36 Burst results for "Oxford"

African countries take delivery of latest COVAX vaccine shipment

BBC World Service

00:48 sec | 16 hrs ago

African countries take delivery of latest COVAX vaccine shipment

"Health workers in Ivory Coast will be the first to receive doses of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine as part of the International Kovacs scheme targeting some of the world's poorest countries. Neighboring Ghana is due to start his Kovacs vaccination program on Tuesday. Namie grimly reports Cave axes the biggest vaccine procurement plan in human history. It's struggled in the international scramble for vaccines and his face criticism for being too slow to start its rollout. Some countries have looked elsewhere in the interim to boost supplies through bilateral deals. The World Health Organization described the rollout as an important first step towards achieving vaccine equity. But it added it was still only the beginning.

Namie Ivory Coast Oxford Ghana World Health Organization
Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Pressure Points

Pressure Points

01:23 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Pressure Points

"Like don't you don't set up an experiment and then push it see the results you sit there and you observe you. Collect the data you analyze the data and whatever like the results that came out of the russel's come out of it like like you definitely could have learned a lot from this about people's resilience about somebody's fucking people over. People will still band together if their lives are on the line fool in in with the same idea is just like even if you aren't getting the results that you're getting right now there's a chance of something will come down the line but by literally turning everyone against you because you're trying to turn everyone against one another it's like just the worst fucking traitor of like any ship ever the the worst mutiny in the history of mutinies because he then was re mutinied by his captain. She's keep fucking idiot. Damn at like you failed job. He was a failed psychologist and a failed. Captain yeah he yeah. Why would you even like I guess not. Everybody was super experience with you. Know being on being on the sea. But why would you follow the psychologist or whatever after over like an actual educated captain. God really go after the university is like. Yeah we're distancing ourselves from you. Like i feel like he's not gonna get funding from anyone else. 'cause they go while the city doesn't know how to handle a fucking experiment whatsoever. Yeah what what we should do. We should do it. Aj will do a pressure points. Experiment will help the p. Raft that the pb sex raft and we'll we'll sail across the pacific. Just you and me. Just you and i will. We won't right. We won't have journal. Entries will do a podcast log and will also do Faceless video recordings of our sexual encounters with one another well. Yeah who else is there to have sex with. And it's it's not going to be a raft really. It's basically just going to be two glass boxes that are chained together that have like little wraps on the bottom of them and so will just masturbate to of another the entire pacific. I was gonna say. An to have microphones and recording shit in box. It just it will will call. It jerking across the pacific. And there's a whole between them about a half an inch wide. Each each will just a little glory hole. Little half inch gloria perfect. We should have been geno. We fucked up. We should have been around in the seventies and we could have gotten funded by oxford and we tell them that. We also are studying like mushrooms and lsd in dm so back to. I'd say we do that part. Yeah we should definitely just get a raft. And and go for the hallucinogens. Get wrapped in hallucinate. That sounds great. All fuck yes. i'm mea and then and then the first week will kill ourselves. Oh yeah we'll Livestream the psychedelic. Induce humping yes and then and then on the thirtieth day when we have our psychotic break from so many fans live stream that part too. We'll facebook live our suicide and that's where we'll really catch frame. Oh yeah it'll finally goodness man. Well you know i. We'll start putting it in the works. We'll we'll figure something out we'll let you get some. We're now accepting donations empty water bottles to build our entwine. Yeah empty water bottles and twine perfect. Oh man well. Another successful episode. I think so that one was really good. I love this. You've this season you've been stuck in the seventies a bit too. I have been at such times. I mean europe the forties and only about the seventy s man. Yeah works bring on the fucking..

Facebook Oxford About A Half An Inch Half Inch Europe Two Glass Boxes Seventies First Week Thirtieth Day Each Each Raft So Many Fans Pacific Forties Seventy S
Is Astra the wrong vaccine for border workers?

Coronacast

04:46 min | 1 d ago

Is Astra the wrong vaccine for border workers?

