10 Burst results for "Oxford Analytica"

"oxford analytica" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:02 min | 9 months ago

"oxford analytica" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"World service. I'm victoria. Craig good morning. Us vice president. Kamala harris has been meeting with business leaders and government officials today in singapore. The trip comes a month after a set of engagements there from america's defense secretary lloyd austin while regional security is a major focus this morning. The white house unveiled a series of other agreements with singapore including cybersecurity climate change the ongoing effects of covert nineteen and plans to alleviate the pain of a pandemic induced supply chain crunch. It's the first stop on a tour of southeast asia. That analysts say is aimed at combating china's growing influence in the region for benjamin charleston a senior analyst at oxford analytica. That influence is focused on economics and trade. This growing influence ethic is interesting. China's economic engagement with the region has certainly grain massively over the last decade that makes china's something. These countries have to take very seriously whether the translates actually into insolence. I think it is questionable. We've seen china has tried to from its white around vis-a-vis australia levi's this career back in twenty seventeen hasn't had success in in bending these countries to it's will so i think it is actually on the economic side that the us can probably put in the effort to match china. It's always been on the security side of the the. Us has been the key part night. So what was the with. This visit is really i think. Focus on economics and trade. That's benjamin charlton of oxford analytica. They're checking the numbers now. Global investors today are shrugging off concerns about spread of the delta corona virus variant in asia stocks across the region ended up in the one percent range today and that's filtering through here to european benchmarks which are trading lightly in positive territory keeping a lid on gains here though is fresh data showing business activity cooled across the euro zone from july to august as supply chain pressures persisted since the uk economy opened up to international travel. This summer visitors have been required to present negative tests for covert nineteen. The government website has a list of private companies offering such tests but a recent review by the department of health found prices displayed were lower than what companies were actually charging now. Dozens of firms will be removed from the list of approved providers as the bbc's katie austin explains the travel industry has complained. The regime has put off potential customers. Earlier this month the health secretary surgi- javid off the competition watchdog to look into excessive pricing and exploitative practices following a separate internal rapid review by the government providers will be removed from its list. The department of health is not naming them eighty two more have been given a warning for displaying misleading. Prices and spot checks are to be introduced the consumer group which said it was inexcusable that it had taken the government nearly half year to properly audit. Its own list of private tests providers. That's the bbc's katie austin reporting there to south african. Our amazon has plans to build a new headquarters on the continent. The hope is the multimillion dollar investment will deliver thousands of regional jobs. But there's a catch the lech river bank where the project is. Headquartered has now become ground zero for a battle between indigenous people and retail companies as the bbc's ammonium casey reports from capetown across the road from the river club development on the banks of the river and this is the sacred site for the koi and the communities. They call this the first frontier. This is where they. I fought off the portuguese and the first place where they fought the dutch colonizers as well and interestingly enough on the wall of the damn. Some graffiti reads same colonizers different ships. The sand is an epicenter of liberation and resistance to the sonnen quake community. That's tarik jinxing supreme high commissioner for the goring a corner quake koi traditional indigenous council. He's been leading the indigenous peoples fight against amazon and the land developers. Who in their right mind would want to dissipate to secretary like this just across. The road is the hustle and bustle of active construction site. So i think there's a lot of variables on the sought that objecting parties then really fully understand what other arable that. It's a rubbish dump. That's a golf course on top. The water is one of the worst qualities. You get judy alfred. He's hitting the development project he sees. The construction is vital for this economy and will be an honor for the indigenous people. We didn't exactly what i believe. That what we rehabilitates era restoring the heritage of the area. There's no heritage at the moment. This is intangible heritage. No one lived on. The is no barrel greg at all on the site at but that gives us the opportunity to restore. It's at the heart of the dispute is two hundred eighty four million dollars project housing units stores as well as use retail giant. Amazon's new seventy thousand square meter. Africa headquarters are sick to be built on the land with a staggering. Thirty two percent unemployment rate economists like ivan to rock say the development show south africa and the continent is a place future. It's a marker for other investors. It's a vote of confidence if you like in the city and in south africa actually is important for the country it will help to encourage other foreign investors. It's not about the jobs or the economy. It's about his culture. This is the final frontier. If we lose the suckling we have lost. Absolutely every one thing remains clear for the koi and then they say their heritage is not for sale. That's the bbc's money. Casey reporting from capetown south africa there and in london. I'm victoria craig with the marketplace morning report from the bbc world service..

china katie austin lloyd austin benjamin charleston oxford analytica benjamin charlton singapore Kamala harris Us bbc javid asia department of health river club development Craig levi white house victoria tarik jinxing
Syrians Vote in Election Certain to Give Assad New Mandate

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Syrians Vote in Election Certain to Give Assad New Mandate

"Syrians have voted in a presidential election almost certain to give the incumbent bashar al assad of forty seven year term. He's ruled the country since the death of his father in two thousand in the last election held in two thousand and fourteen had secured almost eighty nine percent of the vote with turnout at more than seventy three percent. This election is likely to deliver a similar result willett. The result is dependent on the country's two biggest allies russia and iran. Dr laura james is a middle east analyst at the global advisory firm oxford analytica and. She joins me now north. Thanks for coming on. Do we have the results yet. No they're not do until friday evening I think we can make a fair guess at them. Though to be honest. I mean is there any chance that russia could perhaps derail the selection. That's no indication that they want to at the moment There's always a question. Mark over how long russia will see asset is an asset rather than a liability. But i think generally the assumption is that keeping him in place keep things relatively stable that trying to bring somebody else in certainly. It isn't a to be played to soon. Possibly at some point they could bring in somebody similar as part of a deal for western reconstruction aid. But we're very very far from that point. In iran influence iran is also supporting asset again as a source of stability and as a gateway into the country. Pro-iranian militias are playing a very important role there and iran is looking for a reconstruction con contracts and most of all a routine into lebanon where it supports the hezbollah movement so again for a run asset is an important asset.

