35 Burst results for "Oxford"

Are We Going to Give Up and Give the Left Everything They Want?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Are We Going to Give Up and Give the Left Everything They Want?

"Lot of inspiration from Churchill because I know a lot of you feel as if we are all alone and that things are falling apart, especially after the unfortunate and just quite honestly, inexplicable news at times Carrie Lake losing independence on election day, voting machines going down on election day, the we can look to that sort of message of the only thing that the other side needs for their victory. The thing that they need for victory is for us to surrender and the question is, are we going to say that we will never surrender? I know a lot of you are exhausted and fatigued and many of you are just so sick and tired of this. You know, I was actually supposed to be right now in the UK. I was actually going to go visit blend in palace and all that. I canceled the whole thing. There's too much going on here in this country. America first is not just a slogan. You actually have to live out America first. I was going to go debate at the Oxford union. I was going to go speak at the Cambridge, all really nice stuff. You know, stuff that is art would be great honors and all those sorts of things. The country's in way too big of a crisis right now. Donald Trump is announcing for president tonight. We're going to be looking very closely at that. Obviously, what's going on in Arizona the attorney general's race, there's leadership elections in the house, the house representatives still not called. And so here we are. We need to ask ourselves the question, will we surrender? Are we just going to give up and give the left everything that they've been asking for?

Carrie Lake Churchill Oxford Union America Palace UK Cambridge Donald Trump Arizona
 Teen expected to plead guilty in Michigan high school shooting

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Teen expected to plead guilty in Michigan high school shooting

"A teenager accused of killing four fellow students and entering more at a Michigan high school is expected to plead guilty to murder Ethan crumley had created images of violence during a classroom assignment last November but was not sent home from Oxford high school in court prosecutor marquise says crumley later went into a school bathroom with a backpack and came out with a gun At that point he methodically and deliberately walked on the hallway aiming the firearm at students in firing Chief assistant prosecutor David Williams says crumley is expected to plead guilty Monday to all 24 charges including terrorism Investigators say crumbley's parents had declined to take him home on the day of the shooting but were told to get him into counseling

Crumley Michigan High School Ethan Crumley Oxford High School Marquise David Williams Crumbley
Professor Dave Brat: The Globalists Are Creating Armageddon

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:08 min | Last month

Professor Dave Brat: The Globalists Are Creating Armageddon

"Not a dean of any business school anywhere, but am I wrong or is the fact that we've been in two quarters of negative growth? Doesn't that mean professor bratt that we are in a recession? Yeah, well, I think you qualify the dean's spirit. I call ban in the dawn of Oxford, so I'll make you the honorary Donovan Cambridge. So you're unequivocally. I'll be a visiting fellow. How's that? I love the visiting fellow. Good. Your point. Yeah, no. It's just and I don't even call these, you know, partisan or political anything anymore. It's just the globalists implanted people on both sides of the aisle. They've been winning. They're now losing, they've created just Armageddon and almost literally, right? That was just remarks last week, financially economically, culturally, religiously, financially, spiritually, every which way, right? It's not just economic the American people across the spectrum. I think are going to revolt

Professor Bratt Donovan Cambridge Dean Oxford
Goldfish-Goldfish intro and wrap

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Goldfish-Goldfish intro and wrap

"Researchers are disputing the notion that goldfish are forgetful People who can't remember things have been described as having the memory of a goldfish What we can say is it is wrong Doctor Ed lait sibo a biologist at the University of Oxford says don't blame the goldfish She performed experiments They can learn how to discriminate between colors they have numerical abilities that means they can different shade between different numbers about 29 goldfish to travel along a tank with the walls covered with black and white stripes when they were swapped for narrower black and white bands the fish shortened the distance they swam But they use this change of contrast in the environments to estimate if they've traveled far or close They are more than just fish in a bowl I'm Ed Donahue

Ed Lait Sibo University Of Oxford Ed Donahue
The CDC Caught Lying About the Vax "Death Signal" With Steve Kirsch

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | 2 months ago

The CDC Caught Lying About the Vax "Death Signal" With Steve Kirsch

"Some tape here. Of kind of a one two combo. It's a very depressing one, two combo might I add. Let's play cut 57. Of Pfizer celebrating children that are going to be in the vaccine child trials, play cut 57. All of us want to be superheroes. And the most important years of those that help others. This year, thousands of kids like us around the world joined the COVID-19 vaccine trial. To all the kids who volunteered, we'd like to say. Thank you. And then cut 58. This is a hospital advertisement, cut 58. One day, I just stomachache so bad. I didn't want to do anything. The team at new York Presbyterian said it was actually my heart. It was severely swollen. Something called myocarditis. But doctors gave me medicines and used machines to control my heartbeat. They'd save me. These people are so evil. Steve, what's your take? Well, they're trying to normalize the damage from the vaccine. They're trying to cover up the damage in the vaccine. And make it a pure like, oh, the myocarditis is just something normal and isn't a great that this hospital is treating it. But they're not telling you in the ads is that we don't know what's going to happen 5 years down the road for that young girl who was in that TV commercial. Because myocarditis, I think the stance are like in 5 years, like 20% of the people are dead. And their lifelong pharma patients too, Steve. They make for great residuals, right? Yeah, they do. They do. And you know, the fact that we're injecting 6 months old, kids at a very early age, is horrible. And there was a paper from authors at Stanford. Sorry, at Harvard, Johns Hopkins, UCSF, Oxford University and a few more institutions. And they basically said that the risk benefit of this vaccine is so bad. In other words, it's so risky that it is unethical for universities to mandate boosters.

Covid New York Presbyterian Pfizer Myocarditis Steve Ucsf Johns Hopkins Stanford Oxford University Harvard
Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

"When you first came to Oxford, I remember story that you went to maybe it was the bob land. I'm guessing, and you asked for anything by Lewis, but the term you used was Lewis, Louisiana. Can you do you remember that story? I don't think it's exactly as I told it. I may have asked for Louisiana, but I think together we worked it out. I worked so long in the bodleian over 50 years. And I was always working on Louis. So people who worked there called the readers by not by name, but by the name of the person they're researching. So I've called mister C is Lewis when I'm there. And I know a man who is Civil War Robert E. Lee and Hitler. Mister Adolf Hitler. You're kidding. Well, actually, one of the things about Hitler's. Is that the people that I work with have work with for years, these Curtis Brown, agents, literary agents and London. Well, they were Hitler's literary agents. And they have you're not kidding. No, I'm not. Curtis Brown where Hitler's literary agents. Some have they inherited they have the rights to they control the rights to mein kampf. But and all the children's stories that he wrote. Well, I understand that the royalties of mein kampf have been around for 50 years, and they built up quite a lot.