"One of the big milestones we had about yesterday. Was that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. I devices of that have arrived in australia. Which is something that we've been waiting for. We're in phase one of the role at at the moment and those are the priority people. And i thought that those people were getting the fis at shot. But now we've got the oxford esters shut here. Are they going to be getting that as well and should they be getting that as well. We're in the press release from the prime minister and the minister. They say that they will guess. That's what they say in the press release and in fact the minister himself a week or so ago a press conference said the same thing that there would be a mix of these vaccines and the trouble with. That is an an accord. Chris murray who ahead on seven thirty last monday which he was. Who's the head of the institute for health. Metrics evaluation in seattle is. That astra is the wrong vaccine. If you're looking at borders let's pull back a little bit about what you're trying to achieve and your vaccine strategy are vaccine strategy is really for a country that has lots of covid around in the middle of covid outbreak. Because you want to partake. H care quite rightly aged care. Workers quite rightly you want to get in there and then you want to protect the rest of the population you want to. Doctors nurses people who work in hospitals all that nor question and we still want to do that but if the virus gets in through the borders that's how the virus gets seen it doesn't suddenly pop aged care home or residential care or pop up in the alfred hospital in melbourne. It comes from overseas. We'll come back to the new zealand situation currently in a minute. So the total strategy in the first instance should be about the borders if we can keep our borders secure. The virus won't get in and then we've got time to immunize for safety reasons. The rest of the population and so astro is the wrong vaccine for. That is not the wrong vaccine. I'll get. I want to say up front. I will get the astro vaccine. I'll be happy to get it. It will protect you in severe disease. But it won't necessarily protect our borders. It will against probably against the uk variant. It's not going to protect almost certainly against us at african variant which only showed ten percent efficacy against. We don't know what is going to do against the brazilian variant which shows vaccine escape. And there's the california variant in american various which. Look as if they might be a bit vaccine resistant themselves and so what we should be doing is saying well astra's fine and the scottish artist suggests it's fine for preventing severe disease but that's for a country that we should be covered getting in the first place. So that's about the pfizer vaccine because it stops transmission. More effectively than the astra zeneca vaccine. I it works within three weeks. You don't have to wait. Three months for the efficacy. Second reason is that moderna there is no. There are no data drawn. Skerritt said on chronic is last week for pfizer. But it's almost identical vaccines to madeira and moderna reasonable efficacy against the south african vary not great but much better than ten percent and and it gives stronger immunity faster so for our borders we should be using pfizer and getting quick protection and we should be protecting their households. Because where's it gonna go after they get infected should he be infected. And if it's the south african is going to go to members of their households at a higher chance so their families or flatmates should be immunized with pfizer to and then the third thing that we should be doing which nobody's talking about just wondering why not but when i talk and by the way this is not necessarily me talking actually sounded out on people who know what they're talking about who aren't where willingness to publicly contradict the government. They say es actually what we should be doing and it's largely what new zealand is doing. They are immunizing. their hotel. boorda workers and their immunizing their families. They've had an outbreak which will come to in a minute. The other thing we should be doing is actually having a forward strategy. Which is if you want to get back into australia. Get immunized and we should help them so some vaccine doses could go overseas to australia. Scott send send it over to make sure the co chain right to our consulates and remember. Pfizer is not quite as temperature sensitive as people say. It's it's a problem once you've dominated you've got to get rid of it but it's not quite temperature sensitive as can last for a while so if you're an australian in london paris and new york senate to this german embassy or their physicians. They've got doctors attached and immunize streams. Get them to pay for. It is cheaper than a hotel quarantine and so you. Don't get on the plane until you've had two doses and you waited another two weeks so you're fully immunized

Astra Institute For Health Oxford Pfizer Alfred Hospital Chris Murray FIS Skerritt Australia New Zealand Seattle Melbourne Boorda UK California Scott Paris Senate London
A history of Mountweazels