Bashar Al Assad Dr Laura James Oxford Analytica Russia Iran Willett Middle East Mark Lebanon Hezbollah
"oxford analytica" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"oxford analytica" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Turkey participated in the suffering are the peacekeepers seen as I success in Moscow is they sound looking in from the outside? Yes, this is this is a very interesting and multilayered story, because certainly from the Kremlin's perspective, this seems like a victory and Geopolitically. To some extent, I think that's unfortunately accurate, but there's also another story here, and that is that if you read some of the Russian language commentaries about this agreement to the contrary, they Russian commentators criticized Putin for allowing Turkey to become a bigger player in the South Caucasus than it was before. On before essentially losing the hearts and minds of Armenians. So it is to be sure, from again from big picture Geo political perspective victory, But it's a victory that did not come without cost for for Kremlin, so it's a little bit more complicated than a bar. Sascha is a senior fellow at the Washington Institute of Contributor to the Oxford Analytica, a fellow at the European Foundation for Democracy. Malcolm Hoenlein Conference. The president's I'm John Bachelor. Balance of nature's fruits and vegetables in a capsule changing the world one life at a time. Well, I'm a lift driver, so I'm on the road a lot. He keeps me very focused. I knows when you're on the road, you know, you have to be aware of what's going on. It keeps me very much aware of everything. And I definitely think it helps energy wise. It keeps me very consistent. You know, I don't find myself going like one day's good next day, Dad that balances everything out like it says the helps nature. It evens out everything where I don't get sick and energy wise. That's very much across the board. So I love it. Get a wide variety.

John Bachelor Turkey Malcolm Hoenlein Moscow senior fellow Geopolitically Putin South Caucasus Oxford Analytica European Foundation for Democr Sascha Washington Institute of Contri president
Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, backed by the king, moves for absolute power

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:04 min | 2 years ago

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, backed by the king, moves for absolute power

"It is easy to forget that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Bin Abdulaziz. Al Sowed is not actually technically ruler of Saudi Arabia. That title belongs formerly to his elderly Father King Salman however since his appointment as crown prince in two thousand seventeen. It has been widely understood that. Nbs often known is the heir designate. Power behind the throne and at the age of thirty four very much the future of Saudi Arabia in this unofficial role mb has furnished considerable cause for concern he has overseen a terrible onslaught against Yemen and a blockade of Qatar. Neither of which appear to have accomplished much. He has interred dozens of his fellow royalty. For a time in a Ritz hotel and more or less kidnapped the prime minister of Lebanon perhaps most infamously. Nbs is widely supposed responsible for the murder of Washington. Post columnist. Jamal Khashoggi even by those standards. This week's palace intrigue in Riyadh is remarkable. Several members of the court appear to have been arrested at MBA's instruction including one of his uncles and one of his cousins dozens more army officers and civil servants are also reported to have been rounded up east this NBA swatting a coup. D'etat conducting one of his own. If he does manage to reach the throne when King Solomon's time comes. What does he want to do with it and is in BS? Perhaps not quite the Mariah Carey loving modernizer. He would have us believe. This is the foreign desk when you bring in Mariah Carey and all these singers and pay them views amount of money but you do not have an any universities anyplace to learn music. There is no department in any Saudi university to learn. Play ride to a drama making this these other forms that you should look for. And whether this massive youth constituency what she has to some extent manage to bring behind him is still behind him in five years time because young people need to get jobs. They need to be able to get married. They can't subsistence promises forever. So I think Basch is going to be the key determinant his credibility rather than some of the things that I looked with more interested in the book. We must remember that. Donald Trump has given unequivocal support. D'amato Vince on who is heavily implicated in the killing of the journalist. Jamal Hasha he. Trump has had his back on that one and I think as as long as trump remains in power that this relationship will continue quite strongly. You're listening to the foreign desk. I'm Andrew Miller on today show. I'm joined by Ali Al Ahmed and Laura James Ali. Ahmed is a Saudi Scala. The Institute for Gulf Affairs joins us from Washington DC. Laura James is senior Middle East analyst at the Global Advisory Firm Oxford Analytica Ali. Al Start with you and I'll start with well it's not always an easy question to answer with Saudi Arabia's concerned which is the the pretty basic one of as far as we know what has been going on this week Mohammed bin Salman the heir apparent of King. Solomon who has a lot of political ambitions obviously has members of the ruling family who are his rivals and they do not want to see him become king if they would like to see him ousted some just by talking and some by plotting so what has happened is Hamad discernment is extremely insecure about that and he took measures to stop any attempt to remove him. We have two groups here those who are talking and then the sort of speaking ill of Like his uncle Ahmad but Abdelaziz who who thinks that he has better in terms of becoming king and you have his cousin especially the younger ones who rallied around the his main rival. Hamad bin naive to try to dislodge him for power by by force even and that is why we have seen these steps of arrest and monitoring hundreds of members on family who are eyeing the throne Laura to bring you in his they one fundamental thing looking behind this extraordinary shakespeare in intrigue. Is it a reasonable assumption that MBBS is trying to nail down his future in anticipation that King Mohammed who is eighty four years old and not in good health? Con- last forever. I think he's done really since he became Crown Princeton before has been based on that assumption. It's been about shoring up his position within the family and I think if when his father succeeded nobody would have predicted that he could have done it. This effectively. He is essentially unchallenged. Do we understand. If the differences between the rival factions are actually political or is this basically a more atavistic. Instinctual family feud. I'm not sure that you can draw the distinction very clearly in Saudi Arabia between family in politics the two very much Banda with each other. I would say one difference between Mohammed bin Salman. His rivals is that he thinks that the anyway food. Saudi Arabia is essentially for one person to be in clear charging for that person to him whereas some of the people who oppose him wants to get back to a more consensual style family managed rule and Schering of resources and consensus in enslave change whereas if a political as well family reasons bin Salman says no that model work for Saudi Arabia. Dunga all these possible to be clear on rich factions of the house of sowed supporting. Nbs this point. Does he actually have the numbers? I think? So the most important in Saudi government and the ruling. Saudi Arabia is not even the ruling family anymore. It was about power previously. The model like Laura speaking about the there were centers of power at King. Abdullah had the national guard was his own militia guns so he can force his His agenda and his position and so on the delayed crown prince was also minister of defense so he had the army under his control so he can push his agenda and most importantly then the ministry of the interior with late conference knife had the interior ministry. Which has the largest number of security personnel and across the country and so he can use that to push himself to the throne in all of these people reach the throne. Some some did some died before they they got to to become king now all of these powers the Army National Guard and the Interior Ministry has been gutted and removed. Everything that's powerful about. It has been moved to something called the State Security Agency and the control of bin Salman so our bin Salman controls all the military and security apparatus in the country. So who is his real challenge? No one they can speak. They can talk about. They cannot do very much. There are members of the family who want to see him out. This is not strange to the Saudi ruling family King Faysal was shot and killed by his own nephew. King Salad was overthrown by his brothers. And also there was an assassination attempt on his life after he was deposed and expelled. This is nothing new in the history of the family so I expect to see some harsh measures against some of those younger princess like Nawaf bin Ni- F- Who was arrested and Mohammed bin? Naif who is basically the boss the boss of this of this of these people because he has the best chance in rivaling Ahmed bin Salman let us remember. It was the Obama Administration C. i. a. A and Obama who brought Hamad Knife as the future king and gave him a lot of accolades And supported him and tell trump came and push 'em B. S. INSTEAD AND MR. I'm mad but was pushed out and he still. Mr Benign has a lot of support in Washington in day democratic side. So that was the fear that MBBS had Laura how much might MB S.'s? Stature in court or credibility in the court of being damaged by his own somewhat petulant impulsive behavior over the years whether that's launching this war in Yemen his involvement? In the murder of Jamal Khashoggi would there be a concern in the rest of the court that he might be quite the loose cannon concerns among some parts of the ruling family and very strong concerns internationally. I think there are two distinct issues. One is about foreign policy mistakes. And as you've said in terms of Yemen in terms of Qatar in terms of the confrontation with Iran and particularly in Lebanon. It seemed that. His foreign policy initiatives haven't worked very well. I think within the country that's less important like the Ritz Carlton and this latest. Crackdown are actually less important than the nuts and bolts of vision twenty thirty which is his transformation plan so Mohammed bin Salman has stepped forward and said we know we need to change. The oil is going to run out. We've got to move into a new era. Diversify the economy. Be ready for this. Get Jokes Young People Change Society? I need a huge amounts woods that intensive transforming the way in which Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia Father King Salman Mohammed Bin Salman Bin Abdulaziz NBS Crown Prince Mohammed King Solomon Donald Trump Laura Washington Ali Al Ahmed Mariah Carey Yemen Jamal Khashoggi Saudi University Saudi Scala Hamad Knife Qatar King Mohammed
"oxford analytica" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:23 min | 2 years ago