Bob Land Lewis Louisiana Hitler Mister Adolf Hitler Curtis Brown Oxford Robert E. Lee Louis London
The Disasterous Death Toll From Shutting Down America

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:20 min | 3 months ago

The Disasterous Death Toll From Shutting Down America

"Do we have a sense of not only the psychological impact, especially on the youth of shutting everything down of making social interaction forbidden. And then purely from the medical perspective, how many people die as a result of missed cancer screenings and so forth, is it possible to say that those excess deaths are comparable in terms of magnitude to those who died as a result of COVID or who have been registered as COVID deaths doctor McCullough? Well, let's take COVID first a recent survey 18,000 individuals published in the peer reviewed literature by very dark and colleagues demonstrated that those who are hospitalized, they were hospitalized because they did not receive early treatment at home. And so it was actually the suppression of early treatment, which we clearly note in our book, that was responsible for the hospitalizations and deaths that occurred in the United States. And that could be upwards to, you know, with the learning curve on how we learned how to treat the illness two thirds of those deaths could have been spared two thirds of the hospitalizations. That means two thirds of a million hospitalizations and 10 million deaths were avoidable. Now we look at this penumbra of casualties from the lockdown measures and other things that were done. You know, I published the first paper treating doctors how to treat the illness in August of 2020 and right after that was the great Barrington declaration. That was signed by hundreds of thousands of doctors and scientists put forward by Jay bought a char from Stanford, one of my frequent fellow contributors to Fox News. Martin kuldar from Harvard and sunita Gupta from Oxford, the great barent in declaration said, just protect the seniors just apply high risk protection measures to those at risk and leave the economy going, leave everyone else alone. That wasn't followed and it was catastrophic locking down the economy and having people shelter in place who had no fundamental risk from the infection. Now you're right. We see mortality up across the board. Every single category, cardiovascular disease, cancer, other conditions, neuropsychiatric conditions. It's a disaster.

Mccullough Cancer Martin Kuldar Sunita Gupta United States Stanford Fox News JAY Harvard Oxford Cardiovascular Disease
The Christian Foundation of Our Nation With Bill Federer

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 4 months ago

The Christian Foundation of Our Nation With Bill Federer

"People will say that there's nothing exceptional about America. And that America is not a Christian nation. Tell us why that is historically incorrect. So Muslims invading Europe, the Catholic king of Spain tries to stop them, can't, then Martin Luther starts the reformation. The king of Spain tries to stop that and he can't, and he finally makes a deal with the protestants. And he is called a piece of Augsburg of 1555. I took German in college and you know how to say 1555 in German? Film styles from 404 from sake. I think it sounds funny. Anyway, 1555 piece of Oxford, it let every king decide what's going to be believed in his kingdom. And so suddenly Europe, you have England being Anglican, Scotland, being Presbyterian, Holland being Dutch reform, Greece being Greece, orthodox, Germany being Luther in Switzerland, calvinist in Italy, Spain, France, et cetera, Catholic. And if you didn't believe the way your king did, you fled. And those were the people that spilled over and founded colonies in America. So I read through every charter of every colony. England, you had the anglicans founded Virginia, Puritans founded Massachusetts, congregationalists founded Connecticut and New Hampshire. Baptist founded Rhode Island. Dutch reform founded New York. And the Swedish lutherans found that Delaware and New Jersey and Catholics founded Maryland and then the quakers on the Pennsylvania. So just like Europe, there was a different denomination per country in America was more or less a different denomination per colony, and they didn't get along. And

Spain America Europe Augsburg Greece Martin Luther England Anglican Oxford Holland Luther Scotland Switzerland Germany Italy France Massachusetts Virginia New Hampshire Connecticut
Wholesale prices shoot up near-record 11.3% in June on surge in energy costs

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

Wholesale prices shoot up near-record 11.3% in June on surge in energy costs

"About inflation from the Labor Department's report on wholesale prices The U.S. producer priced index which measures inflation at the wholesale level before it hits consumers climbed 11.3% in June compared to one year ago and 1.1% from May That's the fastest pace since the record surge in March and follows yesterday's report that consumer prices were up 9.1% Wholesale prices for energy have shot up 54% transportation and warehousing are 23% higher and wholesale food prices are up nearly 13% from a year ago While services lagged at an 8% increase mehir Rashid with Oxford economics says that price pressures remain uncomfortable despite modest improvements in supply conditions and that businesses will have to figure out how much of the higher costs they can pass on to consumers

Labor Department Oxford Economics U.S.
Have You Heard of Zuby?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:38 min | 5 months ago

Have You Heard of Zuby?

"Yes. I have heard of Zooey, but only recently, but I know many of you know who zuby is. But I get to find out now because he's going to be my guest. All I know about him is he's an independent rapper and author a podcast host of public speaker and a creative entrepreneur with over a million followers on social media and a very interesting background. Zooby, welcome to the program. Hey, Eric, how's it going? It's going all right. You have your very eclectic. I'm also eclectic. So I like it, eclectic. I think I want people to kind of just to get to know you and your story. What kind of a name is zuby? There's a good question. Do you have a last name? Or do you just go by zuby? Well, my full name is unbelievable. Zuby is what? That was wait a minute. That was amazing. Say that again. That really was beautiful. That was beautiful. Say that again. That was amazing. My full name is unbelievable. Wow. That is from the ibo tribe of Nigeria, which is where my parents are originally from. I was born in the UK, raised in Saudi Arabia, went to an American school until I was 11 years old, and then went into the British school system, studied computer science at Oxford University and graduated from there, which is also where I started my music career. And now I am known for a lot of different things from my music to my commentary to my fitness work and writing and so, yeah, different people know me for different things. Yeah, I

Zuby Zooey Eric Nigeria Saudi Arabia Oxford University UK
School shooting suspect may testify at parents' trial

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

School shooting suspect may testify at parents' trial

"The suspect in a deadly school shooting in Michigan may testify at his parents trial Ethan crumley is accused of killing four fellow students at Oxford high school James and Jennifer crumbley are charged with involuntary manslaughter for failing to reasonably care for their son Judge Cheryl Matthews says some text messages can be used at the trial I actually asked my dad to take me to the doctor yesterday but he just gave me some pills and told me to suck it out And quote my mom laughed when I told her unquote Shannon Smith is an attorney representing Jennifer crumley She says this is not about the charges against Ethan crumley He can answer questions that are not covered by the Fifth Amendment So we can call him as a witness Smith says calling the son to testify is not about the parents wanting to throw him under the bus or make him look bad It's about her clients defending the case I'm Ed

Ethan Crumley Oxford High School Jennifer Crumbley Judge Cheryl Matthews Shannon Smith Jennifer Crumley Michigan James Smith
Actor Kevin Sorbo Talks to Dinesh From Israel About His Movie Projects

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:23 min | 6 months ago

Actor Kevin Sorbo Talks to Dinesh From Israel About His Movie Projects

"Guys, I'm pleased to welcome to the podcast actor director producer Kevin sorbo. You know him for Hercules Andromeda, God's not dead, soul surfer, let there be light. And he's got a whole bunch of projects coming up, which we're gonna talk about Kevin, thanks for joining me. I really appreciate it. You are in Israel. Tell us what you're doing there. I was shooting a documentary, I actually came here about three and a half years ago, I shot a documentary with John Lennox, John Lennox is a retired math professor from Oxford, you know, we as an apologist, he's debated all the great atheists who are like singer and Dawkins and Hitchens and we shot here and it's called against the tie to highly recommend that one. But this time, I'm doing the same type of thing I'm on camera, but I'll be narrating this as well, but it deals with the quest and search for the ark of the covenant. And it's been amazing. I'm working with two gentlemen out here that once worked in an archeological dig right now, which they believe is the site of the Israelites before they lost the Philistines at the site of Shiloh. So they're in an archeological dig in Shiloh right now. And these guys are amazing. I'm really, I'm the audience. I'm the guy that doesn't know most of this stuff, but these guys, I just asked the questions and they just take off. And hopefully it's going to be coming out. Sometime around November. They want to rush and get this thing out there before

