this year and started that. And I'm still really reluctant runner and a real plotter and ev have. It doesn't even feel like running. It feels like a series of tiny almost averted collapses along the streets if as I stumble forward from one step to the next bought fought got to the stage room. Relatively regularly five ks and feeling better for it. It's interesting isn't it there. There is an age that I think I don't no no. It's with women because I've maybe with women women as they get older as well but men certainly when they get to the fourty landmark age. They just go Am I gonNa do something about fitness. A lot of them go. I'm going to do an Ironman from nothing quite like that. You did coach to five K.. You kept it real estate's yes yeah I think you get to a stage where you realize. You can't get away with it anymore. I think through your twenties. You kind of feel like you're here and you can put away. How much night and you can get up early to go to work the next day and you feel physically strong enabling things thing creek when you move like I've got kneecaps cast the next at the May there's so many clicks and funny spills more heavy Any kind of realize that actually you can just do nothing and degenerate fairly rapidly or you can try and put up a little bit of resistance because it's really it's resistance now. It's not going to improve the crack. Three S I do. I prop up this wall or do I let collapse spray shrew Taveuni if you want to run right now to up to. That's why you should be listening. Who are running for exactly the reason you've just said who have have taken up? They love it they they want to do it because they think is good for rhythm but actually you feign often do my please stay. You fired this and you find that when you do it. There's something that brings you back. Yes it surely not just completing the twelve week Promo. I mean the thing that I find. Actually if I'm really honest about it is I do feel better after after having run but I also feel and it's not just in the half hour after as well as the next morning when I get up. I find that generally are trying to avoid running daylights Because you know it's a fairly humiliating process. You're GONNA get serious. I would much rather run in the dark. Walk yet. because you know I'm fairly ungainly. They're the best times good. HIVE is yeah. Have we haven't gone to get the kids really. I just have really tattle taxis and things that you get the care it makes you look more professional. A lot of people think so. They think if they just bury casual is it's almost like it doesn't matter as much. I think there's only so much that the wrapping can do to this particular parcel And the kids I don't think it it would be that much of a difference particularly if I'm weasing along very very slowly and only just they've taking people who are walking But the thing that I find the thing that does bring bring me back. Is that half hour after. We're actually feel great but also the day afterwards or even for a couple of days when I'm not running just in everything I feel a little bit better. I'm a little bit more patient with the kids. I'm a little bit more focused when working that sort of thing does have actually all of these tiny benefits that you feel throughout your week and I think you just if you just put on the clothes. Sometimes I disagree with you because I I have all all the clothes. Like all the gear and after you know idea and I'll be wearing leisure stuff you know and I find if I put it on in the morning even exercise there is an element of. I can run a bit faster if I wanted to. The opportunity is there. I'm more of Leisure side of the leisure movement Larry's like everyone at the. The school gates is worrying. Awful leisurewear actually going to do it. Exciting I have some leggings. Still have the Old Essex logo stretched out over my thighs. It's got bigger and bigger over the years. It's comfy clothing that's why it's real insight. Anyone see us running maximum dark go really stretched Essex logo over my left bunch and have you done running since Matt has started. No I've actually. We go bit competitive. Didn't we a little bit argue with each other. It's almost like you call one of you. Staw getting fitter and healthier and happier I mean you have to either go down together or you rise together so that'd be moments from our combat really happy and I just a little bit of my soul talk Ti. No they say that don't they Couples who play together stays together couples. Who Run together? Do they have more fun together. Couples that don't just just hate on each other but then I did see him happier and then I just thought why AM I. Don't see myself out. Like why am I not getting a little bit of that and I should be more supportive and you had in this office but you also you were so excited about Was Michael Johnson. Who is narrating? Hang on the APP. Yeah I mean that was the thing that was great. So the couch to five K.. APP You can choose a few people who tell you what's happening. In the beginning. They give you a sort of bit of a pep talk and they say this is what you're gonNA do run now now etc and is related. Michael Johnson the four hundred eight hundred meter multiple gold-medal when But it's just he's so he really is motivational but t who really does. It feels like he's whispering bringing my air ridiculous because you'd know that there's this Olympic Superhero. He's giving him his motivation but for the first Because it's like a nine week program Graham whatever the first couple of weeks. It's like you run for four minutes and then you walk eight Ed. He's saying things like you're doing great over the last half hour. You've been running aim for eight minutes. I mean you'll say like it's amazing but it just the numbers feel so pitiful But it does give you a little little bit of a g up and so one particular to get to the F- further long and he's saying you know you doing great. Who would have thought you'd have come this far? You've been running for twelve minutes. That's big deal for someone. Who is kids? Any kind of just keeps you going thing. Because I think a lot of reason why wasn't enthusiast about running before is the sort of boredom elleman actually and actually just having that little voice in your area going. You're doing great I think Michael is An keeps going. What do you think cove when you're running them because this is do you think Running running running or not you think. Oh I can do this tonight or did you see clearly when you when you're running. I mean passing. I think the nice part is when your mind starts to drift a little bit and that's particularly if it's on a route that you did quite regularly and you sort of drift often ideas work. DOC related ideas. We'll come or you get into whatever music you might be listening to Noticing things that you don't notice when you've got this paraphernalia of life around you like children hollering for things. You don't have a moment to see things and I think when you're running or walking at pace which is more my style is that is that that is captivating rate is going up. I think I think I'd like to disclaim. I think it is but I think you you can You know it doesn't matter if it's a little bit of chewing gum on the floor that you see it doesn't matter whether you just looking out for the first time in a while. I think just getting out of the house whether you're running to the post office whether you're running a marathon it gives you the opportunity to look around and kind of absorb things around you in a way that you wouldn't Make time for aw would be able to Otherwise you're rushing. You're like come here. Hold on thing with the elements. It's like it's time that's focused very much on you. You don't have a screen in front of you which I even do. But I'm walking down the street half the time. You don't have an errands to-do is feels like you're allowed to have this time in your own head which was quite Reh. Think but then here's the thing so a lot of people say A lot of people who don't run especially Ashley and when they see their quite selfish sport because especially if you're training for something you're you're you're putting time aside coach to five ks while you have to allocate that time every day and busy parents who are working you have to come to some kind of agreement. Look I need this time to go and do stuff. How would you make Olefin? Well I think to be honest. I was most successful in getting out the door three times a week. I would just say Roy. I'm all for because actually you can find forty minutes in the day And I would just kind of say right. I'm off. The kids are sleep. Ongoing is dark enough so the normal quietly hissing joy at time with Michael. Really happy for you have you. How'd you find time to do that? Because it's almost like a me time as well. Yeah well I think I'm a little bit of a paradox because I'm not not to sixty really done two marathons in It was in two thousand and three in two thousand and four and then it was kind of ten years of nothing. So Eddie's sprinting long dissing nothing marathon decade and a half of nothing tumbleweed so little bit will over the place but I I I make time to where my athlete number one as long as I'm in them and it's like it's like beat the boss. I will increase as my pace. We'll make sure I walked to places where I could get a cheaper train. It's kind of incorporating exercise or raising my heart rate to some extent in. See the school run. I mean I have been seen with both children on a buggy one on a buggy board one in the Front Hall Clasping Olaf from frozen Book bag over one's shoulder. I mean all I needed was kind of a Pug Rasping pug behind me and I'm sort of careering school because I'm late. That's my aid to be exercising. This is you know. There's no choice but to run. That's kind of my exercise program. You have no choice. Children no will not get to school and you know I feel. It's called a school run so why not. Why not embrace embrace that? There is so much truth in that. There's so many parents to get there on time to the I was known then and somebody who I met a parents evening. Oh you'll the lady who is run to school and like Oh. I'm a runner too. You know what someone else sees you. Even if it's a calamity Eh. Yeah well you are. If you're running at my excuses always The Dogs Really Slough really sorry. He's no he doesn't stop it every night again. I'm generally always on the run as well because I'm running late but not necessarily with as much paraphernalia as you have in your arms on the way in Holland I remember saying recycled we used to live Amsterdam. And you'd see women with two three kids in the bucket of the front. The kind of backseats dog at the side weekly shop on the back cokie steak under one arm just pelting through Saddam. And I'll say if she can do that with a by I can do that on for impressive isn't the doctor. You know like Loy than healthy healthy healthy speech. So can I ask. Then why did you do the marathon if you. You don't do anything so I'm sure there's plenty people that have done it. Take to off their bucket list. Not set move on to something new. Yeah I think it was it was a camaraderie thing. So is kind chiefs through friends and it became a social thing and it was one hundred. Have kids as well. I think that was the big precursor to all things in time. That you had for yourself and I do remember doing the Maratha and my dad filmed it. Bless him He was there with his votes camcorder and I was running with my friend Elena and and those this incredibly beautiful Brazilian women running in front of us in a Thong and Abroa- some kind of breast cancer charity. She's doing an incredible thing but I mean they will cheeks sheiks won't chafing I think of that. I mean she was high unit There was it was a thing moving and my dad's corner filming us at the Twenty Twentieth Mile. Something and eleanor. I come sort of weasing around the corner and the camera just goes award leaks. My Dad's following this Brazilian pace and my mom's getting Chris Chris and then the camera comes back to annoy. Like kind of plodding is definitely the word eighteen in the final few Few Miles but I just remember thinking that's a memory I have of. It wasn't necessarily about running but it was a bow ellen. I just trying lines go away from this Brazilian girl because it's just there's no way motivational way that we don't need that contrast mmj mom everyone there. It was a social things. It was coming about your question question. It was led by mates. It was led by kind of family and raising money really And then you know ten years have done nothing at where you pro twenty cross that finish finish lane or just relieved I cried. I just cried so much I think just relief of knowing that you can do it achieve its and having seen so many friends along way I mean I did it in five hours. Forty minutes the first year and then Just under four hours the second year so it was also knowing that you can get better mass amazing size. I really went and that comes back to the competition side backing women. Dad was with the starting pistol. You know so I'm going to do you this better because I felt like I didn't do enough before and I felt amazing and then I met my we fell in love and then we just go slowly together and hey we all I see. I get excited when I hear people who have done the marathon who've not that much Taymor and who've who've really enjoyed that process oversleep is not for everyone to carry on going do you is there any part of you. Might that goes love to do that or genuinely interested at all. marathons no Yeah it's just too far Anything that covers more than one travelcard zone I think is too much Continuing seniors to run. Yes definitely and run further as well. I read something the other day. That said Actually you quite seeing it to stage where he realized that the real hi thanks not kick into leaving for about forty five minutes or so And I basically do about half an hour at the moment and I'd like to get to the stage where I can comfortably run for an hour three times a week without too many aches and pains without you know my upstanding too crumbly biscuits That's that would be the stage that I'd be happy to get to think right because a lot of people here notice not only mental health benefits but also in terms of just your fitness. Have you have you noticed. Noticed a difference in fitness. You offense level. Yeah definitely I mean I'm Over the last few years I've noticed that I've got to the stage of Feeling it when I walk up a flights of stairs for example like those minor day to day things or anything. I'm sure I didn't sort of feel ever so slightly out of breath walking up thirteen steps Until quite recently and so from the regular running bit you notice that actually things like that sought to get a bit better and have more energy more. Broadly and the other thing is because I knew me run late at annoyed. It means I don't eat a big meal particularly Agenda and drink anything that either so I eat less those three minutes to if you you are kind of starring. Kenneth Lay discourages. You from picking and drinking and doing anything else that you would be tempted to do if you're stuck in a cold winter's evening code I I just didn't viewed the Olympic runner Alicia Montano who took on Nike aspects and WE WERE IN LA interview. And it was just I think just a No. It's not fair contrast you know me the plotter versus the Olympic champion but She the amount she added La and then just simply simply walking down the street you know I realized how I'm fit I was. I literally walked down the street and was perspiring was feeling a bit uncomfortable on when I saw no. I'm not going to be an Olympic champion. I think the basic line is breath. She had like you know triple Steinberg Like everything like she she was just eating. She's just a machine impressive. Isn't it being around that kind of energy and seeing someone who's functioning I think that's functioning on such a high level. Just I just want to function. I know they're functioning. Is I mean food tight. Ah Exhausting and have spoken to many people have been the Olympics on. Oh my goodness I. I'd I or difficult process. I mean Sally Gunnell Kelly Kelly Holmes all these people they it's not even just they just go running a few times a week. It's a food time. Job is more than a full time job. And you're fully Ameris in that the cool period of time and I I mean certainly more than I could ever imagine giving to the running the thing that most impresses me about people that is how often they keep much of the training up after they retire it in a way that in other sports it doesn't really happen so much. It's quite common to see retired. Footballers who were you know. Just just develop these massively expanded NEX After a year or two because they're still we'll consuming all the food and quite a lot of his junk. I'm not in the world to burn it off. I mean that's another reason to keep running. I think is actually you know it does allow you to a little bit more of what you want. That's what they all say that's why they keep going. I mean Dame Kelly Holmes if you see her and I or Colonel Dame Kelly Holmes my goodness she's in she's she's insane for him and Sally Gunnell who I was who knows with recently as well she is she just keeps up to maintain it really more than anything to justify that eighteen drinking at Peronne solution. It just keep running keep running from Nemo that just keeps on swimming. Yeah so we've just going to rebrand. See so Kelly Kelly Holmes is one of. I've marked a few inspirational youtube clips for the girls to show them every now and then and Kelly Holmes winning the eighth in fifteen hundred in Athens. She comes from the band. She comes from the back and give back story about the fact that she had so many injuries along the way she had this history of coming forth and then all of a sudden she has these amazing runs. And I've kind a couple of these inspirational women doing remarkable things and like there's an astronaut in space and some of the Kenny homes. Every time I watch it I I thought well up in amazing story. And they're such amazing races. Yeah and when you watch it even though we all knew she uh-huh and she overtakes the entire pack comes. I really white as well. Yes an amazing moment. Actually and if you haven't seen it just go and look at it and I it's it's just incredible and for anyone who's running night. What tips would you give them to keep them? Going keep motivated. Oh I mean I think he would be a fitness witness. Running doesn't look. Do you think it's going to look. You know you have in your head like I'm GonNa go for Ron and there's going to be fresh air and it's going to be the perfect moments They wanted me perfect moment. When I stopped doing some exercise I started They said you needed three kilo weights and I was like don't have three kilo weights none of just not bottles. You know it's like it improvisations and sometimes it's like I haven't got my running pants I'm not going to go is like stop with the minutiae excuses and just crack on even if you are applauding on whether you're running a marathon or whether you just trying to get to the end of the road yes I think that's the key thing. There are lots of reasons not to But none of them really are as good as the reasons to go and do it. which is much better? You feel just as anyone come up with. I know it'd be really good if it too but you do always feel better at the end and it's just a case of remainder yourself. That's the way you're gonNA find and it's not just for Nazi it's not just for my. It's not just for me it's not just for you. Is We families you know. I think I started running. I started doing exercise because I wanted wants to be able to pick up. The buggy from the bottom of the stairs are cheap station to get to the top without perspiring. I wanted to function better than them. However as being a role model as a mom as well as dot also knowing the athletics world such you do you think it's important to show your kids late? We do exercise them. We doing. Just see no. We're not sedentary we actually do. Because there's a lot of kids know obviously just want to sit and play games not day much if they see your active they. Yes I think that's I think that's a great reasons. Keep in is probably one of the things in the back of my mind. The why it's a good reason to carry we'll do We do like agility courses for the parenting on Microsoft's basically glee and like if you've got a quite small garden but we set up an Jalousie calls for them and it's like a real life. tetris title chips. That the like you know. There's a few boots that they have to jump over. It doesn't again. It doesn't have to be perfect. Doesn't have to be a craft set up but I sit there with a cup of tea showing wrapping the sedentary life with your go because they're both quite competitive with each other. That's that's a good half hour capture of entertainment you know for all of us and is very very funny and get quite competitive so funny She's united it just falls every lot people falling ivories funding yes. Just laugh at them falling over no no. But you know it's funny inside. Thank you. So much for coming in being members the rump Padron club before I go have like my quick far right which is not quick. But it's you know I've got the pistol ready to go right so and best time of day to run where we've established doc. Okay before an evening meal of okay so you can be a little bit lighter. Run uh-huh and then come home and have a nice meal okay and a few. Yeah it'd be five o'clock tag teaming with your partner if you have a pollen or if you're in your own just five o'clock for dinner put something in the offense is cooking. King lost direct sizing. I love this literally efficiency with guy. Like your favorite time to well. Yours is because it's dark nothingness. That's just society. I like it. I know that you said that. You don't necessarily obsessed with getting the right kit my but do you have a specific trainer that are you running. So the one thing I did was by some proper trainers I took a picture myself And put up on instagram and some old running train is there. Were at least a decade old and hadn't seen action for nine and a half of those years and someone pointed out to me that actually you know they deteriorate and actually is really bad for your feet because all this spring he stuff sort of stops working. Technical crucial way to get injured aren't always went out and bought. Mostly trained technologies come on in the decade. Since I've all those so I got some NYC Feel the cold base at the most expensive ones fine which one's the most proletarians. Jj spool now identified research online and there are a couple of options. I had An actually they are kind of amazing and I realized what I was trying to run in the other ones. It's in the spring a and you did a video called the dad boards which was one of my successful videos. You've ever done. which was him using? Child to account with uh-huh yeah in the old train is actually that was in the old China's and told me through I will say on the floor and her just jumping up and down on my stomach for example simple With Five Year. Old Hanging off. You're not sort of thing but lestat board. Now the Michael Johnson's pipe you know. There's still quite a lot of that in this board. And what's your motivation. When you're getting up you're getting off the Sofa but you can't really be bulldozed? What do you tell yourself to keep going? Mine is an obligation Detroit live longer. Mine is So that when I run I don't feel like reverberations from my buttocks when light waves like just the ripple effect They used to stay still really says. Just get the buttocks stay. Still is nothing nicer as their that running along and feeling we're saying Gigolo that's why they invented leggings that come up and hold your wasted or the ones I wear a newly That great if you've had a baby and start start running The brilliant and you can go straight from school run to actual run off. I don't I'm not here to promote. But they hope they go really high so they hold everything in basically and and Have you any challenges. Are Goals that you might work towards five K.. Coach to five key is that takes That's ticked I mean You know I can run five K now. I think I'd like to get up to being able to do a steady reasonable ten k Without too much issue. I've I've Kinda got this vague dream in my mind going and doing tank as in random parts of the world like this There's a Colorado in Addis Ababa which is a ten okay through the streets of amazing which just limiting and you know? I've got one or two teammates have done really. Quite extreme things may want. He'd run run a marathon on every continent including Antarctica which is just basically running around a Russian signs station in freezing temperatures I think that's see much. I'm not really up for the idea. Mountains but ten KS in random places is something that's not being nice stumps near pounds for 'em How `Bout you if you've got a goal in mind any kind of fitness or running goal is mainly just to be stronger for girls Healthier for myself. I think feel a bit happier.

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Romesh Gunesekra

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

28:39 min | 4 months ago

Romesh Gunesekra

"Hello, this is the writers I'm Georgina Godwin. My guest today was born in Sri Lanka and all of the world before settling in London. His first novel Reef was shortlisted for the Nineteen ninety-four Booker Prize. He's won many other prestigious accolades been translated into many languages judged a number of important towards on one's highly acclaimed writing workshops his new novel out in Paperback This Week is some catching. Remers last time we met we were in Pakistan and India in London where it really really hard that was in the days when they still flew people like us around the world to talk that festival I know it seems like that was the golden age of the nineteen twenties or something isn't It's hard to believe really that. One. Join that little bit of. You. Know pretend jet-set. economy-class. But Yeah, it has changed enormously though today I mean sitting here on the heat with the sun shining sky. Amazingly blue. your dog running around here. Cooler, it seems to be very far away. I mean. It really does and this this weathe-. Filtering both you and I should be used to it coming from from the global south. Let's start there because of course you're born in Shirley Anka. Is that was a long time ago after. The weather's chains climate has changed. The world is changing but yes, it was Sri Lanka Ceylon, as it was then. Don't go dog than I can't remember but it seems I do try to remember for reasons I don't entirely understand. But yes. Yeah, it was. It was a in a way of very different world but in many ways, not such a different world I mean politically, it was a really intense situation. Then at the time of of the set of books ever written is at the time when when I was born in the in the mid. Fifties. Ceylon, as it was then not Sri Lanka had been independent for a few years and. There was already all sorts of political turmoil but not ones that I would have recognized growing up as a child. All on the vaguely. But when one thinks about it, yes I mean nineteen fifty eight to those, Mu -mergency. Prime Minister was assassinated. If you remember the headlines have been quite quite serious. But. At the same time, the the general pictures pose wasn't. Traumatic at all. And I remember. A few years ago in connection with another book, I think I was reading up Came across I think. I. Think it was a World Bank report or might have been the United Nations when you're talking about Where there was wonderful. Paragraph that. Look so ironic now talked about you know this this model society that was on the verge of being Extraordinarily, successful immediately, and then and then of course, things became very difficult. Of course you'll father was a banker. Where he was I think is probably not quite does gives the wrong connotations. The Central Bank foods is what he called. He was he was involved in setting up the central bank in. in Ceylon at that time in the fifties and then mentor and I suppose his. Big Thing was Asian Development Bank which he? was involved. In setting. Up. and. That meant. You moved as a child. Yes. So I was very, I was very lucky even when I was a child in Salon I did have a chance to travel He was a very lucky man I mean I don't quite know how he managed, but he was lucky enough to be sent on various. Government. Missions or whatever you call them. So I did I mean I came to England apparently I have very little memory of this but. I was very young. I came on them. On a ship actually. Through the Suez Canal. And probably, the same ship that Michael Ondaatje writes about which she went on earlier. And, that would have been in the fifties and I think I think well, I remember my parents telling me when they were live that. We've lived here for maybe three months or something that. I went to America again that sort of. That sort of period. And these are things that nobody else I knew in loan did so. I was a bit of a nod character. And I kind of I. I have a big memory of being quite. Pleased with the fact that I had seen snow and nobody has had. You'll books often talk about sense of home and I wonder if that comes from from that rather peripatetic childhood. I suppose it must do. I mean, it's It's probably two three different things really He has it was peripatetic. Nomadic life in in a sense didn't travel around as much as many people including perhaps you I don't know. But. What does notice that there are a lot of writers a lot of people who have traveled around a lot end up. Trying to write about things and that kind of movement. But I think I, think that sense of? A place or home rope. Something that is not exactly where you are. is in a way deeper than that, and I think everyone feels that and that is. That's just kind of a function of growing I. Mean everyone. Had to do at some point and it is very different from the life they lead now for better or worse and I think if you've geographically traveled then I guess. It's kind of a little bit more magnified. And I also wonder about the thoughts are coming from a country which no longer exists like salon for you like Rhodesia for me. These places are simply not there and perhaps we're having nostalgia first somewhere that just isn't. I think these days a days that but I also kind I sort of remember reading about no writers in the nineteenth century feeling the same thing when they travel from the provinces to Paris. And and then in a sense that can never go back all actually you know and I I as an adult moved to. London and. I'm sure you've probably felt this is well, you come to this huge big metropolitan city and suddenly becomes smaller because he keeps meeting people who you've met somewhere else. and. I came to live here. In the mid Seventies. At a time when there was a lot of unemployment around in Britain and people did in a sense gravitate in. Leave the university is wherever had come to leave home leave school and come to come to London looking for a job and. I remember you know in those early years constantly bumping into people in Oxford Circus wherever you know. Last, saw them you know wherever it was you were and many people feeling. That I. Don't know. Leads that they grew up in. The. Potteries they grew up in. the Liverpool they grew up in is not the place they could go back to because it was also changing and certainly by the Eighties Changed Hugely Ninety S. What about writing? When did that begin for you? The writing began when I think about it quite early. But not as early as some writers I mean, I wasn't one of those children who six years old would be writing stories. No I used to read I suppose. Used to like drawing pictures and I was very young but the writing bug really that kind of came. In my mid teens when I was about fifteen or sixteen I think and that was after left. Three Lanka and I was in the Philippines and I would probably say. You know in a sense of Philippians made me in to a person wanted to be a to. Why partly American influence in the Philippines. It was there that came across books slightly more contemporary books. You know not not the hardy. Boys. and. So more contemporary books were clearly writers were writing about being writers as well. So particularly, the beat generation care wax Ginsberg's and pulling it is in all of those people. And there was this. Sense that you. I think that was where I suddenly not noticed. I suppose that. A book didn't just appear but someone actually rooted and. That was a process in that writing and. I think those writers that I came across will people who? Says almost naively one would say kind of celebrated the act of writing. Almost more than the product of writing. But that was very infectious and that enthusiasm just lapped it up and I thought, Oh, I want to do this and I and I did so I With no other ulterior purpose other than just enjoying scribbling. and to me, that's still is at the heart of it and. Years later and I came across I don't know whether you have. But you know the tagging Dennis puts in China and the couple of actually, and you can come across the writings and it's again this infectious. Joy and Put who's running around the mountains. In China and. His poems I like things like I'm running around the mountains and Ham scribbling screaming like mad who has but I love it. That's it. Essentially, I'm reading this I think. Yeah. You're that's not the way I right now. But I I kind of try try to feel that. and. So much of the writing about your books, a lot of criticism talks about this this joy that comes across on the page you first published work was book of Short Stories. Yeah. It is a book called monkfish moon and Yeah it was short stories. Most set in Sri Lanka few set here in in England. but I suppose the distinctive part of it for me was that it was all about Sri Lankan characters and it was a discovery for me as well. It was in a sense. I suppose in terms of my writing, it took me a long time to move away from the. Script on threes. Let's go transit eat the right on the trees. kind of thing to wanting. To write something that. Somehow stays on the page and is in some way meaningful beyond beyond that moment. Build that day. I suppose I mean we started out talking with the joy part with the joy. It's was was was very much in the writing because the subject matter was not necessarily. So because it was very difficult time for three dot com. The war was very serious. Violence was very, very serious and in a sense I felt that with those stories, tackle some some of those subjects. But I Still. Wanted to. The overall sense of the book of the writing to be. One where you're tractors to the writing anyone to stay with the writing. Your your first novel Reef was nominated for the Booker Prize, which is extraordinary for a debut. In those days it was not these days of course now. Sense. It's it's all debut but at the time I think it was a neither possibly the second or third debut novel to get onto onto the list. There was one on new before that which had one. Child to not remember Kerry Hume's. People. because. One off book as it were. So it was very unusual and I was very lucky. Yeah, it was great. It was a perfect way to enter this very glad not one at that point because that would be. Very detrimental as it seems to be a lot of people. So I got all the benefits. and was it life changing I? Don't know what life changing. My Day job. I kept my day job for quite a while. But it was in the sense that it it actually gave me. At. The time it seemed like a readership. I mean I was aware that people were reading I mean. Not. Millions and millions, but you know enough people to feel that. Does that and again I was Lucky. I seem to know a lot of people from other walks of life at that time. So. Even. Though there wasn't the Internet as we know it now would got around. So I had a lot of kind of. You. Know people did write postcards and letters and say, Oh, I saw your book and and also because it was unusual for facebook to get on and also one of the few from. Outside Britain as it were. That was a lot of kind of. Recognition I guess, which is which is nice at the time faded by, but it was nice of the time. People, send me cuttings from at Uganda a Hong Kong. Indonesia wherever saying you know it's Talking about your book and so on. So that was great and you didn't have the classic second novel a problem because Sunglass to did very well it did bill I mean I had I know it wasn't it wasn't a problem I mean it was partly because I've been writing for a long time since if you took a long time to get to the first book So there's plenty of writing. Momentum if you like. To continue with the next book. the difference was that I did give the job to finish that book really because it was. Needed more more head space than I could give it to. Sort of time, job? Lots of very strong women in that book. Yeah, I. I think I. Don't know. It's interesting. Edmund I just the other day somebody was asking me about by they're moving. These types of you to say that it compensates well I. Guess I guess I'm making the point because that is a for me with that is the one that focuses on women I wanted and I was. It's dominated by this matriarch as it were and. I wanted in a sense to pay homage to that. Figure in the book, but even monkfish Moon in two or three of the strongest stories are told by women and I guess in my life. In, the family I grew up with women now. Were strong figures. The Picasso that Heaven's Edge was a New York Times notable book of the year and many people talk about it. Saying that it's enormously poetic and of course, that is another whole strand to your career is that you are a poet to I don't know that ceremony I'm. GonNa. Say I was an aspiring poet pretty bad I. I spent most I think the reason it took me so long right my first book. At blame. Poetry. Because I was pretty clear in my head that my first book would would be book of poems. And so. In a sense, all manager went into writing poems and a few short stories is to keep them. Going as it were but now I think about it i. kind of thought. I didn't know a story would writing. For a long long long time. So I, drive. No very short. Pieces of prose. But I thought yeah. The first book would be a book of poems and and I never quite got that I. Mean I did a lot of problems. They'll magazines published them. There was even one special issue of magazine that had about a dozen poems. And in those days, it's a bit more opened up now I guess especially in the last couple of years but. At the time it seemed a fairly in publishing terms fairly strict. So. A book of poems by any of the major publishers? I remember now used to used to be fifty five pages minimum. And no fifty five phones. With a few poems that went over the page. And I could get to about forty five points as happy with I could just never get those extra five or six or seven and I remember. I just write some long terms and then I just never worked, and then at some point in I think in the there was a story that Just. Suddenly worked really well and. And it was published and I had some really good. Feedback as a result of that and I thought well, no, I can do this I'm going to spend more time on it. So I can't claim to be put the there are a couple of anthologies now that have got some of my in three or four so. I, noticed set. I'm sure they are the day. So something like. Some poetry website has my name on there. I really want to get onto some catcher, which is your most recent book and I think it's just coming out and payback. This is set in one, thousand, nine hundred begins in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, four, really important ear. Yeah it's it's so it's set in nineteen, sixty, four in. Sri Lanka which was then silicon. And setting nine in sixty four. It could have been set any time in the sixties when my first thought of writing this book. But it kind of zeroed in on that year because as I got into the book and thought about it more and kind of. Worked out what was going on at the time and so on. It turned out that nineteen sixty four. was politically very significant for the country. But it's not a significance that is much talked about. Even recognize I think now. But when I looked into it as to what was going on then and tried to remember what was going on then. I kind of realized. It was when there was A. Really, significant shift in. The. Political options in the country particularly On the left And I don't know how much. You want me to go into that I'd tell you a little bit more. I. Think if you could tell us about the boat because I believe everyone should read it. It's so beautiful that the friendship and the loss the that it evokes. The fundamental story is is as with all novels I think that these are these sort of separate kind of less on which. You build a noble says, there's a story that carries through. That's kind of. Location and setting time and place that underlies it and. Some of these can change. So the main stories is the story of friendship. and. Particularly early friendship and. The. Perhaps, the fragility of it or Possibly the life span of it. And we thought giving away anything in the book. These friendships that aren't going to last forever may not last forever. Or the the the quality of it may not last week may come and go and so on. So that was what I was interested in and it was. It was an interest that's pretty much the heart of all my writing I think. And maybe it is connected to what we're talking about in terms of home. It isn't actually decide you of a place. But is no longer place can go to but it's It's almost an age I suppose like the age of innocence I mean there's just So many books because the protagonists here are up boys. So this is a story about two two boys and they're you know twelve thirteen that's sort of age. The old one is a little bit older than that, and it's the story of the younger boy meeting this or the boy and. Falling under his spell to some extent. And it is a friendship, but it's also more than a friendship it in the sense that it's a mentorship might say. And the story tells of this and. Tells of innocence how the younger boy has to. Has To. Grow into it and then out of it. and I guess there is a similarity to what's going on politically in terms of the country having tuna sense grow up. which is. Both good and bad. and. The same going on with all sorts of relationships in the story. So. It's it's kind of sparked by the fence. It's something that I wanted to write about a longtime written poems about this sort of friendship because when I was very young I did. Loser. A very close friend. who died tragically, very young. Ovallis. And it's something that. Had A profound effect when I was I can't remember trial. I guess it must have been And I didn't quite know how to process it really So when I did start writing even at fifteen sixteen I think that were poems that tried to tackle this idea. and. Subsequently, of course. The people have died close and fires. It will. And this notion of. How death has had this effect on all of us. Is. Something that. kind of approached in lots of stories and books, but it wasn't until quite recently that I felt I could do this in a novel. Well it's it's a truly beautiful novel which I recommend to. Everyone. Just we don't have a lot of time I just wanted to ask you to move quick things. One is something that you you said, you talked about challenging yourself about always finding something difficult. Why do you need to do that? not always actually. I would see. Kind of paradox. Contradictory things actually on the one hand I mean I kind of. Kind of want to write. Or explore different things in the writing. So. With, Starting with trying to. Deal with the reality that is very media in very. Very realistic way for Shimon and even three Phelan to set a little bit. Earlier. It was dealing with an answer repercussions of things going wrong in the world. And then wanting to kind look ahead with having said I wanted to. Kim The I. Suppose the challenge staff was to write something not quite science fiction, but I wanted to write the kind of. Book, which has A. Big Effect on people's imaginations. But where I felt. A lot of those wonderful books. Lack something to do with the characters and engagement with the CACTUS. With it's brave new world of ninety four whatever. So that was in a sense kind of challenge and then prisoner of paradise just wanted to see what they can do a historical novel. And just. Just make kind of. An jetpack. Somewhere. So, there are those challenges, but at the same time, I think as a writer and anyone who's trying to sit out to be a writer I think it's quite important not to set. Unrealistic and to challenging a challenge sedona day to day basis. So I think it's good to have. A kind of overall idea of something. That's going to challenge. What do you think you can do? But on a day to day basis just as if you were going to the gym assuming. Swimming. Don't plan on doing. One hundred every day. I plan on. Doing Four So finally, what's your next challenge? Well. I've got. Several things increasing food seem to have More and more different than. Writing projects which all seem to be. Have to be done every day. and. A moment it seemed like, oh well, they can wait another year or two The main thing in terms of fiction I guess is. that. Some characters in. In the sun catch. Who Need? In a sense story. So. I'm. A Long Way to book about. One of those. CACTUS. WHO ON CENTER STAGE? In, the in the sand catcher. But different time different place over differences. So they the kind of big architecture project going on in my hand about that And most of the writing the smaller things. Promise thank you so much for talking to me. I'm sorry that the dog was slightly distracting daughter I think it's good to have some energetic life going going on around us I. Think it's brilliant and I just love. Imagination. Chasing. Doesn't exist. Son catcher published by Bloomsbury and written by Romesh goodness Akara, is out in paperback this week, you've been listening to meet the writers. Thanks to the production team of nor whole and Charlie film a court. You can download this show and previous episodes, my website or APP from soundcloud mix cloud or I tunes Georgina Godwin thanking Phyllis Ming.

writer Sri Lanka London Ceylon Georgina Godwin Britain World Bank Edmund I England United Nations Booker Prize Shirley Anka Asian Development Bank Prime Minister Michael Ondaatje Rhodesia Oxford Circus Remers New York Times
Amanpour: Keith Scholey, Sophie Lanfear, Michael Holmes and Priscilla Chan