"oxford analytica" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"You're from Philip might about his new book black site the CIA and the post nine eleven world I like to tell you about two upcoming programs taking place in this theater. it's Friday August sixteenth at noon William G. Hyland junior will tell us about a forgotten founding father George Mason the founding fathers who gave us the bill of rights not on Tuesday September tenth at noon Sidney Blumenthal will tell us about his recently released volume three of his biography of Abraham Lincoln all powers of earth the political life of Abraham Lincoln eighteen fifty six to eighteen sixty three. to find out more about these programs and our exhibits please visit our website at W. W. W. dot archive stocked up slash calendar you also find some printed materials out in the theater lobby about upcoming events as well as a sign up sheet so that you can receive an electronic version of a monthly calendar. Philip Mudd join the Central Intelligence Agency in nineteen eighty five as an analyst specializing in South Asia and then the Middle East after the September eleventh attacks he was a CI a member of the small diplomatic team that helped piece together a new government for Afghanistan. after returning to the CIA he became deputy director of the counterterrorism center and served there until two thousand and five. he was the first deputy director of the federal bureau of investigations national security branch and later became the F. B. I.'s senior intelligence adviser. what what is received numerous CIA awards and commendations and has commented about terrorism in congressional testimony and been featured in broadcast and print news. he is now the president of mud management a company specializing in security consulting analytic training and public speaking about security issues he is a senior fellow at the new America foundation and the George Washington university's homeland security policy institute and serves as senior global adviser to Oxford analytica a British based firm specializing in advising multinational companies he sits on the advisory board for the national counterterrorism center and for the director of national intelligence and he serves on the aspen institute's homeland security group what is a German please welcome Philip Mudd to the national are. boy you miss the most important part of that which is I live part time in Memphis Tennessee the bluff city well thank you. stick with pains barbecue I was running there and a place called midtown Memphis which is a distort part of Memphis years it's my must be now three four years ago wondering whether to write another book cover a couple. and reflecting on some of what I witnessed that the CI particularly during that excruciating time after nine eleven and realizing some of my colleagues many of whom are friends had written their stories but many of the people that I worked with would never speak would never right and their stories would never be told if no one to talk to them. put their stories together on one simple narrative and explain what happened. so I decided that morning running my five miles in midtown Memphis I would do that. this is mostly their story it's not a history. it's not every document that ever appeared related to what we call the program secret detention and interrogation of all kind of prisoners it's the story of men and women that I served with and who decided to speak to me because they trusted me. step back in time with me this is this is we're going into a time machine if you go back to the nineteen nineties. a lot of my colleagues talk about the peace dividend. the time and to paraphrase one of them when we we thought we had. killed the dragon the Soviet Union and only snakes were left. that's a time after the fall of the Soviet Union the fall of the wall where people thought the intelligence challenges of the future may not reach the magnitude that they reach during that time the Soviet Union but the characters of people. knew they had a problem. that problem started mostly when bin laden was in Sudan xcelerated when he moved Afghanistan. but when I spoke to them and I spoke to thirty five or forty again most of whom will never speak when I spoke to them about those times about the peace dividend there's a great sense of frustration in some ways sadness. that they witnessed the rise of a global network. and that the tools they had were so limited when you look back in retrospect realize it's only twenty years ago that's less than a full generation. the tools the CIA had were limited. if you think about loss of budget and personnel I'm not accusing the national security infrastructure of doing anything wrong all of us thought the same thing the dragon is gone if you but if you think about any organization whether it's a tech organization or manufacturing or organization if you lose substantial. pieces of money of people your ability operate declines. there was also the attitude about terrorism think back again only twenty years. nobody I spoke with could have imagine a world when somebody said we could call the conduct lightning raids in Afghanistan. day after day after day the thought that a raid would happen where there is high risk of American soldiers lives was almost unthinkable before nine eleven forget about a U. S. invasion just a raid against an al Qaeda compound and we knew they knew were some of the compounds were. much less much less an armed drone that could kill a terrorist overseas. in debate for years never happened. meanwhile there's atrophy a bit of that atrophy of the sea I for example training training spies decline the number of spice and see I training programs declined. and the attitude about terrorism was mixed remember after nineteen forty seven the targets to see I typically chase were big targets. the Soviets the Chinese the Cuban Missile Crisis big targets. I served I I returned from taking a leave of absence to the CI nineteen ninety two and was told to go to the counter terror center because it was seen as a place where you send people who maybe. weren't ready for primetime which of course was a model I think. that changed over time like any organization even large organizations people make a difference in the personalities the call for personalities that I read about in the book and I knew so well for critical in keeping counterterrorism from declining further in the nineties. George tenet. the CIA director was immersed in counterterrorism and insisted that counterterrorism get some level of privacy insisted on budget any insisted on ensuring that there was leadership there that was well regarded across the agency not common in the nineteen nineties including. the director of the center again and call for black legendary in my business who raise the profile of counterterrorism increasing the quality of people who were going over there increasing the respective characters and its C. I. before nine eleven but make no mistake. the peace dividend for intelligence the lack of focus on terrorism. that on that day on that day. the CIA and the counter terrorist world was not only not prepared they could not be prepared. they all talk to me about feeling before but especially in the searing months and years after nine eleven about feeling like they are on the back foot. on that day and I had this is this is not over dramatized everything changed. years of debate about armed drones done years of debate about rates in Afghanistan Afghanistan forget about rates to see I will be first in with operatives with money. technology guidance within weeks of nine eleven forget about rates the U. S. army big green will invade Afghanistan. the transition not only in resources but in attitude was foundational. the CIA director used to ask us I sat in on the nightly threat briefings for years I was in we had about five or six briefers I was trading back and forth with another one of my colleagues opening the meeting with the threat briefing a matrix of ten or fifteen or twenty threats people who would write and threats to a website for security services who would tell us that they uncovered a threat. intercepted communications were all kind of was talking about coming to the United States. I started those briefings in one of the things that was so evident and that was spoken around some of those tables with a simple concept. we anticipated a second wave what we call the second wave for years the second wave was what we anticipated would be another nine eleven but perhaps worse because al Qaeda had an anthrax program that we did not fully understand. for months for months and longer we did not understand the research and development we did not understand whether they have taken strains of anthrax out of Afghanistan there was concern that the second wave might not be aircraft that it might be anthrax and added to that was a fundamental problem. we did not understand the adversary. the human source penetration of the bread and butter of a human source of a human informant organization like see IT human source penetration and this is operative speaking to me this is not me speaking the people who ran operations against al Qaeda would tell you the human source penetration was modest. so in the midst of America watching horrific videos of people jumping off buildings and watching pages in the newspapers of faces of the fallen we were sitting behind the scenes with the director saying if there is that second wave tomorrow. can you say I wish I had done this that or the other thing. why don't you do it today. Philip Mudd blacks the CIA in a post nine eleven world. in the midst of all this there was a drumbeat in the spring of two thousand two and I witnessed a lot of this first hand. there was intense and getting louder. in that drum beat was the hunt. for the first major. the I. captive Abu Zubeida. one of the challenges out al Qaeda had was they miscalculated what the US response to nine eleven would be they did not anticipate a such a huge response they thought it might be they didn't anticipate they would take the towers down but they thought the response might be more cruise missiles they also anticipated at the U. S. military when and they working with the Taliban would believe the U. S. military justice they had let the Soviets they did not have an exit plan. the military operations intelligence operations the cooperation with the Afghans the US was working with an organ an element of Afghanistan a group called the northern alliance were so successful that al Qaeda had to flee before they ever developed a plan and many of them fled east. into Pakistan where they started making mistakes mistakes that allowed us. in a part of the business intelligence that we call targeting that is having individual analysts responsible for an individual terrorists to the tactical level where you know with that terrorists communications patterns are you know what his family is you know with the the career network as we had individual analyst and a growing intelligence profession call targeting analysts who were watching out beta in the brief things the growing drumbeat what's the sense that the.