John Lennox Kevin Sorbo Hitchens Kevin Dawkins Oxford Israel Shiloh
Joe Biden Blames the Uvalde Shooting on the Gun Lobby

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:33 min | 6 months ago

Joe Biden Blames the Uvalde Shooting on the Gun Lobby

"I try to understand the mindset of the thinking process that says some monster slaughters 19 children in an elementary school in Texas and it's the gun lobbies fault. I can not get there. I'm going to try. Let's listen to the president of the United States. As a nation, we have to ask, when in God's name, are we going to stand up to the gun lobby? When in God's name, we do we all know in our gut needs to be done is through 340 3448 days. Ten years since I stood up at a high school in Connecticut, a great school in Connecticut. Or another government massacred 26 people, including 21st graders at sandy hook elementary school. Since then, there have been over 900 incidents of gunfires reported on school grounds. Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida. Santa Fe high school in Texas. Oxford high school in Michigan. The list goes on and on and on this grows. When it includes mass shootings at places like movie theaters, houses of worship, as we saw just ten days ago to grocery store in Buffalo, New York. I am sick and tired of it. We have to act.

Sandy Hook Elementary School Connecticut Texas Marjory Stoneman Douglas High Santa Fe High School Oxford High School United States Parkland Florida Michigan Buffalo New York
How Did Rapper Zuby Get to Where He Is Today?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 8 months ago

How Did Rapper Zuby Get to Where He Is Today?

"We've had many, many guests on this show in the last three years. Some of them can be known by their initials like DJT, the former president, but I don't think we've had anybody who just has one name. And we're never going to have Madonna, but today we have zuby with us. He's an entrepreneur. He's a rapper. A man with a fascinating background. I saw him first on my buddy's podcast trigonometry fans foster and constantin Kissinger zuby. Welcome to America first one on one. Hey, how's it going? Happy to be here. It's going very well so far so good. We are 90 seconds into this interview. And it seems to be going all right, but we have a ways to go. Let's start where my buddies Francis and constantin begin there. Superb interviews. How did you get to be where you are today? Where did you grow up? What's your training? What's your background? And perhaps the greatest interest to all of our millions of listeners across the nation. How did you get to be the world heavyweight powerlifter in the female category? Okay, well, that's a lot of questions there. So my name is zuby. I'm an independent rapper, author, host of the real talk with zuby podcast, public speaker and coach. I was born in England, my family background is originally from Nigeria. I actually grew up in the Middle East and Saudi Arabia, lived there for almost two decades and went to school there up until 5th grade. I then went to boarding school in the UK and studied computer science at Oxford University, which is where I also started my music career. And over the course of time, I have released 6 independent albums and EPs, sold tens of thousands of albums, independently, and yeah, I've added a lot of strings to the bow, started my podcast and wrote and released my first book in 2019. And have become well known as well for, I guess what you could call social or cultural commentary. So different people around the world know me for a different things. But I'm someone who is always trying to seek the truth, speak the truth and help motivate and inspire other

Zuby Constantin Kissinger Zuby Madonna Constantin Francis America Nigeria Saudi Arabia Middle East Oxford University England UK
No Link (MM #4033)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 8 months ago

No Link (MM #4033)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I think I first began using a cellular phone back in like 1987 or 88. When one of my radio stations switched from two way radios to a phone installed in our station vehicle. By the early 1990s, we were all using some sort of handheld phone first N log now digital. And the one thing we've been hearing now for what 30 years is that cell phones could cause brain tumors. Well, according to researchers in England, there is no link between using a cell phone and developing a brain tumor. Researchers from Oxford have tracked more than 750,000 women in the UK for 20 years, now I realize it's just women they're tracking here, but they found that there is no link for people to use their phones every day or have used them for more than ten years. Any more, I don't have the phone up to my head anyway. I use headphones connected into it. So I don't have the phone sitting next to me all the time. But it's still something I worry about. Of course, there are people who are going to say this isn't true. It's all false information. But I'll tell you what, 750,000 people watched for 20 years. I feel a little bit more comfortable.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Brain Tumor Oxford England UK Brain Tumors Nasa
No Link (MM #4033)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 8 months ago

No Link (MM #4033)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I think I first began using a cellular phone back in like 1987 or 88. When one of my radio stations switched from two way radios to a phone installed in our station vehicle. By the early 1990s, we were all using some sort of handheld phone first N log now digital. And the one thing we've been hearing now for what 30 years is that cell phones could cause brain tumors. Well, according to researchers in England, there is no link between using a cell phone and developing a brain tumor. Researchers from Oxford have tracked more than 750,000 women in the UK for 20 years, now I realize it's just women they're tracking here, but they found that there is no link for people to use their phones every day or have used them for more than ten years. Any more, I don't have the phone up to my head anyway. I use headphones connected into it. So I don't have the phone sitting next to me all the time. But it's still something I worry about. Of course, there are people who are going to say this isn't true. It's all false information. But I'll tell you what, 750,000 people watched for 20 years. I feel a little bit more comfortable.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Brain Tumors Nasa Oxford England UK
No Link (MM #4033)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 8 months ago

No Link (MM #4033)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I think I first began using a cellular phone back in like 1987 or 88. When one of my radio stations switched from two way radios to a phone installed in our station vehicle. By the early 1990s, we were all using some sort of handheld phone first N log now digital. And the one thing we've been hearing now for what 30 years is that cell phones could cause brain tumors. Well, according to researchers in England, there is no link between using a cell phone and developing a brain tumor. Researchers from Oxford have tracked more than 750,000 women in the UK for 20 years, now I realize it's just women they're tracking here, but they found that there is no link for people to use their phones every day or have used them for more than ten years. Any more, I don't have the phone up to my head anyway. I use headphones connected into it. So I don't have the phone sitting next to me all the time. But it's still something I worry about. Of course, there are people who are going to say this isn't true. It's all false information. But I'll tell you what, 750,000 people watched for 20 years. I feel a little bit more comfortable.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Brain Tumors Nasa Oxford England UK
Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:45 min | 8 months ago

Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

"Before we get into these amazing stories, Mike span, David Tyson, John walker lind, who is Toby Honda. Tell us about what you did in the British armed forces and your life as a journalist before you became an author. Yes, well, you know, we share a somewhat similar accent as listeners and viewers will detect. You still got yours. Our minds kind of rubbing off a little bit, but I don't know. I'm worried. I'm worried about mind getting a little bit Americanized. But I trust yeah, you're a bit soggy in the middle of the Atlantic somewhere. Yeah, I mean the ace. So yeah, I'm 56 years old, I was born in 66. My father was in the navy. We moved around, we sort of ended up in Manchester, industrial city in the northwest. You don't have a mancunian accent. I think the Royal Navy actually did for the mancunian accent, which was pretty skin deep anyway. But you know, I sort of, you know, I wanted to follow in my father's footstep, I guess there's so many sort of young men do. And I also wanted to get out of Manchester and see the world and it just seemed like a very kind of insular sort of small sort of place. And so all that teenage angst was just channeled towards working hard to get out. And so I got a sponsorship from the I joined the navy at 18. Went to Dartmouth, which is the Britannia royal naval college, kind of the equivalent of the U.S. naval academy at Annapolis, but not really because it's more basic officers training. It's like santas is shorter. Yeah, that's right. I mean, I was there for less than a year. And I threw the navy I got a sponsorship to Oxford to study modern history, so I went off whilst serving naval officer, although I barely wore the uniform for those years apart from a few months sailing around sort of Hong Kong and the far east and Australia. So I had some good times. Yes, exactly. So I was serving naval officer for three years at college and then graduated from college and was pitched in to a career. Which I enjoyed immensely, but you know, it was after the Falklands War, which was 1982, I was joining and supplying to join just sort of join the Falklands actually, age 16. But I missed that. I was stationed in Scotland for the Gulf War, tried very hard to get involved. They managed to that's a long way away from Iraq. I know. They managed to win it without meeting my services. And I remember my boss at the time said, listen to, we don't worry about it. There's going to be plenty of time for medals. And I remember thinking, no, there won't. And of course I left after ten years of service without a single