Amanpour

1:00:10 hr | 1 year ago

Amanpour: Keith Scholey, Sophie Lanfear, Michael Holmes and Priscilla Chan

"This CNN podcast is brought to you by American Express, my credit guide a free credit score. And report and other tools to help you take charge of your credit. Your credit score is greater than a number. It's your story. Hi podcast listeners today. Climate protests are happening just outside our office here in London and actually around the world, and we have correspondent Michael Holmes out on the streets for us talking to the activists and the leaders about their cause I'm also joined by producer and director of the new Netflix series our planet. It is voiced by the legendary naturalist David Attenborough. We talk about why we need to act now for climate and our planet. Then how did we get to this point the author? Nathaniel ridge takes us back through the politics of climate change denial in the United States. And Harry's in San Diego token to present a Chon one half of the Chans Aqaba initiative with her husband monks, Kabar about education reform, and Facebook's taxes. Enjoy the show. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour. In London wished today has been clogged up by a movement gaining critical. Momentum is called extinction rebellion thousands of people in eighty eight cities across the globe blocking roads and slowing down traffic in order to speed up government action to stop climate change. Their rebellion is against the extinction of our species. It's motivated by the science which says that we have until twenty thirty just eleven years to save ourselves from a catastrophic rise in global temperatures due to untrammelled carbon emissions perhaps the most famous leader of these new wave climate protesters is the sixteen year old Swedish schoolgirl, Greta Thon, who's eating hundreds of thousands of students in cities around the world on Friday, school strikes and rallies together. These protests a paying off pushing climate change up the political agenda and making politicians talk about green policies. In ways, they haven't done before from the grassroots up now while the young putting their parents and grandparents generations on notice an elder statesman is also fighting this good fight the world renowned ninety two year old naturalist, David Attenborough. He's brought us the world's beauty for decades. But now his new Netflix series. Our planet is a rallying cry for urgent action. Take a look at this trailer. This is the story. The car changing. And what we can do to help it thrive. Tired? Beautiful, isn't it? And highly endangered joining me now two of the people who made this wake up call a reality Keith Scully as a series producer for our planet. And so few Lanphier directed some of the episodes, welcome to the program. Thanks for being here. I guess just want to ask you first sort of describing your words your mission. We're sort of putting words in your mouth, but this is a different series. It's got a point of view. It takes a stand. You're definitely I think we've all been in the wildlife filmmaking business for a long time. And we've seen that things are increasingly becoming more urgent to do something about it. So this series. We definitely wanted to show people the wonders of our world because we've still got them, but they are going very very fast. And it's yet to wake up call. Let's we have to do something. Now, if we're going to keep it, and after you've got to keep the whole buzz fair functioning as we've had from for millennia, and you've been doing this in various different platforms and ways for for for many years. And worked with David at Bremen, just before I go to one of the clips, what is it? So few for you that so important about his voice and him putting all his experience behind this. I think David I mean, like no one else in the industry. He's a trusted voice with no agenda, actually. And I think that's what makes them more powerful on his genuine passion. David theme. Passion, passionate personal the planet when it comes to natural world, and he inspired all of us. Inspire me to get into mattress g filmmaking. So having him kind of wasted series is a stamp of authority on it. Right. So I'm going to play a clip, and we don't often give you as warnings about clips on the natural world. But we do have to in this case because it is a really tragic demonstration of what the current environment is doing to wall russes going to play it takes place on the Arctic circle around Russia's that. Right. Okay. So we'll play it. And then we'll talk to you. And you're you are also visible in this. Behind the scenes that will show you. On right on the edge. Two or three hundred ten. Off mall such pitcher that resulted from three hundred miles now to get to food then coming back here to see any place asleep east stayed on the ice dive down eight foods, even the is easy. I mean, so you're the director you were talking there with the cameraman. I guess how was it to see the had you ever seen that kind of situation before? No. I mean, even now watching it every time it gets me. We went to that location expecting to maybe a bit of tumbling down some shallower verges, and maybe some polar bears -tracting, I never I mean. I was totally shocked. I didn't realize they could climb eighty meter cliffs, and then we watched them many hours on the top. And we're just pretty shell shocked when we saw the first ones deciding to go back to the sea and Mukhin off there in a cord, and it was I mean, it was devastating. It was the hardest thing I've ever had to witness just expanded you, call them Arctic refugees. Just explain why they they climbed up and why they fell down they live on the CIA normally so they they feed on these continental shelves off Alaskan and Russian coasts and sea ice as a platform. So they can rest on the ice. And then they dive down feet and the bottom, and then they rest. Akl now is in between dives. But in recent years, the optics undergone rapid sea ice loss in the summer months. And what that meant is it's retreat too far north now so the closest pace to rest rather than the ice is the land. So what you're seeing these haul out sites that call where they come to rest on shore becoming much more overcrowded, and there's a lot less space, and in this particular site, we filmed at that meant that they went up these cliffs, and then when they want to return to the see they fell so it really really is tragic. I mean, this this episode actually went viral the scenes went viral. We've had some viewer response. One. One viewer said episode two of our planet is one of the most upsetting things I've ever seen. If you get through the last ten minutes without committing to real change to tackle climate change, your inhuman is that the response that you want is that what you're looking for here. It absolutely is almost see we thought deeply about showing these image. Ages because they are obsessing. But so I'm in a wave, I we just felt the world needs to know. This is what's happening people talk about climate change. If it's something of the future. It's not it's happening in the all tickets big time now and animals are suffering, and we have to show it we do about response. I want to play this little bit of an issue. I did with David Attenborough during the last climate conference, not so many months ago, but to your point that people don't know what's going on in a lot of the what they think they do. But they don't know. This is what he addressed. I think that the condition of the what the earth is facing has never been visible to a large proportion of the world's population. And it's the responsibility of people who do the sort of what could I do to make sure that one is happening is visible to people mind, they know, but is also visible to the people who have their fingers on power, both political power and fiscal power monetary power to do something about this situation. It is quite dramatic to hear him say that because for a long time he was a naturalist. He didn't really weigh in on the on the climate change aspect of it, certainly not on the political aspect of it. Tell you tell me what this means to have somebody this important actually weigh in on this aspect of it not just on the beauty of our world Beardsley important. And I mean, David he carries the burden that anything he says is truth. And he's very aware of that that if David Attenborough says something the world takes it as the truth. So he's always have to be very careful to make sure news needs to be sure of his facts. But I think he's come to the point now where he is very very sure what's happening. And he's being very outspoken about it and is having a huge impact. I mean loss just last week. We were the IMF talking to Bank we were at the World Bank. And David was talking about these things to the most important bind cousin. Finance people in the world that has impact. And when you're out there so fee, and you realize that people like David Attenborough, and you all kind of have to convince many world leaders that they have to actually do something. I mean, you're doing something now in order to try to push the needle to significant change in action by governments when you out there. How do you feel about those people in that ivory towers, maybe not believing it and thinking is all a host? We have some worldly to say. It's hard to it's hard to fathom that when you're in the field feeling it and you'll connected with it. And you know, we'll very passionate about they're not true Weldon about what we're seeing. When you come across the story, not worse. I mean, it's so the empirical evidence is just so far waited I didn't think you know, ninety five percent of the academic community. Now in agreement the IP IPCC report, it says that comet change is happening. The sea ice is losing rapidly in the Arctic and so. Yeah. I I don't understand how we should be setting about putting efforts into how do we change is? What can we do rather than contesting? Whether is happening is happening. That's just get almost solving it. I'm gonna play you talked about the you're in Greenland, I think and and these massive glaciers or by Spurs were busy cracking up and play a little bit of this. And there's a huge noise. And we'll talk about it. The last twenty years Greenland has been losing. Nice. And the rate of loss is excelling Latam. Mm-hmm. So it's obviously a hugely impressive sight and sound how long did it take you to to to to find that episode? What did it feel and sound like for you who are actually there? It was like a ball. It was a tragic casualties. But it it sounded like gunshots. Cannon fi was so loud. When that piece broke off seven climate of front of gossiping imagine seven inches long. And when it breaks off half Clemente is underneath the water. So in that tilts back and flips up, and it's all about water and all the ice is breaking up. And it's you can't. I mean, you can't convey Scott bigger than skyscrapers coming to the surface and just bouncing around and new feel so small and in significant, and then you realize the power of the planet the power of this ice and changes going on a huge. You know, it's funny. You say is not as tragic in terms of casualties, but it will be if the seas rise and all the low lying cities, and many many even the US military very very concerned about that. I just wonder what you think about. Net. Flicks going through all the series and actually tweeting out posting warnings to viewers particularly to animal lovers that. If you feel that you can't watch certain scenes at this point. And this point this point turn away. What is the point of that does that sort of defeat the purpose? I think that natural history firms are there for everyone. So that therefore families for young children. And I think it's only right that that people should know that there are some places where we have decided to show distressing images about what's happening to the natural. This is a deviation. Probably from they've previously been used to. So I think they they probably made the right coal. But interestingly, I I don't know. I was just really stunned to see all these young kids on marches, Greta Thon, burgers. We mentioned the sixteen year old kids even younger who are being taken by their parents to these marches now in various cities, it's. Seems like it's the young ones who are going to push the older generation to some kind of action or lab -solutely. And and they are going to we we're only looking at a time scale over twenty years before things get ready ready, very difficult, and this is in bad lifetimes. And it's it's strange moment. Where all that this generation knows everything about the problem, and is the only generation that can fix it. Could you stand by for a second? I'll reporter Michael Holmes is out there in the streets with all these people who've come into the streets, and I'm gonna ask him to just walk us through four. Just settle this young generation Michael you're there in the streets of London. There's been quite a few protesters, and they're trying to blow grows. What are you hearing from the young people and from the organizes? You know, the city well and see Oxford circus one of the busiest intersections in all of London blocked off for what seven hours now completely blocked off and not just Oxford circus, mob lodge, parliament square, Waterloo bridge and the ordinary turn out. It's being remarkably plays in terms of the atmosphere here, very relaxed, and that includes the police as well who staying well back making no moves on this protest. Let's give you a bit more of an idea of what's behind this. And what the I want to bring in dump the Rupert read from the university of East Anglia a spokesman for extinction rebellion and doctor first of all tell me, do you think this protest or protests like this could be a tipping point for action on climate? You've got about ten thousand people today. This isn't just a much known by direct action permission to be we just blocking shutting down big areas of central London. I'm going to be back tomorrow and the day office Maura and they offer that this rebellion. We actually mean it stinks. She rebellion. We are saying that the government is no longer legitimate. They are sending a sound power, which will lead to the collapse of our society. If that isn't righted within the Nazi this teacher. So yeah, I think it can work. It's before in other countries brought down the radical regimes. This may not get radical regime. That's commuting the destruction. That right. Tell me the thing that struck me about the protest today is the use these young people here there are other people as well, then mainly Boston's already young people to the role of used in this movement, just not fed up with the older people. Of course, the us. The youth are the ones who are absolutely in the firing line yet. Gene. So hugely inspired by the climate's strikes all around the world, and what they say the young striker's on those demonstrations face eight save our world's save our world. Well, that's what we're trying to step up and say, yeah, we're going to try to work together to stay this world bad than anyone. I'm kate. I'm worried about this. I'm worried about my own to I'm worried about your future about all of us unless you get our act together like eight eighteen months than the UN sexy. General tells us we're not gonna make those targets the UN say we have to make by twenty thirty. And if you don't do that, we're all on the roads addition, Dr Rupert read from the university of East Anglia joining us to give you a sense of the importance how they see this unfolding Christiane. The police has said Thang way back. They say they want to be here for days even say they want to be here. A couple of weeks. It's hard to imagine a place like Oxford circus shut down for that long. As I say, absolutely no move by police so far on these demonstrators, Michael and you guessed Rupert. Thank you so much. It's definitely sending a strong signal. Thank you for joining us from the streets of London, of course, bad to you Keith. And Sophie, this has been going on around the world and actually millions of becoming out over the last month of these school protests in various in the United States. Well, interestingly the series talks about humans, right? I mean, it's Omni present, but they're the invisible villain in your series. And I say that because you really focus on humans. But what happens when humans are no longer around. So I wanna play this clip, which is about Chenobyl, which famously in the eighties. There was a massive meltdown of the nuclear plant there, and the whole thing was irradiated people couldn't live and live couldn't live, etc. Etc. Cut today. Unprotected human being constructed here for long without a risk. But in driving us out the radiation has created space for wildlife to reach. The dramatic recolonisation of Chernobyl in the space of thirty years is proof of forests extraordinary resilience. So that is really dramatic. I mean, I remember as a young news person reporting on that meltdown. The scientists say that it's uninhabitable by humans for the next twenty thousand years, and yet here you have these resilient forest growing. It's not a very happy hopeful sign about us. Humans is it. Now, it's snow, but it is it. It is a great lesson that nature is very resilient. And if you leave nature line it'll bounce back. And I think the message we want to give all planet is that we still have a loss of nature. It's under remorse assault, and it's not helping us all nature. If you just leave it alone, though, it'll come back, and that you novel story basically had to leave the line because we had to get out. We cannot withstand the radiation. But most of nature can and. And say bounces by just how did you film that? I mean, it looks like it's drones from above. Right. Did you get down and dirty? You can put crews in for a few days the cruise most of it was. Yeah. Not going to. Most most of it, though, we we put these remote cameras that are triggered by movement. And we put them all age novel. And then when a wolf for presents he's holes, or what have you went policy triggered the camera? We got the shot. And so that's how we revealed the natural world that with the camera crews in the field. I mean, what what toll does it have on all of you and on the cruise? I mean, you really do have to go to these places in extremists stay for a long time to capture it happening. It doesn't just happen on Q like a Hollywood movie, and there's so much of asleep beauty, but also massive trauma in seeing the destruction. Well, we really I mean, we work with the world's best. And I think we will have the same ambition with our planet that we've always wanted to make conservation series. You know, that's something. I had have conservation, it's heart. And I think when you get teams like that together, and you would explaining how these ecosystems. Function and how they work. And then the main problem is, and then how we can solve that everyone was really behind that. So I think you know, when you come across something like wars in the field. It's not in vain, you feel that the series like this on Netflix global that we can these thing and everyone was really revved up by that. And you did shoot quite a load of behind the scenes one of the things that sort of distinguishes the the series and David numbers other series. Is you get the last few minutes talking to the crews, and that's not just a vanity project for them. It really does tell the world how and why and the and the feelings how'd you get all of that from them. I think we try to shoot it. So that it's genuine and into the moment. I mean, we don't wanna have contrived kind of scenes, but I think what you don't get from the main series is you don't get the links you go to in the cruise Goto. And you know, the the Siberian Tigers the pro cameraman was stuck in the heightened guessing shot, but the camera traps did and so. I think if you don't show the pine the scenes people might not have the true Chretien of what it takes to get these. And finally, we haven't been able to show bits from every episode, obviously. But the fact that this is on Netflix in the United States, of course. But around the world. Is a big deal. Right. It's a kind of a game changer. It's extrordinary because we've gone to label instantly. But the great thing is the shows of there all the time, and we have a really big website called all planet dot com, which can talk to the series. And so if the viewer wants to know more about a particular episode, they can go on the website find out more, but that might stimulate and then to go back to the series. So we hope that we will start a conversation with the audience about the most important thing on nature and a notion conversation, indeed Kice goalie and Sophie Lanphier, thank you so much indeed for being here. Your credit score is greater than a number. It's your story. Whether you're buying that classic convertible you've always dreamed of getting a loan to finally launch your cat translating or plying for your first place without roommates American Express. My credit guide is more than just a free credit score. It's a tool to help you write your next chapter with a detailed credit report alerts to help detect identity theft and other information to help you take charge of your credit. American Express, my credit guide provides the vantage score three point. Oh by trans union. Go to American Express dot com slash Mike credit guide to enroll today. Your credit score is greater than a number. It's your story in two thousand fourteen my then fiance, and I we're feeling a little restless, and we really wanted an adventure. So after our wedding we set out on a cross country honeymoon pretty good credit score. We've bought this. Awesome. Are the on earth? RV? Life was the life for us today with credit score of seven fifty seven. We're able to prepare for the next phase of our lives. And our biggest adventure is just around the corner. American Express, my credit guide is more than just a free credit score. It's a tool to help you write your next chapter with a detailed credit report alerts to help detect identity theft and other information to help you take charge of your credit. American Express, my credit guide provides the vantage score three point. Oh by trans union. Go to American Express dot com slash Mike credit guide to enroll today. Your credit score is greater than a number. It's your story. So me and my wife took over her dad's grocery store, we turned it into a cafe, but it flocked we have three ice cream machines at home. So why not make nice green? We can make flavors spire by culture. And with the score of seven thirty two. We knew that this was a perfect time to open our Caribbean creamery. American Express, my credit guide is more than just a free credit score. It's a tool to help you write your next chapter with a detailed credit report alerts to help detect identity theft and other information to help you take charge of your credit. American Express, my credit guide provides the vantage score three point. Oh by trans union Votto, American Express dot com slash Mike credit guide to enroll today. So just a note dramatic, please from politicians about the dangers of time it change, and nothing you you might remember the world's first underwater cabinet meeting way back in two thousand nine held by the Maldives President to highlight the threat of rising sea levels to islands like his now, the president of the Seychelles another low-lying archipelago has taken a leaf out of that book, delivering an impassioned plea to protect the beating blue heart of our planet from inside a submersible four hundred feet below the surface of the Indian Ocean, amazing amazing peaches that but here's a question few as one of the world's biggest polluters. Why does the United States also embrace a policy of climate denial ISM, or at least the Republican party does President Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris climate accords. And he's high to form a goat cold obvious to head up is Environmental Protection Agency. My next guest says this is nothing new in American politics in his. Bestselling book losing earth off in Faneuil. Rich has been tracking the process of climate change climate change denial over the past forty years. And he's joining me now from Louisiana Nathaniel rich, welcome to the program. Thanks for you heard all the conversations you've seen how the the youth and the and those who claim to be rebels now are taking to the streets. Take us now back to the beginning of this. Why is the United States sort of an outlier when it comes to this almost official policy in in the Republican party of climate denial ISM? Yeah. It's remarkable. Especially given the fact that as early as nineteen seventy nine we had total scientific consensus on the fundamental science of climate change, not just within the scientific community, but at the highest levels of the US government, the intelligence agencies, and of course, the oil and gas industry, and you're the first efforts on this the story of of losing earth of a handful of people scientists and activists a few political bureaucrats who tried to move from the sort of scientific are can of theory to action and over the course of the decade seventy nine to eighty nine. It was not a partisan issue. There were setbacks. But by the end of the decade, they'd moved it to the threshold of a of a solution. Or as what they thought was a solution a binding treaty to reduce emissions that would have been signed by every country in the world. But at the very last minute the US dropped out. Out. And in retrospect, that's about the closest we've gotten since then. But that that is also the moment at which the oil and gas industry started to work on this propaganda and influence campaign that we are still in the grips of forty years later. To to to sort of explain this because there's also forms the heart of your book, you've just talked about the industry and indeed in the late eighties. The American Petroleum Institute started actually paying certain scientists to write up heads that that question global warming. So how did that work and how did that gain traction then in the mainstream? Yeah. It's it's a remarkable story. And and, you know, the the director of environmental unit at API told me all of this. When I was as doing my research that in eighty nine as it seemed that there was there was short to be some kind of regulatory policy and some kind of global treaty the industry started to figure out what it's public stance should be. And they put together a working group and the conclusions at first were essentially, you know, we should talk about the uncertainty in the science where where it exists. They weren't yet saying that the whole science wasn't certain, and we should make sure that no policy we endorse no policy that affects the bottom line. That's the beginning of it. And they start to find a few scientists, and it's a very small few. It's about three or four people originally who are close to the industry and can be trusted to right at Oriels often for a fee two thousand. Pop at the time and start to speak to reporters. And all of a sudden in issue that at that point was gaining a huge amount of attention nationally, and was not there weren't two sides to it. Everyone was just concerned and trying to figure out what to do about it in nineteen ninety start to see pieces that are articles in national publications that question whether the sciences so established, and that's the very beginning of it. But then the industry almost seemed surprised by how successful this effort is. And they keep pushing it and over the course of the ninety s they go farther and farther and more and more brazen until you get to this this sort of delirium now where yes in entire political party questions the fundamental science of climate change, which the fundamental science which goes back long before nineteen seventy nine into the nineteen th century. I mean, you know, you talk about even now even now the oil companies aunt as far into climate denial. As the Republican party is. But interestingly in in the audible, you wrote about this led to your book 'Europe juuling those years. In other words, the ones you're talking about seventies, etc. Conditions for success could not have been more favorable the obstacles, we blamed for current in action had yet to emerge almost nothing stood in our way, except our selves. So I again, how did this little handful of people who okay, they were being pushed it'd been paid couple of thousand for these pets. How did they get such a momentum and such a tipping point that journalists were able began to treat on the one hand on the other hand? Yeah. Well, they moved incrementally. And I should say that the treaty itself fell apart the framework for the treaty which will later be the Rio summit nineteen Eighty-nine independently of industry efforts that that had to do with chief of staff of George H W Bush, John sununu who sort of the the the original skeptic became skeptic of the science skeptic of the politics, and he won out political dogfight within the White House about whether to accept a binding treaty. And so that's the beginning of it. But then soon thereafter industries start spending a fortune t- tried to block anything approaching regulatory policy. So they're two things. We're talking about one is our failure before nine hundred eighty nine to generate the kind of public support an urgency necessary to force the issue politically. But then from. Eighty nine to the present. You have this vice grip of industry on the Republican party and to to a much lesser extent on uncertainty. Democrats who are have spent untold, you know, tens of hundreds of millions of dollars in lobbying to block any kind of meaningful effort to address the problem. I wanted to go back to the late eighties. When when you know, it was possible to have done something. And there was a bipartisan consensus suddenly amongst the public because you mentioned George W Bush calls as he was running for president. He basically said the following. He he wanted to be sort of Mr. climate president. This is what he said. I want to lead this country and the other nations of the world to to a greater understanding of the threats facing our planet and to a greater commitment to meeting and resolving them. But if we don't see the need act clearly future generations will not only see dramatically in retrospect, they'll have to live with the consequences of our inaction. I mean, what he said, then we could hear on the streets of these protests right now and to be fair the very end of his presidency was the first UN climate conference, which was the Rio summit. You just talk about in nineteen Ninety-two how much of the science and the opportunity was was wasted. Then. All of it. And you know, the the Bush is fascinating figure in this regard. Because certainly when he was running for office and eighty eight and when he first got into office, he was saying all of the right things. And yes, things that you might here in a climate protests today, he said, you know, those who are think we can't solve the greenhouse effect as the problem is called then haven't heard about the White House effect. And when I'm in the White House. I'll do it for my research. What I gathered was that. He really didn't have a very strong understanding of the issue, and when push came to shove he deferred making some of the big decisions to his deputy who was who was sununu chief of staff and that led to the failure. And you can imagine in a in a sort of parallel universe. If you had someone like Bush saying those things and pushing and putting the weight of his presidency behind them we'd be in a different world right now. But the the key thing understand is that the scientific question was settled already. At the end of the eighties. Not only did we have this global treaty in the works. But there were thirty two climate bills introduced in in congress in nineteen thousand eight alone, many of them by partisan and in some in some crucial aspects some of them were more ambitious than than what you see in the green new deal today. These bipartisan bills at the time. So there is yes, there's a cruel irony to the whole thing. So this false food today. First of all we have this. This proposal of the green you deal. We've had the sunrise movement. Protesters camping outside house speaker Nancy Pelosi's office to make that point. And we've had AO see she's no congressman o'casey coaches saying the following about executive why this green new deal should be tossed and implemented. We should do it because we should lead. We should do it. Because that is what this nation is about. We should do it because we are a country founded on my deals of a culture that is innovative that that cares for our brothers and sisters across this country. We should do it because we are an example to the world. So do you think in short in the annual that is a new tide of public opinion that we could go back to that sort of era where most people now think that something has to be done. Yeah. Look, she gets it. This is a profound shift in conversation. When you listen to her say, those things she's she's making a very different argument. And this is true of Greta third Bergh, you had on show, and and and the students and the sunrise movement, they're not making the same argument that activists have been making forever, which is to say it's crazy that we don't act. We know what to do. It's foolish. They're saying that of course, too. But the emphasis is on our failure to act is undermining the basic values that we uphold as the pillars of our society, and that's a moral claim. And I think it's the only honest way of looking at it, and it represents dramatic break in the conversation. And it's it's the kind of argument that until now you only saw from people in the island nations, you saw it from from the pope and his encyclical, but this is a profound shift, and I think it's shaking the whole conversation. Both. In the US and internet with what I find fascinating is how some on these sort of Christian and Republican conservative side, a really weighing in now, while Mitch McConnell, Mike, say, you know, the radical left wing of the Democratic Party is unveiled that green new deal the socialists fans fantasy you've got others the climate scientists Catherine Heo who talks about convincing people from from the heart this door. She said. Just about all the objections that I've heard the genuine objections to to climate have everything to do with solution aversion. The fact that we fear the solutions more than we fear the impacts. We think the solutions will destroy our way of life and lead to much lower quality of life than we enjoy today. Whereas we've view the impacts very distant far off. They don't really matter to us. So to address this. I have to do two things that are very uncomfortable for a scientist to do. The first thing is rather than engaging with people from the head as we often do with data and facts and charts and figures, I have to engage with people from the heart. So we've literally only got ten seconds the annual, but to get conservatives like that on board at her husband's a pasta must be a good thing for people like you and the others who watching this. Absolutely. I think it's a sensual. And I think it's it's crazy to think of this as a partisan issue, and the sooner we make this moral claim, I think the more people on all sides of the political spectrum will understand what we're up against and the need to act right now, the Faneuil ridge also of losing a thank you so much and now we turn to a different kind of science delta Priscilla Chan is a pediatrician by traits. She's risen to prominence though, is the wife of Facebook, founder, Mark Zuckerberg and together, they run the Chan Zuckerberg initiative which aims to advance human potential and promoted quantity. Hari Sreenivasan spoke to John in a rare interview in San Diego where he also boss to about her latest project education reform and try to get into toll about whether Facebook should be paying more tax. What are you announcing today really excited to announce a new program at university of California, San Diego and UC Berkeley a program that we're barring from the university of Maryland Baltimore County, where we really are building in mentorship and practical advice and cohorts for under served underrepresented minority students to be able to pursue careers in the stem field. How does this fit with the initiatives that you're Asian works in see I we're a big believer that we need to have diverse talent to be part of building a better future for everyone. And so we apply many tactics to ensure that we are recruiting a strong robust into verse workforce. That's easy. I we're more than fifty percent women across the organization were a quarter underrepresented minorities. And that's not a nice to have we have to have this in order to be building solutions that really meet the needs of all we also have a science program that allows. Us to really think about how to cure prevented Minhaj all disease in the next century. And having diversity of opinions ideas and backgrounds is incredibly important because we need to bring fresh ideas bring fresh perspectives and skill sets into doing that. Because if we just use the same set of tools and solutions, we're not going to be able to see those breakthroughs. We also have an education program. We're really take an equity lens at how we really make sure that we are educating an opening up opportunities for all an individual at the stem degree makes twenty six percent more than individual without a stem degree. And so we really see this as a pathway to opportunity. You're not the first tackle education for this is a tough problem to crack. Mhm? So how do you think you're going to be able to do it? Where in a specific way were others have been daunted by this challenge. We don't think we're going to be the only ones to solve this challenge. And we don't want to be we really think about how can we enhance what's already great in happening in the field and spread that to more. And so what I'm really talking about is like my experience of having mentors. I kind of think of them as heroes who needed heroes to be able to unlock opportunity when you are in a minority group or you don't know what's possible. And we can't rely on heroes. We can't rely on luck. So how can we actually like look at these shining examples of what's happening of great education? Great mentorship and Bill tool so that others can do it in a high quality sustainable way. So that. We're not really relying on luck. But we're actually building systems for others to access opportunity. So what is the summit learning platform? Summit learning platform is a software and professional development program that we've developed in partnership with the summit public schools. It really is the three pergram project base learning teaching kids lifelong, learning, skills, and also mentorship. And what we've been able to do is take this excessive some public schools and build a software that empowers teachers to better do those things and share them with other schools, freely example of how it works. A school would have their students be able to have a year in review and say these are the topics in English science math that you need to cover an a year in here. The habits of success you need to be able to lay out a project plan track your parts against it. How to ask? For help. So it's got to dimensions. Both the academic in the cognitive skills of learning. And then they take those skill the those skills and those learnings and apply the projects how does Europe project. How does your learning actually live in the world? And so someone might do journalism project or visit an understanding of local zoo into really bring that learn to life give students the standing why something is important one of the concerns when larger nations try to tackle is. Hey, this might be an experiment for you. But this is my kid's education that you're playing with right. What you might take a key learning from this. But did my sixth grader fifth grader fall behind or not meeting certain expectations that they should have gotten by the end of this program. Right. We partner with summit to make sure that the curriculum provided is standards aligned in vetted by academics across the field. And so we. Of course, that's something. We believe in. And we wanna make sure that we deliver not just what is expected but outside results in Pasadena, Texas, the students who are furthest behind actually had a seventeen percentage gain in their reading in twenty percentage gain in math. That's incredible. We want to be able to see that type of outcome from strong implementations for students nationwide. How much of this is informed by your own background is in Asian American child of immigrants. I'm a child of Chinese Vietnamese refugees who came to this country with very little English in very little assets. And what my family was able to do is actually take advantage of the public school systems that we had a Massachusetts, and I had to incredible mentors that told me about college told me that I would be someone who would do great in college. But I needed that mentorship. Because as a first generation to college, my family wasn't able to. To provide that for me. But having someone told me about what the practical steps were take a tease take this class. But also the inspiration of you can do this you belong here is what made it possible for me to reach Harvard as a first generation student in for so many more students when I looked to the right of me and the left of me in high school, they should have been there too. But we often miss the opportunity to unlock potential when we don't give students the right amount of access mentorship opportunity. Let's talk about science. What's the cell? Atlas? What are you hoping to do with it? What is it in? What what kind of Scott, are you hoping that no leads to and so excited about the cell atlas? So believe it or not no one actually knows how many cells are in your body what they are doing what they look like when they're healthy or sick. And so by understanding that we can actually understand how your. Works. How what happens when you're sick? And how to take care of it. When things go wrong, and I'll give you two really exciting examples, I'm a pediatrician of taking care of lots of kids with cystic fibrosis. We always thought that they were these two cell types involved in it was a certain channel in the lung that caused cystic fibrosis what scientists working on the cell outlets and single cell sequencing figured out. There's a new cell type that no one knew before and it's involved in cystic fibrosis. So we they're still lots to be worked out about the mechanism. And if we can take advantage of it to actually treat kids with cystic fibrosis, but that's really another exciting example of how you'd apply the science of human cell. Atlas is in chemotherapies or any drug actually right now, there are many cuma therapies have horrible side effects because they're nonspecific. But what? A researcher at the bile hub realized is that for certain pancreatic cancer. It was a certain receptor on the cancer cells CD forty four that was what we needed to target in the drugs. Previously treated that cancer had horrible side effects. You would lose all of your skin. We need to redesign those chemotherapies to just target that receptor to significantly reduce the side effects. So this human cell atlas. It's going to be really exciting because it's going to be an open resource for scientists to build upon the knowledge of others for biotechnologies to actually build useful tools for pharmaceuticals to build medications that better treat human disease in your interest in criminal Justice reform that isn't inherently political process meaning. We collectively decide. What's good? What's bad? What is reform? What's our debt to society? So does that mean you end up lobbying or advocating on behalf of legislation? So is a political organization. We are excited about criminal Justice because they're folks on both sides of the aisle that are excited about improving the criminal Justice system the way we actually engaged is through to punch strategy one. We work with prosecutors right now prosecutors holding norms amount of power in the criminal Justice system. It is a decentralized system that allows prosecutors many of whom are elected to apply the law at their discretion. And the thing that is disappointing is that there's actually no feedback loop. Prosecutors often don't know when they make a certain decision if it actually improves the outcome for an individual, and if it makes the community safer, so we're working with prosecutors to better understand how they can improve their decision making process and the other side of this is really giving people a second chance we were part of the clean. Effort. How do we allow individuals who have served their time to actually have an opportunity at redemption afterwards right now records, stay on indefinitely affects housing opportunities affects job opportunities educational opportunities. But how can we as a system really allow people to have these records cleared automatically to open doors to them that they deserve. And this is incredibly important to us because one into Americans have a family member that's been incarcerated that means one in two individuals in this country are affected by these decisions that are being made by prosecutors and the opportunities that are available to people after they serve their time. How tied to the success of Facebook is meaning what happens if Facebook doesn't work out does the money in the push behind all the initiatives that CD is making those stop to at. Is funded by our families assets Facebook, but they belong to seize the eye. And so it we are managing the funds. So that sees the I can continue on for as long as we have the resources. You've CI continues your best case scenario is that change the world etcetera. Facebook doesn't do. Well, then these things would be hampered. You're saying they're completely separate CI's work would continue. We're managing the funds that CGI to protect our work going forward. We are always making sure that we have enough oppor. We understand how much runway we have. And we're very comfortable with the runway. We have right now. One of the concerns is that I know that you don't run Facebook. And this is not I know that you're not in the operations of Facebook. But since has been capitalized with the success from Facebook, the concern is that, you know, Facebook sometimes is making money from communities that it's working in in a way that. Might be normal for corporations, but doesn't seem almost moral. Meaning y park yourself in kind of tax havens, wouldn't it be better for communities that you're working in if Facebook just paid more taxes, it would be less work for Seattle? Do if schools were better funded. So I don't think for those who can afford it that higher taxes are a bad thing. I we would be supportive of that. And we do believe in making sure that community schools are well-funded. And so I think it's really about making sure that both the governments advocating to make sure that government's systems are well-funded because those are so much larger than any single philanthropy. And that's why we really think about how we engage on the advocacy level to ensure that those things are true while looking at the incredible opportunity that we have to fill in a specific niche in these space. So what I'm saying is Facebook paid let's say six billion dollars more in taxes wouldn't that eventually come into school districts and fire departments and so forth? And so that would actually be better for communities. It'd be less work for Seattle have to pick up and do right. That's not the way schools in California funded aren't don't actually work that way. And so in theory that all right, but that's not expertly how schools get their funding. So we need to make sure that we are really ensuring that the organ institutions that we care about the NIH school districts are getting the right funding. They need to do the important work. So, you know, one of our previous guests on get it us. I remember him. He had a book out for while and one of his premises is that world, it'd be better off. This is centrally if if you and your husband or other billionaires had less not more and even more specifically had less sane in whether it's health or an education. What do you say to that? I think that we as a society should really think about making sure that we are taxing those who can afford it. And I think that is a great opportunity to insure that are public systems are well-funded. But for those who want to give back, and it should we should be really thoughtful about ensuring that we aren't a single voice that as a foundation as a philanthropies. He's the I should be listening to the voices of scientists of teachers of advocates on the front lines in saying, what do you need what you need to actually build a better system, do better work and actually supporting that work is something that we're incredibly part of doing a mom how much digital technologies in your house like how much how comfortable are you with your kids and screen time screen time is a fascinating question. Because right now, we lumped it as like screen anyone minute is bad or quivalent. But I think it's we need to be. More thoughtful about how we think about it. Like, we have the girls videoconference video call with their grandparents all time, I think that's a fantastic thing. I think very few people would argue that little kids connecting with their grandparents across the country's a bad use of their time. But we don't park them in front of the TV for hours at a time. We think that's bad screen time. And so we are very thoughtful about when we introduce technology, and why to make sure that the kids are getting a balance of different inputs and access to learning that the otherwise wouldn't have had Facebook accounts. And if so what age thirteen in. Yes, did having children change. How you in work thought about the platform and your responsibilities? I built my career around service before I met Mark before I went to college. I knew that I had had had access to incredible opportune. Easy. It was my job to give back. I never knew that. I would have an opportunity this large to go back. And so it was always in our in our conversations that we were going to do this. But it always felt like we should do it in the future. But when we were pregnant with MAC's, we realized oh my goodness. The futures coming any minute. And if we wanted to our children to be a part of a future better than what we lived we needed to make sure we were doing our part. And so that's what gave us the kick in the bottom to actually do it. When we were when we had a newborn, and we're glad we were cloud. We're doing it because there's so much to learn we've already come so far in the past three years, and this is going to be a lifelong effort of making sure that we're giving back with incredible opportunity. We've had. I gotta ask. This is are your parents more proud of the CGI work, you're doing or that your doctor, my mom is. So are you a real doctor like when I graduated medical school does? This mean, your doctor when I was in residency does this mean, your doctor, and then when I started tending are you doctor now, and so I would say they are incredibly proud of the work. We're doing CI. But I think they are just so happy that my sisters, and I have been able to build our careers and lives here. Thank you. That is it for now. But join us tomorrow when I sit down with the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi in Dublin remember, you can listen to a podcast at anytime. See us online at dot com and photo me on Instagram Twitter. Thanks for watching and goodbye from London. Are you interested in learning how great companies grow? Download the Mark podcast. Amar tech podcast tells the stories of real world marketers who use technology to generate growth in a chief business and career success from advertising to software as the service to data getting brands authentically integrated the content performs better the TV advertising. Typical life span of an article about twenty four to thirty six hours where reaching out to the right person with the right message and clear. Call an action that it's just a matter of timing ready to learn the secrets of technology driven marketing than download the Marta podcast. Just search Martin M A R T C H wherever you download your podcasts. Are you interested in learning how enterprise Gail companies drive organic traffic to increase their online visibility than download the voices of search podcast from the heart of Silicon Valley here? Search metrics Inc. CEO Jordan Kuni delivers actionable insights to how data to navigate the ever changing landscape of Google apple pin, the voices of search podcast arm. Search engine marketers and business analysts with the latest news and insights, they need to nephew the ever changing landscape of search engine optimization and content. Are you ready to learn to use surged data defined strategic insights about your competition and your industry as a whole than search for voices of search wherever you download your casts? 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142. London mayoral walks, #1: with LibDem Siobhan Benita