Central Intelligence Agency Philip Mudd director analyst United States Afghanistan Abraham Lincoln George Mason Sidney Blumenthal William G. Hyland anthrax Taliban Pakistan America George tenet. U. S. army
"oxford analytica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"oxford analytica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"High winds in eastern Australia are expected to create more extreme conditions for firefighters tackling more than a hundred bush fires police suspect that some of the blazes were started deliberately. yes the I. has disclosed the name of a Saudi official allegedly linked to the September eleventh attacks the information was supplied private the to a lawyer representing victims' families who is suing the Saudi government Saudi Arabia has always denied any connection with the hijackers. the Supreme Court in Peru has how of the period of pre trial detention imposed on the opposition needed Keiko Fujimori who is facing corruption charges the ruling paves the way for her release in April next year. New Zealand is planning a further tightening of his candles six months after the Christ Church mosque shootings a new gun register will track every firearm and they'll be stiffer penalties for people who illegally trade weapons. police said Heathrow airport in London of arrested two men who they suspect we're trying to fly a drone into the air field one group of climate activists has been threatening action to disrupt flights planes landing and taking off without the lace BBC news. you're listening to the real story from the BBC world service with me Judy market this week we're looking at the recent outbreak of violence in South Africa claims that foreign workers are being targeted him what some according as xenophobic attacks on the way south Africa's neighbors have reacted with me throughout professor Lawrence Landau's senior researcher at the African center for migration and society I'm from the Mojave executive director of the center for the study of violence and reconciliation we're actually P. late south African journalist and Edison all three of them are in Johannesburg here in London Jason Robinson senior African analyst at the research organization Oxford analytica earlier in the program we discussed the possible causes of the violence coming up more on the way other countries have reacted to specially Nigeria and reaction to recent events from a spokesman for the African National Congress so let's look at that diplomatic fallout first of all I'm. Lauren Landau would to you about relations between South Africa and Nigeria and how they have played out in recent times and therefore inform what's happening now what's your reading of that well I think that there has been a as Russian was saying before a kind of global competition between the two you know they've been vying for who is the biggest economy in in Africa although I think when you look at at the basis of ever is very clearly the most diversified and and perhaps the most imperialist of the of the economies and I think it's that kind of expansion is to gender this really at stake here after the violence happens in twenty fifteen Niger wall up to one of the south African cell phone companies empty and with something close to a billion dollar fine basically as punishment and what you're seeing in in Nigeria in Congo in Tanzania is local businesses using this as a lever against south African business to say look why would we allow these people into our country when they treat us so badly way back in their own home country and I think this is as the Nigeria being so big it means more coming from them but I think it's going to hurt South Africa not just economically but politically in terms of its soft power across the continent but these are countries that would have been so supportive of the majority black population in South Africa during the apartheid era. yeah I mean these are countries that that supported South Africa these are countries I think that embraced South Africa after nineteen ninety four and at least initially welcome south African investment as part of global trade is part of expanding opportunities for everyone but what we've seen recently not just in the last few weeks but over the last few years is the recognition that South Africa doesn't play fair that's out Africa doesn't welcome six continental initiatives he's really in it for itself and this sort of plays into that narrative uncomfortable Huffy that's quite a big shift of of thinking isn't it among south Africa's neighbors. yeah look I think the is the a question that just has to be asked in Africa around the images of the elite. from even what Lorena seeing most of this what is inside after college is is what's happening in Algeria is mainly a the the the political elite or the business elite fighting Vale wars with the people on the ground being the ones that get affected because at the end of the day is the question that has been asking who benefits from the xenophobia but most importantly will actually sofas the people who suffers the most of the people on the ground I mean as they say that in the elephants fight is the grass that suffers even what's happening in as Lawrence is in Nigeria is mainly business trying to advance they or needs and a in in the name of what is happening so that that's interesting I mean you know people listening will think back to when Nelson Mandela was elected in nineteen ninety four which represents an enormous change in the way that country looked to the outside world not any to those living in South Africa but what your hinting at is that while that was a huge change actually now quite a loss of what was there before. you still there. yeah I mean interestingly enough the Mandela himself said I have not yet giving you freedom but of giving you the freedom to be free it was just the beginning of freedom there was a lot of work that still needed to happen in terms of social economic transformation which we didn't do sufficient enough and in Africa generally I don't think there's been sufficient questioning of elitism in Africa and those that have been power and how they have peach we take the very same things that were done by they'll process welcome to you there Ashley and Jason in a moment all on that and the other reaction to this being close to South Africa but his specific reaction this is from hot FM it's a Zambian radio station that has banned south African music as a result of these recent attacks at Gary my son it was its programs manager as a registration we thought why not switch off also African music for my playlist and do a statement which is seven all social media platform our retaliation is not like attack attack we have a lot of the evidence yet the country was to embrace them was to around with them and everything else is just that we stayed we're going to pull your music and until such a time where we feel okay our friends brothers and sisters sort of like come down we're coming to terms will push back this African music onto our airwaves Gary Massana in Zambia up the recipe that is the reaction from south Africa's neighbors look different to you this time. well there's been I think it's seven to everyone there is absolutely a feeling of of people in a kind of drawing a line this time round I I think previously perhaps to a able to maybe bluff our way through it and this time they his attitudes have certainly hard and I think when you see high profile musicians arguing from from different countries you had Burna boy A. K. A. who's about friggin rapper I'm in a heated argument about the attacks and especially those against Nigerian foreign nationals because as much as we have an economic competition but not you know we also have a music competition and so that one's a door and your music and vice versa so it when it's not to touch that many parts of our relationship you know that we're in trouble and just again and activity for me I'm involved in like networks off a young entrepreneurs across the continent and it's a lot of sense of betrayal so images taken a huge knock and as Lauren referenced earlier we do have a bit of an imperialist kind of Sloan's to our image anyway we often refer to joking is the US off of of the continent in terms of how we always talk to own interests and can be quite arrogant so this is really not helping things for that but but again going back to what we were saying a moment ago who the reaction a few years ago when similar violence took place was different so I wonder whether the patience of the neighbors has somehow run out so I think when it happened almost ten years ago for the first time in two thousand and eight we will all kind of maybe coasting along still on that and the promise of South Africa being some kind of miracle nation and I think ten years later they are younger angry of people across the continent and it and in South Africa as you know not as willing to put up with with the sort of thing Joyce let me bring you in on that this idea that you know twenty five years own since Nelson Mandela became president clearly there has been an enormous amount of progress but there is still a great deal more progress to make and that people are beginning to feel differently about the country when they leave that and a looking upon it differently when they are outside said Africa as an outline. it can be kind of sees itself is quite exceptional which can also it infuriates its neighbors and others on the continent seen as arrogant it's interesting I think there's comparable populism's I play both in Nigeria and South Africa because it's been about five thousand jobs lost in like a state as a result of these rights and also it's a symptom similar to said Africa of young unemployed people who are getting incredibly frustrated at the lack of job opportunities and the lack of progress and we're seeing the the impact of state capture in the hollowing out of institutions farm policy suffered as well and what what a specific at negative approaches we saw we sat by sheer at the Sudanese leader we saw the. wants to leave the international criminal course and we saw some decisions when it was on the UN security council things like this where that kind of Mandela sheen kind of went away and was seen as self interest I think xenophobia it while it's on the international agenda now is definitely on the domestic agenda but the big worry is that dish. it won't be tackled anytime soon and every time these attacks stars the the concern is is it going to flare up and spread like it did in two thousand eighteen thousand fifteen and the issue of leadership has been found wanting a loss in the past the past eighteen months let me bring another voice in on this because listing to it certainly the last part about conversation is said to coach a liquidity and national spokesman for the governing a and C. in South Africa and he joins us on the line a Dakota liquidity welcome to the program thank you for coming on no thank you very much and to all the list not settle I want to ask you first about how South Africa looks as a result of this group of Nigerians wanting to leave your country some of whom have now arrived back in late goals from a purely image point of view the signal that sends to the rest of the world it doesn't look good does it is the agency. we condemn the recent developments in sort of in the strongest terms. what ukulele done fortunately at total for attacks on foreign nationals in budget love from the continent is Dale C. will not want to start. I don't but I see that some of the best most foreign nationals it'll be law country. I'm rich..