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:38 min | 4 d ago

A history of Mountweazels

"Suppose. I wanted to start a company that sold maps i hire cartographers and spend a lot of time and money going out and gathering data. Because i'm just documenting something which exists in reality. The end result of all my hard work and investment is going to look just like other maps. That are out there already. So why couldn't i just skip all the effort and copy the maps which already exist. Sure i'll change the font and the colors but fundamentally the end result is going to be the same either way right. This is a big problem for any maker of reference products maps dictionaries and encyclopedias. You can't copyright facts but you can take steps to show that someone is a plagiarist or violating. Copyright they do this via copyright traps copyright traps are nothing more than false information which is putting reference material to catch people who copy their content. If you copy everything without checking you'll copy the false information which will be evidence of plagiarism. Promos famous example was in the nineteen seventy five new columbia encyclopedia. they created an entry for one lillian. Virginia mount weasel. They created a full entry in the encyclopedia for which was totally fiction. According to the entry lillian. Mount weasel was a photographer who was famous for her photos of south. Sierra me walk whatever that is according to the entry quote. Mount weasel died at thirty one in an explosion while on assignment for combustibles magazine unquote while there was no cases of anyone actually copying the mount weasel entry. The term amount weasel is now a term for a copyright trap. there's a million. Mt weasel facebook page and the lillian virginia mount weasel research center website which has fake interviews with people who knew her as well as fake copies of combustibles magazine while this is one of the best known examples of copyright trap. It's hardly the only one. The nineteen forty three edition of webster's twentieth century dictionary had an entry for junk attack spelled j. u. n. g. f. t. a. k. The entry read quote junk noun. Persian bird the male of which only had one wing on the right side and the female only one wing on the left side. Instead of the missing wings the male had hook of bone and the female an eyelid of bone and it was by uniting hook and eye that they were unable to fly each one alone had remained on the ground and quote. There's no pronunciation given so. I'm pretty sure i said it correctly because there is no way to say correctly. The new oxford american dictionary has a definition for the word espa valence. Their definition of the word is the wilful avoidance of one's official responsibilities. The thing is this fake word has actually found some usage and there is now an entry for in which which references the original new oxford american dictionary definition. Personally i think esco valence is a perfectly crumlin word problems. The heaviest users of copyright traps are matt makers in cartography copyright traps are known as trap streets trap streets are fictional street or locations which are used to check to see if someone is copying their map. They're usually very small streets or alleys of no importance as no one actually uses it as an address because it doesn't exist. There isn't too much of a problem if they appear on maps. The state of michigan put fake towns in ohio in their nineteen seventy-eight official roadmap. The towns were beata so spelled beat. Osu and go blue aka go blue. The colors of the university of michigan

Lillian Mount Weasel Lillian Virginia Mount Weasel New Columbia Sierra Virginia Webster Facebook Matt Michigan Ohio OSU University Of Michigan
Historic first as COVAX COVID vaccines reach Ghana

UN News

01:13 min | 5 d ago

Historic first as COVAX COVID vaccines reach Ghana

"Six hundred thousand doses of life-saving covid nineteen vaccine from the un partnered kovacs initiative have arrived in ghana marking a historic first for the international equitable inoculation effort confirming the news on wednesday the world health organization. Who said that. Further supplies of the astrazeneca. Oxford job will reach cote d'ivoire later this week. These are the first coronavirus shots from kovacs scheme to be distributed outside. India with a vaccine is being produced under licence. Further supplies will be shipped to the other members as the global rollout gathers pace when readiness criteria have been met and the doses produced tedros adhanom ghebreyesus director general of the u. n. health agency welcome development along with kovacs partners gavi the vaccine alliance and the coalition for epidemic preparedness innovations or seppi but tedros insisted that there was still a lot of work to do to secure support for the world health organization goal of giving the vaccine to all health workers and all the people in the first one hundred days of the year in order for new coronavirus doses to be delivered to kovacs participants. The criteria which need to be fulfilled include confirmation of national regulatory authorizations for the vaccine in question national vaccination plans and export and import licences.

Kovacs World Health Organization Astrazeneca Gavi The Vaccine Alliance Ghana Coalition For Epidemic Prepare Seppi UN Tedros Oxford India
Police investigate racist hack that disrupted Ben Franklin High students' virtual field trip in Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 6 d ago

Police investigate racist hack that disrupted Ben Franklin High students' virtual field trip in Philadelphia

"And the school district or investigating after a virtual field trip Monday morning by students at Ben Franklin High School was hacked and Students were subjected to suggestive images and inappropriate language. It happened as three dozen students from Ben Franklin High School were on a virtual field trip to Lincoln University. According to a letter to the school community from Franklin Principal Christine Barelli. The link provided by Lincoln was hacked by someone quote dressed in a tire associated with a well known hate group. The feed was cut off by Franklin staff, but not before students were exposed to a person making racist comments and showing suggestive pictures of young woman. School staff reported the incident to police in Philadelphia and in lower Oxford Township where Lincoln is located. In a statement, District spokeswoman Monica Lewis said safeguarding the health and well being of students is the district's top priority and that students and families are encouraged to share any concerns they have with principal Borelli. Like Denard. Okay, Whatever the news Radio

Ben Franklin High School Christine Barelli Lincoln University Oxford Township Franklin Lincoln Monica Lewis Philadelphia Borelli Denard
Deputy Political Editor of the Spectator, Katy Balls, Discusses Where the U.K. Stands on COVID-19 Vaccine Administration

Coffee House Shots

02:16 min | Last week

Deputy Political Editor of the Spectator, Katy Balls, Discusses Where the U.K. Stands on COVID-19 Vaccine Administration