The Skylines Podcast

29:49 min | 11 months ago

142. London mayoral walks, #1: with LibDem Siobhan Benita

"The express train Grande I'm John Allege and this is skylines metric podcast so this is going to be one of those episodes out in the bell. So it's all recorded on on my phone with very high tech equipment of headset. We have a Mike in it. This is the first of a new a new series which we're GONNA do at least at least two but we're hoping to get out to four or five in which I go walk around London with candidates to be the Alpine cities Maha and talk to them about their their plans. The campaign hoping to achieve this is you say the the first of the series today. I'm I'm out and about in new London. We've been WHO's the Liberal Democrat candidate. I've already anathema about in in different parts of the London. With with Sean Berry. WHO's the green candidates and CO leader of that party? And I'm hoping to get the wind up shortly Roy Stewart. He's very famous for his walking. Walking and kind of inspired. This entire project is running as an independent candidate. He's agreed imprint. Support the conservative candidate Sean. Bailey and our incumbent Labor masters ECON OF SURF approve slightly more release if but we live in hope. Hopefully we'll get those. Those guys suited soon. Anyway I say this is recruited. NEFA EH low tech way and there will be some background noise pop up and explain explain the series and apologized for that. It was recorded in early November which it was about a month before the for the election which returned Johnson's conservatives with with a massive majority so occasionally the might be a hint of political references to sound a little bit out after date coming from another world that will be why but without further ado. Let's get walking so I'm in seven sisters. which is the landmark? Under bar of Haringey Tottenham development going on around here Carmen. What was on the so? I'm looking at before. But it's some very big flats going. Not Bad now. Swear lowers her friend. A very good friend of mine lives up its own. Come a qua- lots of interviews. It's it's one of those bits. That's quite far out central London probably and the seven eight miles out but as a very fast to blind in the Victoria Law and say even though in zone free free. It's relatively easy to get into town. She's why why it's payment set by gentrification a lot of batteries around community centers use by wipe various immigrant communities all state redevelopment to taking place very close to here. But I'm up here today to see one of the candidates. It's to be London. mannix year the Liberal Democrats should Benita. Who I'm meeting at seven sisters market? I your plus I if we can find the market so we are in a very nice cafe seven sisters road and I'm here with Chevron Benita the Liberal Democrat candidate to be mayor of London next year. She won't tell you. I'm very good very good really nice to this morning. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for joining us. Utah first of all of the candidates whose Matt something in the diary of me so you know. Obviously we're let me nicer to you and everyone else. That's how this works. I thought you wanted to come up here to seven sisters Y Y. What isn't yeah? I think I chose seven sisters because his I came here to meet Vicky who we might see actually if we go for walks later and she's been leading this campaign to make sure that the voices of people who live in the area and in particular those that work in the Latin village in the seventy sixes market all heard because there are so many things going on around here in terms of regeneration schemes development schemes. Where the people who live work here just not being heard voices are not being listened to so to me? It's kind kind of a real example of what I'm saying across London actually in different areas as well where in our desire or in the man's desire in council's desire aw to regenerate and developed which is great. They're not doing it in a way that is taking the communities with them and actually. I'm all for regeneration but you have to do in a way that invests in people invest in the communities and doesn't written them apart and it was so sad actually to meet these amazing. It's obviously real Latin. The American community here at the heart of seven sisters. They've been fighting this for years and years and years and I just think this pattern of the most vulnerable people in London. Not Getting heard is something that we absolutely have to address. It does a little bit like ground. Zero gentrification in London because it's it's very easy to get the central London from here to start a poor area and you know this hour of the market minute but we're not that far from the will be down the state. Tell us the story of the market. What's happening so in the market again? It's part of this wider regeneration proposals here. We're actually sitting. We can see here. Paul Hi this big tower block. Let's gone up right opposite cafe where we're sitting now. And then there's this next phase which would regenerate the Ski Street in which the market says now the people in the market saying absolutely you need investment in in the building and everything and it is looking quite you know in need of a bit of Tlc. But what they're saying is there's no guarantees for for them off to its. Yes they're being told they can come back into that market but there's no guarantees about the rent. They might have to pay. How secure places would be in that market afterwards? And actually what they've created in the market is such an amazingly unique. How of diversity there are people from all over the world that come in that market and and so many of the local people there said to me this is their home is like their second home in the hall turning their kids there is a safe place for their kids to be an all they are saying is that developers and the local council are not listening to them? And actually here in Tottenham. I think you have a history of Labor Council not listening to People Labor rampage listening to the people and a Labor man coming in and listening to people and I was really shocked to hear from Vicky and the others in the market. That Sadique hasn't been here once wants in his Marathi to listen to the campaign. As I think that's just unacceptable if we were chatting a bit before we started feels to me. The one of the one of the issue is we kind of have no language almost for talking about a right to be in an area as a sense of ownership over narrator isn't intimately tied up with literally owning joining the site and so the decline in social housing people can be pushed out if they come with one anymore. I'm because this is quite close to central London. I am quite quickly tube. And so all this great opportunity to build posh flats a fifteen minutes from Oxford circus. How can we counter that? Like what can we do to actually Kinda give people the right to to remain in an area if they do not literally own land. That's a really really good question. I guess the only answer I can have to that is if we put profit above of all else and we don't value that sense of place mall we are GONNA lose. What makes London amazing? We talk about everybody. Talks about London's diversity and it's brilliant communities and I've been saying as I go round. We speak more languages in London than any city in the world. Champion kind of difference and diversity and we embrace immigration or some of us do I would. I would like to think more of us day but actually let's see if we allow people to get bulldozed out by developers are just after Prophet and not after building those communities or investing the communities meantime already here we will lose amazing character of London and is that what we really want so. I think it's a false economy as well because looking forward you're going to end up with London where everybody looks exactly the same where every borrower is completely unaffordable to normal people. Actually the city will stop functioning at that point because you need everybody mocking to make this amazing city work so think we have to come up. With some way valuing as you say place to me this is really personal. My mom came to London from India and my mom happened to come to a pile of London south west London where she found a little community tango Indian community where everybody else in that area looked after them and did give them a sense of place and let them put down roots and you know she went on to meet my dad. And you know we've had an amazing of life now. I wouldn't live anybody. Eddie Morales in the world tool if we don't value that kind of thing. Uh Like I say we'RE GONNA lose. What makes London brilliant? And I just don't want to see that happen mm-hmm. We've left the cafe because they were playing holidays and I got genuinely terrified. You'RE GONNA get sued for copyright infringement. So without went out standing on the street outside outside seven sisters market just before we go into the market. I'd let's talk about the history a little bit your Liberal Democrat candidate now. You'll dressed in in lip them callous. LS With the orangey yellow. Jump Gold Gold. We're GONNA go according to go. Check it when we cooling because it's a coat on top and yet breath is it gold jacket and there's not. There's yellowy orange today John. You've you've very umbrella and plans but you have room for metaphor four and in twenty when you're around as an independent and as I understand you left your job in the civil service to do that and you didn't need a new battle. You came faith if not that far behind the then candidate Brian Pelvic about seventy nine thousand votes gas. Something like that. I am nearly a quarter of a million second-place Sanchez which is pretty good going. What made you will meet you do that? Like why did you give up a successful who serve his career to run as an independent candidate to be mad. There there are. There are so many reasons I could spend half now talking about this but insure having spent sixteen years at the hall of government. I could already see then. A lot of people are talking about now which was our two main parties becoming increasingly dysfunctional. And already then I think they were starting to be pulled to their extremes at that point and I thought we could do better than that. I have two daughters myself and so part of me was also thinking actually while I tell my daughters that women can do anything when you look around in every sector. That's still not the case in this country it's still very male dominated at the top of most of our sectors so when the three parties Lib. Dem's Lebron Lebron Conservatives announced their candidates for the two thousand twelve election it was the same three men who had stood before and I thought my God in a city of nine million people. Surely we can do better than that. I think the one thing I've learned throughout my career. Is you absolutely need diversity of opinion voice background in a room to make the best possible decisions so we definitely need people different backgrounds like may coming forward into public life now more than ever. That's even more true today more than ever that we need different voices coming into public life. I'd been in the Civil Service when they were looking of metro. Mez around the country so I understood. The kind of thinking behind Metro wasn't that they didn't necessarily need to be party political so that was one of the things at the time I was thinking. Actually these rose work created to allow different people to come forward so had background had the experience. I know how central government works and I just thought it's time for women like me. Were could not just talk. The talk of interest. was there a memory for you could win that or was it more. We're about six of like just Ceuta making stand. It's funny because I thought I could do really well. An idea and I think is because nobody had any expectations NHS over independent candidate with no party machine at the time. I think we're I identify which is why I say now. Is this desire for a different type of politics. And maybe I I was just a few years too early then and I actually the electoral commission afterwards. For example I was up against rose. That didn't really allow an independent to have a very big platform hat foam in that campaign and afterwards the Electoral Commission did writes me. And say yeah. You're right you know you. You weren't allowed a party-political brokers because they weren't expecting an independent party to gene campaign so I think it was that seat of a moment where I could already see. That people wanted something else. They wanted something different and I still think people now oh are looking for a very different type of politics and I think that's what we now offer so I'm very pleased to be running a Liberal Democrat candidate. This time allows can next question. Jason is like Whoa. What Damascene conversion to the The Orrin Jello because no surprise I think to Brexit was kind of the last straw for me so on the morning of the referendum result within twenty minutes of getting up I Went online and I joined the liposomes and actually is not such an unusual thing when you know anybody that knows me. When I ran in the Maryland section two thousand twelve is an independent? My manifesto was very similar to the Liberal Democrat Manifesto. I've always been a liberal and actually. I think my husband's French it's become very personal from that. Respect in terms of how EU citizens have been treated throughout this whole process as well an and I just think now more than ever before people who are socially liberal who wants to fight for different types of future for our country needs to come together and work together and it's not just about the a you anymore breaks not just about not it's about fighting for an inclusive future. It's about not uh-huh all those old old kind of fights that I thought we'd one already you know that we've had these old battles about the benefits of immigration about standing up to discrimination. The Nation about making sure that everybody has a can fulfil their potential about championing global international outlive. I thought we Kinda gone past all of those conversations since that's what we're fighting for now and the Liberal Democrats are the only party. That's being really clear on that type of future. So I'm really France available Democrat now. Should we go and look at the market. Let's look you let you just tell us what the market represents Greenland Michael Percent Home Frame Latin American community right and it's not only it's not only about the businesses as individuals as a whole the whole community. I always say that this is the body audie and the communities the sold so we have to live together six together and they just represent everything for their community as you can see bureau people here today spry and in the afternoon it's going to be packed with people. I'm the one is half ten older mothers. Come here with the case. The kids can play around on everything. And it's an important place. And and that is because the community via the place to be so even our businesses with we don't treat it ask us like a hub for a community to me dinner to come and meet than coffee and is served as goes so many purposes it. Ah Bats and balls in the ways that only we understand and the Latino community understand about it but was vicky the lady who's running the campaign to save the seven sisters Marquette Sheboygan. Tell us tell us about the place with that right now. What are we looking at? Yeah so here here. We are in the corner of this market as you can hear it's bustling around and actually okay even busier here. On a Friday afternoon we stopped by one of the little food places here amazing cakes and everything which I know. You're not having Kushner in cops at the moment but as you just heard from Vicky this place is more than a market you have got kind of lots of small business owners here. Who have these amazing kind of outlets here but actually this is a place of safety? A place of sanctuary for people. It's where they bring their kids when they're not in school times it's that community hall and it desperately needs somebody to listen to everybody who's Hey To actually hear what they're saying and invest in this in a very sympathetic way that brings the community with them and to me this is is just a microcosm of what we're seeing across. It's the same kind of thing we're seeing across London. You can link this to issues like grenfell where you have residents who are trying to raise concerns about what's happening to them about the conditions they are living in and nobody's listening to them and we're seeing this across London and has to has to change should should describe it a little bit. It's quite a large space but subdivided into lots of little shops restaurants and cafes counters addresses and now salons and it's mostly mostly Latin American with a couple of things like Carribean food still from elsewhere in the World Jewish lady in waiting to get her nails done and this is where the U. N.. Have identified this place as kind of uniquely multicultural in London. And it's just so offensive and organic and this has just grown ofo chemically. It is slightly falling to bits though this wires hanging everywhere. There's I'm painted surfaces. It just clearly hasn't had investment in a very long time and there's a space up says the we've been told it's been left unoccupied for with a forty years forty years and this is a T.F. Oh so you're absolutely right. I think what we're seeing is deliberate neglect because then ties into the argument. You know the narrative I think developers would lights put forward. Oh my look at a state of this obviously needs to be time on a flattened and rebuilt but in terms of the space upstairs one of the policies that I'm putting forward is we shouldn't have publicly owned buildings that are left empty in London. That's just unacceptable unacceptable when we have both so many people looking for places to live in but we also have things like Oh use centers shutting down Orlova an and community centers for elderly people. Every single unused space in. London should be opened up and given to the public. And it's not just here everywhere. I oh I find. There are spaces in London and we absolutely need to look at these anew spaces and get them back open given to the communities want us talk about policy and what you would do if if you were to win this election. What kind of things you want to do the job? So I've said on on day one the thing that I would look. I think the biggest issue going going into this election it can be knife crime. That's already clear that that's not going to go away between now and may on day one. I want to send a signal to every young person in London. But I'm on on this side. The I understand the issues that they're going to going through and I'm GonNa fix this and I've issued a five point plan which involves absolutely what we just talked talked about making sure that space is given to community so that we can have every single child should have somewhere to go in that vulnerable period after school between four four and six. PM when a lot of them actually get preyed on by criminal activity in London. So I've issued this thing called the happy hour the youth happy hour across London where you have churches which is opening their spaces community centres opening their spaces scores staying open for young people as one part of the plan. We need to have a young Mary in London so that young people can make sure shoulder voices get heard right at the heart of City Hall. I want every single police station reopened in communities or if this if the actual old police stations nations are expensive to run open alongside post offices or libraries. You know let's actually get police back in our communities and I want to legalise cannabis okay cool. Oh yeah absolutely WANNA leak. I've been I've been shouting about this for months. There is such a clear link between the illegal drugs market in London and uh-huh all young people getting pulled into criminal activity either as victim or perpetrator of crime. It's not controversial. They're so many countries that have done this my question society. The Deacon others is why the hell haven't done this already. Our young people are dying. There's a clear link between criminal activity. I'm offering government if I was the mayor of London. Let's pilot cannabis abyss legalisation in London. It's about time that we do this. So that is just around kind of my package on knife crime. I also want zero exclusions policy for London so no charge challenge permanently excluded from mainstream school in London without something. The mayor is in power to get involved with the this the council's Academy Trust I think by this augument. The mayor can't use their soft power. You have the biggest platform in London. A you know in the country by the prime minister really the one thing that has failed to do is show leadership on these issues. Geez it's too easy to blame. Central Government say. I don't have the levers. You're the mayor of London. For God's sake get around the table get them talking to each other and actually affect change through that softer the kind of leadership role. We absolutely could be doing more on this. So that song kind of knife crime and policing I have a whole package of stuff but over already put out but but also I think one of the big issues coming to me. It's just the inequality in London and I think there's more that could be doing. That could be doing so. I'm looking as well it. Can we actually sleety something around Fares on transport in London to make it cheaper for people on low incomes to give them a bit of help. Because I love London. I wouldn't live anywhere else. It's the best the city in the world but for all the things I love about London I know that for a lot of people. They can't access those things and learned much harder place in a much darker place for them to live in. And I want to do something about that. You know I've been talking to people around. Why certain communities are left behind? Why Office so much affects minority CPS London that facing women in London disproportionately? So I want to do a whole kind of inequalities orgy of London and where are the barriers. Why is it that we're seeing all of this stuff going on in London? That leads leads to these inequalities. London can we tackle that in a different way and acoustic housing. Yeah that was question. Housing is obviously a huge issue and it is one of the air is the has some power over free planning policies. What would you do to kind of? Make sure that we are building the houses we need in this town. So I'm still developing. I WANNA say my policies are completely formed at the moment. 'cause they're not still developing manifesto and I think housing is the thing. That's the most difficult because while the mayor has certain powers over planning I'm building regulations. You don't have all the powers that you would want to actually get. The House is as you said before and other issues councils then you have to work with councils but actually the one thing it's clear to me is we have failed to deliver. The homes are food and I don't mean the definition of affordable housing that we have now. That's not foldable for most people in London. I'm I mean genuinely building homes that people can afford to live in where they want to live in them because we have looked to the private sector to fix that problem. The private sector brilliant at building certain types of homes but they've not been very good at building. Ford were homes so why she thinks city hall needs to take much more responsibility for this itself. And that's what I'm looking at at the moment so I will be coming out with policies in the area but it is much more about saying. Can we use the land that tier felons come use the land that city hall loans and actually can we ourselves ourselves build some tree affordable homes that we needed on the loss to the big area. The the mayor is has significant powers over transport. She's kind of touched thaddeus but is there anything else in the transport area you would be wanting to well. I mean today. We've just heard that there is. This now confirmed additional. delay additional cost crossroad. Which is absolutely unbelievable? I think that we now learn that cross paths not going to be open at least not next year. Not into twenty only partially Lynch twenty-one probably and it's going to cost now of eighteen billion pounds but you know that's going to have a massive impact unfortunately airforces finances and we'll any future. My coming thing in is able to do the one thing I would say what people are telling me everywhere I go is. Let's get the basics sorted so absolutely will be putting forward some new ideas days for big visions across London. But we already have crossroad to in the pipe which I would like to see develop but actually do you know what I would also like to make sure the cubes are clean. We just had a report on the toxic air in our tubes and how dangerous is that they are not as noisy as they are at the moment. Because that's damaging to people that they aren't as overcrowded as they are the older signaling issues are fixed that we look at the sexual abuse for example that women get on on choose. I think there's a whole package of stuff around the choose. I want to look at what you just sorting the basics and I also want to look again at our bus network and again can we actually make even more affordable for people so I would like to see a much more many more discounts on our bus system. Actually if I can be doing free buses for people I don't think people on the night bus should have to pay for example. If you didn't have your you're you're always Tocado your touch in just for safety reasons and for young people. Let's make a night buses free so I think they were sorts of things that we can do but like any other candidate. A I think the overarching principle is going to be in terms of transport and environment. Let's try and get more and more people out of their private call us and onto public transport but to do that has sweet reliable and affordable. There's a no brainer with speaking on Friday November. Eight physically as we were. Let's let's just agree on not unheard calendar and this week. A poll came out. which put you in? Full th place behind the COM- chill barely Roy. Stuart's you've ever taken Sean Berry the Greens so as you know someone. Campaigning strongly remained platform. Are you annoyed with is entered the race independent and it's getting votes from people who think he's remain in a win. Let's be honest he isn't I of course I'm a bit annoyed I would be. I would be lying if I said I wasn't a bit annoyed but you know what I'm more annoyed about. I think is hey you you have somebody who up until a couple of months ago was such a Tory. He was running for the leadership of that policy. And now he's saying he's not retool he's Independent. It just is not credible to go from that one st with us the other statement says he's a Cumbrian. MP He has no roots in London and the somebody who ran as an independent pendant before and struggled to get coverage as an independent. Because I was told independence you know. Don't have a record and Blah Blah of course on bit annoyed that he's getting the coverage but you know what I just have to put positive case forwards for why I will be running the campaign that reflects Londoners values more than anybody else in as race. So what you're seeing at. The moment is log off pieces that worries getting because of who he is because his name recognition but very soon people in London were realize that he doesn't doesn't reflect their values and any is brexit here at heart is a conservative at heart. And that isn't the London that I know and love. We'll show path to kind of well. Let's say victory. Let's be optimistic because not PO. Yes it's not bad for you but you're still in fourth place and I think you'll vote share slightly under ten percents this quite a long way to go. I mean what what does a successful campaign few look like from here. I think the challenge for me is about getting my name recognition out so in the Post Ost. Liberal Democrats have always been squeezed between a big conservative and a big labor figure in this election by isn't going to be the case this time because conservatives don't have a big I'm struggling targeted toward now because they've got some really in music. I wanted to get him. Don't stay so actually frost as I say I think watch this space. Because we've done this analysis we know in the general election. We are going to do really well in the general election. That's going to give me the best foundation that the Liberal Democrats have ever had in the merit election going into the mayoral election. And actually if ends up between a race between myself and Sadique Kahn. So the two remainders in this contest and I think that is where it will end up. Then that's going to become interesting because I think people also want a little bit of personality a little bit of humor somebody who can get things done. And and what I'm saying to labor-leaning people in London is if you like speaks values your love mine. We share values law. We're both in that kind of remain Murderer kind of center ground. I with my civil service background. I will actually deliver on things. We shouldn't still have the levels of homelessness we have in London. We shouldn't have this massive delay in cross real. You know all of these things that date has failed to do. When he's been during his Marathi I will make sure? Those things are fixed getting basic sorted in London. I can deliver on those well. I think we should take a cue from the music except the introduce you become too close here. We can guarantee some Latin dogs ex. And let's do that. We need to thank you very much. Thanks very much. You've been listening to skylines the podcast rooms of metric Newsday's Mrs site presented them Ikuta by me. John Lynch and produced by Nick skylines every two weeks. I James Acosta or whatever APP you used to get you podcast. And while you're there don't leave us a nice review to to tell other people it really helps people discover and on the Nikola maniacs people who listen to this in two weeks thanks for listening in Brooklyn.

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The rise of Extinction Rebellion

FT News

18:14 min | 1 year ago

The rise of Extinction Rebellion

"The hello. From the newsroom of the financial times. In london. I'm Josh noble. Mass protests against politicians failure to tackle climate change. But making headlines most recently when members at extinction rebellion gatecrashed at Brexit debate in the house of Commons. Matthew green has written about the group for this week's fifty weekend magazine, and he spoke to never hawk bad. It's aims along with one of the movement's leading voices environmental lawyer for Hannah you mean. Oh climate. Matt we've just heard some audio for me semi-naked protests that disrupted a vexing debate in the UK. Parliament earlier this month, the protest was organized by the group extinction rebellion, can you tell us what extinction rebellion is. And how it started? Extraordinary. Isn't it? The way this movement has burst onto the scene seemingly out of nowhere. In a matter of months. It started in parliament square at the end of October with a group of about six hundred people who decided that enough is enough. We are going to force the government to declare a climate emergency for a campaign of massive disobedience within a few weeks that number had grown to six thousand protesters who blocked five bridges across the river Thames for the best part of a day and on Monday, the plan is to shut down central London with ten thousand plus protesters and parallel demonstrations taking place in cities across Europe in the US, but the group actually has slightly longer origins. A call group of activists one of whom is called Gail Brad, Brooke who is the daughter of a Yorkshire coal miner. And who has a PHD in molecular biophysics, she's had a long history of involvement in social environmental activism and she's worked with. Several other collaborators to create a movement that has gone viral in a very short amount of time. And the goal is to use massive will disobedience to try to force the government to start trading climate change like an emergency and the article that you've written about extinction me in e quotes among could gem Bendel, who's the professor of sustainability leadership at the university of Cumbria, and he wrote a paper called deep adaptation a map for navigating climate tragedy. Can you some of what he wrote and say something about its influence on extinction? Medallion yell. Deep adaptation is a really remarkable paper. It was published last summer by the university of Cumbria, and essentially it lays out professor Bengals reasoning as to why he thinks that the collapse of industrial society is now inevitable as a result of essentially non linear climate change effects because one of the big things that climate tall. Logist concerned about is that as the amount of greenhouse gas builds up in the atmosphere feedback loop start to kick in and it becomes almost impossible to reverse these very dramatic non-linear changes and Jim Bendel spent two months reviewing the science, and he came to the conclusion that we are looking at an unfolding trainwreck here. Now veasley not everybody agrees that society's definitely going to collapse, but reading that paper is pretty sobering. And if you talk to people in the environmental sustainability world, including an academic, then not saying that this guy's a total outlier. They're actually saying that what he's put together is very compelling than the amazing thing is that papers now being downloaded more than three hundred and fifty thousand times, so it's gone viral through word of mouth, and it's one of the main text in a way is inspired a lot of people to look at extinction rebellion and say, right. It's time that we take really radical action to force the government to start doing something about this. This. It's kind of a wakeup call then. Yeah. I mean, scientists have been issuing wakeup calls for very long time. But what happens in deep adaptation, it's that Jim Bendel sort of almost strays out of academic convention. And at one point he writes in the paper, if you take the logical implications of climate science, so their conclusion, should I be even writing this paper. I mean, why are you even reading it? He kinda hits this almost existential crisis. He's writing it and says, you know, I spoke to him. He said look people need to realize how serious the situation is. And actually if you read the science you need to look at your whole life. What are you doing on a daily basis because it might be that we don't have a great deal of time left before things really start to get messy? You say that people need to jam bender says that people need to be nice how serious the situation is. But for HANA you help to Boker the two thousand fifteen Powis agreements on climate change and that was surely a huge achievement. And that was back ignition of how serious the situation is. What's your view of then? Well, it was an ano. Thomas achievement for the international community took about ten years actually to negotiate. It was meant to have been agreed at the Copenhagen conference in two thousand and nine which resulted in acrimony and collapse. So it took another sort of five years for the system to fix that. An Paris is the first time that the one point five degree limit which had been advocated by small island states by very vulnerable countries was accepted as a benchmark for safety and put their alongside the well below two degrees. Limit can you just clarify what we're talking about. When we're talking about one point five and basically since the early nineteen ninety s scientists had said to try and keep global average temperatures from increasing more than two degrees, and that's been the informal benchmark and has been considered the sort of safe standard, and it was very clear, and certainly Jim bundles not Paul visit quesion for most scientists and heads of government. From these honorable countries have known for a very long time that they were massive consequences, and they were experiencing those consequence in climate impacts all over the world. So that's what they were arguing for basically in Copenhagen in two thousand and nine and Paris helped cement that into legal architecture and said that all governments and all policy efforts should be guided by staying below the well below two degrees target and ideally striving for the one point five safety goal. All sounds Harley reasonable. So why did you become disillusioned with that process and become more involved with a more radical group like extinction rebellion because even when we negotiated Paris. The actual pledges the targets that governments tabled were too small to achieve the two degree limit. You know, we're on track currently to somewhere near a three degrees. So we're nowhere near to let learn the one point five, and we knew that in Paris. What had been hopeful? At Paris was a set of provisions to ratchet. It up what's called climate. I'm Bishen and governments had agreed that they would come back before twenty twenty and revise their national pledges. And we'll be doing other things to try and reduce the gap between where we needed to be according to the scientists, and where we were politically. And personally, I just felt it couldn't really see that happening. The same way that we were conducting diplomacy in the same way that NGOs were doing the same kinds of campaigns waiting for, you know, the next electoral cycle to align itself with everyone else, and we had some massive setbacks, obviously, Trump came in in two thousand sixteen and we had a number of other governments Australia now Brazil's so many setbacks that weren't on the Perez timeline as it were. And actually makes that job very very difficult. And I was personally quite exhausted and frustration having been to twenty three of these cops the climate change meetings organized by the UN I called the conference of the bodies GOP for short. So. So these are the big annual meetings that take place in the member of December of each year. And I just couldn't see the way through without something very different happening and nothing that's what is the backdrop to extinction rebellion. This huge frustration in mood this huge recognition that we are literally up the cliff edge. And that we've got to do something very different than just turn out once a year, and you know, recycle previous decisions and say we're going to increase on Bishen the next year round, you know, in essence where kicking the ball into the long grass every time. You think that government's and activists haven't been recognizing that Kravitz? Here's the situation. What is the worst case scenario that we're talking about here or maybe even the best case scenario well in terms of human impacts, your OD seeing some pretty big consequences of increased heat waves increased typhoons increased hurricanes mass migration, huge impacts on food productivity acidification of oceans, so these will affect billions of people and their livelihood than ability to literally survive, so some. That is locked in already in. That's the gloom and doom and the societal collapse in Oreo. I don't think that that's the only scenario I think there are two basic variables where the dice will roll one is climate sensitivity, which is the way in which the entire system response to increase the oa-to. And we don't know that actually we don't know whether will be at the upper end of the lower end of Columbus since Tuesday, and the other is the degree of international cooperation that we have as human societies. So that we do have some control over you don't have control as an individual or nation on that. But actually, we can do a lot through cooperation and through acting and that's the bit. I think extinction rebellion and other groups that are rising up can show. So we would be in a more optimistic world, even if we were reaching severe tipping points. It's not inevitable that you know, when we had these inevitable worse typhoons that we would then actually have more deaths because more robust infrastructure better safety provisions help you avoid deaths. We have type things all the time in the US and others. They don't usually result in high levels of death. Whereas you do in countries are poorer and poorer infrastructure. So I don't quite what nature doles out to us with inevitable. Societal collapse. That depends on how we shape our own future. And that can be determined better by corporation. Can you tell me something about the protests that extinction rebellion is planning on? How you hope that those protests are going to bring about is kind of greater cooperation. Yeah. So the idea is basically from Monday the fifteenth in London, but also worldwide because extinction Williams global movement that they'll be shutting down of some key London sides. We've got five basic locations. I can tell you them now marble arch with loop bridge. Oxford circus and parliament square as well as a presence in Piccadilly circus that don't go there unless you want to join which I encourage everyone to do so in not cycling cycling, so. So at those size will be both showcasing the solutions as well. As telling people what the underlying problem was. And the solutions are essentially about cooperation about learning to be empowered about asking the political system to do more and to be more responsive to both the plummets needs and our own needs. And not to think that this collapse is inevitable. Not just accept that. This is all there is because change can happen. The research shows that mass peaceful civil disobedience really works. And what it all depends on is people realizing that they can shape the political future that it's not locked in a sink. You could argue paps in that case to solve a piece with the political strands at the moment, which is sort of disillusionment with the way democracies are working that they're not responsive enough to what people want which is obviously playing out with exit, but it will say you would say with the urgency of the climate question. I think people have seeing that the political systems around the world on not responding. To the very big challenges that people expect the politicians to solve. And that's why we have to take action and not just rely on letter writing to impede or asking them polite questions through the normal parliamentary procedures and not just having single issue campaigns. We need a much bigger political change in mass, peaceful protests does that shows like it would involve something of a change of mind on people's par and Matt under that you've written in the piece about the psychological impact of environmental destruction. Can you tell us a bit more about what the psychological impact is all together recognizing and how extinction event is hoping to harness that what we're living at a moment in human history. When science is telling us that unless we make drastic changes to almost every thing we do at every level of the economy and society, we are heading for a potentially uninhabitable planet. But we go on about our lives much as if nothing's happening if it's sort of someone else's going to sort this problem out for us, and that's a classic trauma reaction. It's numbing. It's resorting to distraction or denial and we see some people deny climate science all together. I mean, that's the most convenient escape routes. But we watched the news we see mak- fires ravaging California. We see ice caps melting. And we see scientists telling us that we go to steer this ship pretty fast. So that creates a pervasive sense of cognitive dissonance. And I think the reason extinction rebellion has grown so rapidly is because there's many many people out there who were feeling this. They can sense that something deeply wrong, and that our political system isn't responding. And so even if you don't necessarily believe the campaigns going to work, you join extinction were Bill, and you find other people who are willing to talk about this enormous crisis that people prefer to look at. I mean, I've found was reporting that a lot of the people I was talking to was saying he. Yeah. Yeah. I've been waiting for something like this for years. I felt so alone in looking at this and being so worried and almost talk about it. Suddenly there's a place for people to go. There's a community. And I think my hunch is that we're going to see this movement grow and grow because these problems aren't going away anytime soon, turn echo your experience. Yeah. Very much. I guess I took a bit of time out to deal with my own issues of grief and frustration and sort of depression and thinking that I had wasted twenty five years of my life negotiating and leaving my kids and being away for two three months of every year. And I felt very much when the IPCC report came out in October just before extinction valley launch that said basically, we've got a carbon emissions by almost fifty percent in twelve years to avoid going down the road of two degrees tipping points. We're now down the whole house earth scenario where we're in a kind of hellish new equillibrium. So when that came out a lot of the environment climate community that I was. Out of you know, issued kind of press releases and did the normal alert. You know briefed in the media and went on TV and so forth and extinction rebellion actually staged a rebellion. Mass sort of sit in Diane outside Downing Street, and that's what made me sort of realize that that's the kind of courage. That's the kind of actions that are now commensurate with what the scientists are saying, and I think that the public had absorbed in the summers before all of the wildfires in Greece in California, the droughts here, we've had floods million homes in the UK are risk of floods in of experience floods we're going to probably have another series of very serious trout's this year as one in four chance that will have the most severe droughts in the UK. So it was pretty dry so far gone. Yeah, we had the hottest febreeze. So people know this experience is what's happening every day. They don't have to read a book that don't have to read the newspapers to know that something is seriously wrong. And I think that's what's. Made me join is that realization that people are willing to stand up and be far more courageous than perhaps they were in the past. And to say, we gotta do something different. We gotta try something bigger and bolder. So what can I do if you feeling exercised about this oversee you say, we should learn more about extinction medallion, but what can one do as a citizen or consumer? If one is worried about these things, I think it's not all going to be solved by us taking individual consumer decisions. Those are important, and they are things that I've done myself. For example. I haven't bought any new clothes for a year because fashion is a huge misery is the same size as Russian emissions. If you look at it as a sector as a country. So some of these issues like changing your diet. That's the same thing. If you look at all the emissions from dairy and from meat production. That's about the size of India in emission terms. So these individual decisions can add up an are already being taken by individuals. But you can I think not just do that. But also, join a mass peaceful. I would say peaceful civil disobedience movement because that's what I think is needed right now, I would call everyone to rise up. And also firm what it means for you to live in a community that is going to face and pretty awful impacts. We're seeing that in Europe with seeing the results of migration crisis is linked the refugee classes are linked. These are refugees coming from countries that are deeply water stress subjects food security issues. So I think we've got a challenge the political system as a whole for on a yeoman and Monte green. Thank you very much. Indeed. That was never hawk talking to Matthew green. And for Honey you mean, and you can find the link to Matthew story in our show news. Thanks for listening. Remember, if you're not really a subscriber, I would like to discover more F T content. You can find our latest subscription office at FD dot com forward slash offer.

london Jim Bendel Paris Europe UK Copenhagen US Matt Matthew green Parliament California university of Cumbria river Thames Josh noble Hannah professor Bendel India
Thursday 18 April