South Africa BBC Nigeria London Saudi Arabia Saudi government Australia Keiko Fujimori African center Peru African National Congress Oxford analytica Christ Church mosque Lawrence Landau bush Supreme Court New Zealand official Johannesburg
"oxford analytica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:56 min | 2 years ago

"oxford analytica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Home following a wave of anti immigrant violence in cities including Pretoria and Johannesburg. it was one of the top. the the coming back. I woke up you've got me everything gave one kind I just have to run it with all my life. I haven't been able to get out of my house and I will say experience verbal brand of a lot of staff and stocking up on specific African nationals and I thought to myself into the same African nationals will help changing up last night I think it's a shame. in the African continent was it on the situation of blacks given blacks well the spot for the violence is disputed but it's been widely reported that began after Laurie drive is staged a strike to protest against the employment of foreigners you know twelve people have been killed including two foreign nationals in these latest attacks see about got motor is a journalist and presenter of voice of visits FM that's in Johannesburg two weeks ago the looting started to not so far from way I state which is like two on his back into town they said that their toileting sucked up by foreign nationals but it is this is many shops every chopped was actually destroyed and looted even folks that are owned by south Africans including to import to stores finishes holds the supermarkets like a lots of property was destroyed that we own I saw that the kids and as well as for admission also it was I wouldn't say it was targeted some people but it was just a routine that really affected everyone have you heard the shouts chance from people implying that there is an anti foreigner element to this is in talks when and last Sunday when prince Michael subjected easy we came to check this town to address the community it was clear that there was a with dancing and obviously taunting around saying that they told one for initials in South Africa and oversee the seats they giving the government twenty four hours which now I think it's about seventy two hours the government agency do anything about it but yeah so what does that what density taunting and there were walking around the streets off off to this town in protesting against a foreign nationals is it clear how organized that kind of behavior is I mean all the people in charge is it okay straight what's happening the cost of doing that is being led to by all the music doing this with me like that he does that he does what being pointed to to to lead to a couple people from certain villages I live in hospitals. but now effect it's everyone C. bunga motor well these attacks are not new but unlike in previous years the reaction from the rest of the continent from Ethiopia to Zambia to Nigeria has been much stronger this time office of canceled events radio stations of stopped playing south African music and south African businesses have been attacked in retaliation elsewhere the violence is raised a number of questions about the status of the south African economy about attitudes within South Africa to people living and working there who come from other African countries about xenophobia and about fake news because some of the video shared online about current events have turned out to be old or even not from South Africa a tool so what's behind the attacks all the purely economic or are they a reflection of a great intolerance in society how dependent is the south African economy on foreign workers and what impact will the negative reaction on the continent have and does the government have a plan to bring an end to these attacks for good my guess throughout our professor Lauren Landau's senior researcher at the African center for migration and society dumbfounded Mahaffey executive director of the center for the study of violence and reconciliation for Ashley P. lay south African journalist and editor all three of those are in Johannesburg here in London is Jason Robinson senior African analyst at the research organization Oxford analytica a little bit later on in the program we'll be joined by the national spokesman for the governing a and C. in South Africa Dakota liquidity. a fairly straightforward first question is this just a case of xenophobia or is it more complicated than that for rational appeal a what's your take on it. so there's been a lot of contestants about the idea that this is surely just as enough attacks I noticed a full file government to professor label that criminality quite disingenuous the after they themselves hold responsible for stoking much of the tensions previously but from the numbers that are coming out we understand that twelve people were killed and ten of those of African so it's getting harder and harder to the stand with this is just an awful big violence simply put away that is something far more nuanced and that we need to unpack going on here laurel and though what's your take on it but clearly there is xenophobia is is part of the story here and as you heard people are angry and produced and that anger is being directed at least discursive Lee act at foreign nationals but I think we eat while it's easy to think about this is the kind of rise of global center for with that we've seen in the UK or the United States or Europe this is something that's very much rooted in local governance is rooted in who is it that controls these areas whether it's in tune is this the sort of leaders that you heard about or community associations and it's the way they are mobilizing violence to eliminate competition to get resources to express anger and I think he is this is really is worse in some ways and just at the immigrant rhetoric numb from the Mojave first thought from you on on what lies behind us yeah when this happens what we say is this we are from just having gone in and really understood today eruptions when that happened is that is not a matter of a that will lead we've inherited a society that has deeply entrenched in tolerance and xenophobia is one of them so it's really important to or seven one's understanding of this psychological accu tech settle for society and why we have some of the issues that we have in Jason Robinson the first thought from you on on what might lie behind this I think just to echo some of the previous points there's a whole mix of issues I think low level symphonic phones is happening all the time and the police don't categorize and murders of foreign nationals as a separate kind. re so there's a bit of a a morning of the water is in terms of how many are actually kill than if it probably works to the authorities favor that we don't know you know that it's not out in the public discourse so I think that there's a whole host of issues I think to echo some the previous point you know we have official unemployment at around twenty nine percent the expanded definition is