Mike Span David Tyson John Walker Lind Toby Honda Navy Manchester Britannia Royal Naval College Royal Navy Atlantic U.S. Naval Academy Dartmouth Annapolis Oxford Far East Hong Kong Falklands Australia Gulf War Scotland Iraq
"oxford" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"London physiological logical. Society is the oldest organisation in great britain dedicated to the study of language formed in eighteen. Forty two one of their first objectives was to create a list of the deficiencies of the english language by eighteen. Eighty four they had hatched the idea of creating a new dictionary. That would solve the problems. They saw in current dictionaries. The process of whoever was incredibly slow. It took until eighteen fifty seven to establish a committee to create a list of unregistered words. These are words that weren't in current dictionaries or were poorly defined. If this had been the extent of what the illogical society had done. I wouldn't be doing an episode about this. The man who headed up. The committee was richard chenevix-trench. Trench was an interested in just coming up with a list of unregistered words. His ambition was much greater the report he produced with something else entirely. His report was titled on some deficiencies in our english dictionaries. It detailed all of the problems with current english language dictionaries in the nineteenth century. He noted problems. With the lack of coverage of obsolete words histories of words synonyms of words in poor examples and illustrations of words. What trench propose wasn't just a dictionary like the society had considered in the past. Trench was proposing writing the dictionary the most comprehensive dictionary of the english language. It wouldn't just be a list of words but of all of the words no longer in use and the history of all the words and where they came from. This would be a massive massive undertaking in eighteen fifty-eight the illogical society formerly called for the creation of a new dictionary which they called a new english dictionary on historical principles. First order of business was hiring someone to be the editor. Trench wasn't able to take on the assignment. As he was appointed the dean of westminster abbey. The job fell to herbert coleridge. Coleridge was only twenty nine. When he was appointed in eighteen sixty he created the outline in strategy for the entire project. He began the system to categorize the hundreds of thousands of quotes which would be required.

physiological society of londo Professor james murray oxford english dictionary proj Dr william chester simon winchester oxford Murray marie
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"And we share an einstein quote so that inspired me to have a look for a couple more quotes from albert einstein. I found to that. I thought i'd share you today. The first one says imagination is more important than knowledge that one and then second one days. If you can't explain simply you don't understand it. Well enough really excited today to welcome to our word up. Oxford education podcast lauren. Stevenson knowing is a physics teacher and the assistant director of blackpool research. School which we're going to be looking at an expert adviser fool. The education down nations improving secondary signs guidance report which created seven key recommendations bridge that gap between research and the classroom which such vital vital step to bridge currently studying for an ma in education. She is a very prolific blogger with a brilliant block site that i've been having an account. Lauren huge welcome to our podcast. Thank you for having me reading of this. Have you with us. So you'll six year of teaching. So i thought really fascinating to know a little bit about you. Why physics why teaching your passions that lead you to where we find you today. Well i i was one of those people that kind of went striking teaching from university. I kind of always knew that. I wanted to work with. She didn't s-. I kind of always had a love of science and enjoyed mass. Which is why. I went on the kind of root out of the three. I did quite a lot of extra curricula at things at school and three university and it just kind of lead me down the path of working with like older students and kind of secondary six full type age and surely enjoyed it so at yet teaching straight after you invest your choice so you can straight through face and ready to go..

blackpool research albert einstein Stevenson lauren Oxford Lauren
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Profession new probably fool on their knees by about now. We still got another three or four weeks to go. What do you do. What do you do to down. I think first and foremost it's important that you have to get to a point where you value your evenings and weekends and and is time for when that your time. You know that that's for me. I call erin time or family time. There are two things that i really enjoyed to. Which which i like to cook a bike so i do bike wedding cakes and cookies and things and my family absolutely love my biking but also to cook as well and cook different different cuisine like learning about different tastes and but yet the wedding cake saw are from nine hundred side. Yes that's incredible. That's if i scrolled a bit further down your twitter feed going to be honest with you. I haven't done them in a while but and there is somebody who has asked me to do. Once that will be on twitter very very soon properties by baking if anyone bakes of which there are lots on twitter. That dykes i liked. I mean you just eat all the less. Does that with all the scraps of the leftovers. Which is just the night and the other thing that i really enjoy to enjoy during which is great for mental health. Day is exercise. Now i probably don't like accelerated. But but i've got a spin bike. I just a got my so speak because he of may and i literally just blasted music and for forty five minutes. I'm just in that zone. The day that you know you might have to pack day then the lettuce out. Yeah just let it go so those are probably my escape. 'isms really well. The two quite usefully connected because spinning. You can go an early. The cake a uptakes fantastic. Well aaron. it's been an absolute joy to chain. I hope we stay in touch. Because i think you've got such a fascinating career. Thanks thank you. We hope you enjoyed listening to this. Podcast from oxford education. To find out more about your read the and have your say please visit. Www oxford secondary dot com forward slash smarts..

twitter erin dykes aaron oxford
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Hosted by oxford university press with helen. Princeton guests in this podcast. We talking about the early years and those earliest experiences that our children have. And i found a quite by emma goldman who feminist writer lecturer that i felt really responded well to the narrative of what we discussed she said no one has yet realize the wealth of sympathy the kindness and generosity hidden in the soul of a child. The effort of every true education should be to unlock that treasure and we also talk about treasure baskets so i found a lovely chinese proverb. That defies the idea of landing that wants to share as well. The chinese proverb says nanning is a treasure that will follow. Its owner everywhere huge. Welcome this.