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:46 min | 1 year ago

Thursday 18 April

"You're listening to the globalist first broadcast on the eighteenth of April two thousand nineteen on monocle twenty four the globalist in association with UBS. Hello and welcome. This is the globalist coming to life from majori house in London. I'm tigon rice and coming up today. The mother report has released later, albeit in redacted form, the man who compiled it as bringing no charges against Donald Trump, but can his political opponents find some new ammunition among its four hundred pages. Also, today's global est when Paris woke up on Monday morning. It did not expect to be having this debate by Thursday in rebuilding the Notre dam should it focus on recreation where new imagination and then our series on. How education influences nationhood, here's from Bosnia. Only I came to fifth grade. Did I realize that we're being segregated by ethnicity? And that we were taught that we were good ones. They are not while the other group was taught the opposite. We'll also have newspapers and business news to plus shoes. The sky be the limits as a plan is hatched to project advertisements into the stars. That's all had right here on the globalist lie. From london. Thanks for being with us today. I'm tigon Rosh. The time is two one in Washington DC, which will be on tenterhooks later as both sides of the political divide. Awasthi publication of rubbers Motors report into alleged collusion by the Trump campaign with Russia. The attorney general William Barr received at last month and decided there was no evidence of a criminal conspiracy. A similar conclusion was reached by Robert Mueller. But now four hundred redacted pages are being released for others to make up their own minds for member that the special counsel himself made no recommendation about potential prosecution even though that was affectively his job. Although Donald Trump says he's been exonerated Democrats will get to make up their own minds. Jacob power Keillor says deputy head of the Americas program as Chatham house and joins me now. Welcome to the program. Jacob what exactly do you think? Democrats will be looking for. I think they'll be looking especially hard at the section of the report of the deals with obstruction of Justice, the tree terrain that Muller has had navigate is that the department of Justice has long held that a sitting president cannot be indicted. So even if Muller believed that the president obstructed Justice and believed that he had the eighty five percent chance of conviction that the DOJ guidelines suggest should be in place before an indictment is issued. He according to the DOJ on guidelines couldn't actually indict the president. So the question is does the what was his job to recommend impeachment, which is the constitutional remedy for high crimes and misdemeanors committed by the president? I think there's an argument, and this is you know, were in the twilight hours of being able to speculate. What in the report, so I'll do a little speculating and there there's there's a chance that. The way the obstruction of Justice section is framed is designed to be the basis of an impeachment inquiry. Now, we don't know that it's possible. That Muller simply said, here's some evidence for here some evidence against it very difficult to establish intent, which is a key part of -struction of Justice. I'm not gonna make a call because I think it is appropriate for the higher levels of the department of Justice do so and bar in his role as attorney general sort of hand picked by Trump said, yeah, no, we're not we're not going to bring charges on this. But it's also possible. But Muller looked at the reality that he would be reporting to a Trump appointed official and framed it in such a way that would come through congress and be a necessarily call to action for congress, but give congress the option of engaging in their constitutional remedy so Tokyo's through what constitutional remedy could be what kind democratic lawmakers. Do if they find something that they think they can pin on Donald Trump. Well, in theory, the House Judiciary committee could open impeachment proceedings against the president which would lead to the question put before the full house of representatives of whether to impeach the president. Now, the problem with that is that impeachment is the equivalent of an indictment, the actual trial takes place in the Senate. The Senate is controlled by Republicans and not on you need a vote in the Senate. But you need a two-thirds majority in the Senate. So you'd need twenty Republican senators to go along with impeaching president of their own party and in less the report actually has a signed receipt from from flooding report saying, here's one collusion. Love you lad, I just don't see that happening and is not it's impeachment or nothing. I mean, surely, the, you know, if there are embarrassing details, which might not alternately prove imp-. Peachable worthy that they can be at least aired in public and and call some some political damage will they be aired in public. The problem is that because this is the work of the Muller team has been shrouded in. Secrecy has been the most leak proof place in Washington for two years, but there's been enormous public attention paid to the the sort of theatrics around it not least by the president himself and the president and his aides have largely successfully managed to cast at least two they're sort of half the political spectrum this investigation as an unfair partisan witch hunt. So I don't know that anything that's in the report will fundamentally change the political calculus might change a few minds on the margin. But I think that's the that's the best case scenario. I think opinions on this are so hardened. But it's you know, it will create a firestorm and intellectual. Or political impact will be very very limited. If anything at all some people were shocked that Robert Miller didn't go further in his conclusions. I suppose, you know. We don't know. What's in the report until we see? But it does seem hard to imagine that if there were some kind of a smoking gun, then Miller would've would've prosecutors. Well, again, the he stuck between a rock and hard place because he can't really prosecute the president. I think the the thing that surprised people who expected there to be more fire on the actual conspiracy side is that some other close associates like Jared Kushner, Donald Trump junior and so on weren't indicted, particularly around the question of their public statements statements to congress about the Trump Tower meeting on June the night twenty sixteen. And I don't know why maybe maybe they felt as though the the molar team felt as though the statements made to congress weren't. If false enough to justify the kinds of false statements prosecutions that have been brought against say, Roger stone. But again, I mean, I think the the fact that Muller didn't prosecute Donald Trump only reflects we'll be able to say more about this tomorrow. But that only really reflects the fact that department of Justice guidelines are very clear and very unambiguous. And you can't prosecute a sitting president. This isn't of course, going to be an unfiltered publication. There will be reductions and questions of what was reducted and on why. Exactly. And William Bard has to be said is not a neutral disinterested. Party. He did write a an unsolicited legal brief essentially arguing against Muller's appointment. By the same token. He's also personal friends with Muller has known him for a long time. But I think that's overridden by the fact that he clearly sees his role here as. Allowing the president to set the political terrain advantageous. Please possible. It's been reported in the last few hours really that the White House has gotten advanced briefings on the content of their port, which is a fairly absurd thing. I mean, the this is a report which is going to have significant potentially damaging political information and giving the White House the opportunity to sort of pre right there spin about it. I think is not in keeping with the kind of neutrality that the Justice department should actually engage in around these kinds of politically sensitive, topics. Jacob even if this report doesn't actually give the Democrats and all of mission in and of itself. I it strikes me that this is not necessarily the end of the road. Because of course, you've got all these power prosecutions of Donald Trump's inner circle. And goodness knows what any one of them might say, you know, to to get him into trouble and to get them selves a lesser sentence. Well this. The thing. I mean Muller has taken his hat off the rack and gone home. But a lot of the work that the team investigated has been spun off to other parts of the Justice department, including the famously independent southern district of New York and a lot of the the prosecutorial work that can carry it out against for example, Michael Cullen by the NY. Has been off shoot of Muller's work. So while the this is the final product of the special counsel's investigation, you do have all of these sort of spin off series. And frankly, if I were on Trump's team, I would probably be more worried about legal challenges coming out of some completely unrelated issue because again, Trump has had two years to prep the ground with no collusion. No collusion complete exoneration. No, collusion and get his side while onside about that. It's something around corruption involving the Saudis or the Chinese or. Security clearances thinks that we've heard a little bit about which are potentially major major scandals. I think could blindside them, and they haven't done the kind of prep work and could be much more politically in even legally damaging or get most in the mix of all the other scandals. Jacob parakeets. They were left to leave us. Thank you very much for joining us. Here's what else we're keeping an eye on today. The North Korean leader Kim Jong UN has overseen the testing of a new tactical guided weapon the first test since talks with the United States broke down in February. Pyongyang stays news agency did not say exactly what kind of weapon was tested, but it did describe it as a powerful warhead at least twenty nine people have died after a bus carrying mostly German tourists crashed on the Portuguese island of Madeira the bus which had been carrying fifty seven people plunged off a road before landing on a house Vancouver. Trump said that her father offered to the job as head of the World Bank. But she turned it down Donald Trump's at his daughters should run the development finance institution because she's very good with numbers. Speaking on a trip to every coast, MS Trump said she was happy with the work. She's doing as white as adviser. This is the globe list. Stay tuned. The time is eight twelve in Khartoum where Sudan's as President Omar al-bashir has been locked up in a notorious maximum security prison. Best known for detaining political prisoners during his thirty year dictatorship. He was deposed in a military coup last week, but while Sudan's new military military-led. Interim government says it will prosecute al-bashir as won't extradite him to face the charges at the international criminal court wants to press against him. Well, yes, men, I've dealt Mageed is a Sudanese Australian writer broadcaster and joins me now to Adalah. Welcome yes-men. Thank you for joining us, and for oral Beshir's political opponents. This must be a bittersweet irony of sorts that he's locked up in prison that he sent many of their like minded people to. Yeah. It certainly and quite symbolic. I think and it's oats also quite interesting. Because when the news first came out that she'd was sent to go, but a lot of people didn't believe it and lots of people like, please we need photos. We need evidence. You know, Twitter was sort of full of like when will we see this with our own eyes? And of course, one of the journalists that broke the story was like, you know, if anybody wants to go into over and take this photo, please welcome right? And so there hasn't been any photographic evidence. But it's been reported in can sort of confirmed by sources within the prison. And so I think it is interesting, but I think most symbolic than maybe something in in my view that has sort of tangible reality in the sense that. This year's military regime. Still is in place. Right. And so what was seeing I think is sort of scuffling within the the the the people at the top to position themselves, but they haven't dismantled issues regime, right? And you've got sort of the external whether it Saudi or the UAE all the Arab. Leaders around the region who have sort of supported the transitional military council and said, you know, happy with the negotiations that are going on between the military council and the what they call the coalition for freedom of change. And we won't this to go through and what happy with the civilian government having coming into you or whatever. But what it seems to me and to many I think on the streets of quantum who are still purchasing and the streets of Sudan. Mu broadly is that there isn't real deep systemic change. And so I and so move I think is one that the military council has seen as this is something that we can do to locate the protesters, and this is something that will look symbolic, but perhaps isn't necessarily going to make she'd pay really full for the crimes of the law study is at this stage other any figures within the old a'moral Bashir, kind of machinery people are saying, you know. This. This person is lining themselves up to to to beat the new president. But hand who's the head of the military, the transitional military council the moment does seem to be kind of like the one that people are most okay with his second in command. A man named who's known as him it. He is. I mean, he's they're all pieces of what? But he's certainly quite a piece of work. And he's another one who people have there's been a sort of PR campaign around him to say, you know, he's actually on the side of the people, and and someone actually you look at his track record. He was one of the worst in terms of the crimes dot four. And so on and he's the head of it was the head of what's known as our Steph the rapid service four. So I think they're all people positioning themselves, but that is quite concerning because it means that when it comes to a civilian government all these people actually going to step aside. What about the individual? And you'll have to remind me of his name who people are saying wouldn't be too bad as it were why not and what might be bad abrasion. I think generally anyone who is associated with the old regime is trouble, right, or at least has blood on the hands in some way, right because the bishou regime when on for thirty years almost two is and it didn't really leave much space for anyone who didn't agree with issues policies, or at least the sort of the Islamist direction that they took. And so I think generally whether it's the coalition of freedom and change all the SPA, the Sudanese professional association all the people in the street. Generally. I think people are saying let's not take off the bull because if we allow this, you know, military council to be transitional military council, but just the people that sort of end up staying the the nothing is really going to change. What about? What the the military government has said so far there their willingness ultimately handover to a civilian government or to facilitate the introduction of a of a civilian democratic government. Sorry. Go ahead. Tell us what they're saying the making all the right noises. Right. They sort of saying we're going to release all political prisoners that talking about they all this sort of saying, look we understand that you everyone's upset, but what we need stability right now. And I think and this is the challenge I think for the protesters the protesters at the moment is there was pot of the community. That's like, you know, what maybe this'll be. Okay. Right. Maybe we can trust these people. But I think that the people who've really driven the protests sort of saying, let's it is it is dangerous because once people get comfortable with how the way with the way things because protests are really disruptive to everyday life. Then we're going to accept this and nothing will actually change because it's also remember it's not just about power. It is about the fact that there is a dire economic situation. And so if the military council continues to hold onto power, they haven't presented any economic policies, Ernie sort of repositioning. How they're going to bring Sudan back to a position of prosperity. And then you've got the African Union threatening to revoke membership to Saddam unless civilian rulers. Restore does end. Does anyone care or listen? I mean, I thought that was quite interesting. I'm not really sure how you could revoke membership to a unit which is sort of like you. So that is very African. It's like right in the. I think it's it is definitely a symbolic move. I'm interested in the African unions attitude towards this. I mean, Uganda the president did offer to give bisciotti sort of amnesty? And so all Ugandans will hold up. You know, what's what's going on him? And so I think this definitely scuffling to see what happens to shoot as sits a president. I think across the board and to to look to these sort of aging despots. So I think it was small of the African Union to say this is the position that we wanna take because they want to position themselves on the side of the people. But I'm not sure if they actually would go ahead and do it feels monop- Tomac. Thank you very much for sharing your thoughts with us today. UBS has one nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries. Of a million hundred of the shop is maulings freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. No one this mall. The one know small. Help you contact us at UBS dot com. Nineteen minutes past the hour our series on the globalist. This week is looking at how education influences nationhood today. We're going to hear from Bosnia a country with a complicated past and present its government is divided along ethnic lines into two so called entities. There are three presidents more than a dozen prime ministers. The system is dominated by nationalists who pretty bluntly relish their divisions low. Everyone speaks the same language in many parts of Bosnia children from different different ethnic groups are educated separately. Even if sometimes it's in the same school building in the past couple of years. Some of these young people have been refusing segregation. They insist that learning together is the only way for Bosnia to move on from its past Monaco's guys Loni went back to school in the town of yet saying. Screech these children at be thirteenth of July. Primary in the town of yachts. Now the school Hsieh's building with another primary school in it's called bet coup. Shutt- the difference between the two schools is that the thirteenth of July the students arrested Crofts and a better Kucha ethnic Bosniak Muslims or this was not cheap. VS cool. What you have here is two schools under one roof. The people's are attending the same building. They learning completely different curriculums Flickr Jentzsch Jansher is the principle of the Bertha Chetta primary school or this was not cheap VS for. L primary. School follows the curriculum. The Asian is in Bosnian language. The other school teaches the Croatian language both. That the differences between both Nian Croatian Serbian Montenigrin alike. Teeny tiny that the Etymologists have looked at this decided it's the same language. So innocence is thirty thing experienced, which the children are having that is different other than maintaining this idea that the language is all different Roz. The Kasey would on some of the C stem the system as we have it now is a cancel. If you ask me that children are not taught anything except ethnic division. I'm waiting for the day when the whole system will be reconstructed and United. I say the same thing to every visitor who comes here I'm living for the day when I will be asked to leave because I was part of a divided school. And now we have a unified school. Both knee is would listener shnell anthem rings out to Mark the country's national day. But only the Bosniak children are at the celebration in they're in the minority here where Croat nationalists would rather be part of Croatia than acknowledged that citizenship of an independent country. Those attitudes extend to primary education the principle of the thirteenth of July school evil. Dan, says she wouldn't be pushing a unified classes. Thought about Krinsky she could have now I'm of the pinion that initiatives fa- change should come from a higher level then behind down to institutions to implement the decisions they've is room for improvement. But the decision has to be made at a high level on the other hand the constitution of Bosnia recognizes that we have three different people's with three different languages and the right to express choose that, cultural or ethnic identity. Any improvement would require the whole system to be reconstructed? But lately been indications that the children on into play bull with that kind of tuition. Up the hill. Yachts vocational secondary school classes weren't segregated. But the authorities had plans to split them when they learned of the scheme, the students launched a protest movement at gained international attention and eventually succeeded in faulting the segregation plan, if it's a Yukon which was one of the protests ringleaders ish was, but as though I finished the first four years of primary in the countryside. We want split that only when I came to fifth grades. Did. I realize that we're being segregated by ethnicity. And that we were taught that we with good ones. They are not while the other group was told the opposite. That's when I realized they were separating us because different what sort of problems? Do you think that Kohl's is when children of brought up and told the something different about an essence that neighbors neighboring children who should be really that playmates that fellow students bug toward? Over the night. Overturned importa the much kit that results in hatred because you're brought up being taught that others. No good. And you don't spend a single our learning about that culture belief so values since you anything about them that only results in hate almost Niger this. In addition, very often students taught to hate by the parents in their homes because parents went through the wool if taught to hate home and then end up in segregated schools. Don't know nothing, but hate. Students won prizes for their efforts and their examples being an inspiration to other protest movements across the country. But many thousands of students is still being separated on the grounds of ethnicity and the vocational schools literature teacher amyloid Cavs bash says that storing problems football's Niyaz future, I think it's really hard in divided country to think differently. And but it's really important that we. Say that educational system which is like does separately. It's not okay. To be say school to be talked to grow up together. Was very hauled to make the case facing opposition people didn't wanna children to be together to keep them split probably because of politics because it's this education. It's the bar of the like political system. So like political system created -cational eighteen but kind of student we need to have what kind of citizens I mean to have. So when we have that aim that what kind of citizens, we want to have if you have a nationalistic or state for like kind of government. It's logic that they trying to built that kind of eventing political system. It's dividing and focusing on sigo gate, sicko Gatien and discrimination and occasional system. It's part of the whole system. Quarter of a century old from the end of the conflict, the divisions in Bosnia still seem entrenched, but the school children of have shown that young people have an appetite to make a better future together. If only the educational varieties would be willing to listen for monocle in yada. I'm guide along. Thank you for for Porsche. You're listening to the will have the papers and just a moment. It is twenty seven minutes past seven here in London. We're going to continue the program now with today's newspapers joined by joy la- deco columnist with the London Evening Standard newspaper. Welcome joy. And so talking of London. Well, it's unusual place at the moment. Yes. Well, certainly many people's journeys to and from work are being disrupted by a large group of climate change protests, this particular act change process protest is capturing imaginations more than most because pretty much basically so disruptive it to also fantastic carnival. So they'll getting heavily dressed up. There's Santa clauses running around. They're all life stages with classical orchestras playing. They all. Ah bans on another stage popular bands, another stage and this huge pink ship. That has poked self in the middle of Oxford circus busiest shopping street now, it's virtual because paying ship has closed. Oxford circus DM crossing point for people in the city, and there's also been, you know, yesterday disrupted the public transport network unless the people saying, well, you know, if you won't to make a point about climate change. Why are you obstructing people using a relatively economic or environmentally friendly way to get to work. Yeah. They they went climbed on top of de law train down in canary. Will it's kind of it's creating some control Cathy as the the means that doing and that kind of weed disparate organization, so nobody's don't particular hyrog- cool. The upside of it is ocean street, which is absolute what one of the worst streets in London traffic is completely empty out the moment if you're talking about pedestrian housing for many interests are standing in the way of doing so. So this is kind of an interesting trial run. Well, the west send representatives to saying we've lost twelve twelve million in sales in few days. I will come up and down the street, Freddie, regularly on it's never been more pleasant. She thinks go shopping the paper coverage for for for us on this. Well, so the guardian has got a kind of relatively soft touch. Explanation of what's going on the minute. You go to the right wing press. Them becomes a lot more punchy saying that the mayor of London has is basically doing soft touch on these protesters wising, the police declared them from the streets and the protested themselves citing that the that he had a shed passion in which comas for that protest for that for the coils of climate change. I love them have been arrested, and there have been it's a wonderful story there about three hundred arrests all the London police cells all now full on. They all are the having shit mills wet all they just can't rest them because it's. Yeah. To hunt two hundred police turned up in parliament square lost night, and they can touch arrest anybody because I had to take them and some people kind of likening this movement to the modern sufferer jets all. Yeah. I'm not sure that's the case. Then the key movement. They come from the same routes what they're suggesting is that someday history will look back in this and say, this is a turning point. And these people were making point that nobody else was making forcefully enough. Well, hey history is going to be calling to them because very shortly. Michael g-o-v is going to be releasing his environment. Historically, you might begin to look back and say, we'll one cool. The chef go his paper what ready to have. You got for a story. Also, there's a fascinating comment piece actually in the financial times today about what's app. It's by Joan gap. Now, we know about the control around Facebook and fake news. And what Mark Zuckerberg is sutra loud to happen by reducing the amount fake news. And and using motivation on Facebook is that people are beginning to move onto that groups and sharing messages now gap ascites two things one is the anti vaccination to New York City where conspiracy theories were being pulsed around. But his big point is on India, which is coming an election is on its way and a lot of rumors of being pulsed around which, you know, fairly malign, and the basically they have now putting up posters saying shed joy north rumors as a way of trying to control this this top themselves or doing somebody Indian television governments and the the point about what's sap is that it is encrypted in a way that Facebook is not and they actually get into these what's up groups to find out what's going on. They can't block them. Gap comes up with interesting. The other way of doing way the way we chat does it in China, which is it's not cryptic and for the social census work. So when it comes to the debate surrounding social media, and there is a very vigorous vase of the responsibility of the likes of of Facebook on the Facebook owns what's up while things on Facebook things that are written on Facebook and publish there are public and they're for the world's to see in there. They are affectively to my mind, anyway, a publisher they hate that term. Correct. Comes to what's up. It's it's it's private it might be shared amongst, you know, a big group of people, but it is affecting private messaging. It is but because the groups all two hundred and fifty six. Yeah. Quebec says is like a living room than a public forum. Six people. Money. Is that you can't actually move around so much there enough. What's up counts? Now that are kind of essentially replicating messages in a number of these groups that it becomes a full himself. What else have you got? I well, this wonderful routers, blown up in the UK over a letter Prince Charles written, which also shambles Hewlett president. And it's a let you sympathy about Notre dome. But what has happened is he's in some spellings or his spellcheck is pop Johnson spendings, which Americanization English. Extrordinary? So realize is spelt, we we would spoil Americans we call it, z z and civilization. I see and. The the British public which holds its language. Very dear has risen not as much as the French when I say, much French and they've risen up complaining, bitterly, how can future king possibly be debasing English language here? Now, you would expect the future came to speak with or to write with a British English. Well as verse history point out, and this is where you get pedants over the place. It's in fact, the is it E form has been in use in English spelling since the fifteenth century, and it's one of the things that the America when when you transporter language as we did two when the settlers went to America, it they tend to hold onto old spellings, and in fact, all the newest spelling color in the fifteenth century. I'm going to have to check that full you. Thank you joining dak-. Thank you very much. Still ahead on our program is space the final frontier for advertising next, though, we're going to Paris on the debate about how to restore the Notre Dame. You're listening to the globalist. UBS global financial services from with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of people. We bring fresh thinking and perspective to our work. And we know that it takes marriage of intelligence and haunt to create lasting value for Clinton's. It's about having the right ideas, of course. But it was time about having one of the most accomplish systems and unrivaled network of global experts. That's why at ABS we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference. Tune in weekly to the bulletin with UBS, bro. The latest insights and opinions from UBS and experts from around the world. You'll Bank with the globalist monocle twenty four. I'm tigon rice. The time is eight thirty six in Paris, which is continuing to mourn, the devastation of the Notre Dame cathedral in a fire on Monday. But the government is moving swiftly to advance its restoration, the prime minister at wad Felipe has an answer international architecture competition to rebuild the cathedral spire, which collapsed, of course, because of the fire while the cathedral dates back to the middle of the twelfth century. The spire had only been adage during restoration work in the eighteen hundreds. The prime minister said the competition would ask whether the spire should be recreation or perhaps simply reimagined Alan Dunlop is a fellow at the Royal incorporation of architects in Scotland and joins me now. Welcome Alan what your instincts say rebuild it as it was or try something new. The major philosophical be good morning by the major philosophical debate. It's to do with what considered to be the author Tissot when you make something remake something change. It have to admire the align and the embellishing of the both French president on the prime minister embarking upon major program restoration Bill but appear the five years, and you know, international competition to to redesign the spy on KOMO about will be a significant debate which involve all the conservationists and the architects all over the world where this should be a new thing or whether it should be something, which is a replica veal built in eighteen fifty food. Is you see it is an impressive that. So soon after the fire what is it now lessons less than three day three full days since it broke out. We've already had this competition announced and maybe by the the very holding of this competition. It does sound as if the French government is keen for. Something new obsolete remarkable. I mean, the north rhythm is for me the physical manifestation of French history. And she had at the coach into a nine. So quickly afterwards that they're going to hold on in national competition that potentially could see something you in such DeMarco and symbolic building is quite astonishing. And I applaud them vision of French, but the left themselves to be can a horse the fortune to to see the rebuild it in five years. I mean, most they expect some in the world sale take much longer than that. So so, but, you know, good luck to them and say that invasion ally, and has to be a applauded so one about the, you know, the decision about whether to recreate his as it was to do something new. I mean, I do remember watching the coverage on Monday nights and hearing about the spire collapsing, and then being almost degree somewhat comforted. By the fact, that the spire was an addition in the eighteen hundreds obviously predates most of the. Things that we see around us every day, but still not as old as the rest of the cathedral itself. What it does not even in and of itself? The fact that it was a late addition add to the argument that actually when replacing it we should do something, perhaps even more contemporary. I condone up in on the point of view that when we have a situation like that you should do something attempted something us something that presents forward thinking country. We have a similar debate going on in Scotland instruction of the Mackintosh building reaction to the street afterwards was we have to recreate replicate. But by been stunned anything else, I was only one of the few people that said, we should build something you rather contradictory. I thought that you know, such was a symbolic nature of Notre Dom that they would have to build an to replicate exactly as it was. But you know to my amazement KOMO right away. And that even considering no that they should build hop. Something new and the president said we're going. To rebuild it and rebuild even beautifully. So that's that's as I say plaud- embellishing that align than if spot, frankly, they go ahead, and many people pointing even to something the architect of the spire rose himself one Violette leg who talked about the importance of being contemporary enough being recreating the past. But I suppose given the outpouring of grief over the the fire a could be understandable that perhaps some Parisians might clamor for for the past well up -solutely say it will be a major philosophical Christian considering, you know, the important doing something new and insufficient and. Do. Allen. We haven't got much time left. But just a thought on how do you do that? Because suppose, what some people will be worried about is some kind of you know, you know, modern spike just simply PO PO poking of this after the Notre Dom, how'd you do it in a way that sympathetic? Well, the Frances some architects, cuddly defend shark, h of the major high the moment simply architect, somebody conservationist and buttons doc takes the world. I'm sure that spike will be the last thing that the fringe people would actually say, I'm sure that are ways that you can do contemporary tipped Asian, but still have it sympathetic and complementary to their general structure, and that's what the competition is done of the Royal incorporation of architects Scotland, thank you very much for joining us today. Forty two minutes past the hour. And it's time now to talk business news, I'm joined on the line by the financial analysts. Louise Cooper, welcome Lewis to the program, and so Amazon having conquered the world is giving up on China. Yes. So they said to voices yesterday that it's going to show close. It's online store now it's not giving up on other things like selling cloud services like selling the kindle, but in terms of Chinese Baya's buying stuff from some Chinese Sella's. It's cutting that service, and the reason why is the entrenched Chinese competition, Alibaba and JD dot com. The two Chinese companies that do huge amounts on the internet. But particularly do this little Amazon role in China control, eighty two percent of the Chinese e commerce market. So this is a feature of the internet in China that is dominated by Chinese businesses. So I mean, I'm as did actually try to conquer China. They made an acquisition over Chinese online shopping website in two thousand four for seventy five million. But that kind of giving up now. Now. Clearly, this was slightly good news for Alibaba and JD comb, but to be honest that you know, they also dominant the Amazon is pretty much giving up. They don't compete. They can't ship things as false. The warehouses on is big. You know, they it's a question of being Kony's scale. And if you're the big massive operator this massive advantages to that. So just highlights that China is set for internet. Mulkey all by itself, remarkable stuff. Let's stay in the tech space now until about Pinterest do Jews Pinterest threes. No, I love the way they call it Pinterest. If you don't know what it is. I mean, they call it. A put tippety tool for planning dreams. It's kind of like a digital pin board where you look you can let load up load of pictures, and in a way, it's quite interesting because most people use Pinterest use it because they won't to buy something. So my colleague at the BBC was like he's doing his house. And he said that his Pinterest digital pinball is full of pictures of plug sockets, for example, currently in the market to buy plug sockets. So that should make really attractive advertisers. And it does Pinterest is floating today. A believe on the new York Stock Exchange it's being valued at ten billion dollars. Never made a profit. Of course, it's one of these Unical anyway. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Who cares? Who cares? To be. It's quite funny 'cause they did actually say in the statement that to quote, it expects to operating losses in the future and may never achieve or maintain villa? Taylor. Can't can you let that can you help me with this? Louise, sold out recently similar statement coming out of out of Uber as they're planning their IPO. They they said management or Shahi said that the company might never be profitable. And that kind of set off alarm bells in my head. It's gonna hang on. What's the point? Then oh, you're so old fashioned off. So fast. But isn't the pros, and ultimately they'll own the world, and they'll you know, they'll they'll be huge money-making machine. But if you look Amazon why everybody if you go back ten fifteen years ago, everybody criticized Amazon for never making profit Amazon said it's we're gonna which is first book seller. When it going into these other products. Oh, my God, you cannot take Amazon now and also there are legal Gatien's other thing about a flotation documents is there are legal obligations. They almost have to say this, otherwise they could be suited insurance policy. Okay. And the extreme thing though, about Pinterest is that it said the original price range was fifteen dollars to seventeen dollars it selling shares nineteen dollars. Now that tells you there was huge damone for this stock for global investors. But not only that the most recent unicorn IPO was left. We spoke about it on this program. It shares a fallen twenty two percent in the last month since it flotation. So despite Lucic Shetlands money on lift, no, one cares. They won't the next Unical dream bizarre. Let's talk about older fashioned stuff now at Germany Europe's biggest economy not growing as much as had been expected this year. So this is really ugly year ago. The government full cost the German economy would grow to. Point one percent in twenty nineteen. They've now slashed their full costs suggest point five percent growth. I mean, it's belly growing tool. Not only that apart from Italy. It's the slowest growing region country in the EU, and it's old you to the manufacturing slump. Germany is the manufacturing economy of the EU? We know the car industry is have a terrible time events pretty bad car industry figures out overnight. So the very depend on the common street. They have very -ceptable to problems in global trade. And you know, we've talked about the Chinese US trade will many many many times and by the way this. Nope. Point five percent growth narrow expected this year. And it could even could even be be nothing because the risks of definitely on the downside. This is the weakest GDP figure for something like six years, and it could even go into recession very narrowly avoided recession. Bye bye. Very narrowly avoided those two quarters of negative GDP know, a good thing, given the German economy, Germany is the check writer for Europe in terms of bailing other countries out, and they must be eyeing things. Like Uber with suspicion if they're so dependent on the gar industry. Oh, and by the way, Trump is coming after the you in terms of trade will he started with China? He's gonna move onto the EU. I'm particularly the car industry of the common street in his sight as the Germans point at the biggest EM doubly factories in the United States. Lesson deed. Let's finish up briefly by talking about Venezuela, which is come at the top of very unfortunate league. Yeah. This is Bloomberg most miserable economy globally, most MS we shouldn't really laugh about it. Because onto Neath east assistants is real poverty deprivation on the streets of Venezuela. I mean, it's Venezuela. Either the great socialist experiment failed entirely lauded by the far left in the UK is a great way to run into comic. Clearly, not the Venezuelan government hasn't published any economic data since twenty sixteen. That's how bad it is. Bloomberg estimate. The Venezuelan inflation something like eight million percent, this this survey does is look unemployment and inflation. So high unemployment means you've got money to survive high. Inflation means even if you get some money to survive the punch pow that money disappeared these the two things that calls deep. Misery amongst populations high point high inflation Venezuela, talk to less that it's Argentine than it South Africa in the most happy places to live in terms of unemployment and inflation, Thailand, Switzerland and Japan no-show about Japan. It's almost deflation because the economy has grown for so many years most place, though, pretty children Cooper. Thank you very much for joining us. You're listening to the global so monocle twenty four. Time now for a toll story in the American west coast city of Portland, the coin centers guy scraper is an art deco icon on the skyline. But it wasn't always so admired. Here's Monaco's Carlotta Rabelo. Right across from the Hong Kong bridge in downtown Portland. Lies one of the most recognizable buildings of the city skyline. The coin center built in nineteen Eighty-four coin centers home to restaurants office spaces and apartments, alike, and due to scale occupying an entire city block. It's almost as h side of the building has a life of its own. To one side fund the entrance to the residential area to the other a plaza and turn a corner new find fountain. From its inception. The coin center was all about the importance of public space, and how to blur the lines that separate the different lives and folding in each floor from a distance it immediately stands out due to its pyramid like talk, and it's orange brick facade dotted with white limestone at the base reminiscent of the art deco style skyscrapers from the early nineteen twenty s this modernist construction towers over the adjacent streets. It was named fountain plaza originally, but it quickly were off with people calling it coin center instead after one of its biggest tenants the television network of the same name that occupies the basement with studios and the upper floors with offices taking full advantage of the building's architecture. The blue spire at the top of the tower is used to house the tennis and all other necessary Queant used for broadcasting. For nearly twenty years. It was also home to the six green coin centers cinema until its closure in two thousand and four. But this wouldn't be a story worth telling. But that a bit of control rec- in the mix when it was being built the coin center face some position not because of its thirty five floors, or even it's they statics, but rather the location you see if the wreck blocks the view of Oregon's icon ick. Mt hood, which had been welcoming drivers heading eastbound from Portland for decades. Nonetheless, the project went ahead and today, though, spillage views are reserved for the owners of the Penthouse's on the top floors looking back at the coin center today, my not seem revolutionary, but at the time of its construction. This was Portland's own experiment in mixed use buildings and how to strike that ideal balance. And while we're not saying this was the perfect formula. It was a volleyed attempt that has to the test of time. Thanks to Carlotta Rabelo for that report. You can hear more toll stories by listening to the urban est. Our weekly show on city living undesired, you're listening to the globalist. It's fifty two minutes past the hour. We end today's program in outer space, the final frontier of humanity who so far haven't brought advertising with them until now perhaps a Russian company by the name of start rocket has conceived of a way to launch glowing billboards in the night sky, and the soft drinks maker, Pepsi did a plan to be the first brand beamed onto the stars. But it seems it would have been a giant leap too far. Partly was just an experiment. The technology is there though, start rocket plans to launch collection of small light emitting satellites called cubesats, which can be precisely controlled and connected together. In low orbits to spend at names create shapes. All it needs is someone to buy. This unique ad space Joan grant, as a brand consultant to interesting is worked for Coca-Cola among others at John welcome to the program when you think about the the dilemma that Pepsi had actually whether to proceed with this experiment. In you understand why they why they might have held off hilarious PR disaster. Because the the American said that they had no plans to do this the Russians then confirmed to the magazine that was investigating this that they were planning to do. And then the American spokesman said that must have been language difficulties. Probably was shouting. I think the issue here is cut official pollution, would you like a poster in the middle of anything more horrible than than an ad in the sky that the warriors I think what in the sky be fine. But they need to look out five years later, and it was like Times Square and actually in America read on spice dot coms website. It would actually be legal to launch a commercial investment spice that you could see without a telescope with you know, those regulations Cleveland apply in Russia. But it looks like another Pepsi peo- coal because they basically about public pressure. Not to do. I mean is there any danger that were props over sensationalizing wh-what? They would have been because. I suppose, you know, there are ads in the sky the planes, go up and drag, you know, ads for generally tacky things over holiday resorts that I'm thinking of right now. I mean, would this are you gonna clear on what this actually would have looked like or is it just, you know? A collection of no. One hundred percent show. But it looks like they spell out your logo and lights in the skies, be points of light. But like don't display or something like that. Yeah. Time to imagine. It would probably not can they haven't raised the money to to do this yet. But somebody at some point, we'll do this shuttle, and you know, is it the case advertising is becoming more more pervasive omnipresence or is that just people's imagination. I think probably is if you look at the surface area of there's a lot of stuff at the moment about this just way too much appetizing you'll social media and last week lush pulled outs of using that full. Move invasive appetizing to constantly have those little videos popping up of looking for Cam Cameron's, recently, kennel move and digital media full. There is a sense that perhaps you'll sing more of that. Because it also people spending more screens the online world, though, I suppose I'm thinking of the real world. Now, I remember covering story. I good for years ago now about traverse and in my hometown of Dublin where people were spray using a stencil and getting a, you know, a power hose, spray painting, an add onto the dirty footpath, and you know, just cleaning up the relevant bits. And it was it was controversial. And I can see why because they didn't pay for that footpath wanna see an item my path. Probably Domino's actually did a benign version of that. They did Domino's brands at pothole covering in a couple of America said that they said so that that that libary people could get to you quick it was like a public. I think it's too much Brunswick. But the trouble is if you'll sitting there is a brand marketing person trying to get your Brandon fronts of people the such a lot of competition for attention that people will continue to insane stunts, whether it's in space will side. Well, we talk about space, and the is it doesn't have a great huge footfall. There's not many. But obviously, this this particular not the first time people have talked about advertising in space. Coca cola. We're trying to do something. The late nineties projects on the moon. In fact, the thirst astronauts, including puzzled red went into spice, wearing omega speed mouse to watches and competitive was both trying to astronaut spice guns it kinda fest nights. People doesn't it look at the number of movies says in space and so forth, so prince bound to try, and so the Muslim increasingly and as has been evidence that kind of lack of investment space programs. I think we're somewhat less interested in space these days, and we would have been into the funniest story recently has been malls one, which is a Dutch reality show. Which is costing for people to go on a one way trip to Mars an incredible things have full two hundred what space expert described as a suicide mission? Covered ly- the currently doing intensive selection in the last hundred. I mean, they're not to go for ten years. But it's people who've just had enough to go. If you people are letting nominate. Russia. Or North Korea ramps Jong ground. Thank you very much for coming on and sharing with all to the day that brings globalist. Tune in for today was produced by August much. Larry cons carl-otto Rabelo researched by patrons and trust them are fully and studio managed by Christie Evans editing help from Jack jurors after the news headlines. Landau Augusta Sheku is in this chair with music on the continental shift on this more current affairs. Coming your way in just over four hours time when the briefing goes on air that's live at midday. If you're listening in London the globalist will be back at the same time tomorrow. But for now from me tigon rational of today's globalist team, it's goodbye. And thank you very much for tuning in.

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Opiods: five words that will save lives; plus Andrew Bailey is new Bank of England Governor

The Leader

15:20 min | 1 year ago

Opiods: five words that will save lives; plus Andrew Bailey is new Bank of England Governor

"This is episode sixty of the leader. We've been publishing on news analysis and commentary every weekday at four. PM for the last three months and we will be back after the Christmas break. In the meantime tell us what you think on social media and use the Hashtag the leader podcast tells what you like and what you don't and of course subscribe through. Your favorite podcast provider gives a rating to now from the Evening Standard in London. This is the leader. Arenas arena. Hi I'm David. Malzahn addiction warnings will start appearing on opioid painkiller packets in the UK as a direct result of an evening standard investigation contains. A poet can cause addiction five. Simple words this little box. It is part of an awesome of weaponry that that can head off the problem or investigations editor. David Cohen talks to the leader. Roberta's struggled to get regulators and drug companies to make a change that will save lives. Also I'm delighted to announce that the next governor of the Bank of England. We'll be Andrew Bay Chancellor Sergey Javed's named and Andrew Bailey is the next governor of the Bank of England. We asked the Standards Business News editor Alex Lawson. If it's a good choice art taken from the Evening Standard's editorial column. This is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper ahead to Standard Duck Kota UK slash comment in a moment. The five words. We'll save countless lives. And how the evening standard put them there. It took me about two weeks addicted moving year and a half lost everything my family businesses. I my friends kept saying I was going to stop into into stop. 'cause you open the last year. Philip hopwood spoke to the Evening Standard about an opioid addiction. That cost him a six figure salary his home and his family it it started when he was given morphine in hospital after a burst appendix soon he was picking up his drugs from a dealer on Oxford Circus. I wanted to just stop taking because I realize become an ethics so I wanted to stop so I just stopped and I'll go really severe withdrawal symptoms within twenty four hours. So so it's shaking Insomnia anxiety panic attacks and near near stages so I had to get some more the evening. Standard's investigation led by David. Cohen revealed an unpublicized enormous. This and growing problem with opioid addiction in the United Kingdom it also identified one small change. That could help and addiction warning on packets more than a year later. That's what's happening. An editorial column is welcoming it. The appearance for the first time on OPIOID packets of warning messages essages stating contains OPIOID can cause addiction. Is a lifesaving change that will have lasting benefits for decades to come. It is the wonderful step forward for which the regulators concern should be congratulated and a great victory for this newspaper which has played a game changing role in securing the reform we revealed in March twentieth eighteen. How the pills manufacturers were failing to tell us about the full extent of the danger range? They posed even though the same drugs were required to carry such messages in the US. The first packs with the new message finally starting in to appear in chemists. We are delighted and proud that our efforts have helped chief such a valuable advance while investigations editor. David Cohen is here to talk about his work. David what's been achieved. You Sir addiction warnings have begun to appear on the front of prescription opioid packs dispensed the high street for the first time And this will be arriving at pharmacies in time for Christmas. So these five words contains Hanes opioid can cause addiction are now in place directly as a result of our game changing twenty eighteen investigation which we called the opioid timebomb. I'm interested in. Why took an investigation by the evening standard to make this happen because these these five was the very simple? Don't take a lot of space the appear on packets in America. Why the reluctance here in the UK? Hey in America the same drugs the same highly addictive purchase opioids have addiction. Shen warnings on the box. They called black box warnings and in this country as we pointed out tonight investigation. None of the boxes of the most potent to prescription opioids had any mention of the addictive nature of these drugs. So the Dick of potential of these drugs on the box and and when we first approached the regulator they were resistant. They said no they were very happy with how things were. But after article in the pressure Investigation to their credit. They immediately responded. Set up an expert working group. Who deliberated for about nine months get getting adding all the evidence and then basically decided that they agreed with the Evening Standard and setting process a system whereby the pharmaceutical companies were asked to change the labeling it was done on a voluntary basis all the pharmaceutical companies? He's greed said no sanctions to be imposed and they will ask within three months of agreement to make the changes and these. These new PEX are now beginning to hit the high street. Not all at once they will hit it not all at once because different manufacturers is have different manufacturing schedules. There is another issue in the these. Painkillers is being given to people who don't need them are we. Are we prescribing to manny. Well that's that was the context of this investigation. We revealed that they had been an eighty percent. Increase in prescription opioids in the UK in the lost ten years and about twenty. Three million prescriptions were being issued and our research and the scientific evidence was showing that in ninety percent of cases. These drugs were entirely useless. They were no better than a hot water bottle than placebo. People get onto these drugs and then they thought if they don't work. They upped the dose and they upped the dose more and that is the the the problem though a high profile cases of people dying following Painkiller Addiction. So it's a genuine serious and very large problem Absolutely absolutely over two hundred thousand people killed in the US and we have to be smart. We have to avoid that here and that is why Matt Hancock. The Health Secretary has gone on the record today praising our campaign praising our investigation and saying he absolutely insists on these worn can these these Addiction warnings being prominently displayed on prescription painkillers prominently displayed eight. But you know not taking up a massive amount of space not a really long sentence and yet it likely will save lives. I hope so. I think that it's one of the things that I'm most proud of in the ten years of investigations. I've done on the evening standard. These five simple words. This little box is something which I tell. My children is a legacy of the investigative work that we have done and I really think that it is part of an awful a weaponry that can head off the problem and save lives next as from Leicester is a Westbrook Xiaobin Fan and West Brom Riding High League championships over hoping to bring some of that points as the financial markets are business news editor. Alex Lawson looks at the career of Andrew Bailey including why the next governor of the Bank of England is known as the the big sexy title. Andrew Bailey has been announced as the next governor of the Bank of England. He's currently the head of the Financial Conduct Authority and has has been chosen over a wide field of speculated candidates including the Deputy Governor Dana New Shafique and chairwoman of Sandton dear Baroness Strategic Darrow but announcing announcing the decision at Westminster Chancellor's Sanjay Javid said. Mr Bailey was the clear frontrunner when we don't this process. We said that we were looking king for a leader of international standing with expertise across monetary economic and regulatory policy and in Andrew Bailey. We have found just that. Here's what the standard things. The next governor of the Bank of England Andrew Bailey would be the first nice to say that unlike current governor mark. Carney he is not a rock star of the central banking world nor does his appointment as a middle aged white man and break any glass ceilings. But that doesn't matter for he. Is that even more important thing a dedicated public servant with good judgement with a lifetime in and around the Bank of England. Mr Bailey proved his mettle as a steady hand in the heat of the financial crisis when Mr Bailey was asked to become head of the FCA towards the end of two thousand fifteen. He didn't really want the job he knew he was taking a risk with his career. In taking on such such a noisy difficult rolled bought he was told directly that his country needed him and so he did his duty he only asked for one thing in return that he considered a candidate for the next governor of the Bank of England then chancellor promised that he would be to chancellor insulator that promise has been more than made good we welcome Bailey of the Bank Business Business News editor Alex Lawson here. Alex who is Andrew Bailey so Andrew Bailey is currently the executive of the Financial Conduct Authority. The city watchdog His name has long been in the frame for this job. Feels like a lifetime that we've been waiting for the announcement of Marconi's successor. The decision decision has been delayed and delayed because of that word Brexit And now we finally have that clarity that everyone seems to hopeful these days. We were expecting to Stepped down on January thirty first Brexit Day as it may be that will now take place in March time for the handover and of course vacancy at the top of the CIA well but needs to be filled on government will be involved in that decision. Bailey himself. He's a bank. Lifeway joined the Bank of England in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. He knows it inside out. The Bank of England is of course this buying overseas All the magazine. UK In steps in when this Things like the the northern rock crisis and of course. SS interest rates Bailey as assays is from Lester is West Bromwich Album Fan West Brom riding behind the league championship Soviet hoping to bring some of that buoyancies of the financial markets. But yeah. He's very much seen as a safe pair of hands in this process. That Taylor has been interesting at times as the bank looks potentially two points of woman but instead in the end selected. Bailey is a safe pair of hands. What is needed? We're heading into some fairly uncharted waters with with brexit. Well is interesting. Because we see so much so much fireworks out of Westminster but really Bailey's going offset that we saw I with deployment of Mark Carney a different breed of governor and international what's called a rockstar central banker and there are a few of them around around the world but Bailey is a more low profile kind of person and but nonetheless is seen as a sort of fat empire in the city The people like he's also also got this nickname of the big sexy turtle which was handed to him by Marconi and he will need a thick skin into this job. He's the only thing thing that run up to his candidacy that might perfected him. was a couple of scandals in the city over the last year namely the London capsule and finance. Ask another. We've led on on in the paper and also that near would blow up in his fund bally's handling of those two has been questioned. What's Mark Carney's legacy heading off if they're heading off to do whatever it is you do when you leave the Bank of England? What's even behind? Yes what mark did next will be an interesting one to look out for. Lots of speculation. Asian around that already Connie his legacy is really about modernizing the bank. This is a centuries old institution This dealing with a market. That's changing rapidly. We're seeing the rise of things like crypto currencies and different ways of lending and the bank has to be agile and keep up with that and he's been at the forefront of dealing with that he's also been very very clump things like climate change Personal Passion of his which has been interesting area for the bank to step into once more part of his legacies? This nickname that he earned himself The unreliable boyfriend this was to do with his introduction of forward guidance hadn't sown interest rates. It would seem that he was setting out the bank's forecast And then having to revise them all the time To the point where people getting annoyed by that one. The things that Bailey needs to deal with is is giving a bit more cloudy tomorrow. On where interest rates are heading. And that's the leader triads. Atta Morning News Bulletins through your smart speaker just ask for the news from the Evening Standard and subscribe to this podcast through your podcast provider to make sure you don't miss an episode. We're he every weekday at four P._M..