up near forty percent youth unemployment is over fifty percent and I think cam one issue which we might touch on is the disjoint between the official government rhetoric about attracting skilled immigrants and said after being open for business and then the political posturing the populism that's not only within the ANC would also other political parties so Herman moshava the mayor of Johannesburg he gets a lot of the blame for some of the pockets of fines we seen not as most recently but previous before that some hardline comments about illegal immigrants as criminals at the D. A. the main opposition for the twenty nineteen election campaign how to secure our borders as slogan as one of their chief concerns and the ANC of also played thought as well and even the health then health minister last year said that it was migrants who restraining the health system didn't prove didn't bring any facts to bear on the issue but it plays to kind of have prejudices that are there already there's a lot in your first four ounces all of you I think they fall under the heading of more nuanced and more complicated and certainly a lack of days or in some areas as well that might add to the the focus of for this and being certain of exactly what's happening and and who the main victims all will come back to some of those points in a moment I want to bring you this voice Stanley but who's a Nigerian pasta he's been living in South Africa for seven years how does he explain the reasons for Nigerians deciding to leave South Africa for good name Jerry and have lost hope on the side of a Tory T. in addressing these issues because there's a lot of false time is kind of our time. he's from happening in the Republic they raise a lamb so in some locations you know on these kind of attacks and over and over again little or nothing has been done by the twenty two to really address this issue once and for all why do you think this is happening now I'll say this is up and down due to pressure looking at the economy of the country the economy is not doing well right now at the moment so the citizens are. click on sign about a state of the nation and the one girl Tory T. to do something origins strictly tried to raise the issues and this is not happening very fast and this house three god anger and aggression and which has left you. these current attacks we now weakness he seems I see we are the major targets so it is better to go home to be safe this is not the first time we have in this issue Stanley Hoover and a jury imposter he's been living in South Africa for seven years the appeal of South Africa Jason Robinson to those from outside the country when you look back in recent times and you look at the numbers who have moved there from other parts of Africa what's been the reason is it purely economic or is there more to it than that I think that's I major focus of its basically set off because the economic hope of the continents and when it's doing well if it lifts up the rest and I think one of the interesting things is even though we had the debilitating to that's a nice finance we also the twenty fifteen violence people are still going to set Africa it's still quite an attractive place to go in terms of opportunities around the major urban centers bush with fast comes those pressures that we've touched on you know Nigeria has been the most vocal and and we've had the repatriation in the past days but arguably countries in the southern African development community neighboring countries have been affected so just as much if not more and I reacted quite strong yes yeah and I suppose the Nigerian elements has a few layers to it there's the human and on social almond which is protecting its citizens which is completely legitimate and then there is perhaps some of the the power play you know the farm policy element to it as well I want to get on to that a little bit later on in the program for Russian you heard of pasta and he was talking about the number of Nigerians leaving and why they're doing it to was talking about them being targeted I mean is it clear whether Nigerians all being targeted here or not from what I've seen it's not entirely clear but I'm sure my co panelists will have more information but I think the lack of data and it's very hard to really understand what is happening with all this data and also the power play is very important we know that there is a history of diplomatic tension between our government and. Nigeria's government and it's a lot of fixing so to speak of various muscle that various times so I think there's a lot of thought to be taken into consideration but in my anecdotal lived experience hands of Africa it seems that the violence is pretty indiscriminate in terms of the phone is that it is attacking and even the bobbins who are probably the the best to kind of blending in from up north I mean obviously people from the surgeons widely and publicly and in the best but up people from longs involved with specially from they develop tribe they do tend to learn the set after languages pretty quickly that they tend to look similar but even they are being targeted so it's hard to say that on June specifically are being targeted can I bring them from doing an organ on that point specifically don't for this lack of data is not because it simply isn't there it's difficult to work out what's happening or is that was there something else going on I mean we have been saying that even today we've just had our crimes does been released and missing that it really difficult for us to be able to have that analysis all of which particular groups are actually involved so that we can be able to check of this or not but it in for me the biggest issue is the fact that to the people that tends to be generally affect Ted is mainly the foreign nationals of African origin so there's a very strong police component to this almost like this internalized racism and they hate to offer the other that two looks like me which has very strong psychological components to it and I also wanted to just touch briefly on was the reasons why people come here because at the center for the study of violence and reconciliation with quite a trauma clinic will be with directly with the refugees and migrants and when people talk usually differentiates try to differentiate between the force migrant as a result of conflict and as a result tall of economic issues but we are finding increasingly with the clients that come to us that is a really difficult to differentiate to those issues and most of these migrants don't come here because they wanted to they will tell you that I don't want to. his difficulties of Africa but back at home is tough I was just in Zimbabwe four days ago it is terrible people come here because they're desperate and I think I challenges yes we are is that organizations like you initial C. R. the would invest in funding refugees but there's not sufficient to work done with the host country so sort of again I'm not prepared to see how do you walk in integrating these the non nationals will come here what are the reasons for them to come yeah so the work.