oxford university emma goldman Princeton helen
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Can support wellbeing definitely because we not just you know your wellbeing when you're at school as we've talked about there a lifelong learning now. You've got chosen and the ability to go and learn to points. I sometimes see people say you know. I mean my full cheese unless you doing. Ma or msu. Oh absolutely not but you know this is something. We've done to constantly encounters throughout our lives and again back to that that sense that of having some agent say over what you're doing and and again the medical support easy to do that you. You're not powerless. And just wasting for somebody to come along and tell you cannot. She stopped to explore unpick. Tixx controlled direction. I'd even within the parameters of what we do within the school system. There's lots of potential. A may i wouldn't be from actually the covid gas in the time we will be at home will have enhanced stat self-reliance because we haven't been in grapes in classrooms in in lots of cases and and some of young people i've i've had a gcc's student going through it and it was all about her own self reliance and taking what the school will giving her and then cracking on absolutely and someone that really well some will have found a different way to approach. That may even things like the remote teaching a spike a state to look teaches day in day out and work with remote proficient some of those students who often quite quiet in classroom remove. Sit back and let somebody else Perhaps also the question or tight lead in the lesson. They were coming forward even if it was on as opposed to on kind of the audio. Were coming forward on chat. And they're putting their ideas or asking for support and then that was leading to them being able to email and being half those compensation so all of a supper by they were saying. Well actually. I need something here. Unkind to alert you. Thought whereas in the kallstrom may well those as potentially saw doggone let somebody else's question is interesting is net new ways of working and trying to capture the best of all of it and i suppose in many ways it's about establishing the right climate so that there's a feeling of understanding and happiness about what what it is asking people today since the Type risk as well with if you will verbalizing or by explicit the processes that might be guy who hate. Sometimes you'll make mistakes. Thinking isn't something to be perfect steps. And i think that's something that's why pulled us teach as teaches total. And so what. I'm doing piece. Roy seem like a choice. And they got a whole select. Don't want to do that so no them has to that and again on explain what choices not explain my reasoning and that will help say the To might changes and to not always get it perfect. i absolutely. I'm happy to be wrong. Because that's the state of learning. You know a few quick fire questions at the end are just to help us all. Leave this podcast with few recommendations and a few interesting pointers to what we can what we can do this summer and what we should be doing in the classroom so top end cutie tip for medical condition i would say really reflect on your own beckel processes yourself is most likely that teaches inky tayo or wherever you are. Your career will have a loss of tacit knowledge and things of just become so embedded said that. You won't be aware of them. So i think taking that time to really think through your In your mexico conceived processes will help each than translate that students and give them the paracha in a my shakes exit to that. That's brilliant advice. I love advice. Because i think you're right. I think we do get to a point where it's so innate. You know this is just how i do it. This is my process because by the time we get to teaching the classroom. But we've we've aced education. We've gone through and and done all the steps and been good at it too then unpick that. I think that's great advice. So that we understand those steps a cabinet wellbeing quick finau some read recommendation. They're always good. As but i think the lying in the guard on the air with terry patchett is he's gonna might yukiko. He's gonna make you saying you might make you cry. But i just a wonderful risa and a lots to explore it. Would it would keep me going for opted summers Back centuries back trust pretty okay. So tape wrenching. Best classroom will teach snack radius snack. And i'm not freddie many advising people for their wellbeing that they don't have time for lunch and that was started. We'll finish ashley quite tight state. And now i'm getting my nutrients Guardia bassey's be my best snacks the classroom. I can have a quick swig but back to the jaw. Go back to it later. Let's see cool again. Tell skin he'll it. Said it looks like a spice strengths powder you mix but lots and lots of flavors pretty. I'm up to come to find that. Ben and we're all thinking about the seminar there you know the weather's warmed up. So what would you best end of term activity be you could set us so your students and then surfaced off probably the chief of both because he knew we often think that she didn't send coruna school will be full of energy at the end of term. They might do that for the first five minutes. But late justice teaches do full on their nose and quickly have have a really long sleep. And i think that would be my best advice if you have celebrations quite enjoy the guggenheim hopper reading really loan. Say don't feel guilty of outset and then that why each might most of the rest of your holiday because you don't want to carry that taught mystery with you. That's great advice. Keep yourself comfy. Maybe blanket comfort via snuggling wellbeing absolutely. So it's been fantastic taught you about such a fascinating array and it comes from such a a knowledgeable and so thank you for sharing your wisdom and your expertise with us today. You're more than welcome it a fussing because she sai at. It's been lucky to talk about it with your great. And i think there's a blog coming along so keep your eyes peeled for his blog on. Ap sites thanks. Thanks take care. We hope you enjoyed listening to this. Podcast from oxford education to find out more about the read the curriculum. And have you'll say please visit. Www oxford second dot com forward slash smart..

terry patchett Ben first five minutes Roy both today freddie mexico oxford education Www each yukiko oxford second dot com Ap this summer gcc guggenheim Tixx bassey
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Links and then building those schemers around selection as well as we access that knowledge and then extended i think mexico mission can really be that breach twain. Those what are we doing now. I'm working do previous. Say an even things like retrieval can be quite mexico It news all the time. You know you're talking about pulling information together thinking about how you might apply that to this new question which is asking you to retrieve the information the full. Yeah so important. Isn't it and so much that then comes down to talk. The new speak for change report talks about how vital talk is the currency of learning. And you know that's the conduct through which we deliver all our understanding the classroom and being really clear about that process moving moving from not knowing and working three why we don't know and getting to a point where we do absolutely yeah definitely and so how does how will that support the learning of young people. Well it again said before it's going to drool world the toolkit that they've gone so it will help than say whether the feis challenges for it will help them to think about what they did with tackling that particular concept will problem in the classroom so that that will lay out that the the areas that they've go available to that help them to climb if we being mexico as well. It's about mona string of progress and that can be quite motivational ashley. Young people we talk a lot about engagement. Those kinds of things in cost what we really told you about that. Is that motivation to learn. And so if they are understanding will this is robin successful. Before these things eichel available today the action use for this talks kid to die in front survey then. All of a sudden women powering shakes to be able to do that and to feel. Motivated is nothing better than seeing the progress. You know. i was watching this morning and a lot to do word. check macgyver. On five hundred words slowly they might not be the route five hundred words yet but he's going in the right direction and it's signed with students and seeing that understanding that and understanding why they making those decisions as well equally it can highlight for them where they were gaps and where they might need to find out something more doodle search again. That's something. I'm very aware of myself. An okapi rights. You're working on something course. I actually i need more time to reflect so may soy out. Search something else around it or support and again students. Finding that is really empowering. And i've had students who were very mexico and by had been doing some retrieval work and they said this is fantastic. Because i can say which are the areas i've struggled with sti- on guns go wide side on going to look at this on not combat to do this that you fight. We might get one or two of them in the clubs but the more we talk about extent i guess the more they become aware of and they can start doing and so it's their why in. Its they routed to being able to stay there and indeed talking to each other about supporting each other. You know i i. I wasn't sure about this. What do you think. What could i put that. And as long as we're checking that there aren't misconceptions being that through vices than that again that can be really important states. Fading empowered dependence become lifelong. Learners is costa. Will we doing this today because this is what we're doing in the lesson. Yeah so so important and lovely to have. That is a great work activity. And you know that sharing that self scaffolding. Almost of what they're doing in order to move forward and motivate and that she doesn't really build resilience because if you can see your south moving forward and being responsible for your learning and understanding what that means absolutely and even then you in innately much more resilient causes what we're trying to build towards you understand where the issues might lie and you can start to in the same way way planning something as teacher or there's a whole school you think perhaps about what those barriers might be. I but then think about where you can overcome the. I am not as about resilience so that we just like difference to how you feel about your learning as well and i think p- possibly might just be my own experience but i think we quite good at this level and we when we get to all key stage five not bad at key stage four but maybe maybe wh what does it look like to be. Good at the keys three. Okay kaycee too. I think probably you recognize same things with those students. And we possibly put more scaffolds and scaffold the covid interesting because you need to know how much scaffold and west withdraw those to allow the students. But i think you might seem more problems Even things like ci was on the board and talking around those when shoots completing tasks. I'm getting them to think about when white house i would use that can support that medical Processed are have had some people sites. May you know spectacle is lovely we see at key stage kaycee. Vikes students needs to be a place to do on an actually our disagree. I i i think it does depend on knowledge tasks and they need to have experienced Fall as low as win. My he knows links coaching them to buy saints. Very young children can be very medical conceive and talk about their learning perhaps using a slightly different language but they can do that on an show that frequently even in early years you will say children who are going through those processes thinking about a. Did i do this. Four off Now and then you know that needs to south goose sorts of incredible appropriate that say even those youngest shades. I again with sem. We support students. More gets more scaffolding today. But there isn't anything tonight. Sighing will therefore you compress your students. Sdn or your younger student. You call mexico. We need to build on. We need to work towards it so we have those students but mine site by oncein a go home tonight and i'm going to school.