Andrew Bailey Evening Standard Bank of England United Kingdom David Cohen editor Alex Lawson Chancellor Mark Carney US Financial Conduct Authority London Arenas arena Roberta news editor America
The history we don't hear about  Colin Grant

VINTAGE Podcast

29:18 min | 1 year ago

The history we don't hear about Colin Grant

"I thought began to re revisit. Some of the stories we're kind of administering but some of the stores were not familiar. But as I heard the store again and again from these elderly people who are now in the eighty s and ninety s had in mind. I was on the antiques road. Show and that's what I was hearing these jewels or this precious antiques zeke's that not been bad for many many years. They've been stored away in Culbertson People's minds. I never had pat form and I was going to be asking Dustin down and revealed them to the reading public. Hello and welcome back back to the vintage podcast with me liens today on the show who really excited to be welcoming. Colin grant TVs. GTO Colin is the author of the new book book called Homecoming Draws over hundred firsthand interviews archival records and memoirs by women and men came to Britain from the West indies between late nineteen nineteen forty s and the early nineteen sixties. We have from nurses in Manchester bus drivers in Bristol. SEAMSTRESSES in Birmingham teaches in Croydon. Dockers is in Cardiff interracial lovers in Hiwickum and the Carnival Queens in lead seventy years after the arrival of ships such as the Wind Rush Colin grant very very skillfully draws all these stories together in these incredible Generation of Pioneers Shah. That lives I wanted to hear a little Obama called in about how one goes about a huge like that and how he found the experience of writing homecoming. Thank you so much for joining us today on the vintage. podcast how we very. Well thank you out ten. How would you say it's a steady eight so I gave you want to get on so homecoming is such an incredible book? And it's already having an incredible impact. I really enjoyed hearing all the different things and actually I listened to the audio book. I know that a lot of our listeners. Love audiobooks listening forecast. Say The audiobook. Because they're really interesting experience to hear the voices as well Tennyson it will a- and about your the thinking behind the book when when I can concept came into your head and what it was like an his first stages of planning a few years ago I wrote a memoir about growing gluten with my Jamaican parents called bad guy at the wheel. By guys. My father's nickname his Jamaican can. He had baggy is an all of his friends equally. Funny Nicknames that define them and they adhere to whether they liked the name or not so there was one man called old shine. Who was bowled? Like me anxious was very anxious. Tidy boosters very fussy but his footwear clock had one arm longer than the other. My favorite was manacled somewhere. And when somewhere came to this country from Jamaica in one thousand nine hundred system light summer suits tropical suits the matter. The weather weather come halo storm and when I thought about writing this book ask my mom. Whatever became of somewhere and she said well he caught a cold and died within a few months and I was shocked by that straightway which she spoke to sit in very matter of fact way had an edge to it but also it was quite a funny and I remember that when asked let's grapple loosened in the sixties all? The people were really really funny. There were like in my mind. CAST members of guys and dolls the Damon Runyon and they were all of my figures. We had no television until nineteen seventy two but they were television and what. I finished that Book Burger at the wheel about six seven years ago now I was wanted to continue it and away. The beginning of homecoming was a continuation of that story story but equally there were books. I read as a young man about Caribbean people in this country especially a book by Sam Cell Phone. Call the Lonely Londoners which is a book about a man called Moses who is kind of meet and greeter. So Kirby America's Dan to Waterloo station or Paddington and greets this carbon pioneers come off the boat train and equally. They have Wonderful characters wonderful names as a character. Awesome Galahad is rather light my car somewhere and when I finished up I wanted to myself. Well what would what would become of those people from the nineteen fifties and sixties if they were still alive today and what were their stories. What was the story of their great pioneer migration to prison? And although there have been books about that I don't think anyone's really interrogated the individual stories. And what you get with this book which is kind of oral history is a kind of an accumulation of similar stories and by that accumulation. You realize there was a bigger truth because sometimes when you hear stories you think that's just a one off when you hear again again again and you realize the experiences and I wanted to to have that kind of course onus in this kind of chorus line because right the way through But also the kind of gives you some of the shape and the contours of their lives from six to the present day and the people that you you chase to feed the book is e. Say An instruction that you you kind of chose intention eaten interview more women than men. 'cause you know those stories are represented. And and also more Chinese these people than Jamaican tell us parents Jamaican and three quarters of the migrants came from the Caribbean were Jamaican. But I right now. The Jamaicans take up too much room in the culture. The make too much noise have to credit opinion on themselves and they're over represented in our culture in terms of books books films music and sometimes they're kind of eclipsed some of the other islanders so I was very keen to address that so if that into more from Guyana kits and I was interested to find out why people ended up in certain parts of the country. So if you're from Saint Kitts you end up open leads. If you're from Saint Vincent in Hiwickum if it from Trinidad you end up in North Hampton and I think we want to these areas because they they were pay people were or their friends and associates broke. Equally is very keen to complicate the story because many of us will see those photographs photographs of the wind rush generation. The wind rush people coming off that ship. Ninety forty eight and the kind of I chronic now these men in Fidora's and zoot suits behind. You ever see any women in this girls but on that ship is often said from the beginning of that story. That now was that the five hundred Jamaican men. That's not true. There are other islands on that ship and the two hundred women on the ship including a woman called Mona. Baptiste's this wonderful jazz singer so I wanted to tell this story but also I wanted to use them to complicate the stories because the women were actually much more generous with their antidotes. Does that much more prepared to interrogate the interior lives and live longer but also in all honesty but I went to interview them. They're prepared to feed me saying that being you played this game I think three hours and the men wouldn't think to feed me and I'll be the on the floor gasping for water a little bit of bread but women would feed me straight away and actually what was interesting to me. I thought began to re revisit. Some of the stories. We're kind of finishing but some of the stores were not familiar. But I heard this story again and again from these elderly people who are now in the eighty s and ninety s had remind. I was on the antiques roadshow. And that what I was hearing were these jewels or this precious antiques. That not been added it for many many years. They've been stored away in cupboards in people's minds and never had a pap form and as an dustin down and reveal them to the reading public because to me they are wonderful rich funny cide. Moving polemical sometimes Philosophical stories that. Give a real sense of the panoply of of of of carbon life in this country. Because I think sometimes sometimes we have very reduced idea about the carribean presence in all honesty. If you look in terms of the archive in film and Television News Pretty Negative and right from the word go. It was pretty negative. People talk about the hostile environment. That Theresa May introduced in two thousand twelve but in my research it was not a new venture. She was very from the very beginning. And I. It's what I was interviewing a lot of these people who are in their eighties nineties to some of the archive of this month. Lockup in the British library the BBC See San Marcos in the BBC people around Archives let the deejay Don Letts had done lots of news twenty years ago. He's archive you've but also I would to my hometown is Brighton. Went to Sussex University where the Mass Observation Archive is held old and in nineteen thirty nine mass version which is so socialist research tool wanting to discover how people live. That was the whole idea of massive station Tau to working people live. What do they do with their money? How they use this time they still go to church too? They gamble. How do they make love but not at thirty? Nine maps vision decided to do a survey about black people. What did people in this country? Think about so-called Negroes in nineteen thirty nine and it wasn't very flattering it was pretty obnoxious really And I wanted to give a sense of what this carbon people who come into because in their minds I say this is true was everybody I spoke. They were a British. I'd even my mom for the book my Mom's from Jamaica and when she was growing up making the nineteen forties she knew how to fold the union flag flag. She could site keats. Shelley Wordsworth automatic pope's by Roach. She knew them all didn't need any book to repeat this poems and she told me that when she went to the cinema the reality cinema and Kingston in one thousand nine hundred dollars at the beginning of the screening of a film people. Stand up to sing the British national anthem and at the end of the screening people. Stand up to sting the British national anthem and I interviewed amount from Guyana. Who told me that when he came to this country went to the cinema and at the end of the film he stood up and such and he was amazing Nubia standing? He was really perplexed by that. So the sense of why they felt Brigitta. So what idea of Britain coming to see if they'd had it had access to these archives from from muscles version. They might have been a bit perturbed but what was interesting also. Is that the British. Sometimes they produce these booklets which they sent out to the Caribbean to give people an idea about what to expect. So there's one booklet produced by the BBC called going to Britain question. Mark as a small pamphlet is western some idea about Codes behavior so if I was to say to nineteen forties forties as an English person and you How do you do? What did you think MSA very? Well thank you you say days how do you do okay. And if you saw a group of people standing behind the other in a line in a shop that is a Q.. You and your place in this case is letter. Zet the back of the queue because there wasn't much adhesion at adherence to queuing in the copied. It kind of vignettes. Were interesting to me to kind of paint a picture about the the the the rather ordered society perhaps Apps stoltifying society that they were coming to and I think it's important because I I it's not something that we see on the British curriculum for children. It's not something that they grow up. Learning learning about an especially for white kids is something I think every missing. I'm you growing up. He said the You you felt you had to prepare a kind of a sentence since to explain If people asked you you'll race and you said British by birth Jamaican by waylon inclination and Bagai wasn't he wasn't on board with that over a million and if that's evolved clever little sentence I devised to myself talk so often. I thought rather winning sentence if a bad guy. My father overheard me saying that I would say to friends he would berate me say. Stop Talk Tripe your body right here. Yeah I am British. Don't let the man take you for food. So he had a very strong notion that he was British British his possible bore the stamp right of abode. And he's very proud of that and but I did. Have this difference about what I was. I think a lot of people of my generation Gratien did because our parents from the Caribbean and off-the-wall really weren't really welcome here. And there's always this temporary state in which you live if this notion that you might go back. You mentioned in the about not in packaged changing the wallpapers identity. Stay well yeah because the muscle is this mythic five year plan. We'll stay here in Jamaica ponds and say you come and you work some money. Which means you save prosper and in five years you're going to get back but five years becomes ten ten becomes fifteen and before you know one day as we did we work up? We saw parents exchange in the wallpaper. And then you know you are here to stay so almost in respect of my parents. I say I'm British Came to me fairly late though because I remember when I was nineteen I went to Jamaica by myself for the first time. Ever very thrilled and excited. What about the prospect? And had that phrase in my mind about being British by birth Jamaican by will and inclination and those in my the way that my Caribbean parents friends walked and my father is Lavi walked with just faster than slow and is very cool and I thought so. Cool to be Caribbean person. That walk so I'm in Jamaica in nineteen I every morning I get up and go to the market In Kingston the capital and as I go to the mark. I'm I pastas vendor every day and every day shot to be hey man hinge man Englishman I and I kind of ignore him. And by the fifth day I got to mess. Am So what made you think English and he says well you walk like an Englishman and I realize the I am English was born here and actually everything that shaped me a puff. My parents has been a product of being in England in Britain so in in order of my parents I I I you know a very valid Kind of observation. Can you make as well as the the very recently we we do associate the woodwind rush with the word scandal. And how how did that impact the way you put the book together. was there anything that can permeated into your process. Yes well whilst I was compiling the book because the book is a series of interviews cleverly edited. Pardon me and be beheadings Hundred Twenty people in the book and Wausau is compiling the book book. The windows scandal emerged going on for some time but emerged through the stellar journalism of Emilia. Gentlemen from the Guardian again but equally as I was interviewing people as here in silicon stories about people being stuck about people nervous about leaving because because they hadn't sorted out there possible because people came here and When I was growing up anyway your passport you not to show any identification into anybody and that was kind of British in a way that we didn't believe in having to have a stamp to say who you were but I got a sense of people who had relatives who were getting caught up in the scandal and equally Determined to go to Jamaica. I've got to the Caribbean to talk to people who gone back because the book is trying to show a lifetime of a carbon person in this country in a way. When I was putting the book together I had in mind the model of the five stages of grief by a psychologist ecologist quarter Elizabeth Kubler Ross? And she says there are five stages of grief denial anger boggling depression and acceptance. And when I talk to people I could see that through these five stages in the experience being Caribbean in this country and the Warsaw Lewis's desire to go home to the Caribbean and some people did so I went to the car being too into some of these people for my final chapter but whilst there I came across people who had been caught up in scandal so they'd gone back for a funeral ten fifteen years ago. They'd I'd be some question about the possible that possibly be removed from them and they found trapped in Jamaica so I interviewed a few people at that. who were waiting to see what's going to happen at? The scandal unfolded and the. The governor has woken up to the fact that has been described transgressions. Trying to sort things out But they've been rather slow in the process and Sometimes not coming clean quickly enough off this woman. I spoke to Who Can Morgan? Who they've put? When I spoke to the government offered him a visiting visa? Sir are returning to the government returning visa and it very very strongly said well. I don't WanNA returning visa. I'm British I want my British possible back. If they don't want to give it to me they can keep it and I loved that spirit they can keep it that kind of sense sense of their own personal worth says of their own integrity. That came through again again. And the sense of being decades of slights call the microaggressions sometimes of macro questions. But what I admire about. The people interviewed that I interviewed. was that they strategize how to get around these difficulties. So for instance many people had difficulty finding funding work They get the advert for the job and get to the place of work and the person giving up the job. Oh Mr blogs you just a little bit too late jokes soft. God feel any coherent arrogant convenience and the woman said about this press which happened again and again again ore. Three the Englishman is the nicest man in the world. When he's telling you know the humor but mostly what they did they? They took things on the chin. They moved on pulled up the column that coat and they walked on but also they they. They were largely thrilled initially anyway to be here I you can imagine Britain England London multi-centre of the wall for these people in the Caribbean to come from the Caribbean to England was like coming coming from glasgow-to-london felt the part of the country. But also those this great clamour attached to all things British and Britain the mop made an kingdom was like a badge of value but all these words have been in the ether as they move about Oxford circus imagined the frill real being able to say I walks to Oxford Circus and again these early pioneers they might take photographs. Have Post because because made up and they'd send them back home and there's one man called Wallis Collins who went to Trafalgar Square an not to focus square pigeon stood on his head and drops something onto his head. Shall we say and he wrote back to his family. I went to squad squad decision to this. I am making history making history. I'm at the center of the universe. I wanted to capture that. Not because I think sometimes we. We reduced the Caribbean story. In a way I want to detach the word wind rush from the word scandal title because there is a scandal but mostly I'd say this is a celebration story. Everybody saw their lives triumphant. That didn't see the lives. Be People people who've been victimized no wants to be a victim and what was What was it like trying to get these stories? Where were they were they always very forthcoming with like previously? been quite private about that. And you talk about this assumption that Stories from the women who have not been in nineteen because people might not have volunteered at first again that that can you talk about how that can also be kind of inheritance of of slavery in this idea that they don't want to be had. What was it like different for every passing or mostly? There was reticence because I think people don't understand that tha- that Jerry very conservative with a small C and They didn't the phrase goes me. Don't let people chat my business if they don't like to share stories sometimes. The stories aren't very a pleasant so they want to share them sometimes. It's still embarrassed about them. Sometimes they would be interviewed by me with their adult children. Present and those children hadn't heard the stories stories so they didn't really want to reveal the stories. But also what happens that with the passage of time to get older this veneer of respectability decided this sort of descends. Every like myst- and you forget what a naughty little rascal you don't want to be reminded you don't remind people so there was. Is that difficulty. But I think partly because I'm of Jamaican ancestry and I can at a stretch. Sound Caribbean savary carbon. Nab I can kind of mimic it and I I know the phrases by. Maybe I can't say it so but I know the phrase on the culture so I think they began to relax and I think the children were more suspicious of me. Children are adults in the third and forties. Because they're more savvy about journalists or rightism. What's going to be done with these stories? How will this story edited? How will I be revealed will be revealed building respectful? Way or not most important word in the Jamaican lexicon is respect. People want respect and so they are very guarded. And and when you go to the Caribbean you might get into a taxi driver that enter taxi. And you're chatting with the story and said what's your what's your name he wouldn't say. My name is colleen say my name is Mr Grant. Dont everybody's Mr. Yeah it's respect so that's very important so I was having to disabuse them of the notion that I was going to explode them but I was US prepared to sit with them and I know that I've been over the years to see a psychiatrist who hasn't been deceased. I come on back of and for your psychiatrist's cottress session. As an hour long session ULTA fifty minutes. You Get up to put your coat on. And that's when all the good stuff leaks out when you feel the heat is off. Yeah I think in journalism they talk about a handle the donut as you're about to leave one mile state so as to wait for that to happen Almost like a war of attrition where Dan. I'm not leaving until I got some good stuff Let's say they they relaxed and they were very revelatory so much. So the after while some of these adult children who is still present in the room subtype away the tears and they say of never heard that story before are never heard that story in matter detail before because things were tough and I think you do protect yourself or you feel you protect yourself by not talking about things so for for instance Split this lovely ladies in the book so I'm sure she doesn't mind me saying wave Bushel. ninety-two from Guyana teacher. When she came here? Yeah and one of the first black educational psychologists in this country. She told me about the fact that when she tried to find accommodation. You might this phrase. This sounds like a cliche now. People looking for combination they see the signs saying no blacks. No dogs no Irish. No Gypsies Sue Waving see the signs in the post office in the shop. Were in people's windows. Tom Tom Again and she would ring up all right to the same by the way I'm black so let's not wasting everybody's time if it's going to be notice to me no now. Because she saw they signed so many times she tells me till today. She can't climb the steps a knock on the door if she suspects the person opened. The door is going to be white because the trauma of being rejected is buried in uh soul is in her body so I wanted to explore that. Because explore the cliche's what does it mean to have these these slides to have this dismissal. Missile time and time again so it took a while for me to persuade them to speak at this. Sometimes they become too who revelatory and I say. Show you what to share this. And they did. Because although I've said that this veneer of respectability descends as you get closer to the than you were at the beginning. I think you think well why not I'll be. I'm very soon all all other. I'll be I'll be in the ground very soon. So why not share these loss little nuggets with people. That's the sense I got from them and they were delighted. That'd I must say when some of the audiobook others have heard the BBC book the week recording on Reiter. Four am when they hear themselves read out by a Seasonal Collin. Samuel Donna Crawl Michelle Greenwich that delighted their so delighted to is to know that the stores are rich and beyond the four walls and elevated fake story so generously and so have have you. I've loved what you've put yourself in the book as well and how you really carefully curated it and really showed us an a a new side is often seen also done it with respect and I realized say thank you so much. Thank you got that word. Filing respect is important to me because I was determined that I retain their dignity and and the had remind always had in my mind. My father's walk as I was compiled in this book. Because my father has a set of this just faster than slow and and when I watched my father walk as a child again again it comes to my mind a footballer on the losing side of the FA breath. I Cup Final Mansion. The steps to his loses condolence medal. There was dignity in defeat. This always always dignity and these people have dignity from the peel to the call. I wanted to retain that definitely have. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for listening to this episode of the vantage podcast. I really hope you pick up a copy of homecoming coming voices of the Wind Rush Generation. Thank

Caribbean Jamaica Britain BBC Guyana Obama England Dockers Manchester Birmingham Hiwickum Colin Dustin Damon Runyon Tennyson Theresa May Sussex University Brighton Croydon
London after coronavirus: to rebuild, Boris Johnson must show more leadership. And Extinction Rebellion gets a reboot

The Leader

13:49 min | 3 months ago

London after coronavirus: to rebuild, Boris Johnson must show more leadership. And Extinction Rebellion gets a reboot

"Hello it's David here the leader bring you news analysis and commentary every day at four pm from the newsroom of the evening standard subscribed to make sure you don't miss out and get in touch to use the HASHTAG deleted podcast on social media. Now from the Evening Standard in London this is the leader. Hi I'm David Mas. A New London is emerging. We believe an evening standard is calling today for London to get back on its feet, get going, rediscover the genius of our city, the things that make it so brilliant. So special as schools go back, can some workers return to the office associated editor Julian Glover on the rebuilding of the city and they had a Lotta time to rethink mistakes that they have owned to and Ben Been Very honest about confronting features right Assam Fishwick on the reboot of extinction rebellion. Taken from the Evening Standard's editorial call them. This is the leader of the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper had two standard code UK slash comment in a moment rebuilding London. Education as Charles Dickens. Once told an audience is the one needful thing. This morning people's at the southern, Primary School, the bears, his name today resumed their lessons once more they are among the thousands of children go back to classes some of them for the first time since March for head teacher. Castle Buchanan marks a turning point as the country recovers from the Luna Virus Lockdown. The children before they came a feeling real mix of emotions just like the adults from nerves to excitement being maybe a little bit worried. But now they've been back in the classrooms. We've walked trying this morning and we've seen just to see if smiling faces I think everybody's just. So please keep out with their friends with two tales in this city. Children got on public transport. The grownups stayed home. The evening standard found some key rail and underground stations. Almost. Mt Tuning. Rush Hour. Editorial column says it's time for adults to take the lead from their children and give the city a new start. The magic which makes London. is in terrible danger a city is really no city at all Intel vaccine is developed. Covert is here to stay and we can manage to live with it but even without a vaccine infection rates on our low and hospital admissions and deaths much lower, it does not make it safe in never will bay it does mean that we. Should start to live our lives again. So today, the evening standard is calling for a new start for city. What kind of society are we? If we think it is safe and vital young children to travel and meet, but keep many adults from doing the same? Yes it will take courage to start on. London lives again. But this week we must find it. Out Associated Atas Julian Glover is here Jillian. We're talking about London becoming a ghost city. How serious is that threat today? The Evening Standard does something it rarely does and that's run a whole page leading article with devoting more space than normal to the voice of the paper because the issue we're talking about. Is absolutely fundamental to the future of our city. And that's how do we get London back to ambition back to confidence back to growth. Back to the extraordinary things which made it and still make it such a special place in the world. which was hit hugely. By, lockdown which began as we say, five months and ten days ago, and it is still here today we're not saying covert isn't a threat we completely except. The horrible risks of disease, the people who've suffered from it the need treat people. The Need to get a vaccine if we can and the need to be confident and careful about how we travel how we meet how we engage with each other. But. Our argument is that we can do that. Now we're going to have to get used to doing it now because covert is going to be with us for a long time, there's no immediate sense of of a vaccine that's going to get us back into normal life back into work. What we've got to do is find ways to live with it, but that's easy to say Julia not so easy to do. So we say London is an extraordinary city made so special by people meeting, going out, enjoying it using our extraordinary public transport system. Being able to do the things that make the city, the envy of the world, the center of the world in many ways. And to do that, we can't just allow our children to go back to school, which is a good thing and it's happening today. Hopefully going smoothly across the city but we can't let our children go back to school and yet have many adults say they're going to stay at home. They're not going to go out not going to meet in offices they're not going to spend money than not going to shop. They're not going to go to theaters not going to enjoy the things that make London. Special. What we need is a way to do all of that and stay safe and we think it can happen with think it's already beginning to happen. We're seeing people coming back in small numbers into the city we need now leadership together lot more of that underway swears that leadership coming from then is it just the Prime Minister? Does he have to take the lead should? The mayor of London be involved in that too and what do they need to do not random changes of rules, contradictions confusion, the things that spread concern and fear, but clarity for the long term. So we want to see things like the mayor out and about enjoying the city showing people, he's part of it. We want to see the prime minister, the man who is. Meant to be the great communicator that was his big pitch for the job when he needs to communicate a sense of solid clear ambition over a long time to London and to the country not just tell us one day we gotta get back to work but then the health secretary at the same time seems to be saying, maybe they'll be a second wave and we shouldn't. One day it's fine to travel to Portugal few days later. No, that's changed again, there's a absolute need for clarity confidence and certainty. If we get that, we believe an evening standard is calling today for London to get back on its feet, get going rediscover the genius of our city, the things that make it. So brilliant special. The place that we love we want that back we want this month the start of a new September, the start of an autumn almost of of recovery to be the moment, we get London back on its feet. Next, does disruption of everyday life is it warranted in the face of so-called looming climate catastrophe and they would say we're even the asking the question is to an extent mission accomplished Sam Fishwick can extinction rebellion pull itself back from the break? Don't. Extinction rebellion back does anybody care The taking over London City Center that's almost empty anyway. For ten days of protests, there's been a long hiatus since the last action during which the group's reputation has taken a battering where once they captured attention with things like pink boat and Oxford Square they've since being criticized for demonstrations that tried to disrupt public transport an attempt to shutdown Heathrow airport with drums that didn't get off the ground a features writer. Sam Fishwick be looking at the group's efforts to revive itself and he joins me now Sam are these protests something of a reboot for extinction rebellion. It is a bit of a reboot. Certainly, they've had allotted time to rethink mistakes. The will made towards the end of last year. They have owned up to and Ben Been Very honest about confronting I. Mean if you cost your mind back, that was the counting town incident where to protesters jumped onto a busy can each train during rush hour much to the fury of the passengers that was a PR disaster. There was also the Heathrow paused campaign, which again was a a bit of a client in an NPR tons the plan. Was A spinoff splinter group Princeton Valley managed by Russia one of the cofounders that we turns to disrupt flights over Heathrow apple and you know many clinics billion felt that this was beyond the Pale they're endangering lives and a consensus was reached. They shouldn't do it. They went ahead and May I think you looking at a few instances last year? David that message didn't quite hit the mark and they using. This September to reestablish that raison d'etre that the reason being. And they've been marching towards parliament. Is it significant? The London is the location for this report, because course, extinction rebellion kind of spread across the wild up to a point. Is it important that the come back to London and reassert themselves here? London is important. London lungs is where extinction rebellion. Gained a foothold in the world's attention sitting the protests that went global and it went global from London. Most people do arena who have experienced organizing protest organizing action will tell you that. London it is a backdrop. Has gravitas around the world, and also with a media corporations here if you protest in London, it is around the world of the people you spoke to who involved with extinction rebellion. Did they feel the walls and image problem? About them being this kind of Porsche. Action Force people who can afford to be arrested a middle class rebellion so to speak. Yes, they're incredibly worried about image. Because you can't found a movement. A movement focused on the on the. Problems. You cannot bring the masses in if they cannot see themselves within the movement and I, think one of the problems extinction has confronted repeatedly is does delay us does the does the ordinary person around the world see themselves as of this movement do they see themselves as someone who can be arrested to the see themselves as in the imagery of someone Thompson atop pink boats Oxford Circus it's incredibly fun. Can they can the ordinary person save himself constant and they've made internal changes as well, Roger? Halloween. You mentioned Dalia. He's no longer leading the group, Izzy? He's not long leading the group He's very much still part to the group which still very clear to say, but Roggio Jalan had I did the movement in continues to have ideally moving they found on to the direction they want to take it again this comes into question of how does extinction billion see itself and what direction doesn't want to push to woods. Gari Society to inside. Extinct. billion. They realize that the window they have to enact fundamental change on policy within this country and around the world is closing and their best. When they are working to change the agenda and changed politics, roads, Rosen disrupt, and destroy. Is there a place for extinction rebellion in the new? Post lockdown wild after Kaduna virus what their study very keen to point out the amount of work they put in during lockdown. To reach out to other organizations, protest movements such as black lives, matter or indeed I spoke to one extinction belly and coordinates who told me that she conducted training a digital software. They will use zoom with the NHS quite early in lockdown they are as attended befriend organization when they're the best Is there a place for? Disruption on the streets, is there a place for disruption of London's transit systems? Again, I feel the envelope. Bali been pushed on that. It is the same moral quandary they have created and raised since the first protests which is does disruption of everyday life is it warranted in the face of so-called looming climate catastrophe and they would say we're even the asking the question is. To An extent mission accomplished. That's the leader you can keep up with all the latest developments in the evening standard live blog. You'll find at Standard Dakota UK, and we also have morning briefings available at seventy answer your smart speaker, just ask the news from the Evening Standard. This podcast is back tomorrow at four PM.

London Evening Standard London City Center Julian Glover David Mas Charles Dickens Primary School Ben UK Assam Fishwick Sam Fishwick Kaduna Standard Dakota UK editor Portugal Intel Castle Buchanan Prime Minister
Promenade (with Michael Hollick)

Probably True Podcast

23:06 min | 7 months ago

Promenade (with Michael Hollick)

"This is the Promo for the strike. Explains a podcast. Where I Chris the non-scientists Strana me questions and I'll Frito as the Astra Hollick trauma best to answer them. So Dr. what are black holes as Pluto not a planet. What's up with the son's polls? Why does Jupiter want US dead is beetlejuice Supernova? How is the universe going to end? Can we hit? You're right on an asteroid is that this is a thirty second promo you can find the astor. Alex planes on all your favorite APPs or follow at the Astor Hollick on social media. I thank you to new Patriot. Supporters Andrew Phelan who you wouldn't call the life and soul of the party because no one is kind of Prussia. His presence at a party never fails to improve the evening of the people around him and the enigmatic Adam with no surname. Who is the kind of person you couldn't help? But get into if you stood next to them at the bar you can join their ranks and get a complement of your very own by supporting the show on Patriot. Patron DOT COM and search. Probably true the last few episodes have been a bit heavy so I thought it was time to go for something just thoroughly joyous and fun so with that in mind. Here's a chat. I had on the importance of kindness with the delight. That tis my friend. Michael probably just call me a low level Media Hall. Oko now absolutely not I present to you an audience with His grace the Grand Duchess of Brixton. Michael Hollick listening to probably true. Please be aware that this podcast may contain strong language and adult themes it would be boring without them by castaway this week. No that's wrong so I'm fifty fifty six. Nearly fifty six and I've lived in London since I was among the twenty s and grew up north west London and book to a reporter trays reports on local paper and then six months. After I joined that properly it went out of business so having so exhausted. All the Gay Life Northeast Essex to offer quite literally exhausted quite literally it was downing. It was a data by the no the E and there was one purpose and it was in the middle of nowhere just became apparent as I think to. Most men my age you know if you want to have any sort of future game and he saw life as a gay man you were going to have to move to a city. London was the obvious answer and also as a journalist starts world work was. I knew one person in London. I've gotten outgoing personality. You have I have have an I. I'm not packwood's Bob would say you talked to anybody but she used to be a criticism. They'll move. You Never GonNa be Short France. It was all going on used to read about in time out in the listings. One of the things that was listed was a Monday night group. Who Gay Young London? We show you log back. 'cause I had thirty inch waist and CHEPE bones in an open mind were the days. Yeah yes we all coming back. Only so I screwed my courage to the sticking point and went to long flash drives everywhere on a full t-o-n loss document chatty that's where on met the sort of core group of people three or four people. Actually who are still my friends today. That was my introduction to gay life in London. It was very much a social. Obviously there was a lot of people jumping into bed with one another different. Been the most outgoing paypal on that sort of France so someone drew up the lines right. I would imagine many of your listeners. Work in the airline business. Think of a route map right. And they're about about three people say who represented to know. New York's JFK Heathrow and Abu Dhabi and everyone another go. Everyone had to go. I think of me is like Anglesey so yeah very nice this time of year. It is the parallel you get. I think what was interesting was serving a purpose separate from the gay saying we don't move to London so that we could live the fullest life. Possible I'm proud. You know you're not gonNA hide away. I want to be me and I want you to leave me the fuck alone basically except obviously when you so you've got this wonderful group of friends and everything but you still got to find people to To date I think the euphemism isn't it? My reform was not going out standing balls or whatever it just not very good at it. I'm sure you would just unapproachable. Attractive you this and I think the first half of face like a slap Darcy. Don't you down but I was annoyed as well. I still I am really. I didn't know when people were hitting only Lightened books. That guy's not opportunity you jay things as well which in virtuous back to really really foolish one night out. Bain probably had a feed basil something. A gentleman caught my eye. Well we caught each other's aw. Oxford circus cheering this on the job. I think I think he was discreet. Enough to get onto the other end of the carriage K. You know only Naff but I really just I haven't got a bloody clue off seven sisters thinking okay. What what are the odds? He's a local. He must be local. Well I was half right as as as it. Transpires is but he for a discrete pace all the way home at this point. The show people listening to this probably homeless. God you know Keep No. It was a late night. There was nothing. So I SORTA got homers the doors and shut the door just thought well either. That was a little bit under okay so he was a little worrying for all suggested a show. Half of me was the most suitable sensible because of eminently sensible was probably thinking. Oh Christ you know. It's price day tomorrow. Go UP EIGHTH BUT IRAN. The bloody doorbell very bowls flatmates in bed. And obviously the Christ know. What am I going to do so the Dole? I think I was well. I take it not going to make me cause generally malkhas dunk. Carry the copy of the Guardian Ad. A conversation in I think Paul now under the harsh bare lightbulb lie so probably fell crikey. This is a mistake basically. I've seen how the price day the next day or deadline looming anyway. And then he said Oh I live over an archway and There's no tubes now any sensible person right would sort of say. Well get a cab walk you know. Surely surely there are buses linking seven sisters and archway. Did I do any of these things? Did I buffalo? I've always had to go to Scott. He'll be the death of me over all the licensed drivers out. Of course. I've always kept her car. So what did I do? I drove him listeners. I think that was a lesson for me. That's that's been a patent throughout my Bremen. Take Life always doing the right. Did you get to know him on the drive home get? Fortunately no wasn't very chat now. It was very nice and very very British as well. Yeah I was expecting you to have had a quick change and open the door and some skipping has and the other thing about about London everybody smoked. I mean you know. And I'd like smoke chimney. Sada probably Coupla we house coat colors FAG Liebau. What Watson Imagine I can think of other a cage of gears later when something similar is happened. I mean it's just all to you just a good a soft touch may be. I mean he must have been quite attractive. If you had to face like a bucket full of spammers end seventeen love that way. Good luck potty. Oh I didn't see him again. You didn't no no no. I'm afraid not geeze later. I did I did do exactly the same well. No actually I think what the hell was I thinking? There was a chapel banged on the window of the car when I was driving back from from Saint Francis embracing on leftover was on the window. Who's running very fast? No you bullshit. But he was definitely very very drunk and was in a car on the art stopped at the light shares. This fellow just by of course he leaping me. That's why did I could have brought a bloody taxi service really so you banged on the window gets because he was roaring drunk and of course me being rather than just I F- is fixed ahead and just hang driving like five minutes away from my front door at this point and he's fucking wait noises. Well you know again anyway. Someone THE WINDOW DOWN. And you know it's just oh hello you drunk. I is sort of slurring his speech but he was a nice looking young man. And what can I say? Well you're GONNA do okay. It's not the Bronx. But he's not rise in the debt and you've got the rising nobody will go on wage aleve Richmond which is what forty five minutes drive. Something like this is about. Forty minutes is a not inconsiderable drive. And then you've got to come back again. If you come back again Zeke to just be like you can sleep on my cell you can sober up on my sofa and find during my and as I got the single so no root for cut narrow for anything really said that wasn't good. Arpan try these Fowler back and we got stop combined. Shout could stop by the police on the way. Oh what just this little eagles drunken insensible your own. Ah and I thought where are you going to do? I'm sorry go bloody Kalou practical trial skin. This host passed out on the seat beside me. This doesn't look. I mean nothing to say hair off some new party stage I think was welcome midnight and again you guys work next. I seriously would you like a cup of tea. And what was the Queen Mother to you? Call it say no Kadim adjourned Buick? Probably both but I was trying to. You know people for that and he started talking about his girlfriend. She'll therapist anyway. I'll use the bathroom and there was evidence solve ago. Friendless definitely lady things lady only products anywhere Alabama and transfers and again. I just on Crikey shouldn't just leave. Now she got I. Think you know following the Tottenham debacle. This was a fear factor. I think sort of odd learned my lesson. I think going to work the next day. I'm still ashamed of this. This is the Protestant. Work Ethic Writ Large Right. 'cause I'm still ashamed of this. The I had to actually ring up. Doug mobile phones or anything so I actually had to get on the bloody phone and Li- it's not like today where you just get an email wouldn't sort of Otago dreadful dreadful cows. I suppose if you've actually got the ring to find him when you were yes. It sounds like a little time was worth the pet. So y your car I mean. I'm sure you're very no. I think it really was just things happen to one. Satellite Lady Glenconner Tacos. Things happened while they just do. I suppose if you sort of if you're a idiot just walked around. I still think even in the sort of Internet Age. Where we're all sal angry and you just On the finally so switch on twitter. And it's just like your early morning twitter alerts. He's just like everybody in the well. He's angry about something and they're all shouting at you. But that's not my experience the Willis toll and I you know I don't. It's just not a mine. Hiv obviously but much experience of wealth. Die Today is that it's it's kind of Nice people are generally pretty date and generally they've got your best interests at heart. Were too generous more or less. I don't know I mean for one moment suggesting that you should go out and start your taxi service or indeed. Have a car in central. Because it's really worth it but these were sort of accidents where there's serendipitous has happened stances. So what happens I wanted? You know when you spot someone. It's us a for instance. What if he's spotted someone? You Really Conduct At the Henry Wood promenade concerts. Some is often one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. And you thought but that's right now when you just sort of stalk them on. Grindr or whatever and it gets Ashley Stalking. They're on their true cheapo confirmed suspicions. And Yeah. That's what I see. Yeah you stalking his word. Is they talk? I mean there are ways you could still them on twitter instagram. Assuming not but that's a bit a bit creepy whereas psych nine guess so. Yeah but we didn't have that option so you know I even if they did. I tell you know even if even if graduate been around. I'm not sure I would have clad the sauteed. Of course I would have had coach in the front too so the site. Oh hello but yes there. Was this chapel. Used to oversee had a season ticket upstairs in the calorie at the alcohol which is big open area. All the unfriendly people prominent downstairs. The ones you see on the tally the crazies. Why you think that battles that's no euphemism and Shopping people out of the way because they dead to stand in this ball whatever. It was my father's before man. You could just slay here out off. Status was in the. I don't want people get Roger. The problems is wonderful institution but it attracts different kinds of people but yes others this chap upstairs problems. Who who who caught my shall we say? It took a few weeks to pluck up the courage because gaint Augustine always work. Somebody very neatly folds little blanket and sits on. It gets packed lunch out. What are the bless exactly loving date haircut of the fresh face you know. It's just like the fact that could be. Xm Full says one just wasn't to know but eventually yeah you know. I clocked out. Carrie suspeater mentor. We dated for a while and we're still friends which is lovely good. So did you share his pack Not such I remember daughter but you know what a lovely way to meet someone it was. This is the thing. Isn't it this sort of the old fashioned way of gains? Serendipity I suppose the man that you that you drove home and then obviously caught something from Manhattan to take the day off. Did you ever seen no no? When of settled down in south London and Mike Friendship Group it established itself. We will now properly established as young guy abouts in London. You know get young men in on it was it was great guy out meeting people fantastic social life. My friends started nope pairing off. But you know a lot of people would be life partners. May I'll guard is is always the bridesmaid star. Always the bride. I it did seem to be well. Everybody else was making house and settling down. I just saw God. I just couldn't just pick expert it his love. I can just not found the right man exactly. Well maybe you up now. Seven years is a long time. You know don't forget society back in one night but kid but it was the to date someone for a few weeks maybe months. I think it was the longest and then it would just face lout none of these people were bad people a lot of them though several of them. I'm still in touch with and some of them went on to become very good friends. This is all take Nice is. There is no positive staff at easy pull. It was always a sort of sort of more of a sigh that it's all big a Standard Stall Rao starring plight now fag of Heights. You know slamming. Dole's now being a now I've done very few things in my life. I regret but meeting. You is one of them. You could always hold that hold. That one in reserve is my advice. Thanks the nuclear option because there is no going back from that at. I don't think I've ever used it. Accepted in jest. Always keep a store of one line and you never know in light of the stories and stuff you told us. Would you say you had a little bit of wisdom to someone who's in a similar situation who's kind of dated here and there for a while but hasn't found anyone data? The thing is when I met my partner we met the old fashioned way on Gaidar for star. Eighth asked me out shaky. Bucket asked me out on a Monday night. He should. We make a drink on a Monday night. For a point I was forty eight is I'm a man of habit I'm Monday cycled to the gym. Go home so saint no so I sort of voice is to always be prepared to change your plans during set in your ways. I didn't meet until I was full. Shiite. He's sixteen years as you ask you know he's eighty we wait until he goes to university a no the very fact that. I was sort of quite prepared to sort of site. Well it's nice idea but I have plans counts the plan apply. Even if it's just routine right so I would say never say never to cliche but you really have got to be comfortable in yourself. Maybe it took nearly fifty years to be comfortable in myself. That's very possibly true. E You can still have a lot of Collection tally stories. To tell don't use the nuclear option. Don't be mean to people to make yourself feel better in the immediate active. You know just because you're her most of the time when I split with somebody it's been them doing. The splitting only wants I think. Did I do the splitting? I still sort of regretted not because I think would still be together. I don't think we would but I think because I did it for the wrong reasons and it was made. It was mean-spirited it was just boredom and Cape your friends around you as well. You know friendship is much more important than the great dark man who may or may not exist. You've been kind and all your stories. I mean it's ended up with you picking drunk tots and driving them home. But guess what you put it like that. I've never life missionary Martin for working among the full in fact. That's probably what I've been doing. All these years is is. You know ministering ministering to the to the in torment there's an old house with a blue plaque on it and I can't remember the name of the woman but it says friend to all in need and I just think missile. Yes yes and self respect though this frontal in each not big euphemism. Fagin is doormat. Exactly exactly Oh gosh because obviously. I'm not a dorm. I'm outspoken. I think he's he's. I am caught outspoken. And maybe a little bit scary in own first. Meeting a French sent me some years ago. You know the the thing about us. Is We take a lot of so nice. Where putting on a very kind way of putting it you know. I am very self aware. I realize you know I've got caught a bearing to you. Yeah so big personality I think is the phrase that's most commonly used is neil here smog. He's got a big personality. I just made yourself loud will doesn't like to be the center of attention like this idea. That isn't it on the regular spiel about making sure people don't feel alone. I mean nothing is based Especially I think now in a city the size of London weather also many more people than they used to be. I side with technology distancing every from each other and because people lead such atomised lives is even more possible now to fill so terribly alone in a big city. And you know you. You're not but especially if they sit next to you on the bus especially if shop. Well yes exactly who knows where that badly that was probably true. The multi-award-winning storytelling series written and produced by me the multi-award-winning Scott Flash hot it was designed to remind all of my siblings that we are. None of US allowed. You can find links transcripts of every episode and all that good stuff probably true podcast dot com if you enjoyed or found volume. Anything you've heard. You can support the show on patriotic just gave it to patriots dot com slash. Probably true. And if you want to get in touch just probably true podcast on the socials.