Africa Pretoria Nigeria Johannesburg. Zimbabwe Ted seven years twenty nine percent seventy two hours twenty four hours fifty percent forty percent four ounces four days two weeks
"oxford analytica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:37 min | 3 years ago

"oxford analytica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The panel's decision directing nation is rough now playing contract. We want to St.. This outcome as a painful situation for the guy trying to choose to be in the situation but rugby Astrid position reminds Israel, his actions, lift us with no choice but to the fiction resulting and today's outcome. Now that has been a very strong debate in Australia over the whole process, which has led to this point with many of the players supporters saying he's being sanctioned simply stressing expressing his Christian beliefs. He's had support from people within rugby as winners from outside the game. It's, it's taken on a very strong kind of social tussle in Australia over recent weeks. The white expectation is that this is going to end up in court with flower likely to challenge the ruling. He's he can appeal within three days to another panel. And then eventually, if that funds against him, it could end up, as I say going to the courts, and what would essentially be tussle between religious freedom, and what rugby Australia's talked about. In terms of inclusive inclusivity within the game before Australian rugby style pizza fit Simon's fully in support of the finding today. Name a single of the rule was I in strata the one that relies on public support, who could have the star impli posting like that guy's guy to go to hill twice and still we employed name. A spin saw would be prepared to put millions of dollars towards it over those who starring says the guy's gonna get a hill the game has changed. We're willing to the twenty th century, you had no right to, to secure people that are born guy, and come up with Christmas, that they're going to hill as there is a long way to go yet on this before it is concluded there's a sporting adamant to own of this as well. Of course, Israel phone. It's Tonto exaggerate, what a big stone. He is, as far as Australian rugby. Consent as a World Cup in Japan later on this year and amongst the things this seriously throws straight preparations for that tournament into doubt. But all the talk is about what's going on in the courtrooms and what it's right to be able to say what the reaction to that is more on that reaction on that through the day here on the BBC sport. Today is at eighteen thirty GMT nothing getting with a sport. Many things now you'll be familiar by now with the US trade draw with China, you'll recall. It's also in a separate to spach with the European Union. But we haven't for a little one now talked about it's argument with techie, but Philip is on the business desk, and he's going to remind us that I'll even yes. Several arguments going on between the United States and Turkey, one of stealing minium. In fact, US imposed fifty percent tariffs on Turkish steel good news today those coming down to twenty five percent less good news. Elsewhere in that. There was a second row going on between. In the US and Turkey with regards to oppress, the who've been arrested that caused the US to impose sanctions on sitting top Turkish government ministers. And then there was a third row that was taking place as well. Which was designed to buy a Russian missile shield Tikki is a significant member of NATO, which cost the United States. Some consent on joined now by Mike, Taylor. He is a senior analyst over Oxford Analytica, specializing in eastern Europe. Now, one of the reasons that the US is that the railway between taking the US is ramped up. Is that yesterday tickets said that it was going to buy this Russian missile shield last night, the United States, remove turkeys favored nation trade status, which means that all goods going across the United States will now attract tariffs, you don't think that's as economically significant as it sounds. But you do think it's politically significant is that correct on sort of thinking with a. The Turkish president will restore easily does kind of tough way on from the US goods, an internet point of view took it in a much weaker position. But at one doesn't seem to worry about that. I mean if you look at the issue is really about Russia, missile cropped up now. So why is it the Turkey wants to buy a Russian missile system, given the a member of NATO? And that was Oviously gonna play stresses on its other relationships. It's kind of an awkward member of NATO. Regulations hadn't been so great. Vera, VERA Corwin took your future now US troops participate in the invasion of Iraq from Turkish sue the getting really upset about this S four hundred Russian at six to your cortisol because see what they worried about really is the, the, the Turks will facing this this, this off. And with the Russian backup technicians in Turkey, helping him to run the get used to time the Turks want to acquire the f thirty five I'm still fighter. This is the this is the top of the US, Feige and US. Congress is no saying, well, hang on. If you're gonna have a Russian missile, you can't have our top fighters because they'll be able to train against one another. To the in country and they can practice started at work out how the year four hundred green down fine. So economically. What do you think that this might mean full Turkey if they end up placing tariffs on US imports and they have tariffs on the experts as well? Couldn't they spe- demagoging for the lira and for their inflation situation? I think because any sort of relationship in US in Turkey investment. Frightening is we saw that in the lyrics to the big hit because the back of their minds people thinking, well, if Turkey needs to go into captain. You go to vote in the on the street editions of immediate hit with a with a learns Turkey food. Yes. Get very worried about this mug say, thank you very much for joining me. The business. Many.