one five hundred words tonight two kaycee today this morning ashley three Four Vikes south goose mexico macgyver okapi robin stage five eichel Sighing white house
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Senior leader responsible start development school improvement. She is now the lease fascist english adviser for kent working with the education people and is an evidence lead in education. Take a mental for the child's college rights for the tests and his co. also of leading in action. She's currently working on. Cpi curriculum making conditions growth. Which is a book about stuff development. Which i think comes out any minute now. In addition to that studying literature ma and somewhere in imax not. She fits in time for running every day. Zoe huge and very amazed an owner inspired. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you really appreciate you asking me to be here. I guess one thing that i should probably actually did start my career as teaching assistant so i spent two years working in schools before my teaching career style of nothing. That's always a really interesting. Why i've stated from lots of different angles does really inspiring. Wow so all our teaching assistants you hardworking and cherished professions that you are. That's inspiring isn't it is wonderful row re really really valuable. Adept in is a teaching our sometimes. Very much activity rheingold. They all have something exciting to bring. What was the key. Difference between going from ta to teach. Would you say. I think cut at the level of intensity with those relationships. You know it. My first year is ti. I was working for forty hours a week with take the student and another ice house. Wait with another. So how i understood them was very different surpassing the cost of thirsty. Where say three or four hours away. And so i could really understand and help them to unpick that learning in practice for why the strategic yeah fascinating three fine cabinet for us to change our perspective d member when you did you teach trading when i did my teacher training over in canterbury when the first things we have to do with shadow people yes and that concept of going from job fy two history to science in your head changing constantly. It was hugely valuable today though obviously going into teaching because like saying what was going on all of those different lessons yeah and the the different approaches that were being used in order to support all stated. Yeah and it's not that going on like that. I couldn't possibly take away. I think i was saying from the i. Blue were the student. And how can i scuffled his co. bed perhaps differently. What the cost of teach do five minute. How can i be used as a resource. Sometimes working with that student on wants wamba of its working with groups of students again scaffolding and supporting the How perhaps disa- cost teacher. So my first questions i've got full yay. I now wonder if that's got. Its roots in what we're just talking about because these this series of podcast is very much going to be around meta cognition and i wondered where your passion meta cognition arose and when that happened maybe actually. We're beginning to touch on some of the answers. Then i think it really kind from saying that. how hot talking things through So i would say a teacher explain the concept and then the cutbacks. So slightly bemused food or the sheet and spice of support. And then i would have to rethink go through some of those processes about learning. Why cells how did i understand that asks. How did i understand that topic. And then what did. I need to perhaps twice to might more visible to the student i was working with and that was something that translated to when i was working with how classes and sinking all again. What do i need to model for them. More needs might really. And how can i use. Things like probes and questions to support that process with them as well fascinating so for our listeners. Who aren't familiar with medical condition. We get lots of parents listening to this who might not be in in our profession. Can you give us a good definition of what is medical mission. I think the simplest estimate that across the that some thinking about our own learning processes or a thinking about run so we have hoped nation which is the cut of how we process information a knowledge. And then it's what we say about process so looking into it almost as if you were outside and thinking about that process seven. We used to be quite often cold so the exchange learning to learn a lot something that people might be more familiar with those things that were often used in in. Choose tom sessions to support students again to think about their learning. Are sexism what they need to do with it. Sits underneath the umbrella of self-regulation so he's got different elements that she will so from regulation as the my ninth. How we are doing the toss that we were onto taking and then within each goal cognition medical and motivation and they sit very closely together today in practice. If i was to walk into a classroom how would. I know that the teacher is doing some medical mission. I think modeling has been really It's really excited off over the last few years People are very keen to use the concert. So you may will say a teacher who is reading. Actually talking about the processes. They're going right. So i might read something into class would pose inside bowl. I'm actually now. I'm going to make a prediction about what's going to come next or i'm going to think about what they slide. I've come across before. Is there anything rate that similar today. So do i recognize agencies. Do i recognize the officer in the title with starting to unpick that medical process issue exchange to think out the the control box. They've got available that prior knowledge in order to be able to tackle those challenges coming. I think that's such a crucial area for us is within english teaching but within all areas of the curriculum that we're we're showing that process of learning as multiple just from from leveling still divide that word sentences on the board. You know how to go from really you know it. Uninspiring construction sentenced to something. That's going to really engage in. Show tylenol those things and the process of going from one to the other and talking that through yeah. I think that's really important moment for young people to understand that we go through those. That wasn't as good as i could do it and so let's change there. So let's what that round or let's not in another layer of meaning and processed to get their young. A big fan is Things slow writing so we saw. Was you do exactly that. So we pay by pace and i will multiply by on sci-fi style one start something with the assimilate on a metaphor martha sensors all explain around that choice. Of why making those choices of what. I wanted to achieve but also then draw rome things again. The i've i've come across before. I'm going to use this off because i've seen successfully used elsewhere so all the time it's making those.

two years forty hours three Zoe four hours five minute canterbury ninth first year today twice first questions each goal one thing first last few english seven Blue kent
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"This morning. I am really excited to welcome to the podcast. Sophie bartlett sofi is a year five six primary teacher. She's the english and curriculum needs for school. She's over the twenty seven thousand followers on twitter which gives a quite a lot of clout in the world of social media. And how does this. She came up with the hashtag. Teach like a champion champion bit of a play on a championship. We love that. We're gonna have to hear about that safety. Welcome to the podcast. Hello hi night. Thank you for having me. We so you can be with this. 'cause you're busy busy planning a wedding. Yeah we're trying to the bed time especially at my last year. That third time lucky last time lucky not going to be sunny and birds are going to say absolutely on our wedding day last year. It cold with rains that maybe it was a good thing. Get married las really. The gods shining dance to we just talked about teach champion. Just tell us a bit about that to kick yourself. I think from being on on twitter so long you so i found that it was really helpful but it also made me really anxious about teaching because i felt like everyone was always touching the best stuff in it. Made me feel like. I didn't teach not do that. And it just made me panicked. So i risk thought tweeting. Some of silly things happen only embarrassing. Things will the things a role and that she bit more traction easy for me that the united really good lessons what my friends suggested. Why don't we give it the hash. I teach trump Trying to find one and then people just started joining in is a really good way. Also just a bit of a dose of reality. Everyone has rubbish rubbish days. And it's nice to know that other people are doing the same things as you and it just feels like a big old saw from twitter. Sometimes you know what if you had a rubbish you go to each other and it was just a little bit of light relief. Basically