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 A week with Extinction Rebellion  podcast

Today in Focus

26:51 min | 1 year ago

A week with Extinction Rebellion podcast

"Today reported aiming gale has spent a week with extinction rebellion and environment. Correspondent Matthew Taylor tells us how realistic demands really are. Well, always do the protests over the guardian. You'll your Pat just kinda whoa patch. And if a protest goes off, and I don't get covered. I feel a little bit kind of aggrieved. Did you did you expect to be spending seven days down there? No, not really, no. This. Let nothing overseen. I've never seen anyone. Hold full sports central London for five days, and then have a kind of protest festival atmosphere each one. Godley Makoto Daming Gail spent last week with climate activists extinction rebellion they've described themselves as the biggest civil disobedience campaign in British history. Coming up on tonight's program with climate change protests in their second week and mostly middle-class eco activists. Temper tantrum known as extinction rebellion came to London. Asking thousands of people to break the law extinction. Rebellion is fighting climate change. And it's been making headlines over the last few months. The protests have lasted ten days and the have been over one thousand arrests when parliament returned from recess on cheese day labor and pay at band called an urgent question in the Commons. Will she seek the persuade the prime minister to declare a climate emergency many authorities of Deng to focus might across government on the centrality of this issue today, the Greek planning to wind down that protests across London financial. The protesters have raised the profile of the climate crisis beyond all expectations. But who are they? Could they be about to change? The course of history. From the garden. I'm indirection today in focus a week with extinction rebellion. Damon Larry amount of the protests that basically brought London to a standstill last week. What happened? Monday fists with extinction rebellion. You played full spots in central London. So around mob large. It was it was the the climate crisis area. Then hopes of circus. They've got the they put in a big pink named off the better Cassetta Sousa one hundred economic vista was murdered. The bait was about the trace wasn't that were based movies around different tenants of their of the ideology. So yes, Oxford sex tell the truth, and it was that. Because because it's done the from the BBC. Anyone to see more more coverage of the of the climate emergency. From there, south Wolseley bridge. Which the chiefly turn into a garden bridge, and they on poet plants and trees and stage. Then there was parliament square as well, which was supposed to be a kind of a space for experiments in new coins, democracy, new kinds of participation democracies. So we're gonna have people's assemblies done there. Cut of David breath hanging out underneath the dinosaur. That all week. I was kinda surprised when I went down on Saturday. The if felt so quite quiet didn't feel like from packed streets to feel quite different often. The remarkable thing about the stress g that they've that they've devised as she need of people to cause really serious disruption because they've got so many people who are willing to be arrested in the thing. They gave a figure of two thousand at the beginning of the week that they'd signed up you willing to be arrested. They can use these as they quote him arrestable ze. Two to bitty gum up any attempt by the police to to clear the area. Section fourteen of the public failing to move on when requested required. Each one of the four sites was protected, essentially, a human barricade of people who were willing to sit down in the path of any advancing formation of police themselves together with books is glue themselves payment, even clean themselves to each other as much as the police could arrest people for every one person arrested at some points to more people attending up and taking their place. Each person. He's arrested for people have to carry that person away. One office that has to go with them to the police station to process them. They couldn't fit three prisoners in each police about please time is about police time. Nothing. That's what they've really. That's that's where it really where. They've they've tested the limits, and that's really how they've managed to keep going so long. They have three very specific bonds. They okay. So. So I I the mandis for the government's tell the truth. They say that the government has has not really been honest about the true implications of climate change. And and that they cite some some really frightening. Scientists come out over the past couple of years, particularly IPCC report says the thing that we've got twelve years to stop catastrophic runaway climate change. The second demand is. The government institute citizen's assemblies, essentially, an excise in in radical participate democracy because they say that the political system that we currently have is not fit for trying to tackle a problem. Like this. And they're fed. An I suppose most radical demand is that they're calling for the economy to be completely transformed to carbon zero by twenty twenty five. So that would be no CO two emissions atoll in sexiest in in six years. Yeah. One of the targets of the protest was the headquarters at the oil company shell and real m'aiment for me last week was seeing the internationally renowned lawyer woman cold for HANA Yemen. And she's also one of the lead author on the intergovernmental panel on climate change reports, and she clued herself to the floor. Actions. Is pretty. That's right. Yes. She stuck herself to the pavement in front of the show building. This was the day off the five other activists had stuck themselves to the doors of the same building smashed a window Smit it with spray, chalk graffiti, and it was a very moving actually the footage of had been taken away to her husband was Aaron her nine-year-old, son. And the fact that she's willing to make us. Oh, arrested. Got arrested Fru such she is fearless. She will do anything to make you listen and care about what's going on. And actually say I felt being down the whole day was quite emotional. One woman who really struck a and mayhem name Hannah when she was one of the last protesters oaks circus, and she was looked into one of these mental Chaves, and she was seven months pregnant. I've never been arrested before. So I don't. I'm just a little biting she to had fatal kids sticking out top. I'm gonna asked her about that. Yeah. It was clearly very hard for her to talk about what was happening. Why does that make you to full? It's it's. We have to up and realize that I'll kids have a future. Join your time coming the protests. You went to the headquarters in London to meet one of the founders usually for the major used octa go Br just for the old boys network to back off. Told me that she had been trying to find ways to bring about social change for an on time. And that she done a lot of research, and and personal work and even traveled to Costa Rica, and she says she prayed for the codes for social change when she returned. She she met Roja Hallam who is kind of the theories in the strategist mind, what is the extinction rebellion doing? And she told me she had a long meeting with him at the end of that meeting. He told me that he just give me the Kotze social change. So that was a bit strange, but also very beautiful a gallon. What should they have? They meet quite a few times. They start to pick up. What might be a way of bringing this to the form? And then what happens when does it really start to get traction. Gosh. Well, I suppose when it really starts to get traction is Oktoberfest when they would up the deck. Croatian of rebellion in November when they carried out there. I actions. Five major bridges in central dumping. They didn't have a lot of activists at that point. But what they did have is they had they had tremendous resolve and had these people who completely win into arrested, which is not something that I've ever seen impetus before Jimmy when you see people push us to trying to to cause disruption or commit disruptive acts someone will run up with with Moscow and smash the window of an estate agents or something and then run off and they have a completely different ethos. They say if you're going to commit an act in the name of extinction billion, then you have to take responsibility for it. So if you're going to go up and you're going to smash that window, then you're going to have to stand next to it afterwards. And as the police come we have to tell them what is done it. The more chosen that particular location for doing it. And then you have to be arrested as getting along feel like in as as that developing what the movement is. Are they looking to the past of bettering previous protests? Yes. So most of the people who are involved in the core of extinction of Elian a protest veterans. A lot of them were involved in the occupier protests. Mistakes from those one of the mistakes of those protests. I think that when people start use drugs, and that kind of soured the atmosphere around those protests comes and so that's probably what lies behind quite strict restrictions on those kind of things when they were is going on. You know, you see the extinction billion people walking through the crowd, just politely asking people who drinking. I can you can you put away can you go and finish that outside and and come back when you when you it's done, and according to gale Brad, Brooke. Very much of of how they work. They don't feel that they've come in with the master plan, which they're going to execute every single point of as she H thing is an experiment, and then they come out and stage action, they then go away. And they think will what's worked. What hasn't worked? How can they do the same thing again next time with more effective or to they need to completely be think? How do people fail when this lights class-a Waterloo bridge was cleared on Sunday, Oxford circus as well. I think people were disappointed, but the impression from Gail and some of the other organizes spoke to actually they were slightly surprised that they'd lost it as long as they had. So they were they were pleased as punch everything that we've done has gone so much better than my expectations. And I feel incredibly grateful that we've managed to get Brexit out the new I'm sure it's not out of the news. But you know, what I mean? We've had two point four percent decrease in the missions since nineteen ninety. We have to have drastic went on the today programme which was relatively intimidating. But it was okay. When. To a train highlight that as against. David timber. It gets you on this day program neck. Zober disrupting people's lives. Not to talk about crime all the time. All the time. Sorry, don't to be on this. Because if we if we were treating this as emergency that it is it would be on the news. Absolutely. Every single day. Nick Robinson made this common that obviously they cover climate change. It's just like that. When you say that you're not get in this thing. Something I've been increasing interested in is the image of climate change protests and the way that we talk about it. So you start your name, Billy. I did stop a couple of guys he were passing by. He really interesting, Jack and Billy. But I don't agree with how it's being done. It's the bus disruption. It's going to cost a lot of money, and they were just like lots of less dead just passing by. And it was quite interesting because they were saying, oh, it's so annoying and they were calling them hippies. But they actually have this sense that how maybe we just need the hippies to kick all with needed that all along. And it was always gonna come for Jamaica. Ashley, this is a good thing. It's this is. Yeah. It's raised awareness of what's happened in very, thanks guys. So everyone would you say more annoyed or more like welcoming annoyed in a good way? Essense g get walking around the protests like how the protests are being perceived. I think there's still a sense the there's a there's a real EKO were vibe. And I think yeah. As he said, it was always gonna come from that place. There's always going to be those people who care the most about climate change who were going to move. We're gonna kick this off who were going to be the organizing principle, and you saw a few people going through the who really went impressed. One of the things that really annoys people is when they got still traffic. So one guy told me he'd been punched in the chest by a motorist. Who is furious that you've been stopped in traffic member public. It's wearing Kolyma hippie Thiam, I'm benefit, etc. Cetera. I kept smiling trying to explain what we're doing. And why he's gone punch may I on chest in front place officers with cameras on the other hand, I think people who've been been won over by what's happening and particularly saw a shift in the kinds of people who involved competitive back in November when it was very much. More of a hardcore November seem to be almost let the trailer for for what's happening now this Easter and this time, you know, I've seen a much to coalition of people get involved people, you wouldn't necessarily expect to be involved in a climate protest. These two guys who was self proclaimed capitalists who fund manages than they'd invested their own money into buying five thousand stickers, which they distributed them. Essex was very much that the business community is more likely to act than governments are and one guy who was saying he was using his skills as a fund manages to try and start an environmental fund at the same time. And then they've just been people walking in off the streets normal London's who would through and seeing this is happening and and flowing a lot to gain vote and have a piece piece of this. I love people have commented on how different police behavior might have been if this weren't a large grape of predominantly white middle-class people. Yeah, valid as valid critique to make and part of the problem. Extinction billion have had is reaching out beyond that cool constituency of white. Middle-class so individuals who don't really have a lot of fear from the police. I mean, they've come under criticism from the left for their strategy of getting many people arrested as possible because you wouldn't be able to ask a group of of young black hole Muslim men to go and take part in the process where essentially the goal was phonetically arrested because actually being arrested holds a lot of fear. If you're a community that's victim of kind of systematic. Institutionalized racism by police, I mean, I'm mixed race. And I grew up basically being told by my mother to never go anywhere near the police. And if I see policeman, please come in to turn around and walk away in and and try and keep as much distance between me, and I'm as possible. But that set the the tactic is working and the the people who are involved in extinction rebellion. I'm not quite sure how I feel about this statement a saying that we need to use our privilege. In order to to make the change, you know, to to achieve the changes that we want to see, and they they say that the fully aware that they are much less likely to be treated harshly by the police. One of the people I met there was was in the Bela. My name is nebula Collahuasi. I am from Uganda and Egypt was born in England that. Seeing. Swarming road block. She was one of the few black people are suing the demonstration, the one thing that sees color is climate change. It is coming for all of us, regardless of where you live or who you are even though of course, it will impact people in other areas more, sir. But the end of the day, this is all our worlds, and we have all contributed to this fault. So therefore, it is our duty to take responsibility. And it's also a duty to educate all of us and all around us and go beyond your circle, b on your culture. Go be on your demographic. Because that is the only way we can incite real change. I mean, some people are just perhaps never gonna be one either by thinking Belen doing. But does that even matter to them? More understand their stress G is they don't feel they need to convince everybody that action needs to be taken. They have have this belief that they only need to convince a certain a certain proportion of the population. What they is. If there they're three and a half percent of people who are willing to take radical action to the point of being arrested in order to to change things than that can carry the rest of society with them. Do you think this is going to be a tipping point for climate change was it flash in the pan? Very interesting. The Stokely Carmichael who is involved with civil rights movement in the United States used to say, we must know difference between mobilization and organization one of the characteristics of mobilization is that in this temporary. Organization is permanent and eternal, and he said, there's a lot of people out there who can mobilize, and they can bring lots of numbers of people together, and they can take them out on a big demonstration. But there are fewer people who can also organize. Many brothers and sisters who've been to the million in mall much. We'll see it you. I was there. Well, what are you doing today? My sister. I was there. And I think actually extinction billion have managed to do is manage to combine organization with mobilization. It's time they do one of these actions. They gather thousands more volunteers. I think they'll onto something with the ways in which that they've approached this protest in the ways in which they organized it. And I think it may be a tipping point in the public consciousness and understanding of climate change. Whether that can be translated into into action on the social societal wide level is more difficult to say with definitely a tipping point in the nature of protest in the UK. David. Thank you very much for you. Coming up how real estate extinction of billions three demands. Welcome back. Just before we crack on a CPA quick favor. We've been nominated for two awards at the British podcast woods. But there is a third and it's the people's vote. So if you like what we do here at today in focus, then please do go and have a vote. I just had to British podcast awards dot com forward slash bite. Thanks. Now guarding environment. Correspondent Matty Taylor. Reminders of extinction. Rebellions three demands an assesses how realistic they actually are. For me, the quite simple and quite neat. And it's not the onus can't be on an ad hoc. Protest group to come up with a detailed Pacific set of policies to address. Boy, it's a huge challenge. Think that has to be taken up by scientists policies policymakers and politicians. Extinction rebellion. I amount is for the government. Tell the truth about the scale and seriousness of the climate crisis. The idea of politicians telling the truth to be honest about the biggest crisis facing this country. Indeed world doesn't seem particularly radical big ask. The second demand is for a citizens assembly, and that would basically group of reps and members of the public coming together to hear evidence and to come forward with solutions. I think that the idea of assistance Emily's is a legitimate argument. We've argued to hear the guard in the seventy should be useful for the Brexit debate. The fed demand from extinction rebellion is for the UK to get to the net zero carbon emissions by twenty twenty five. Now, this is a huge demand. A most people most experts think it's highly unlikely to chief d- because the moment we call the climate change committee saying that we need to eighty percent by twenty fifty we've extinction about the other now saying we need to get to zero missions by twenty twenty five but that by staking out the territory in a wider more radical area, the twenty twenty-five end. Suddenly becomes their missions by twenty thirty five twenty forty suddenly becomes the middle ground. So you change in the church which can be debated. If we would try and get to missions by twenty twenty-five, it would mean huge upheaval. We would need to radically transform the way we move around transport systems from any fossil fuels to electric. We would need to Trump's former energy systems overnight housing energy systems aren't duster energy systems away from fossil fuels to renewables or potentially nuclear from eating food that was flown into the UK. So I guess I would argue that this is not about. Tacking on environmental policies to the existing system and promoting renewables have been more. This is about looking systemically. How we organize as we are operating system, which is devouring planetary resources. Yeah. Is an environment. Correspondent at guardian. The job is no no without its stresses exile. But in the last week or ten days is almost almost a strange sense. I'm feeling which props tiny sense of ultimatum that that things might be changing in terms of what is happening the hard reality what politicians and governments doing. But at least in terms of. The awareness of what needs to be done. And I think that's the real achievement of extinction about in the school strikes and other movements. The guardian has been closely following the protests, and the reaction you could find all of it films reports interviews photographs at the guardian dot com. That's all for today. My thanks to Daming Gail. I'm mighty Taylor. Today's episode was produced by Elizabeth Casson, Joshua, Kelly and Brenna dove sound design was by execute. An executive producers of film may not Aniko Dexin. We'll be back tomorrow.

London Makoto Daming Gail David timber London UK gale Brad Matty Taylor Matthew Taylor Commons BBC Damon Larry prime minister IPCC Deng south Wolseley bridge parliament square Cassetta Sousa
The London bus

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

30:50 min | 2 years ago

The London bus

"And welcome on board this express service from Dory house. I'm your driver talk. This week show is entirely devoted to London's most important mode of transport the bus from the Omni bass to the arrival of the double decker. We take a look at how the humble bus has helped define the city around it on the stories that it left along the way. So do you have a ticket all coming up right own? The best of me talk. So welcome to this week's program. Finally, please get comfortable journey will asked about thirty minutes. And joining me fellow passengers Travis Elber and joker Travis is an author and Joe is an architectural historian and also a bus driver. They've just released a new book called bus fare, which shows the history of the London bus through a collection of different writings about it through the years. And throughout our interview, you'll be able to hear some of these historical articles to we start conversation. Talking about the omnibus horse-drawn service, connecting Paddington to Bank helmed by uniform wearing driver and conductor that's trying to imagine. Welcome aboard moved down the bus. Please everybody find the seat and before we begin our journey. A reminder of the rules rule number what keep your feet off the number two. Do not get into a snuck corneal self and then opened the window to admit a no Wester upon the neck of your neighbor. Roll number three have you money ready when you desire to a light? If your time is not valuable that of others, maybe goal number four do not imposed on the conductor necessity of finding you change. He is not a banker rule number five six your limbs, straight and do not let your leg. Describe angle of forty five degrees there by occupying the rim of two persons role. Number six do not spit up the straw. You're not in a hawks die, but in an omnibus traveling in a country, which boasts of its refinement. Number seven behave. Respectfully to females and put not in unprotected laugh to the blush because she escaped from your brutality number eight. If you bring a dog, let him be small and confined by strength number nine. Do not introduce large parcels an omnibus is not a van pool number ten. Preserve bickerings and disputes for the open-field. The sound of your own voice may be music to your own is not so perhaps to those of your companions rule. Number eleven if you will Roach, politics or religion, speak with moderation all have an equal right to their opinions. And all have an equal rights. Not to have them wantonly shocked roll number twelve refrain from affection and conceited as remember you're writing a distance for six points, which if made it a Hackney coach would cost you as many shillings, and that shoot your pride elevates you above plebeian accommodations your purse should enable us come on ours. Too critic indulgences. The time thirtieth of January eighteen thirty six. Darlas w so the the fascinating thing is I guess when people think they're going to read a book about buses, I've already pitcher them onto something writing blaming and with four wheels on but you start with actually with wills and hoofs as well. The beginning of the book you look at the kind of roots of London buses going back to the almond of us. Could you explain to listeners about those early days and the people who drove those horse-drawn almond buses that we have in way to thank for. We have today. It was very important for us that we did the whole history of us is nearly two hundred years now, I don't think people necessarily realize that you know, we signed the book that people start thinking about busters with Cliff Richard and route Marsters swinging sixties, but this whole other history. And because it's not so visual Victorian stuff. The writing is the kind of important way into it. And when you read it, you realize that although is changed massively those were horse buses. And things were different. Nonetheless, there's much commonality we recognized the behavior described on buses in that period. We would recognize the people who work buses in that period. And it's fantastic. I love that continuity of London history. Mr. Sheila bair is the guy who does what is it that? He does that makes it a boss vase just jumping on a coach or hitching arrive things we identify with the moment of buses beginning innovation that, he brought from Paris. She works in Paris. And again Londoners don't tend to realize that the London buses shift French invention. But the idea that you'd have a short whole vehicle which seated a lot of people and would stop very very frequently and didn't cost too much money with something absolutely new coaches done longer distances. They were more expensive. They were exclusive whereas the London bus from the beginning was a democrat vehicle. You know, anyone could use it for a relatively modest fee. And is what does that mean for you today? About mobility. And we'll concerned about how these changes in the way, we get around with the way the city looks way functions with who can have with joy about democratizing of access to mobility when the almond bus came along. Well, did it do for London? I mean, one of the things about it is the has to run on slightly outside the main drag of the city because the Hackney carriages had a kind of monopoly on the innocent London area. So Sheila biz bus runs along what was include the new road departed from outside the stinger pub in Paddington along. What is now mulligan road in Houston road and Pentonville road to the city of London. And so it can immediately and stance as the idea of the suburban commuter, suddenly people can work in the city of London and get a bus into their place of work rather than living close to it. So you just kind of transforms how people negotiate the think about the CD creates the who spun on. The couple eventually with railways and later chew blinds creates the idea of kind of suburban London way, Putin's the classic Putin the commuter based in George goldsmiths, great comic creation new lives in the laurels in Holloway. And the joke of that is in a way that, you know, living in this country issue. In fact, is the whole right? You know, kind of mocking kind of mocking this petty bourgeois aspirations of this, man. But it just means that people can finally get around London live their way from the smog of industry really in a way hummus, grace, the suburbs. It's the first step on the road to the suburbs. I mean, she'll be himself. He profits reasonably well to begin with the very quickly other operators cannier operators come onto the scene. And this point isn't a monopoly on you can run buses. This is kind of frenzy of new whole spouses in pulling up and down streets in London. And Sheila Baynes eventually goes out business, but it for time. It's like this. Wild west in a way of horse drawn omnibuses in the city where the conductors says were known as sort of cads because they stuff as many people as they possibly could into their carriages in order to make much money as possible enjoy this huge new market was it as an untapped Marco. Is this a moment of change the city that more and more people are coming into the city. And so there is pressure from ability because it strengthens you want to have people around before where people just literally walking everywhere and working much closer to their homes, for example. Yes, and yes to those questions. So I think that the city had she, but she clocked up London had ground to a halt. So the bus was one of the things that helped it start to move again and other ones walked or used the river. Or if you're very rich used a camp. It was chaos out there and the great thing about the bus. The thing we learned is everybody gets on the bus. So it's plus and women's don't to use it and stop to explore the city and get access to bits of the city that had not had before and everyone acquire. That knowledge that essential knowledge. The London is have which is where buses go, you know, it's one of the things that makes you a London is nine oh, I can get the bus from there. And then I changed their and I take the next one and all these people develop this knowledge in Victorian times mean she'll be unveiled his whole spouse in eighteen twenty nine seven years later is when London bridge station opens up steam trains, bringing communities from further outside. It's exactly that kind of moment where London is moving from being a kind of more gray area in city into a heavily industrialized absolute pivotal moment as far as the city growing and transforming baiting. People living in towns cities in Britain than living in the countryside size again. It's the right vehicle for the right moment. Nama say this is one of the great things about the book is just literally pieces you understand that the mores of the time because you, yeah, you've got like how to behave in a boss, you what makes it good and back, and I found those bits kind of really insight for glorious rate. The motor comes along the. The bus becomes addictive it close to what we think about all through the bus survives and adapts as you say, we begin to get better train lines into begin to get the underground begin to get more motivated goes Joe, why did the the bus not only survive on the streets, but stay key and people's mind, and they thought about the city, and it's one of the thing. I think it says on the press releases the tourists in travel by cheap London's travel by bus, and you really hammer. This point home is is always been part of the psyche of a Londoner to know that bus route, for example, and carry something like three times passengers and chief, you know, we we imagined chiefs the great workhorse of London nine nine thousand buses the route lettuce us morning. Eight o'clock we'll be out there this evening at five o'clock there the things that carry people and when the bus arrives, it's really quite nearing. I mean, they're all motorized vehicles. But it happens so quickly introduce the first night of us in a very early years of the last century and. Within ten years all the buses are motor buses, thousands of them. And they introduce kind of advanced designs for them. The famous beat bus was one of the first mass produced vehicles ever ever made in this country. So it's at the forefront of technical innovation as well as neighboring this enormous rapidly expanding city to grow. But why did it see for example, the tram or the twenty bus which we did have them off? In the late nineteenth century and lost till the nineteen fifties Charlie buses loss from the thirties to the sixties, but buses of flexible buses can go almost anywhere as long as it's not a low railway bridge or overhanging tree or narrowness otherwise buses can go down the streets of London. And if something happens like a bomb drops in the blitz or a water main bursts, you can just over two bus. You can't do that with the tram. You can't do that with a truly bus. And you certainly can't do that. With an underground train cloth. Limited his work. She the buses were considered more middle cloth. As a means of transport of the democratic as well because they could move into more suburban the mostly based districts, trams and other vehicles wouldn't necessarily. Visit the good people of Hempstead said they didn't want trims trams would bring the grace unwashed. So there's always been buses in there were never trams. Almost this observed. Ceremony. More told today all the buses stopped at eleven o'clock and people stood still streets. John Wayne James eleventh, November nineteenth. London Rena bus lighting stored. How strange it seems to see the buses. Well lit up stairs. I'm down headlights on as required the streets like fairyland Milan's going again at full power diaries, F T Lockwood twenty seven th of April nineteen forty five. Joe how did the the bus managed navigate to was in those a shortage of fuel when as you say many roads being bombed the communities are being challenged especially in the second. How do they manage keep the London buses running throughout that war? It was an extraordinary prodigious effort to be honest. You know, and they almost did feel and the government will was minded to to take them off the roads and they were reduced in number in both wars. But the really interesting story, of course, is that they were forced to employ women to make them work. So in nineteen fifteen late nineteen fifteen first woman. Train's conductor by the end of the wool, all the conductors. Conductor women and lots of the maintenance stuff in engineering stuff who even as well silently in nineteen nineteen to the moon again. But in the second mode will the had to bring women Bank. They wanted to get rid of them again in nineteen forty five. But by then they weren't enough people. People didn't want those jobs, and they were forced to concede that she women had a role. Play. And so they've remained working on the buses ever. Since is also to do with race is about because the bus companies goes about a dose, and they start recruiting to bring people wind rush generation into. Maybe you could just as a tool for social change. Yes. Yeah. I mean, the black British bus driver that we know Joe cloth. Who's actually in nineteen ten? So the story goes back even earlier, but you're right after the second World War, London transport has shortage of labor in looks to Molter looks to actually look to sort of polish exhaust based in London that time and eventually then it's not to the Caribbean. Tobar betas and later to Jamaica. So the two postseason boss, which needs this extra level of staffing? Because you've got to drive around the conduct plays a kind of important part in multicultural story of London and in bringing people from former colonies into the lifeblood of London as citizens residents, and employees. So it's very very important story in that I'm working alongside motivational white crews, and so he kind of integration from the word go, and that's very important extraordinary stories. I've met men who arrived on plane on Friday, and we're chick training ground on the Monday in lich. Straight from Barbados to chick and a week later on a bus. Joe we've mentioned in the introduction to this pace. You are an academic who still a couple of days a week as a bus driver. I'm when we think about that culture landscape and the sense of community the seems have been ever present in the history of the bus companies is that still surviving today. We know there are challenges for transport in London. We know that many of the cruise feel a little bit more threatened sometimes by the kind of people who jump on the bus. But for you does that still feel that sense of cameraderie in the bus does something special. There is a real spirit about it's still it's not quite the same as when they were crew buses with conductors lively because used to work with somebody else driving is quite a solitary activity. But it's true bus drivers do wave to each other. I don't know it's a tiny little thing. But it really makes my diet six o'clock in the morning on a miserable code day. You'll make comes post the other way, and you should eat each other. And there is not coming Rodrigue at the road. So. That's really really important again. It's not the same as it was in London transport days because London transport was his great paternalistic organization that Ranya life pretty much you signed up everything to them. Whereas now, of course, it's a more commercial activity, but it's still a very important part that that sense of the fellowship of the road only buses streets. Get your number one, Charles Dickens, as we get into the city a little before ten four or five of party, our regular passengers we always take them up at the same places, and they generally occupy the same seats. They're always dressed in the same manner and invariably discussed the same topics increasing repeatedly of cabs and disregard of moral obligations. Envinced by omnibus men. There's a little testy old men with a pattern head who always sits on the right hand side of the door as you enter hands folded on the top of his umbrella. He's extremely impatient. And sits there for the. Purpose of deeping sharp. I on the cat with whom he generally holds a running dialogue. He's very officious in helping people in and out and always volunteers to give the cat poke with his umbrella when anyone wants to alight, he usually recommends ladies they have sixpence ready to prevent delay. And if anybody puts a window down that he can reach he immediately puts it up again. Now, what are you stopping for every morning? The moment there is a slight indication of pulling up at the corner of region St. when some such dialogue as the following takes place between him and can't what is stopping fall here to cat whistles and affect not to hear the question. I say what are you stopping fall for passengers? I know you're stopping for passengers business to do. So why stopping say difficult question? I think it's because we prefer stopping going on now mind. Man with great vehemence. I'll pull you up tomorrow. I've often threatened to do it. Now. I will thank replies. The cat touching his hat with a muck expression of gratitude. Very much obliged. You. Indeed. In the laugh. Very heartily gentlemen gets very red in the face and seems highly exasperated the stats gentlemen in the white nickel. At the other end of the Vigo looks very prophetic and says that something must shortly done with these fellows, or there's no saying we're all these will end and a shabby genteel man with the green bag expresses entire concurrence in the opinion as he has done regularly every morning for the last six months morning chronicle twenty-six September eighteen thirty four. Why not take a wonder into the wonderful world of Monaco with an annual print subscription you'll receive ten issues of the magazine year. Plus our seasonal specials the forecast and the escapist subscribes to one year, plus and premium packages, also receive our new annual the Monaco drinking and dining directory, and that's not all of plans comes with a free tote bag delivered to your door. We invite all fans of the Ernest describe today and receive a special ten percent discount on any of our year long. Subscriptions simply visit Monaco dot com. Forward slash Irv next. That's never been a better time to sign up Monaco, keeping an eye on the wall. When you began to collect all these pieces of writing, and as I said is rich and varied and is amazing. How many different kinds of writing about buses that you've found surprise? It. Did hold such a central. I know you come out to Virginia Woolf a couple times in the introduction about to say that you see there women who was living in Bloomsbury who understood what was going on in central new associates, but one thing she knew about was the bus timetable for her. I think is important GC's the Motorola's bus as an emblem away of modernity of the modern metropolis, which is growing that point. We've seen suburbanization is happening buses reaching further and further out into the countryside and she to know about London's buses important part of her street smarts for want of a better word. Not anyone's have used the word street smarts, described venir wolf inspect, but it's part of her her persona in a way that she takes on the idea of being London volts knowing about the London buses in the roots. They move in. Being a fait with the rituals of them. And he puts that into her fictions going back to about the writing, and what surprised us in a way when we go right back to the nineteenth centuries, actually, similar processes going on people like dickens, it's incredibly important to Dicky's that he knows what's happening with with the whole spouses simile Minna Mayhew does the great London labour and poor the great sociological study. He interviews new a bus driver timekeeper a conductor. So it's important for them to get a handle in a way on this phenomenon that sense of people knowing about the buses just seems to percolate on through time three each generation of writers. And as you say, the book contains a variety of approaches in responses to their historical documents newspaper reports and so on and articles written various points in time. They're also stories poems and in a way of found material. I mean, one of the last pieces in the book is photography documentary-maker. Julius trauma is night bus updates from his Facebook feed. So that idea of. Of still commenting on the buses, whether it be Mayhew interviewing the more someone's just their own personal experience of it. To recent years NS settig design story, so many Londoners very sad to see the disappearance of the traditional route Mazda where you could leap on the back some day. You could be holding onto the pole. They've seen as dangerous in great for access other people. We let me have the Ben debauche which never kind of got into people's imagination. Even though it was potentially good for more people to get on and off those fad Doges. It was meant to be more easy to get on and off. And then we moved onto the I think quite generous the Boris bus and your book designed by the industrial or industrial designer Thomas Heatherwick, which looks beautiful but divides opinion too hot in the summer, except you've driven the mole. You've seen the more. What's your feeling about all those buses? Let's. You allowed to give them marks out of ten in lovable terms and useful terms. I can tell you that driving musters, then lovely things to drive. They were quite moving bus with the day. And you know, they came out second World War military technology because London transport had built bomas joined the war and everything they knew about building Halifax bombers went into the design of the right master. But you looking at camp today, it's primitive in the first root muster ran before. Sputnik? Went up the loss rate most of his built before the Apollo rockets landed on the moon this pre space age technology and in comparison verse buses, very sophisticated vehicle. It has lots of technical problems. It was rushed into production far too early because it was a political vanity project. They're very nice to drive. I like the fact that they've revived the idea of a bus designed environment because you know, buses before that looked a bit like play school set sold on him bright, hideous college me grain juicing with horrible Sates. There was no sense of it being an environment and Hedwig quite rightly said a bus should be late. The old idea of cinema. I should take your wife from ordinary life. You know, it should make you feel a little bit special. Does that I have to say I like the boss in many ways, they're about they'll remorse tres, I'm old enough to remember jumping on the bus in deciding whether you want to sit in the smoking area or the non-smoking there's all those kind of social changes to travel around the buses, we kind of forget. Yeah. It was a windows day getting down. Smoking heavily stubbing out on the wooden floor. The update was the smoking. I mean, it's interesting. I mean, one of the things about contemporary buses, all they're supposed to be all kind of the larger bigger they've got to cope with but disabled access, which is a very kind of noble MVP, but also the kind of shopping in the shape of the human beings that are getting onto them. So those are very physical changes which have occurred as Joe said the root most emerges when London is, you know, in the postwar or sturdy in this Bernal feed around so maybe people are a little slimmer and than the contemporary shapes our contemporary has to respond to the needs of the contemporary city. I agree with both you though, I think the week bus as a vehicle the design of it felt a lot calmer. The lighting spectra example, the not the traditional Marquette design and the wooden floors, actually, which is kept in the design so entering it. If feels less tens whereas often, some contemporary buses Joe said with their bright colors are the Goldie fabrics and ill shaped sees. I felt the opposite of that didn't feel very common tool. I feel as though they're intensifying your experience of the city, and I think that Sony something as far as a design for any kind of future buses for London should take some lessons from the idea of an environment. Which feels as though you have gone up in the world by entering it rather than being kind of humiliated and forced into, you know, tin can in order to negotiate the city and the original name for it was the new bus for London. So rather than just buying off the shelf bus that could be in Glasgow Lester Kuala Lumper, it was genuine designed for London. Not in the same sense. It was designed for built in London never left London. But I do think that London has shown Vic. Boss retires. London's most famous boss the forty year old region three made its final run last Saturday and received a big sendoff watched by hundreds of people cavalcade of autism left London transport's parking garage to make their final run over the sixty two route to Ilford and barking site. This is London transport's last route to be worked by RT's and two hundred zero STS had booked to go on this last run. The cavalcade was led by Artie one now in private hands. The very first production model followed by six London transport RT's and several other privately owned examples it returned to barking garage shortly after six pm to be given a cheering reception by the patiently waiting crowd as one enthusiast put the end of an era the RT region three I entered service with London transport in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine and with its narrow upright radiator, grille and half cab became one of London's best-known sites and tourist attraction in its own right about seven thousand will built and with a forty history. The RT was London's longest serving commercial Motors thirteenth of April nineteen seventy nine. Last couple of short questions. Joe one few. We see this debate in London. You are the the numbers of people using London underground buses potentially going down a little bit because of the success of ride sharing apps, for example. We know that there's meant to be a boom in one day in driverless vehicles. We'll see we know many people are feeling so frustrated, but it's clogged up city that tending to bicycles in pedestrian is ways of gangs work, if you did this book again in twentieth time, do you think that be as much rich writing about the bus to be added write-offs alone bussey your peril? I mean, they are wasn't doing raising the. I mean, they all three central London. Really traffic speeds in central on the down to where they were when host traffic on the roads. So people get them in central London, but their thriving in the suburbs. And one of the changes is happening is a bus being moved away from the middle to the ages. I think the London bus is here to stay. I think it will be more flexible already technology allows us to know in about is coming for instance, which in the past it was just used to their impre. Didn't you know? So they'll Bill it more flexibility, and it will become more user Centric as all devices in our life have become but it'll be there in twenty years. Now, I'm sure you're gonna answer this question even troubling. And so could you both pick a number of a have a number of a bus route between two people around the world if they coming to and they're going to jump on the bus, Joe, what number would you say easy for me? So when I drive the number nineteen bus that does all the tourist sites as right through the heart of the West End. It's a fantastic rate of. London institution, and very importantly, it's been running on that route since nineteen six we think and Travis as a resident of stoke Newington. I feel almost beholden say the seventy three again Rahva classic older than moves from the east of the city northeast of the city and down into the center into the West End pulsing long the Houston road. So, you know, picking up bits of shila beers original old route used to go all the way to Victoria has been shortened. Now only goes as far as Oxford circus. But it's still I think a majestic number of bus route. I have a drivers. And Joe thank you so much. And that's all this week's episode of the Arab missed the show was produced by Collado Rabelo and your tickets collected by David Stevens. That's play you out. This episode of the well is not the fringe original their inspiration for London's very first omnibus is Brigitte Bardot with nipples. Thank you listening city lovers. Yeah. Take. Explo- the original brilliant hardback volume from the writers and editors behind monocle magazine, the monocle guide to cozy homes is available at a very special price. Exclusively for urban is listeners to buy the book at half price just twenty pounds plus postage. Visit monocle dot com slash urbanism. Book offer that's monocle dot com forward slash urban est. Book offer monocle keeping an eye and an air on the world.