US Turkey Australia NATO Israel Astrid BBC sport European Union Philip Simon Russia Oxford Analytica Congress Turkish government senior analyst Oviously Japan president
"oxford analytica" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"oxford analytica" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Now, it's been a great female. So the Chinese economy will be the trade, what would the US and the rows of qua-, and we'll talk more about that later on tonight's program. But it's not all bad news. China is increasingly ambitious exporter to countries that used to see the trade going in the opposite direction that is creating all kinds of problems for countries like Germany to explain what I'm joined by Sarah fouled, who's an international economy analyst at Oxford Analytica, Sarah, Germany, and the PawSox has done very well selling to China. But now the trade is starting to flow the other way. That's right. Yes. In this two reasons for this China has been moving into high avowedly segments. So it's making more at self of what it used to buy from countries such Germany, and then the Chinese economy is also slowing so it's buying list generally from the rest of the world to going on that of course, the economic problems in in Germany the rate of growth in the German economy. According to the most recent full concerts, slowing quite sharply. So anything that suggests that the export market is going to shrink for them is another problem. They don't need. That's right. Yes. And they have problem because they. Behind the US and China in a number of need technologies. Areas such as official intelligence and blockchain than us five years more than half of the investment offficial intelligence across the world was in China. So Jimmy is playing catch up in some areas like that that it needs to improve its competitiveness in to raise its exports in those areas, there's a sense from some people speak to that China is just a bit more nimble a bit more innovative foster moving than some older established economies and manufacturers like the ones you see in Germany. Yes. Well, the European Union investment in innovation has to be split between the twenty-seven countries sin this been no single state with the fundamental. It'll drive the research. So all talk temp top tech companies the so-called fangs a rule US. There's no European FANG. That definitely playing catch up. But there are ways the they can catch up, and that the German government is planning to invest three billion euros in offficial intelligence in the next five years or so so they all definitely setting policies. Much more today less now. How confident would Gemini bay of being able to keep pace with China though? I think it's certain services sector sectors. It still has a big advantage. It's much much more stab listed runs a huge surplus. And with the US administration currently being anti climate change on these kind of things. Climate change is an area where actually Germany and China have been quite good allies over the last couple of years signal quite a few areas, whether they are cooperating one on if they need to start talking about the moment, let's have more access to each of us financial sector load of services sectors that they can get me to a benefit out of working together and Sarah. Thank you, very much, sir. Follow is from Oxford Analytica. You're listening to the daily from multiple twenty four. Now. One of North Korea's top negotiators is heading for Washington, Kim Jung. Charlie's reportedly carrying a letter from the North Korean leader, Kim Yong gun for Donald Trump. That has added to the speculation that a second summit between the two men could be close when ideological Thomas would spec. Deduct John Nelson, right who is a senior lecturer in modern Japan at Cambridge University. He started by asking if these latest talks are cultural pluralism, the big issue that I think is focusing people's minds is the possibility that this meeting is preparation for the much-anticipated second summit between President Trump and his North Korean counterpart. There's been a lot of reporting from South Korea suggesting that community to all learning meet secretary of state pump Pompeo on Friday. But also that he will meet President Trump at the White House that would be a significant development. We know that the North Korean leader. In his news address had made it clear that he wanted a change of attitude on the part of the Americans Donald Trump himself, of course, as being signaling recently that a second some of meeting is potentially on the cards..

China Germany US President Trump Sarah fouled Oxford Analytica European Union North Korea South Korea analyst John Nelson Pompeo German government Cambridge University Japan Gemini bay
Bridge linking Crimea with Russia opened by Vladimir Putin

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:50 min | 4 years ago

Bridge linking Crimea with Russia opened by Vladimir Putin

"This is the monocle daily live from studio one madari house in london as of tonight europe has a new longest bridge it's nineteen collaborators long in fact it costs the end of four billion dollars to build and we'll doubtless cause any number of pub quizzes to descend into riot over what the definition of europe actually is the bridge links mainland russia to crimea next from ukraine in two thousand fourteen and means that motor traffic between russia and crimea will no longer have to travel by ferry or pass through ukraine president vladimir putin opened it in person by driving a big orange truck across it joined with more on this budge on macleod a senior analyst at oxford analytica john the big question i technically speaking is is russia building this bridge even legal benz's his lawyer talking about putin works by russian laws and he you know he's never really addressed the question of the international galaxy of of his acquisition of crimea henze he won't bother to to address this issue either so what were the imperatives driving the building of this bridge which is no small technical accomplishment is it a is it an economic thing to incorporate crimea into russia result the the the statement of ownership or is it a a demonstration of of russian engineering well if we were living in normal times and you had a region like cry of crimea which was part of russia building a bridge led this grandiose engineering project would be a sort of a marvelous thing because crimea is got kind of project sure and the needs that connection but that's that's not really the circumstances in which it was built it was built.

Europe Russia Crimea Vladimir Putin Macleod Senior Analyst Benz London Ukraine President Trump Oxford Analytica Four Billion Dollars