last year twitter first third time latin fifteen hundred eighties english Sophie bartlett sofi twenty seven thousand follower greek trump united five six one dance
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"That we want kids to be building and larry in them in their minds around language to unlock the world learning when they get to us. I'm sure that actually academic vocabulary in particular is going to be a really crucial element of that unpicking. Some of those words. What does it mean to review or analyze. What is a conclusion because unless these words really thought about the positive learning incorrectly questrom yelm. I think with nothing was was reading getting You'll read for pleasure making them understand extending the Making them understand what you're teaching them needs to give them the confidence to make it mean something today because it's that connection that it works isn't Thank all too too often. We feel as teachers. Cain of leading. Aren't me like while i'm trying to legislate a solve this thing on twitter Brought during the war. Didn't like mike heads can't do that. I should be did not not just for your children. Need not thank that relationship that we have with their classes. We knew what the that such an important point. Because i think teachers you right and twitter is a fabulous tool can be quite a an oppressive cloud of information. That can panic. But actually you're absolutely right. You are the expert in the room because they are your glasses and your contacts and you know what they need best to have that strength of knowledge and professionalism that you are making those right choices as really really crucial for us to remember and hang onto his name l. digitally. I think we can try and do too much daisley being guilty of arguing that we should do more than i think is probably right for children. Nas not arguing that some deserve some doing The goals the same but how we gave them their states have to be definitely can't be the opposite the connection with all even for that point we are painting tops for child and the gate language and the love language in the sierra links. Together if we do that too soon and try and start breaking things in hammond Prefixes and suffixes which i see as an angel the importance bibles see when you try and stay in teaching not instead of just getting them to lay on the wards On you're trying to push the race to You just lose them. Yeah we've all done it with when you're tiger movement so i try to nascar unborn me. Yeah it's true. I'm might have been given oliver twist a bit too young to me off. Yeah definitely you're right. it's about that. Lifelong learning and teaching for ten years doesn't mean teaching the same year ten times absolutely. Actually that's that's a really good point for me because you know i'm talk for twenty years and only now really talking to you. Does it make me think. Why are we not joining up our english and history departments a whole lot more because we need victoria. London kenzi smoke filled learning. We need to know about a whole plethora of historical context in in english. And you guys are busy doing. We're not joining up. King think fit. Everyone's sweethearts to their curriculum again. Maybe we've given the gift of kubat that we're all right. Well you've always taught this takes in the shia You've covered the On yes history. You've always liked to do this. The industrial revolution indeed there so much historical scholarship the antique Hair salon de and of skills department sat cpt titan to really build up update knowledge. Then you know they could change. You could find a way to teach the industrial revolution high school and still make it challenging. I with my husband's in english teacher regularly. We will be sent tv news..

twitter twenty years ten years today bibles London mike heads english ten times nascar
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Up into your seven in the impact to pool Davis it with language. But i think the coal is really important just that exposure to written historians I think again. It just depends on where you're you're challenge. Denied the students in front of the that are going to be. Some students have watched me to be. Are they watched the rebound civilizations. They might watch the original. You know they're really comfortable with that. Or the watched a few lacey in tight with their mom and dad to be some student super name. Maybe beard is been fantastically leader. Doesn't she won't be vape. She looks like her long haired like the way she talks excited. She gets to begin homepage. dress up to talk on and henry agree like we with language when as adults with perspective with a confidentially to be able to enjoy that and see if it is that these days. You'd want to have a glass of wine 'cause you knew she Dr dre overwhelming for young. People's i think understanding the you are for some teachers in schools that's is exposure for rush titan. You'd exposing children to this day. May they're gonna catch street a week. It might really turn them off To know the children from abbas. Nor thank i need exposed to this old italian Kind of planned and you need to alighted them to kind of feel a little bit in baddest. When they're watching these things 'cause in overtime that will change so you talking not i'm now thinking about horrible histories and how much my own children just to do the vile vikings and the rotten romans and all of that year. Do you think that that kind of a massive story led world of history is a valuable part of you. Talk it yet and i think that i really do actually and i think that i'll be guilty in the past of doom a long history teachers in history graduates which is a little bit snowmobile Affection for example. You know there'll be a bit well. That's not really what happened in. Actually you know who cares who cares if madden tailgate. Like the base shirt of mail. All i knew is that after reason. All of the.

Davis seven italian vikings a week
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"With <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Music> the <SpeakerChange> activities <Laughter> to <Speech_Female> actually. <Speech_Female> I was advantaged <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> because of my knowledge <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> many parents <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> on the stone the speech <Speech_Female> sam <SpeakerChange> development <Speech_Female> you know and <Speech_Male> because i had twins <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> had the contract <Speech_Female> developing speech. <Speech_Female> Sorry didn't <Speech_Female> see <Speech_Female> the contrast the <Speech_Female> right in front of me but <Speech_Female> thank you know so <Speech_Female> if if the parents <Speech_Female> don't know that when we come <Speech_Female> to expect parents <Speech_Female> to understand what speech <Speech_Female> to the <Speech_Female> cognitive development <Speech_Female> necessarily but <Speech_Female> where is the professional <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Music_Female> looks at child <Speech_Female> understand is <Speech_Female> actually potential <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah and <SpeakerChange> to kind of <Speech_Male> without <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> louise. 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"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Tastes and and children are the same and so i tried the same books on my youngest. And he's just not having any he was. This is crazy. Twitter sense fake. This is wrong. I really like science fiction and my husband can't stand there and we've just read done each champion of the world which is just yes very sweet. I mean it's just something very very sweet to dial two and it is a lovely safe story that you know everything's gonna be alright not for. My youngest is quite necessary at the moment to present him with some world whereas i the parameters of the well but in here we will be safe like. Nothing's no way to come and get you. And i think that's what he didn't like vile unite sci-fi in that world is a on itchy. About on that you know the sort of ood what's going to happen there and it feels safer in that role dull world this and in that child need is a spark power and it you committee see him like wake up when you use inflection words in you can see him get infested in the store a because of the invoked. Some of the words used so sad story with amazing language in for children. I think you're amazing. App just bringing all of that to life when you read. Well i let things. We could see more addition that see. Well actually interesting. I look costs for stories. And i didn't identify you could recommend any any listeners. Recommend any but the some interesting people reading children's stories left tonight. I would be like as any good good question the question. I don't know an answer to a but maybe you should do it nor yes. Maybe i should chairing. That's why i just did it. Yeah let's have an finally which is that. We're all quite fixed on the tv right now. I think because there's not much else happening so wanted if you have any netflix's recommendations or could tv out there. What would you recommend for us in the next few weeks months any particular lines or just then watch. I need to finish the queen's gambit which was ups acquaint scam but yes loves. The gray began now. I am loving only obsessed with high kings. You've probably everyone seems like viking our happens. I'm racing here. it's really.