London Joe cloth London transport London bridge station Paddington Travis Elber London Charles Dickens Dory house Mr. Sheila bair Houston Paris Roach Hackney Omni Hempstead John Wayne James monocle magazine
Branding crisis

Monocle 24: Section D

30:31 min | 7 months ago

Branding crisis

"This is Monica on design. Monaco's weekly look at the best in architecture craft furniture and fashion. I'm Josh Bennett now. Coming up today is the first and a two part special on. How design can help in a crisis today? I sit down for an in-depth chat but the JOE designers behind a possible mark indeed Clive Russell and Charlie won't houses clients include medicine frontier and there the jury behind the instantly recognisable visual identity of the extinction rebellion movement. Save 'cause I think we can talk about a brand being presence rather than brand so we were creating a presence for extinction rebellion that presence manifested itself on the streets. We'll also speak with a witty French illustrator. Who turned his hand to attorney? Cheap pandemics avoidable blindness. I know it it has to be light but I don't necessarily ticket like the. I think it's important to know who you're talking to keep that in mind who that coming up right here on MONOCLE DESIGN ON MONACO. Twenty four do stay tuned and a very warm welcome to Monaco on design. As I mentioned today we're talking to a Jew of designers behind an agency is called this ain't rock and roll founded embarrassed South. London in two thousand nine. The studios founders Clive Russell and Charlie Ward House. Don't function like your average agency. The PAT TAKES UP CAUSES RATHER THAN CONVENTIONAL CLIENTS. And it's done. What for firms including Medicine San Frontier and extinction rebellion so? How could design at clarity legibility and flair to a cause? His branding a bit of an understatement. When you consider the planet to be your client. Oh I'm why should designers pitch for work for free and in their own time? Well spoke to Clive and Charlie to find out about this and more so clive. I'd like to start with you if I may tell me a little bit about your your work and your background you. Charlie ro vista graphic designers but Tell me a little bit about your career so far well. Most graphic designers some. It's quite varied. I think graphic designers quite fortunate in the fact that they can move across lots of different disciplines and do lots of different things. Charlie and I started the same rock Rawson ten years ago largely to sort of take us away from an agency which lacked any principles offensively because we were tired of trying to Design things that we didn't believe him and I'm proud to reconnect to a great apostasy design surpass that the bow house William Morris on has some feeling of a social purpose because when we're talking about communication it will just communicating about something that someone wants to sell to someone then. I'm not sure you've got anything to say really and Charlie I'd like to turn to you. Here's a clive. Mentioned this kind of collective fire in the belly this determination to do something different and move beyond the probably slightly troubled term of just branding something to kind of finding a cause. I wonder how you about finding clients who who represented that Kozo whose work you kind of agreed with. Did you seek them out? They end up coming to you. How did that kind of work? Well if concerts always a wonderful thing isn't it? You never know how you gonNA find people to start with but then when you look back. It's fairly obvious we did that. Partly by just getting involved getting involved in projects and took a fully autonomous approach to things so for instance we've been involved with the Brixton pound a few years we designed the paper currency that you may have seen. The famous is the ten bricks pounds of David Bowie on that involvement then took us into the sort of the world of community activism and we've always maintained our own projects few years ago we invented a a nation state of mind Kubrick. Stop here a country that doesn't exist. That was based on the idea that you could. You could a citizen of bricks dope here by dint of the values that you held not by dint of where you lived and that brought into contact with people like body politic that we ended up doing events and happenings with and then you end up creating your own momentum. New Start attracting that kind of work. I guess out. And then you act on it actually sort of feedback soggy and do something and people who aren't familiar. The Brixton pound is obviously a way of keeping money within independent businesses local businesses. I think caused the monocle always going on about the idea that your community neighborhood is important and may be in the era of lock down a little more important than ever before. Hopefully we're all realizing that I want to move onto a a term which we afford interview mentioned. You said that you don't like the term branding and I wanna ask you clive. Feel free to come back at me on the phrasing of the question. But how do you brand a crisis? Because Charlie mentioned there are community based causes and your work has also looked at things which are not just community based causes. They are crisis in the offing. How do you go about turning your skills as graphic designers to confront something that is so immediate? And so big so pressing. So I suppose firstly the term branding the issue. The time branding is that implicit meaning withheld within it which is about ownership you brand cattle and do you brand slaves. It's not a pleasant word what we've done and try to do with actually Moose design agencies do this. They don't realize doing we give work away effectively now. Ordinarily people give away give it away for money so the agency that creates a brand as we will Offensively leave that brand with the people who ask them to do the work with extinction. Rebellion was slightly different. Because obviously we've because I think we can talk about a brand being presence Robin brand so we will creating presence for extinction rebellion presence manifested itself on the streets. It manifests itself via the Internet in various different ways and it manifest itself via people. So it's very different to buying a product and so you probably know that we don't create any matching vice because selling stuff is not what we're about extinction rebellion with to start selling stuff. Then we business as usual so part of what we try to do with movements is create points of involvement. I'm I suppose in components that will be cool the experiential but our points of involvement Workshops say you can print your clothing with block type. You can So you can create posters. You can do all of that sort of stuff actually. The important thing while you're doing that stuff is not the making of the thing itself is actually the fact that you're talking. And interacting with other people. And that's how you begin to sort of on a grassroots level begins to build a movement the visualization of that is just the unity the outward facing states have big by actually inwardly. There's of more stuff going on across quite inadequate explanation. I think I know what you mean. If I'd moved to you Charlie I suppose a lot of listeners would be interested in your creative process. The impact of the design of the color scheme of the funds of the whole visual identity has been tremendous. And it's commends. Both of your work. But how do you start thinking about these? Things is about getting off your ass doing stuff being in these places talking to these people. Who is it staring at a blank? Piece of paper and thinking. Actually what is the thing that comes I? Can you give us a little bit of insight into we're talking about extinction depending I guess but the creative process that you guys went through extinction? Billion is fundamentally a do it together Movement for all it some sort of diy ethic. It's absolutely something that is moving. That's about people working together. That's where we started. The work that we did for exile was absolutely dependent on not just a group of creatives and it was a group of creatives. It was a team of people that came together with different disciplines but also the strategists the people with years of protest experience the wisdom that came from the research and all of that kind of thing so it was a completely collaborative effort against the fundamental thinking behind. It was that we knew that. Four X HAVE ANY SUCCESS. It would need to motivate a wide constituency and. That's quite difficult in that kind of campaigning. Protest Activists Fair. Whatever label you? Want to give it because everybody comes to this with their own opinions and we knew that everybody would come to exert if they did come would come with their own. Baggage visual clutter and so it was very pragmatic on many levels. We knew that we would have to cut through that sort of visual chatter and those expected stock responses to matters of the environment but also matters of process as well as aesthetic that goes hand in hand with protests business. The guy's hand in hand with the environment and we needed to be able to work with and beyond that so when you've got like a kind of a radical tackle bunch of people turning up on Waterloo Bridge. We needed to be understood as a collective that was greater than the sum of its parts. I'm not inspired a lot of the simplicity of what we did and inspired thinking around. Flax that could flutter above the heads of people and things like that it was very pragmatic on on the design front but it was definitely a collective overview of the different protagonists. The would come to these actions that inspired the initial thinking. I'd also like to track back to that previous question about. How'd you brand the crisis? I just wanted to make the distinction. Really that what we're doing is providing an identity to the response to the crisis. Because how you Brown. The crisis is something that business as usual is doing all the time because you brand the crisis by telling people there is no crisis if your BP or shallow Exxon Mobil. You start talking about how you're going to achieve carbon neutrality or or how. You're moving to shift from one way of behavior into another way of behaving you. Give people hope and reassurance that Bill Right. That's you brand the crisis by making people think that there isn't a crisis and that's something that's true for the environmental crisis now as it was for big tobacco telling people that smoking was a matter of freedom of choice or British. Politics is about enabling people to take back control. So branding happens all the time. Just wanted to make that clarification. Brenda response is not necessarily something that happens with much coordination. And that's something that we've attempted to do with with exam. I take your point Charlie. And there's something I think for our listeners that to really bear in mind while there is jostling for the moral high road from companies. Who are responsible for creating this. The word crisis ends up somehow in your campus. If it's your fault or the responds to it to the previous point one of the things that came up with the beginning of extinction rebellion when the future is totally fats than the past is incredibly important. And so a lot of the visualization came from US tracking back and looking at past movements. So we looked at the suffragettes we looked at para sixty eight. We looked at all of these things in the past and sort of tried to create something that was relatively timeless because it couldn't feel as if it was part of the sort of fashion moments that we're in that time so it had to be different and had to create bid of Zyppah guys moment. And you guys mentioned. I think the phrase was visual. Clutter but this idea that people arriving at a march event would bring with them lots of associations but also. I suppose that the idea of protest itself has this visual language. Which as you mentioned there reaches back through history and across causes what is the image of protests over the years is that the silhouette of a placard is at the wearing of Bo. Is it placing a little flower in the end of a gun? What would the What were the things that you needed to suppose? Habak and to take away before you could create this very simple. Elegant logo formed color scheme that you went with one of the key factors was also to try and think about the processes of involvement. How could we quickly get people involved with making the designs so it had to be ludicrously simple but had to be as I was saying earlier slightly out of time so when we look back from processes we began to look at ways of printing that we used in the past power? Sixty eight sticks in my mind particularly because of the nature of the way produced it's posters and so the font that we created was based on form and the way would type prints so that actually what we printed onto people's cloven would also relate to what was online on the Internet. So you have this aesthetic is at once analog but also it is digital so those two things that easily combined by looking back into the past trying to mix these techniques together one of the best examples of this is the wood cups that miles does one of the ways. These cuts prints on. People's jackets is via free day printing. So you're able to take a lie. No cat you digitize it and then you create freely block averts and then you prints onto people's clothes again so backwards forwards forwards backwards and that in essence creates the simplicity of itself. Because then one of the things we didn't want to do was have one because that would be a nightmare. We'd like some crazy sort of fascist movement. So we wanted a plethora of colors can looking backwards simple references in our own history. Like at Watt a policy that he used and the printing techniques that he used again. Referencing those within the identity. We've created and there was a lot to in front five different people. I'm thinking about these viable pieces of recycled material. We could find and things like that because that was quite important. Say as you can imagine. It's an economic even after all that Clive Russell and Charlie woodhouse at these south London design studio. This ain't rock and roll will hear more from them shortly seduce. Stay WITH US. Next up on mark on design. We look at how imagery cannot liberty to serious information. Frenchman Matthieu is nine for his pithy illustrations for titles including Vanity Fan brands including erm as a new may have seen him adding little fund the monocle. Weekend Edition newsletters to from his Airy Plump Film Studio in Marseilles. We asked me to tell us how illustrations can sophon difficult conversations and won't earthy sketched out a charming survival guide for the current pandemic. The survival guide came as a till idea. I've been very bad at keeping up with my client in a nice way of had so much work done. I was always putting it for later. You know thinking all send something later. You know even postcard for the New Year anything so I had a couple of ideas of what I could San and maybe a nice way to say you know. Hey guys love working with you and thinking of you in this strange times. So that was like the genesis of it and then he was really trying to find it till ideas. You want to be offensive so he was trying to find the right balance to find the humor in this situation and yes strangely. I think like some the image of held up. Now that we're in the phase in fronts where we're about to start to leave the home again. Some of these image actually student apply but some of them have maybe a couple of them maybe bit dicey now thinking some strange way. There was one which I still find quite funny because it's really going into the surrealists side which I think the join can really help. Doing that would be very hard to make that image with a foot to graph Weinstein's that when he's just a simpler you should wear gloves and essentially deepen inside giant glove. Kinda like walking assess as if nothing was happening saying. Hello to each other and chemo enjoying this very different styles and approached his sons. Ken enjoy many different ones. I know it has to be light but I don't necessarily take it lightly. I think it's important to know talking to keep that in mind. So it's your choice of finding the line of what is the intent? The intent wasn't to mock The disease of the people it was almost mocking I Dunno I if I think in somewhere it was almost thinking. If we're sending it to a hypochondriac who had some sense of humor that was kind of What could I say to ease up In these times for just a couple of minutes hip elite the rubbing his head with low sugar after beating the little skimpy got through the mail and burned in the trash but at least he would have had like a couple of movies. Do take a breath and widen. Look at it in a different light. I think joining as asserts insensitive Kindness be a certain sensitive Does a humanity because the line is drawn by hand? And that's always something that I feel very strongly about as almost never used a victim because I think they leave out some of that Very important sense of what enjoying his in terms of the illustrator. The fact that you can feel someone behind joy you can feeler almost a presence. I think and I'm not talking just for mind. Any joining of any distributor. I think you can feel the the person in some way through to join so I think that really helps because you know there is some on. You. It feels less like an attack eventually or less like something that is pointed at you. It adds a sense as you would do. If you talk with your nights had to pub- having fun and balancing ideas out and making fun of each other it does feel a bit more like that. There's a presence with you when you're reading it. I think if you had to sum it up it is an escape somewhere just like you would say in a good movie or good piece about should be an escape but if it's a good one it should be an escape that when you come back to your normal life drinks you sidestep on how to look at things. I don't think escape for escape. Sacredness. City good thank. You should be escaping to come back with a different eye. Fresh Sean looks things. And that was illustrator. Matthieu Musone in Marseilles speaking to Mongols very own nicknames. My many thanks to both of them. And now we rejoin Clive Russell and Charlie Waterhouse to talk about what ideas to run with which to leave behind. Plus designers shouldn't went for free activism. As I've mentioned there is about creating impact and I suppose the the graphic designers traditional role would have been also take into account beauty. These things kind of mutually exclusive this conversation that you guys had as well when you do see as you mentioned earlier. A flag flickering overhead on Waterloo bridge. There is part of your job which has been the function of it. Make an impactful message. And there's another part where you as someone who is committed to and observe an appreciator of mutate must also think about that as well. How do the two things come together? I guess you happy that you achieved. Both I think the two things are essential and when you combine those pap seemingly disparate things. That's when you get the real magic and that's when the alchemy happens and you end up minding your own gold Exxon has always Bayden seemingly disparate positions. We talk about this appalling crisis that we are in at the same time as talk about beauty and love and compassion and that's a fundamental part of what Xsara bounces about how we hope as a planet with what is happening to us. I mean that's about how we live. Even as we face the ever increasing inevitability of our extinction so on an intellectual level that holding of activism and and sort of love and rage is fundamental to what we do but also in terms of this sort of the iconic to look like a nonviolent army on the march is important for understanding and the design has been fundamentally important for creating comic moments of blocking roads so a seven meter banner for instance that has a compelling message and it's designed well absolutely forms of of centerpiece of the physicality of our actions. But when we created the garden bridge on Waterloo bridge or when the pink boats turned up in Oxford circus than it gives the ability to imagine better spaces and it's being echoed at the moment in sort of central London. Obviously the lack of business as usual and the lack of traffic is bringing some of that kind of quiet reflection and birdsong back to our urban spaces and and that's kind of part of the thinking is well all parts of the result of what acts are does with. Its actions is when it closes down the road it's not simply the activism of closing a road and disrupting people but it's also the beauty the that closed road results in which is the ability for people to walk and cycle without being endangered by traffic or the pollution of the traffic. It enables nature to come back in. It was said this time last year. When we closed off the corner of Marble Arch. That was the first time you could hit birdsong in that part of London for several hundred years probably so beauty in activism or truth or virtue or humanity all these sort of slanty abstract magical nouns absolutely part of the whole identity and presence and design of the movement and while we're grappling some of those very big way to have two topics. I Guess I talk about the PAS. You guys didn't take with the branding. I always think interesting. Whenever I've worked on magazines books radio shows. They're always little moments of gold unexplored avenues of inspiration that get left on the cutting room floor and the don't end up being part of the final product. Can you clive? Think of any examples from the branding process an idea an unexplored avenues that didn't make it to the final identity but that you thought was interesting. Zoli are cutting room. Floor is more like Probably resembles a massive scrap yard because the numerous strange items been mentioned along the way and things that actually made it out a quite crazy. I mean I can't actually pick one thing. I'm just trying to rack my brains over what might have happened. There are things that are going to happen. That really interesting. I suppose. One of the really clearly defining moments was not creating two typefaces which saved us an awful lot of time we just created one and that was quite good because that was the moment you realize that maybe Google Fonts on so bad after all and sometimes something in open source nature of Google. That is almost acceptable but not quite of the things that we left on the cussing ru four were not around much stronger language. At the beginning there was a huge banner that we did where climate change with fucked and at that point we were going to go down now form of messaging almost entirely so we were GONNA use entirely shock messaging and actually there was a lot of people that were like. Whoa hold on a second. We want to be divisive. How divisive do we actually want to? We want to use the C word in public offend that many people that quickly and so that those around the language and how we might be able to encapsulate more umbrella like aspect to the movement by just turned down a little bit folks in was that perhaps would difficult for people like rebel and rebellion rather than going hard into the Swear words and shock factor that. Perhaps we were thinking of in the original. I did and Clive Alaska. This and then Charlie will come to you for the final word but I think to kind of go full circle and the interview in your decision to maybe step outside of the usual remitted the graphic designer to seek causes rather than clients in the traditional sense. Means that you probably have to say no to a lot of people so I'm a little interested in whether you've been approached by private banker in oil interest brand for them and what you said to them but I also wonder what would be your perfect clients. Moving forward I suppose. It's hard to know but clive tell me. Is there anyone you've said no to that? You were happy about. And who would be the ideal client moving forward it can be as fanciful as unlikely or is imminent as like. I'll start with the the last question I so. We almost have the best client already. It's worth so I think that's quite a good clients. Admittedly I work with is free earth. So I'm guessing with my after. Ask to feed us as well. Actually we quite lucky we have some wonderful clients anyway. I'm always interested in the unexpected client. That still fits into those principles. So I think graphic design one of the wonderful things about graphic design is the fact that your often plunged into worlds that you know nothing about and that learning process immersion. In another person's world is a wonderful thing. People who've said no to we've set notes a lot of people I think we said notes momentum at one point there's a fashion brand as well not big one but yes so it's sort of. Charlie might be able to think of a juicy one that we've set up to on struggling. You don't need to show any names. It was more the idea of I. Guess for our listeners that you can be brave about your decisions. You don't need to show for people that you don't believe in maybe a slightly harder road to walk but maybe also it's a walk in which your head can be held a little bit higher. I suppose that's a little bit what I'm getting at and the Nice thing about your ethos as you mentioned Having client better no one can disagree. Within the earth in the interest of the earth is a lovely thing. Charlie. Picking up on what Clive said. There is there a client that you'd love to have in the future. Is there anyone that you would love to say? No to saying now is a very powerful thing and it's something that I think. The design industry and the industries that feed it don't allow to happen very often in were expected to pitch for free and shift all the risk of that onto the shoulders of the creative agencies. Which in turn makes incredibly difficult for the smaller people to survive against the muscle of the largest setups things. That's the most fundamental Mo- that this rock and roll has said over the last few years we refuse to pitch for free and I think that's been the most fundamental things Matt level. We've set not loads of people that in a different world would've been amazing clients. Lots of people in the arts creative museum sector. Who thinks that it's acceptable to ask you to do work for nothing at the same time as asking other people to do that. There has been quite empowering. There's probably leads of other people that we would also want to say not but they probably dream of asking us to work with them anyway in terms of the deal. I'm going to be as mysterious as clive on that. From when we're at our best on the sort of all of us not just us too is when you do something without any hope or expectation of result or success when he can step into the unknown and if we do that with the work that we do and then attract of the people see something that they like. That is the real challenge. Because it's that kind of thing have been put into a new a challenging space forces you to learn as much about yourself as it does. The currently working with that was clive. Russell Anjali waterhouse heads of the Design Agency. This ain't rock and roll many thanks to them for joining me and is with regret. The only have time for on today's show. But if you'll game for a few more design minded delights do listen to a five minute. Mid Week sister show monocle on design. Extra DOT has on Thursday and do subscribe to not miss a beat. It's also available wherever you get your podcast as is our entire back catalogue for more delights. You can see capital subscribed to Monocle magazine on newsstands. Online will sign up to our daily bulletins. You can say peruse are fine collaborations books like at Monaco Dot Com. Today show was produced edited by the effort patient. Maybe Evans with research from Charlie Phil mccord and Nick Manasseh. Thanks to all of you on Josh. Thank you very much for listening and goodbye.

Charlie Clive Russell Clive US Waterloo Bridge London Josh Bennett Charlie Ward House Marseilles attorney Monaco London Medicine San Frontier Monica Brixton Exxon Mobil David Bowie Moose design Rawson
109. Remember, Shaun Bailey is 47 years old

The Skylines Podcast

28:23 min | 2 years ago

109. Remember, Shaun Bailey is 47 years old

"Breath. On july. And this is skylines symmetric podcast. If you've been been listening for wall, then you'll know the couple of months back. We did a pair of episodes speaking to two of the candidates shortlisted to be conservative candidate for mayor of London there. She's free people not shortlist and true to my luck in life in general, the one we couldn't dissuade through an interview with the one who proceeded to win that contest. Shawn Bayley Kurnia member the London cembery twice failed parliamentary candidate in Hammersmith and well at pennies somewhere. Yeah. He declined speak to us as I get impression. He's declining speak to a lot of journalist. So I'm not taking it too personally. And if I was running his campaign that is probably our manage to to be on this because it's not going. Anyway, I figured it was time. We kind of how this you know, if shoreline come to us than we will we will discussing behind his back like lace Gucci down the ages. So Stephen bushy it took me about how how is going. Hello, steven. How you doing? I'm well, right. Right. Quite looking forward to being being terribly mean about someone. He snapped me. It's I mean, I think not endorse the snubbing of this podcast by thing. You're exactly right. And I say I have to put my hands up with someone who when he announced when look he's not gonna beat to dicamba. He's not going to embarrass the conservative party judgment than looks like it may have been half right about equally. He's a poor candidate. I doubt he has a grip on any sort of areas of the role heat of. Definitely is always concourses. We have a lightweight is not planning policy is English. So I mean, I think it would have been I mean the other two candidates. I think emerge from their appearances on this podcast with their reputations. In Hans 't. I did not think that Shulan Bailey would have emerged from it with his reputation and aunts. And therefore you his team were wise to swerve it. Yes. I think so I mean, I did actually I just like chatting wonkery, really. But I did enjoy expend both of them. Andrew Gulf is he's he's been thinking about how to run London for a long time. This is like full tilt of the mayor not unless he has some views on my showroom will now so thousand crisis until but he has spent low time thinking about he's clearly and gazed with the mechanics of the role. If been up to me, I would have picked Morrissey, actually, because I think the worst case scenario there as well. I think London is would be flattered by an American sang hail of the city so much. I wanna be your man, I think she was talking about a lot of issues kind of not traditional. Serve to issues like homelessness and child care that would appeal to kind of middle class London voters she would need to win. But I think the might find it to go to run against woman and in the worst case scenario, if they picked Morrissey would have been she would emerge as new star in conservative party. They could lead to parachute into seat. Only don't think Bailey's going to have that good around. What do you reckon? Yeah. When they when they were nnounced, basically, whenever I would see someone who worked for the cargo will look in order, which would would you woman and the commonality was Bailey would finish lost. I think so I think you have both would have been very strong. He really knows the brief he has a variety of independent view. So you couldn't do the whole. He's an avatar of the Tory Posey in the country. You couldn't run things went badly wrong. For for for some reason. He couldn't run a fear campaign based on the idea and he's a dangerous. I right wing. So I think though, I think you're right about all of the upsides of Morrissey candidacy, the one tactical advantage Morrissey does not have is because she is someone who is clearly going places and paused the the benefits of hubbing the candidate would have been creating someone who could have gone down the things for them. She wouldn't have been able to if you know, those these feel. Hypotheticals if in twenty twenty two big issues than our problem for the Tory party, Brexit and Heathrow. Joy Morris ability to kind of go. I'm not type of conservative is a lot more limited because she is someone who could and should be aiming to get a seat in parliament somewhere. Andrew both. There's no I'm just gonna say is near the end of his career in the beginning. So he would be much more able in that situation. If like Brexit bad. He throws his pro Beck Brexit. Yeah. So that's I think we can do the wrong type of Brexit. Right. His his ability to. Whereas what they've actually got. Yeah. I mean, we're let's let's kind of run through some of the stuff. That's that's emerged about Bailey so far. So he's he's fended. I mean, we should say he's not like current statements is basically, I think particularly journalists particularly uncle businesses. Either have kind of been drawing his archive for stuff he's in the past. But the things we like rich vein of slightly crazy things he said around two thousand five in which he's offended pretty significant chunk of the population. I mean, one of the highlights so far is talking about how celebrating Diwali would lead to a crime wave. That was a thing wasn't yet. So he said then people taking off time for devante and eat with destroy on our community and without community would turn into a crime ridden. Cesspool remarks, which wet they when they came out first, they responded with a very old non-sequitur criticizing eminent code, the mayor Grampian Kensington now law conservative stink than the. Reason why he did that is because actually heave used the mayor runners of profile Braise in order to be the candidate in Kensington next time. But as a year the thing is important to understand is is far as the conservative parties viability as the second party in London alone its viability as a party, which might spider to get back to. It's twenty twelve position of winning London Marathi affluent Hindu voters, who do guess what? Take off time. To celebrate Diwali on essential fat coalition. Right. That's now isn't even a Volta group, and they need to have to win voter group. They need to have to do even as poorly as Dakhil Smith it. The the remarks about Muslims are obviously quickly offensive bought the conserve they unless existential to the conservative party, although they the Muslim populations Molly to live. Yeah. Is less affluent. And in Westminster tumbles are more concentrated in seats were. Where the conservatives do not retain an interest. Although, of course, the other element of is the other of pain point further conservatives in London are socially liberal graduates. Earning above average who in twenty ten and twenty fifteen did vote for the conservatives and in twenty seventeen and indeed in the Richmond botox unto the first Marilyn very much did not. And although like, you know, there is a very fair critique to be steady than as chunk of people in in most leave moved to London who you know, they they couldn't tell you which one of developed need was which they like live in a city where those things celebrated they the Pov them he'll of London to them. And they want their mayor to also feel that way so multiculturalism of London Israel's population, not a bug his feature something that people like, yeah. And interesting as people kind of won't be able to integrate into a kind of London ISM as it were. But they like this idea. That, you know, people like, you know, we'll get in the people there watching the football with will have different lives VO. So those those two sort of vital of Ota groups, and he is already annoyed the there's a much bigger one. He's he's potentially night, which is women women. Really? We took Melles. Yeah. Bailey has said the allowing teenagers access to free contraceptives and abortion services were lead criminality, and this is good normalize sex. Which is obviously what does what does that even mean normalized sex? The thing is I'm not gonna defend those from public policy and more attendant, I should say there is more user has written that young single women in the cities deliberately become pregnant -als kill homes and benefits. Quote. These people are not stupid if the state office the money for doing something they will do it in simplest latte. Great is it right? So from public policy perspective, and indeed a ghetto kind of being correct about the factors. Those statements are nonsense. Right. The proportion of lone parent households has been roughly flat over about verbal quarter for about thirty years the proportion of teen pregnancies, however is one of the big policy successes of the law stable government. Indeed, this is just continued to fall into fall into full four nerve areas policy interventions than both parties to hurt we are laboring traditional conservatives kept. There's also probably some social changes in terms of more awareness about sex Ed than have helped with as well. The flip is low will advise nonsense is nonsense popular with us an electorally important section of London. So indeed, the Sanni weird thing is on my own estate. I will talk people will serve say because. Yeah. People have as I did I say siemian TV occasionally. Number or something to do with politics. Talk. Talked me about politics, right? The idea that era people who get pregnant Gaer council house. He's really really really strong, even though it has no basis in vite Ordine peoples lived realities off. I'm Wade is people will say this to me at like ten cessation every nice when we got. But we know all of the people who in this block. Do you think is an adequate print, and if there are not on this block, then where where these people live, but at least vice something which wall it stupid and wrong does appeal to a chunk of Londoners who, you know, basically voted for cannon till two thousand eight then flipped back a little bit to corn. But not as much as as other other voters. So at least it's stupid. But at least it's not electorally repellent, which realize the level where order act with Bailey lie. The remarks will be dumb. But at least that dumb remark is not lie. You know? So in a deposited the same very busy two thousand five pamphlet suggested the good looking girls tend to be. Around jr. Is a a nice comment. Yeah. I mean, I think so I think the problem with that KOMO woman knows nobody editing. This pamphlet lays how the I can imagine like someone saying this out loud. I want to know how this got into print as a good thing for anyone. I think one of the other so remarkable things than our this is revealed is one eight two reminder of the hilarious state of the conservative party into and five. But to I mean, the number of people kind of said, you know, when I've gone these comments are not going to help him electro going to say, oh know, he grew up on a on an estate, I mean one he grew up in a terraced house next to an estate and was maintained by the local authority to. I mean, I grew up on an estate and live on an estate now, it doesn't mean than I am. I I haven't liked glean some magic social policy incites by dint of light year. I didn't absorb it from the walls. And I think there's there's an element to some of the hype around Bailey's, and he's never really lived up to. Then is basically this kind of like gave his kind of his Asian of our will because of his background. It must be true. It's a bit. When Labe MP's have been in the army, there are so few of them and people kind of project leadership qualities on some of them are simply not they're not mentioning any Dan Jarvis. In particular, the way he was gonna talk possessor as as a future labour leader, but stint Harleys Bogra fee rather than if he has used to them politically. Yeah. I mean, Dan is kind of the example item. One more impressive than Shawn Bailey. But he's a little bit like going like more nutritious than mold. He did most get himself elected math, admittedly, the label near the Sheffield city region is not that's not hard election. But nonetheless, he got that post. So I think there's another of their in the other problem which one baby has separate to his his remarks. I think at least there's a really strong sleek of chauvinism among people who've lived in this city, all our lives. I just don't think will accept his Amirul as Merrill prospect, someone whose political career is really going backwards. I mean, finding a marginal seeing twenty ten and then a safe labor seat in twenty seventeen is no number sign of a man who stars on the rise. I just don't think than the London's will ever accept a second tier? He's been tipped as a rising star over decade now, and you can't do that light. You've arisen the oil you broke in the first place. Okay. It's time for number installment of our occasional feature of the experts of of the I I'm here with threat your policy, Paul twenty. Pocus? And this week. I've got a very big question. I think about policy make do miss matter. This is city need a man deprive. Or is it just like with kind of been shunted into this debate? Because let Joe's ball really mas- matters Domon dooney delusion without. As an again, I feel directly question is it just something real? I think you're just not shut a point with this. A number of benefits. Half quality technical reasons, why the report material when think about the current Baz city region rather than just a lead of law thority civil one side. And I think that the real big benefit of the man is what people 'cause best soft power. It's how one person died elected by actually million people in in terms in terms of Manchester meticulous. Very high profile which allows the going get things done. I think that's the thing that Luther eighties particular probably constrained by because they're elected by by a couple of thousand people pops in one neighborhood, then sort of chosen to be leader behind closed doors within whichever parties in empowered auto is gonna be your turn this time. Whereas, you know, the husband legitimacy in guava and get things done. I think it's quite interesting. If we look at C sitting con having a four hundred America despite being the mayor of London burnin clearly sorta take on the month of being the mad cheerlead the norm and seeing that you not take remitted beyond a bunch Esther. Yeah. Him and Steve from the if city agent clearly themselves a doublet going around by the drums. The on duty. And I think that's great. I know what you say the same things. I couldn't be particular America. The American New York is always been a very high profile position. Despite changing, obviously, many many times the opposition still take capes with a real sort of esteem around the office, which allows whoever occupying too too often and get things done. But is this just? So the dependent on scale was met life. You kind of look anew took mind for key matters metro's, but we do have the the low confer teams Pacific measures affecting elected leader of the council and some of them have been a national profile. I think modern Reese in Bristol yet Johnson in the poll the other night, you kinda got it stopped on you don't tend to his much about what the mayor what has been saying. So is it just like its way of this comic a place, and it's nice. We get a help somewhere. Smaller was certainly I think that it's quite interesting because I think it's a reflection the characters that that will go particularly in bristle law authority, Marvin especially very forthright good pro five lots of ideas, and he's very dynamic. I think tell short sort of one of the one the big, I guess, the Maryland model is humans point pens. Pennzoil. On the quality of you to get. But I think the certain scale comes into it. I think if your clean if you've got a large Mondays, then you've been elected by more people are probably gives you a great amount of soft power to go around to kick. People the boom about this store need to get that sorted. But what exactly the right skill is? I don't know. And I think if you were a mayor of a smaller place pretty dynamic, imagine, you would still get you would still gotta voice. So I would say it out say it's important, but it's not absolute necessary. So do you think it will be a good idea if mos- Jeep Inc? Click governments have missed trick by not just making the model. But that's a really interesting question. I mean, not something that is problem policymakers at the moment you about this idea. Now, the sexiest did if communities come out and said, we're gonna have a devore framework. We don't know exactly what that's going to be. But it seems to be comes off the back of Tory manifesto words, which could have delusion for everywhere. The big question is what is the right model everywhere is it one thing east another thing for for companies in more rural areas, I think that's still needs to be worked out. Figureheads about Google could talk to is Sony about thing. If outside of the biggest cities, don't put forward, a convention will actually have one elected politician will be a good thing. I think we should be open to that. I don't think we should think that. That it can on me for big places, but let's have a conversation about. Okay. Last question. He's your favorite, man. Any man never fictional mayor. I won't tell Kakheti from the wire I well I did want to play football against Steve. Whether it's a party conference a couple of years ago in we're cutting bit of a spot with one another. So I didn't think that's early. Yeah. It's it's the president because you never. I think he just I think it's just dead competitive, and I'm dead competitive as well because citizen, Chad, eventually, the is really really nice block. So. Very much like stage despite purporting to get on what they're all. Only that place also came to be getting behind their pie journalism push that place forward, and that's great. You know, like all of our cities relive all measures. I can't thank you. Cool. Do you think it was a mistake for some of the big names who touted his possibilities like Justine greening? Should she go for it? So I I've actually done you turn on this in. So even yesterday when we won't we offer to appear on this. I would have said yes, the reason being sediba karnal, though, he's a great campaigners quite weak incumbent. His the somebody could have been in the big centerpiece of his time that pedestrianisation of Oxford circus affectively being killed on by Westminster city council. It's very difficult to see what his his wife done message twenty twenty. The hope affair is the only thing I can point to the solid achievements yet, however, the natural environment, I'm near the politics of London away. They're changing and the fight when the government then unless there's been a government, and you have a labor government in office was sitting of -ment nationally will be building an apple and a large chunk of the city doesn't like will be pursuing a Brexit's a large chunk of the city doesn't line and he's very difficult to work out. How the conservatives could win and why used to think is the Ed Vasil Justine greening. To in my view. Underrated conserved politicians would be wise to run and give that profile on the on. However, the thing I've been really struck by is not then and many many conservative activists are I should say are very aware of Bailey's weaknesses and all aware it's difficult race. But there has been a kind of systematic kind of. So when I wrote he saying they should run mountain Gregor who who worked on several to release you've action to this is a good piece. But you've underestimated the the ridiculous expectations conservative members and will have and people already selling to say things to me, you know, of course, we're going to beat Sadique Khan because they have convinced themselves than sediba karnal, though, he is is a lot weaker than the actually is. And I now think than it would not have been good although year, we would have said, well, just greeting quitted herself. Well, all good right up from the economist didn't insult any vital electoral blocs of. Even I don't think any actually we're being good for them brand internally. I think a big interesting problem for the Tories in terms of whether they are going to retain a competitive interest in citywide elections in the capital than they do not have a reasonable sense of where they all building from which means that if you are someone who could help them build from it. Why would you take the blame? Basically. I think they've underestimated much operation Boris Johnson walls. But I mean, two points in response to that one is it despite this slightly weird electric system. It is kind of two which race like the if the con- doesn't win the Tory candidate will listen, you will that's the way it's going to go. So therefore, whoever that candidate is in the same way that like, you know, five thirty eight sang before the twenty sixteen presidential election. Trump could win by it's a to which rates. He could win stuff happens. The Tory candidate could win. Scandal. Could come out the mood could shift in weight, you know, predictions of mugs of this point in history. The other thing I would say is if it's not a job for Justin greening type because the no adding to this just kind of butts up my point about will they should have gone for joy Morrissey. They should have gone with someone who is building a brand rather than someone who's clearly on the downward slope of their career as show baby is. Oh, yeah. I mean, they would have been better off with with either of the other candidate. I mean, the thing is the big difference. We knew on European politics, including the UK, even align for majoritarian electoral system is voters Armel willing to shop around now. Yes, present the console of all the second party in London. However, if you look at all of the polling out of the capitol, and you look at the local election results is not certain then that will remain the case. Right. And so, yeah, you can you can draw a very plausible scenario where econ is defeated by Shawn. Bailey. A lovely voice Brokaw for that. Because you just couldn't believe the problem. I have is. I know from intellectual hygeine perspective that you've got to keep an open mind. And I know it's the originally possible. I know that he probably does have, you know, a a one intentions or something, right? I love Conseil. Yeah. But I don't believe it. I cannot get my head around is simply cannot conceive of a man Balan impressive becoming mayor of like, I take your point about how something else could imagine on the because it to be fair. Let the first Maryland action. The two thousand Ken Livingston was not Lampe candidate. He came up as an independent Anais claimed allowed full by the by the electric system in a way, I make it to second place. You can win. Yeah. What what happens if branks is going really badly. And ios d-conn isn't well ahead. Sean Bailey's continuing to drift. And then someone like the Pimlico plumbers guys yet. Basically, a pro European Tori gets into the race and says look if you don't like Brexit, but you're a conservative vote for me. You send a message about about that becomes quite powerful. I think a war if you know what I Sean berry goes Sadique on is going to be mayor of London. Hsun Bailey is not gonna win. If you're concerned about Heathrow the only way to symbolize that if you are if your anguish conservative vote for me or what if Caroline pigeon. If the lib Dem's simulate the same, and then you get big third party vote out of Richmond Sola. Yeah. That whole of the of the fly of country, the bitten the I read amusing flyover country in weight. I mean, the planes flow. We we should be we should be wrapping up. But just before we do is the mechanism for replacing Bailey light could the Tories go who by mistake here. Lads get rid of him on put someone else because election is still eighteen months away. There's no constitutional mechanism to to do. So they would have to. Off him to step aside. And he would have to agree to do. So. In have of bull appointee into disrepute, which I think it will be hard to say. I mean, I think than to. Although I think there's actually a very strong case to be made for trying to sub him out. I don't think they will. I think he's been interesting. Senior of of double down on defend defending remarks. He has now today finally apologized for rather than having a well London based on piece of race it Bill ready start to put on sanitaire around him. And then which would worry me if I were him all C H Q. But I just think that they're stuck with him partly because I can't see how how buff would would want. How this point? And I think if you'll joy Morrissey in Norway, you've kind of already banked the fact that people like you and me and all those of London facing journalists like Dave Hill's excellent on London on London blog would not saying, you know, he's actually quite good joy Morrissey before she ran that campaign bus. She's got what she wants out of out of this. Why would she give up year in her life to probably lose to con in a circumstance when the Tories would have dumped one candidate, which is never a great position to be in? Okay. So we look forward to may twenty twenty one. We almost certainly at sea the com- kitchen bellied us cenex time. You've been listening to the book cost from geometric, the new states. It was presented and produced by me, John if you enjoy the absurd them, please do consider Levi's nine chains. They really helps people to discover the show and the more people getting this show that cheap. We'll go. We'll donation for the medium of trains. Thanks for listening. Goodbye.