netflix tonight each champion Twitter two next few weeks 's
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"To tackle with. Your boss will be ready. Yeah awesome okay. Let's let's think about the link between the covering reading and sort of wants to think about in terms of not just the text which we know is too but the story behind the text i know certainly is a mum semi none left primary school. Not berry signed. My youngest is seven but sent in primary days. You know the days when they came home and said spaceship landed on the top failed. That's the catalyst for the piece of what they're doing about kits all or science picker whatever. It was an the primary school. My kids went to a brilliant at doing narrative based teaching and breathe to livestream that really events and dramas that would take place on the playground. She saying that. That's important to engage. Focus build the company franchi often. I mean as i said before. I absolutely loved the trauma in the classroom acting out characters. Really get into it. And i think that helps george mike capillary but will say to visualize the by capillary. Mike influences in terms of everything. I've been into schools where they thought the five brigades come comment because during the great fire of london the to read out to the children experienced. It not helps children. Who don't have that background. They might not necessarily have experienced hind. Bought the guessing not when they come to school and one of the things i say is that sometimes yes. The children have experienced that high But when they're in your skull that being supported by and you're going to help them enrich than with range of experiences drama activities going on trips when we can or even just watch the thing with like capital as it kind of fits nicely with reading because you want to sound the word defeat you to read and comprehend But i think sometimes we can't we to save much my capillary but we have to be mindful in terms of reading but it's just one of teaching ratings regarding around moment scalper model thousand one. We got a language structure. John that children need any to make inferences and they have much of the tax that mccaffery fit said within that wide bit of raising. I think why Important now as the aspect that we on excol teach children reading what we call a cowboy hat and the drama. And all of this. And so i think it just suppose saas with kind of focusing itchy like icon by capillary and making explicit joe adjusting if children are able to read the words to understand the not really reading Yet because of course where that leads you not forgotten but if a capital which i think you're right i mean i've been teaching. What twenty something years and really. We want focused on vocabulary explicitly. I think office implicit. And that's why we love teaching english in particular. Because you know you get to unpick like we were saying what what makes people take these gorgeous kids sitting in front of us and we get to know about them because we're talking about the country yet..

John seven Mike george mike one fire of london things twenty something five brigades great english thousand one
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"I just remember tweeting Train displaying release engaged with over a very young age that passionate about it take children who don't get our it's in that spot kind of walk in that field yeah fascinating. Poetry boy is not a huge huge benefit to us in everything that we want today oscillating. My mom loves writing. Poetry is always writing poems within sharing them. If as an bench she was so rotten. If that's a funeral she would rise on lockdown. she's reading poetry. He grew up yet genus. Yeah she lost On credit from fascinating. Thank you. that's really. That's really brilliant. So you telling us about your passions which is really inspiring tinky. What about your best lesson. So i know that you do lots of observations. It might be when you've you've seen or when you've taught yourself what's your best lesson. Our hands on approach. So whenever i work in schools i always do a co. Just really simple car teaching batting working alongside the tape. Just i'm teaching while but the best way i find is to do the lesson Model fast last then. Five to say watching washington school in london in in brixton gifts boss than quiet off struggling that rating i did a session of the capillary halt owns with them and basically songs that they knew and it was interesting because the children looked at me as if to say who is this teacher. Common and famous upstart basic showed them some songs different. Now i need nia with you songs. We let you remember. You probably know this already. How is a marriage lyrics on the.

london today Five washington school nia Train brixton
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"By oxford university press with helen princeton guests. In this podcast. The word perform is going to come up and we thought it would be quite interesting to look the etymology behind. That would say this word came around and around the thirteen hundred's and meant to carry into effect to fulfill to discharge or carry out what is demanded or required and then really. Interestingly the theatrical musical sense of the word perform came around in the sixteen hundreds and that meant to actual represent something on stage to sing or render a musical instrument. And i particularly like this word is the verb form so in in the verb form of the word in middle english it meant to make or to construct to produce so to bring about but it also meant your dreams coming true. How lovely sam. Soon perform in middle. English meant to make your dreams come true. So that's a really lovely moment to i remember. That's a story behind that. Would i am joined by shaheen wilkinson which is an absolute joy. She is an incredible array. Aw including adviser very experienced primary schoolteacher senior leader. She's been adviser for la in sutton. She's also an ulcer of all sorts of different books by a you pave and education for about twenty years. Welcome to our podcast charade. All hot luckily to be talking to you today. You have just really lovely to see you. Although we're just going to be hearing you want me on us and tell us. Why did you choose teaching. Originally i was breeding the ethnic about english from very little overlay h five at puns and read assembly as is something that i've always been passionate about and i did my level english. I did just a straight degree. In english literature us even teaching and that pga in in primary. And i think it was on staying like degree and we did a unit on children's literature for the whole yet riddick. Ach than it was harry potter about just being released on tees also actually yet. This is something. I'd like to say it was onion tale take might agree that i wanted to.

shaheen wilkinson harry potter today about twenty years helen princeton english English sixteen hundreds oxford university sam thirteen hundred sutton
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"That's another anthony. Brilliant and just generally a so so engaging for kids aren't naturally facilitate lots of talk which she can then level is the teacher in plaque book. The best bits and catch the best bits for keeping on the walls or wherever. I'm we've had a question in from twitter which is very cool from a lady called rebecca. And she's asking us. Where should people go to get. Hold of the right kind of mask vocabulary. Excellent questions all right. So fiction is out there. Those people with oxford al subscription. Of course. there's an online version available. Here's a plug for something. That is entirely free for anyone to load off my website. A vocabulary list. I've only done it for the primary curriculum if anyone's interested. Let me know what i can do. A second one at some point but a basically went through the national curriculum the two thousand fourteen version with the current version and and picked out all the new vocabulary vocabulary that that is introduced in each year group. One to six. At the time. I wrote the early years. Fallacious age was still being finalized. It was still in consultation so i haven't done anything around that yet. Incidentally early as teachers all know the importance of language describing languages everything because it allows them to have a hook to make sense of things is the primary vocabulary book is a pdf can be instantly downloaded and it's thinner so you just literally go to go to my website andris dot dot uk and at your search around. You'll find a primary vocabulary book. So that's one thing it doesn't know rebecca definitions. I'm so for definitions. You need to go to those online extremism things textbooks. They usually not infallible but textbooks are usually very good for explaining the names of op terms. Which just allow you to think things through really because the problem with masses. It's such an abstract idea. If i think cats cats you can can hold it you can but if i say double that's a really difficult thing to either draw or sale fake so so we have to kind of if you're in a pop or a little bit early. Yeah a little bit early for a double double pechiney double. So that's all the way awesome so final question relates to the most recent word report which came out in october and the focus of that report was looking at bridging the gap at transition and thinking about what it looks like to move from key to key stage. Three in terms of capital is something that i think is going to become more and more prevalent in our schools and something that we should be. Arming our kids with equipping them with the right. Toolkit to move from primary.

october twitter six rebecca each year two thousand One Three double one thing second one andris dot dot uk fourteen
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Of podcast hosted by oxford university press with helen princeton guests. We thought that these podcasts be really interesting to have a think about some of the etymology behind a few of the key words our guest talk about so. Let me share with you. The word divide so divide is from latin dividends which means to force apart cleave distribute to separate or distinguish that was the original meaning from the latin in the sixteen forty s. We got the phrase act of dividing and then in eighteen o seven in american english. We've got the meaning of divide coming across in the separation between river. Valleys nice image. I was thinking if we got a little story behind. The word helps us understand. Hang onto it. And then in the late eighteenth century the meaning came across his. To sever the union or connection with was the first time that meaning came across. Meaning disunite or cost disagreed in opinion the mathematical sense. The word came around in the early fifteenth century. Meaning the operation of division and then the phrase divide and rule. I seen around the sixteen hundreds and was one of the sayings machiavelli. I am.

late eighteenth century sixteen forty s. early fifteenth century oxford university latin american first time one english eighteen seven sixteen hundreds helen princeton