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Dora Maar and Jann Haworth: acclaim at last

The Art Newspaper Weekly

54:19 min | 1 year ago

Dora Maar and Jann Haworth: acclaim at last

"The newspaper put coasties brought to you in association with bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three to find out more visit bombs dot com. It's the newspaper. Podcast I'm Ben League. Thanks for listening joining this week. We look at two women who in different ways of not received you. Recognition for their achievements is artists. A bit later you hear my interview with Jim Howarth who has a retrospective show. Ah Talent House Gallery in Chichester Gallery with one of the best collections of modern British art in the UK. But I do Ramar. Ma was one of the key. Women Artists in the surrealist movement exhibiting her photographs and photo montages in several of the seminoles really shows in the mid nineteen thirties but after nineteen thirty six when she met Pablo Picasso so she became more famous as his mistress amuse than as an artist in her own. Right because they'd characterized her as the weeping woman and said it in portraying her in this way he was obeying a vision forced itself on him for her part Marceta Picasso that only portrait of me allies with Omar continue to make work particularly paintings endings in the fifty years that she lived after her break up with Picasso in Nineteen Forty Four. It's only since a death in one thousand nine hundred seven. That work as an artist has been gradually reassessed now now after it began at the centre Pompidou in Paris early this year. A major survey of Mars work just opened at Tate. Modern in London I went there and took a tour of the show with a curator. Her and Louis Emma door didn't begin life Cutura or indeed more. Did she tell us a bit about her background. She was born Henriette. Theodora Markevic to Croatian father who was an architect and a French mother who owned a Fashion Boutique and the name Dermot came about for a number of reasons probably. She told her father that. There's another photographer. Who is active? who had the name Markevic? So mom made sense. Dora had also been kind of name of affection throughout her childhood. And she publishes under Markevic. Theodora AH Durham is a name that sticks. She didn't begin her artistic life as a photographer. d'Ici she studied painting into decorative arts school. That's right she was. She desires to be a fine art painter. She told her parents this as a young woman a teenager in fact they advice that it was quite precarious career choice and that she would do well to settle something like the the decorative arts instead and so she went to committee to James and she studied pluses in the applied arts. Let's use. I took classes in painting as well and in photography of course apply and it was really then that things change for her. She was sort of millions of look young photographers at that time. So she met some of the key photographers of the twentieth century. Didn't she quarterly on absolutely she. She had a darkroom with brass. I at one point although then. He's really in the early stages ages of his career as well. She became an assistant to the American fashion photographer. Harry offset miss and and her talent achy for the medium was really identified by An art critic named myself say the very influential photographer editor Called Manual CJ. She seems to have had enormously precocious. Oh Shit talent for photography. Because she don't just taking up publishing photographs and showing them right unless she had a camera as a girl and and in fact her parents were she was on the ship. Travelling between Bernarda reason Paris she would photograph then and actually we. You can see in some of the works that she produces a teenager the kind of style that we see later in her surrealists were even like intentional. Double exposures playful use of shadows his attention to shape form architecture. All of these things which become much more pronounced as her career develops the earliest room in. The show focuses much more on awesome commercial activities but also the key thing about her commercial activities is like you say that there's a sort of clear sort of sensibility in there to Blow to push the edge of that of that of that format can tell us something about. I mean we're looking for instance that image of new sh L.. You're here new Shilowa. It was a great surrealist member of the group and on the one hand we have two straight image portrayed photograph but then also next to it. We have this photo montage in which a spider's web been overlaid over new shoes face. This is a really fantastic example of the way in which Mas surrealists really sensibilities also very apparent in her commercial commissions. We don't know exactly where this image was published. But it's believed to have been made for an anti she aging cream called Roger. Fantastic years line. Wait for you say she's over late two different images to very dramatic effect and really represents the innovation at the heart of mass. Work will say the kind of the glamour and dark gothic elements much of it throughout this room. That we're looking can't you some of it. You really can't believe that it's a commercial photograph and there's an image of a woman with shampoo in her hand looks directly like a immediately look much more like a surrealist votes within could ever be used for commercial purposes the images that you see in this room that really remarkable and today we live in completely image saturated world back then in the nineteen thirties. This is a time when photographers are constantly constantly pushing the boundaries of the the medium and this is a time the modernist period when photography is no longer being seen only as a tool of factual recording but also as something that can really play within some for reality and the people who are commissioning. Photography Editors in advertisers are really hungry for these images and Commercial Ashok commissions become a really important air forum. Photographers like Ma. I suppose if if you know anything about mall. You're likely to know that on the one UNHANDY was part of this sort of glamorous autistic Miller on the other hand that she she was involved with surrealist one thing that's I think less well-known about work is that she was at your side streak photography. We're just going to go and have a look at that now. We know the room where we see Doorman Street for movie. And we're actually facing two images made in London which here in one thousand nine hundred thirty four and really striking about this for me. What strikes me is this extreme vulnerability of humanity manatee amidst this sort of unforgiving city that surrounds them? It's true and there's a certain stillness even quietly to some some of Durham on street photography. where she's really honed in on individual figures in the city streets with standing in front of a photograph graph of a well-dressed gentleman holding out his hand in what we think is probably the city of London or maybe Oxford Circus? And he's he's holding a sign that says no no Dole work wanted and this is a really poignant reminder I think of the particular economic moment in which Mars working next to that photograph. There's an image of very heavily cloaked very elderly woman selling lottery tickets sitting under the sign for Midland Bank at Oxford Circus and again it's a very very compelling image because the sitter is making eye contact with the camera and speaks to this moment in which Mars active. She's like you say she is making Zuma's shying away from the camera meets our gaze powerful. He doesn't chew and you see that throughout these images the very often individuals or small and she doesn't tend to do these vast street scenes involving large numbers of people. She's very very much focus on the smaller intimate moments on the street. Yeah exactly so. She Hides Rolex camera portable relatively lightweight for the time and she was able to respond and quite immediately to the figures that she encountered on the street. It's important to note that she's working. In two specific context. One is the development element of the documentary mode as we now call it and the other is the political and social climate so this is the time of of real unrest and instability. Not In France certainly and of the economic depression elsewhere in Europe and North Facing smart captures in her work to do first meeting. And you see it throughout the show is that she's she's involved in all the strands at the same moment so on the one hand you have the fashion photography Mesh toffee then. You got the street photography. And now we're going to look at some of these the most real elements that she finds in life in the next trip so again. We're looking at photographs that were made on the street. But in these this always a quirky element Oro Roeper nnounced surreal quality. Some of these. This one is on the sort of Quirky aside saying this is a sort of what is in a weaker. Kangaroo think it's a wicker maybe a wire a kangaroo that for some reason or on the Durham are encountered on the streets of London. This is a photograph which has more than one of my dreams in recent weeks so so bizarre and it's just one example of the way in which Dermot he's the camera to capture the absurd in the everyday this very straight street photography griffey where she's photographing people in impoverished circumstance. But she's also got a great eye for the absurd. There's a wit and playfulness to her work. She's surrounded surrounded at this stage. It is involved with the surrealist. He's familiar with the sort of Raton doctrine. The very clear ideas that he's expressing about things like religion in and sex and other things. She seems to have an innate feel for it to me she seems to be able to sort of spot that in these every day through the streets he seems to table to find the images which correspond with some of those theoretical ideas says if when she became associated with the Met The surrealist three have political leanings and it was a natural fit. I mean the kind of thing that I have been drawn to which we see even from her work as a teenager. Just fits so perfectly. With the surrealist preoccupations certain subject matter appear again and again like the see even coral shells subject matic blindness. These again and again in her work. And they're so consistent with surrealist themes and ideas against the most surreal all her works a photo montages. And we're GONNA move onto those next next now. We're at one of her. Most famous photo montages which is called the pretender and this was shown I know in certain surrealist exhibitions in the mid nineteen-thirties. What's really fascinating about this? Is You show how this photomontage was drawn from her own. History as a Streetwalker tillis about so we can see the on the right hand side here. A photograph Dermot took on the streets of Barcelona a group of children playing and a voice kind of tremendous deficit kind of backflip. He's very bent over and she has used that image. Within a surrealist montage. She converted the photograph of the boy and she's placed him gainst an image image of the volts the palace for say she's also retouched over the windows in the palace so that they appear to be bricked off and by inverting these two who images it appears to be kind of an endless circular motion. It's very disturbing. We don't know what's going on. This is just a typical way in which are reused reused now any images by others but also drew on her streep talking photomontage. I'm really come to look at these images at how apt photomontage. George was as a medium to express surrealist ideas that in a way. It's almost the perfect surrealist media it is and I think the surrealist had a first thing unsure well how took we could fit into their medium but it was in works that really dislocated images from their original context or in in collage and photomontage. They found the answer. There are ways of just creating very surprising. Surreal irrational examples ready. So let's look at an. It is part of her sort of surrealist period but he's actually not a photo montage but an image which has confounded critics for a long time. You there was this portrait of Ubu and if you look at the critical history of this were people are trying to work out. What the Hell it is? They think it's a mandrake in drake boots or some sort of strange misshapen vegetables. What are we looking at? We think that we're looking at Armadillo. Fetus and its claws. Certainly any seem to suggest that Moore didn't ever want to reveal what this was. She wants to retain some of its mystery but certainly it becomes one of the most important photographs photographs. That's included in the major surrealist exhibitions throughout the nineteen thirty S. She this I think speaks to. How brilliant she was as a photographer? Because it's it's the way she she shot it. We think he's probably taken as specimen in Ajar right. How would she had access to it? Otherwise but what she's done is so on the one hand she shot two in three quarter profile. This extraordinary raking light it lights up the clause for and also it's the sort of close up misdemeanors Um She was a brilliant technical. Talk for everything that you mentioned. The shadow chasing shadows are something that are really important within her work. Her First Commission Commission One of her First Commission Surrey was for a book about this Michelle Monastery and in that work you can really see her attention to light and shadow. She makes use of that very dramatic effect and had two pictures of the Gothic architecture and that appears again in her work for the criteria. Heim I'm and again in works like this. where she's using shadow to create mice? Unsettling effect the accentuates the subject. Now we're the point now. Where we we come to a rupture in her life work the moment where she meets Picasso? WE'RE GONNA go into next week. which is all about in that relationship? When did she meet Pablo Picasso? So counts vary but We believe that it is Rather right at the end of nineteen thirty five the beginning of one thousand nine hundred eighty six one of the two things which really strikes me when I'm in this gallery and we'll talk about a couple of specific works in a moment is the up to now. We've had this surge. This extraordinary fertile talk period of creativity in her life where she is grappling with photography and photomontage extremely creative. Way When we get into this room. Of course we're looking at Picasso's castle work but we're also seeing a massive shift in her work she turns again to painting. To what extent did Picasso Force her back to painting and to what extent unwilling return to a medium that she did study. I mean we believe that it was willing return as he said she had always hard to be a painter. And we have to remember that this this time. You couldn't be an artist under photographer that the two were seen as mutually exclusive however creative register. It could also be So to be fine artist if we can use that term dorm all felt the painting perhaps was was the route to take. She's as with Picasso. He's encouraging her. And it's also an opportunity for her to really can regain her confidence in this medium by mutating his style. That's very clear as they were. We're looking at right now at a picture of Picasso absolutely is potassium in the sense that he's Jews using his language that it's that sort of host cubis portrait ultra that we see yes printings at the she's really developing her heroin style over a number of years and and likewise he's learning from Huzzah. There's a very complex darkroom technique called cliche which combines took photography and printmaking Picasso her trade this in a very informal way nine hundred thirty thirty two but he was never accomplished in the dark green. We'll though he taken photographs the chemistry of the dark cream with something that he was by no means kind of affair with breath and with Dermot. He's able to learn this technique of course the other side of their relationship or beyond the work life. And there's a painting that door makes it this time which we're looking at now. which very clearly portrays what's going on soons will tell us about this fabulous canvas that's been shown in public only only twice before and never before in the United Kingdom? It's cool to the conversation itself. A very loaded title and it depicts door back to back with matures walser. Who who was the mother of Picasso's daughter and someone that Picasso kept really uncomfortably close to the both of them for the duration of our relationship? Quite literally yeah so shipping next door to the studio essentially. Yes she was. She was very present at the time and we can only imagine how uncomfortable uncomfortable frankly horrific that would have been for both women. It's traumatic but we wanted to include this canvas because it's a way of expressing door Amar's Feelings on this moment in her life but three her work. But also there's a formal connection with Gernika does great work about Spanish of war. Isn't there because door. Contends Contends that the electric light that we see the top of this work influences Picasso to include a similar light in great campus. Many many theories about the electric lighting. Gernika one is actually that The discharge of doors that he used to eliminate the campus he worked worked with one inspiration. The lump of the light of course metamorphoses from a son Anton I but interestingly Dermot said in one thousand nine hundred that she was the one that put an electrolyte new painting I and he took it from her. And indeed the canvas that we're standing in front of now by Dermot was made in January nineteen thirty seven. He begins congon-qoo tremain that year. Is it right that she was actually painting in that. Same Studio that very famous studio where she also documented the creation of Guernica. Yes so we have a negative in the exhibition which shows a canvas believed by experts to be by Dermot and you can see in the background that GonNa is just visible. Which means that you have? She was working on campuses at the same time as he's making Gernika. That's quite unprecedented. Isn't it in terms of Picasso's access to up the Women Women in Picasso's life having access to his creative world yeah it certainly sheds new light on the kind of dynamic in the studio at that time. There's a real understanding understanding. I think St the works in this exhibition of Dorma as a professional in her relationship with Picasso because she is making work. She's got this very important important commission to document his canvas as well and so it's not just about first relationship. It's about how they really can educate one another. I I have to say that for me. There's a point this point in the show. I feel a little more crushed by this extraordinary creation that we see in the photo. Montage the camera and then her shift painting it for me. It's a great disappointment because she was such an extraordinary photographer. Montage career and and you show her development through in the next room through landscapes. Yeah but she again. This is a myth about all that she somehow so to become a recluse um which continue to make work in she I think Cetera. Mas Work has very much been broken into life preemptive Picasso but we have to remember that their relationship breakdown in the mid mid nineteen forties. She died in one thousand nine hundred seven and she was making work really close to the end of her life and so that the reason is a real shift in her work. DOC IN THE MID Nineteen Forty S. Yes perhaps it's in part due to the breakdown of their relationship but there's also unfortunately many other traumatic events in her life at that time and perhaps most importantly it's the end of the Second World War Life in Paris. Those surreally circles are completely changed so we can wonder what happened if she never met Picasso but we also have to think about the fact that what she was doing in the nineteen thirties was the product of a very specific political social and cultural moment. But I'd like to go to what I think is a really delightful ending to the show and look at these extra photo grams that she made we think tools the NFL. And yes. As I say I felt hugely uplifted when I came to this final room in the show because it seems to me that she's again again. It's the darkroom return and here is again experimenting with Prince. Maybe not with the camera. These wonderfully mysterious images that shanks. Yeah using using light. Can you tell us about these works. Well at some point in the one thousand nine hundred zero believe Dermot went into the documentary began to make cameras us images so she either trae slight across photosensitive paper or she made photographs by placing objects on the surface. Sometimes cutouts of figures she would sometimes also so you. Things like tinsel even her rosary beads feature and it's very consistent or parallel with the approach to experimentation in the nineteen thirties. And it's really interesting. I think this time. Her biographer Victoria combat. Asked her about photography at this point in her life and she said that she was interested trusted in making photographs. She wasn't interested in documenting. The world. Outside it was. Bonanza wasn't interesting in the same in the way that it had been in the thirties. Much like the work that that we see in the nineteen thirties. Dir Mar Bright at the end of her career is very interested in manipulation of the photographic surface of negatives does around forty negative to help in the archive of the Pompidou. which really attest to that? She has scratched the negatives jus use chemical to really break down the emotion and and to abstract the negatives and you can see in the projection that we have in this law stream some negative and positive images. Well the show shop. She has returned to her archive in a very very innovative creative way. So it feels like to me. This feels like an assertion in almost like a summary of of of her career. Obviously she did have clear aims to be a painter but his painting photography wrote at the end. She really doesn't. I don't think she would have got to the kind of gesture. All abstract photography had she not this intense period of experimenting with making in other media as well so she seizing oil royal. She's using pastels while going out into the landscape in the south of France and making very abstract impressions of the landscape. So there's a real journey that this exhibition traces says I think. Do you think with this show. Finally we can say that door. Mars going to emerge from shadow. I really hope so. I think it's I time. It is difficult for anyone who is in. Picasso's close circle and not to be overshadowed by Picasso but now that we have this extra access to so much of Duras work and I think a real contemporary interest in looking at overlooked artists. I'm sure and I hope that audiences will really enjoy getting to know duras. Ask Emma thank you so much thank you very much to remind is tape. Modern until the fifteenth of March Twenty Twenty. We'll be back talking to John Howarth. After this. The Russian artists Talia Goncharova was a woman of many parts as the recent Mitch. Respective of her work at Tate. Modern perfectly showed her artistic output was exceptionally wide ranging from parading the streets Moscow in futurist body paint designing ballet class jeans and book covers. She was only thirty two. When in one thousand nine hundred thirteen? She held her first Solo Exhibition in Moscow displaying playing her trademark stylistic fewer in a diverse collection of more than eight hundred works and approach described him off tones as everything is by her husband. Mikhail Larionov rear early work from that first. One woman show landscape. bursaries comes to bombs Russians. Say at the end of November as Bonhams head of Russia Daria Christova says says the Telia gone through over was a remarkable woman vision who challenged artistic social and gender conventions landscape Birch trees with its heavy textual brushwork and vibrant mypillow. Pennant expresses both our interest in traditional Russian folk and the idiosyncratic adaptation of features for more information visit bonhams DOT com. Welcome back now. A Trivia question who did the cover of the Beatles sergeant pepper album if you said Peter Blake you wrote impart part look at the MIT self and it says this staged by Peter Blake and Jan.. How eighth photograph by Michael Cooper? So it was a collaboration between three people yet. In most cases only blake credited. Cooper is barely mentioned and how it's contribution is almost forgotten how and Blake within married and both key figures in the Papazian in swinging London. Howarth who grew up in Los Angeles but came to London to study art in the early nineteen sixties showed at the Trendy Robert Fraser Gallery in London and at Sydney Janice in New York? Well now how has a major retrospective show reaching works from the sixties and the decades since the house gallery in Chichester on the UK south coast host. which is where I went to meet her? Perhaps the most dramatic work in the show is a recent project were in progress made with her and Blake's daughter Liberty Blake who she refers to in the interview interview as Libby. The work riffs on the sergeant pepper cover but also attempts to correct some of its gender and racial imbalances but began the interview by asking. How about her background in Hollywood the art director father and ceramicist mother Jan.? I wonder if we could begin by going back to the start and your life growing up in Hollywood because your father and your mother were both very creative people with me yes they were. I think by first memories are very much about being in my mother's pot shop as she called it And she was a ceramicist and she made figures and Had huge kilns and all the rest of it and had six or eight people working in for her at any given time and Then my father was in the film industry and He would stand me up and make me pose for some sketchers. Churn Story Board. He was doing and Talk about that and and to I was on the backlot quite a lot and on the sets With him he would take shake me. You didn't seem to know that you don't take children to work He just did it. And I mean there are no other children around but but somehow scampering about the backlot nonsense. was you know what I got to do. And did he feel yourself. SORTA taking in the means of constructing visual images in that process. I suppose I did. I've I think I've not thought of it quite in that way. Yeah I mean because My mother is making three dimensional Things in clay. My father was making film you know narrative And I was going to the movies you know. So I was seeing the end product of some of these things. And certainly you know the The sequential process was very very open to me. I could see it from a lump of clay all the way through you know slip and the mold old and an all of the terminology was very very familiar to me and the kind of the arc that a piece of clay goes through You know all the way through the firing and glazing and so forth and the fact that a woman was at the center of that running this business and then my father's side of it being that You know the the messy process of making a film in the first instance of carpenters and builders and and sketches and drawings but you know The prop Amana messy prop room and the plaster castings and so forth so That but also that the funny part of that for me is that I think I took took surrealism out of it. You know that it was in a way. All these substitute little figurines are substitute walnuts. Made a plaster Eh. You studied for two years at the University of California in Los Angeles but it seems to me that the big awakening terms of your work was in in London. Both at the court and at the slade is that right. Yeah that that's right I mean. Ucla I was still in the mode of of school. I mean I loved. Ucla the thriving in the atmosphere of Being able to do American literature in English literature and studied Greek ancient Greek and Forced to do due geology. Which I just fell in love with an anthropology I mean it was? It was fabulous to have real mental meat to chew on but when I came to London Brandin it it was like a dam burst of dreams. Basically that that suddenly you know I was really using my brain rain or all my brain because it wasn't so much book learning that you then spouted out on an exam There was time to really think about things and and because I I jumped into the middle of performance in as much as you know the first thing I wanted to do what I came here it was good. At the theater goto musical You know string quartets protests at wigmore hall or something You know it was that live culture of theater that that really grabbed my thoughts. It's and then to the underpinning That I take very seriously about the sixties of the emergence from World War Two but then through the voice of you know people like you know all's born and Becca turned and the playwrights in a way they set the stage for the common man being a a star or being center stage so you know that that you have. That view of British society was so important in terms of Okay Young Beatles cels or Gerry and the pacemakers you can come onto the stage and be taken seriously so you know that that was important but I think for me. The the the notion of The brain being alive. I feel that that's what happened for me so it was. It was really being able to use. Not just the left brain academic you know kind of Acquiring of academic skills but also then that more creative more responsive more I don't know you don't know where these ideas come from and suddenly you actually have to recognize that visual kind of poetry. That's in the other part of your mind. Now at the slade a Tutu said something to you which triggered a very powerful response from you. Tell me about the episode. Well I think the The world at that time particularly in London was dominated by the kind of male paradigm. I wasn't used to that in California. I mean I didn't I I didn't see it at first because I'd never experienced that before. I was blind to that fact because in California. It wasn't like that so I didn't no. I wasn't equal and gradually kind of like coming coming into consciousness. I thought hey this is really kind of strange. You know this. What are these guys talking about? You know that they have this sort of something. This genesee qua of you know we know paint and we know design and composition and well women. Just don't get at. That would be their attitude and I just sort of was puzzled by about thinking. Well it's just that person but One day one of the tutors came by my painting and I was becoming a little anxious thinking well if I did go back to UCLA. I'd need credits and So I said to him You know I oh I think maybe it would be good a good idea for next term to see if I can get credit for what I'm doing here In terms of what I would need to Show in America. And I said what would I need to do. Should I put my portfolio together So that that can be assessed and then put me on a kind of credit basis and he he said well no no not really we We don't really ever look at the female Portfolios we just look at their photographs Because they're here to keep keep the boys happy and it was like wait. A minute was such a I mean you. There's nothing you can say to that all you can do act and so you know I mean I took it that. Oh Yeah we'll sort of old fashioned empire type person who hasn't quite got the modern world yet but but certainly. That did go with other things that I had been experiencing And you know to be fair to the temperature of England of that time women women were doing very well in many fields. I mean Mary. Quant was excelling and there were designers and models. And you know women that were you. I know in lead positions. It wasn't equal by any means but but certainly women were doing well in certain fields and of course we saw an explosion vision of of that during the sixties. But it isn't right to say that this xt's were you know a big rebellion was successful. I mean the miniskirt is really not not for you. Know the feminist movement really we can say oh wait the pantyhose liberation. Well No. They're not they're showing your legs so that you are attractive and you froze to death in London wearing the clothes we wore. You know that wasn't good so served in the exhibition here at Pailin House. We see many of your early works. And you can see the different ways in which you're using materials in rudy creative way so in in particularly in the in the old woman piece for instance and then in the Mae West piece I want if you might talk about the way that you're approaching image making using these materials at that time the work Goes between a wall surface or a three-dimensional freestanding Figure so if you're doing a wall piece you're really doing i. I thought of them as drawings. So it's a two-dimensional Piece that I would do a big drawing. And then I would cut the drawing as the pattern and for a quilt Or Patchwork more properly So in that instance you're using fabric flat I I didn't particularly have any value system on. Oh this is a synthetic and this is you know cotton or wool And I didn't really think too much about fade because I couldn't anticipate that so I mean I used fabrics for their color And they were existing fabrics and. That's that's a big distinction between the early work later work which we may be touch on but the existing fabric mode I was at the mercy of whatever was at Selfridge is or Wherever I was buying fabric? So that's one kind of avenue and then when it comes to three dimensional A lot of the time I you. So if I'm making was making a face jerseys were the way to go because they were so Sort of flexible as going round corners. And of course. If you're making a face you got a lot lot of corners to go round so so thinking of something like they made Which isn't in the exhibition? But I wanted to make The ideal woman was the Russian and I wanted multiple references to ethnicity That was layers and layers of silk stockings so That will be that will accommodate the twist of the corner of mouth or a nostril in a way that say a flat fabric. Wouldn't but then I liked the challenge or the disassociation from reality that you can get with a woven So a figure like Frank The old man that I made Early sixties he's That butts up against the difficulty of doing that and and it distorts reality to a certain degree that you know is interesting so yeah so different uses It might be that you're upholstering something in the May West thing or doing bar relief or going to a flat so it kind of depends on what the idea is. What the three dimensions you're trying to achieve are so it's interesting that you chose Mae my west? I mean you you obviously knew Hollywood stars as you were growing up as you say on the back. Lots of these are the studios. Why did you choose me West? What she's she's also figure obviously in surrealism Dali's lips so so I wonder about what was the power of Mae West that made you want to make him an image of her? Oh she's not obvious an obvious choice. I don't really like doing the obvious. So my choices would avoid certain. CLICHE's what I would consider cliche And Mae West interest to me because she was smart you know she had a brain. It wasn't just a look and she wasn't a particularly attractive woman one but she Pretty woman she was attractive. And you know the idea of her boldness and her her renegade nature She said she said the only other woman I would even think of possibly being is Mabel Stark who tamed lions. So it's that kind the thinking and her her her humerus just devastatingly funny and I liked her sharpness and so to me. Here is the woman that was not conventionally conventionally beautiful and she rose to stardom. She wrote her own scripts. She was just terrific maverick character. That's interesting to me. The the Dolly Bird you know vacuous you know. Empty headed not full of character. Woman isn't isn't something that I would be interested in doing. It's not that person is bad or anything. It's just that it it wouldn't be stimulating enough unless you kind of. have that sense of really wanting to do something that is not the right energy am. Let's talk about Sergeant Pepper. Of course there is the old woman that is in the exhibition in is it's a version of work that is part of that gathering on the front cover of sergeant pepper's album your your role in that was hugely significant is often regarded as a peter. Blake image. Can you tell me about on the one hand you'll role in it and then also about the sorts of reception one of that work since. Well I think I mean Libyan. I find this to with the big mural that it's often difficult for people to Get inside the idea of collaboration collaborations and where it is one person leave off where it is another begin and how these influences you know You know where do we establish credit where the prejudices is credit and things like that so you know without getting into the the diatribe of that The the later things in the fifty year anniversary. Everybody's claiming authorship Asia searching forever so I was I was going to sit kind of chuckling in the side thinking okay. I'm the person who didn't do. Fifty percent of sergeant pepper. I did the other fifty percent and then there's Paul's it pulses one hundred percent Peterson. One hundred percent I say I did fifty fifty percents of two hundred and fifty percent cover. Whatever and you know it doesn't really matter? is also the product of Media You know it has been exposed and sold and had media of EMI and all of that behind it So this was the first explosion. Asian in the sixties of those kind of media ideas of people getting famous through a magazine or people becoming well known and getting you know bigger paychecks because they were on television. So that's important to take into account on this thing that is called an icon and I did begin to take that into into count in two thousand and three particularly because rolling Stone said okay. We're GONNA give you the hundred top albums. Guess what's talk it sergeant pepper and I was thinking you know what it's time I'm to evaluate that so I sat down by my fire in Sundance and I thought okay how many women are on this cover and there were twelve six of whom were fictitious characters. Petty Girls Pinups Three times the only women on the cover were chosen by Peter and myself The Beatles didn't choose any women the idea of choice. He's on the cover. Was the Beatles were to choose their heroes. They didn't choose up so Peter and I chose the rest So the Beatles really only chose thirty forty percent the the heads that are on there. Peter I really did the rest. What sort of ethnic diversity is on the cover? It we have Sonny Liston and we have Georgia's Gurus but but But basically what is what's that add up to. We haven't got any blues musicians chosen by the Beatles we have no rock and roll You know that's really significant the black voice in America with rhythm and blues like. That's a game changer. You know never mind jazz you you know. So so the idea that The the diversity wasn't there that social activists really Kinda don't appear there That the relevance of the people bull there there are literary references that are significant But for the most part the cover is a cover by young people. The WHO don't know that much and I think reviewing it all at time later was really kind of interesting because I had to reckon I had grown up. You know an I knew more and what I then recognized in the cover were the gaps and so then I persuaded someone in Salt Lake to give up a wall and we did a big mural called. SLC pepper which was meant to have a gender balance of fifty percent women. Fifty percent men and that it would be Catalysts for change so people who actually impacted social development and so that was very important to me. And I think you know Sergeant Pepper Holds its ground for the sixties as a representation of the sixties. which had a good deal of you know sort of fripperies in the thinking you know there was a lot that was light? We can't lionize the sixties as big sort of feminist revolution. It wasn't We can't lion is. Is it as huge breakthrough. There were a lot of losses if you count the losses on sergeant pepper. There's Robert Fraser died of H. I. V.. John was shot Mao. The bodyguard was shot. Michael Cooper died of an overdose. Say Michael Kupa was the took of who actually took commute so again. Another collaborator on this on this very collaborative project and and again you're stressing collaboration. That's extremely important. Because as you know you packet that you know little things come in. There is a big peck that took Hitler out. John's at that was on John's Lewis of up. Heroes was was Hitler. There's no way that is in any way allowable or or okay. There is no way to process that you you have to say. John had clay feet if he was able to make that choice. so You know we can overlook these these things pass over them as if oh it was the you know the folly of Youth Hitler's not the folly of youth is really a stupid stupid decision so that had to go so you you know all of those things were were important that way It was important to check with people to say. Do you mind mind if you're on the cover that was Brian Epstein set stepping in and thinking. Oh my goodness we could get sued and of course. They didn't check with photographers. Who took the pictures of people who are on their? I wonder about that the during questions and and conundrums image for evidently. But what's brilliant about. This show is that you have a work which very clearly evokes that image. But he's very much of today and took about activism is is directly being used as a kind of activist image in in in all times. Tell us about Well the the mural that that we have in Reproduction for him in the exhibition at Talent House is called work in progress and It arose out of a comic Strip that I did for a show in Wolverhampton And that was called Mannequin defectors and the mannequin defectors. Without describing the comic strip in detail are marching in front of a bit of a Civic art or street art and it's a mural of women Who are of interest or of accomplishment and and eventually those became women who are are catalysts within the arts and Sciences and social activism? And the idea in the In the piece was that it would be a mural of women in the comic frame was only like three inches by vice seven inches and when I came to draw these faces in in the street. seen I was pretty good on women. Artists pretty good good on literary women but knew nothing about science nothing about a Madison and had to do some research and I thought this is terrible. I mean if I don't know this you know there are a lot of people that don't know this so I approached a friend called Geraldine Dreyfuss and said German you know. I think it'd be really good. Idea in Salt Lake that we do another mural mural and we do this and she and I tried to Sorta forward this project and it didn't really happen and you know for years I mean from two thousand and eight you now through muttered about it every so often and then I had a meeting with Diane Stewart. Who runs modern West fine art in a Salt Lake City and I said Oh this is another idea ahead of the might be good to kind of forward and Diane said we have to do this now and she just did it? She got the money to back it up and it it took off and we produced a mural that now is fifty sixty feet long And it's Fifteen panels that are eight foot by four foot And we have it in in vinyl reproduction form and we have the original collage form that was done by my daughter. Liberty Blake She collage all the paper. APOR heads that were created in dozens of workshops with women and men from all walks of life and mostly non artists and and we use the stencil graffiti form of cutting stencil from a photograph and then the participants in the workshop then stencils salute them selves pick their paper pick their paints all of that And then libby takes product and then makes this wonderful college and a new actively taking this on the women's march twenty seventeen in Washington. Yes we There was a bus from Utah and one from Philadelphia and we. We started altogether there from Philadelphia eventually and and we had such great time. It was it was a one of the best moments of living on this planet. As far as I'm concerned earned it was just amazing. You can't you can't begin to describe what the feeling that that march was like. We were all so devastated by The election and the mural went from being this what we thought was a celebration to the first woman president that it would be the backdrop for that kind of thing. The man probably appear in the museum in Washington That is on the table at this present. Time called the women's museum And it all crashed to the floor and suddenly I mean the day after the election I went into a museum where the museum where the the mural was hung and just stood in front of it and thought thought. Oh my God. What's just happened in the end? You know looked at these women and it was the most strange moment because it was like they were in revolt suddenly unle instead of coming together celebration. They were protesting and I felt like it was saying you know. Get off your ass you silly girl you know get working. So it transformed into this other Maryland and suddenly we were saying yes. We're GONNA go on this March which was outrageous for me to to do that in the middle of the winter and and So we we went and we carried it up Pennsylvania Avenue and you would stop every so often on the corner and hold up four of them or however many we got lost and lost part of the mural somewhere else so it was pretty amazing and You Know I. It's not life changing. It was life enhancing That experience yeah and it was also at the Sundance Film Festival. rally and also at a march went up to the capital in Salt Lake City. So it's it's been around. It's been to twenty four places in in three years. Twenty four news in galleries museums and so forth. So one thing. I was really conscious of standing in front of it. Is that everybody's individual experience of it will be different in the sense that I'm recognizing certain people are recognized British literary figures like Joint J. Stint and Charlotte Bronte for instance and I never political figures and people like Michelle Obama and things like that but I was conscious of how few faces I recognize and it was just brought home to me that they were great heroins across the world and across time who are unknown to me and everybody to a certain extent with experience that same feeling in front of us. It's a cool to kind of educate yourself as much something else isn't it. Yeah it's it. It's that horrible moment of realizing what you don't know and I mean that's the reverse of what we take to most artworks. It's sick kind of question of what we know how sophisticated we are how we understand it. You know all of those things and this is meant to be an unpleasant shock. You know that I don't know L. This I don't know her and of course we don't always recognize people by their faces. We may know the Broncos and not familiar with what their faces are individually individually. But I think this e that especially if you see fifteen of them this Sea of women and you think Oh my you you know. You're overwhelmed by all. The heads are over life size. So the you can't really in Maryland. You won't stand up close to it you step back and they then remain big Becau- and so that was deliberate to keep them large so that you stand back and the these heads are are impactful even though they're reducing because a perspective And and it's accused. It's accusing you in a way And I love the that it's a thing of not knowing you know that that minute of insecurity where you have to recognize our reckon with that and and it's true for me too. I mean I was wordperfect on seven panels doing every single head just like that and now I have not lectured in front of it for a while and I need to rate again. You know. So so it's Yeah it's really it's important. I think that the stories connected with these curious women who had everything against them. It's not they just had to normally achieved stuff they had to go through. You know trickle to get there you know it's a battle so you you know that's important. I mean we look at Mother Jones and we say her house burned down. All her children died of scarlet fever and her husband. She was a four foot ten. Can this little powerful Irishwoman you know who led a labor union movement. She said I'm not a humanitarian. I'm a hellraiser Caesar and so it's it's that I mean. She rose literally out of ashes. You know so that that takes so much spirit era and so we have really take our hats off to these women who survived enough to make these accomplishments happen that they did you know John. That's a grim. I am too and thank you so much very kind. Thank you for doing the interview. John Howarth close up is at Pailin House Gallery until the twenty third of February twenty twenty. You can read all the latest art and Heritage News on our website at the newspaper dot com or or not APP for IOS which you can find in the APP store on the website you can find the subscription to see you so that you can read the newspaper across multiple platforms while that you can also subscribe for free to our daily newsletter relate to stories click the newsletter link at the top right of our homepage and decide not for new monthly newsletter market. I oy with comment and analysis every month from market journalists in London and New York. Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already and if you've enjoyed it please rate or review it on apple podcast. You can also follow us on twitter at Tan audio and we're on facebook and instagram. Of course. The Art newspaper cost is produced by Judy housekeeper. Amy Dawson and David Clack and David is also the editor thanks to Emma and Jan and thank you for listening. We'll see you next week. The Art newspaper Podcast to association with bonhams auctioneers since seventeen to three to find out more visit dot com.

Marceta Picasso London Dermot Peter Blake John Howarth Sergeant Pepper Paris Ucla Ma Beatles Louis Emma Hollywood Mae West Jim Howarth United Kingdom France Salt Lake City centre Pompidou Michael Cooper blake