"Yes and katie. Boris johnson is trying to lead the way on this discussion. What does the u k position. Severe macron is Five percent of the current vaccine intake. I think that the strong sense she got from ministers involved with this is that they don't want to give away vaccines until they have been able to offer a vaccine not just to the most vulnerable. But ideally everyone in the country and tens of the adult population. And i think this goes to a desire by the uk to almost tried. Reach head mean free. Immunization see something happening in israel. I think it's probably easier said than done. And even though we all very lucky to be high vaccine uptake country if you looked is rather as where we could be going the beginning to see slightly when for example at vaccines fatigue characters. I think the age group you go. The uptake still very good uptake. But no expansion to see the level you get say eight year olds amongst thirty roads. Now i think that when it comes to giving away vaccines. Dj very much does want to do that. And i think that they can see that. You can emerge as a global player by coming gossip benevolent as james touch and actually right near copies. Various governments have ready. Go ahead startled that. As to whether i think there is still some debate to be had because there has been idea at the senate. Mtv countries and food scheme at has been talked about the idea of countries in africa. And beyond. But i think that that has also been to airmax. Mp's such as if the public violence is very far behind the uk. Actually as close allies neighbor. We should be stepping in there now. I think what might make this decision. Earlier is ultimately what is the desire what is demand for some of the vaccines. The uk has given hearing more reports of various european countries. Saying they don't want the oxford vaccine may be actually some the things he geeky has to offer an received. But i do you think the senses that this will stop being a problem soon. Enough because ministers and officials believe that you'll start to see the data showing that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine does have a really important facts and what she had that that the level of skepticism is going to go

Boris Johnson Katie UK Israel James Senate Africa Oxford
WHO Formally Authorizes the Use of the AstraZeneca Vaccine

WBZ Midday News

00:36 sec | Last week

WHO Formally Authorizes the Use of the AstraZeneca Vaccine

"Of time. The World Health Organization is green lighting AstraZeneca's Oxford University's vaccine for emergency use. We've seen this now with modern and Fizer, it was widely speculated that it would get approved quickly, and the approval comes after a review has determined that the AstraZeneca vaccines benefits outweigh The risks, so the move will now allow the U. N to ship millions of doses to developing nations across the globe. The vaccine's still has not been approved for use in the United States. Dr Fauci says that may not happen for a couple more weeks.

Astrazeneca's Oxford Universit Fizer World Health Organization Astrazeneca U. Dr Fauci United States
Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

Coronacast

03:45 min | Last week

Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

"We finally got the therapeutic goods administration approval of the oxford university astrazeneca vaccine in australia. Which was something that was hinted that was coming soon last week. By paul kelly Yesterday it happened. Norman fine print. Well i'll give you a big print. I look at the big print is this is a really good decision. Untrustworthy decision on the part of the therapeutic goods administration. It creates a political problem for the government. But it's it's it's a sound decision based on the evidence so they've they've maintained an independent position so it's really quite impressive so the first thing is that they have said and i think we've presaged this on corona cast. They've said that the ideal dozy jr is twelve weeks. Apart at standard does of the astro vaccine twelve weeks apart now the evidence is from the clinical trials and presumably they got more since they published trial in december. Is that if you give the vaccine three months apart. Then you get ninety percent. Efficacy in terms of preventing symptoms mild to severe symptoms of covid nineteen and it gives one hundred percent protection against severe disease so in fact the dosage reaching recommended brings it up to the performance of the pfizer vaccine. When you say a standard dice is that the original standardise that was always being used or is that the half dose that was used in one of the parts of the trial that we were talking about las g. no martin standing is to standard doses according to the trial not the accidental. Half does that was given as part of the british trial so it's two standard doses three months apart. And if we're able to do that there's a problem with that. By the way is that you can get variance coming in as a long time to wait in new things can happen with the virus but it does give you that high degree of efficacy which is great news. The detail here is that they had a problem with their trial is that they were late. In recruiting people over sixty five and the trials do not have a large number of people aged over sixty five who actually got infected so they can't actually give you a number for the efficacy of the vaccine in the over sixty five they can give you the average but not offer the over sixty five themselves now. What they say is that in the an. It's true in the laboratory testing over sixty-five very strong antibody response. Which makes you think that you will get efficacy in new over sixty five. But they've got no proof of it in trials yet that will emerge as time goes on and there in lies the problem for the government because in the light of that they probably you know and they're going to go with the evidence people over sixty five shoud get the pfizer vaccine to be absolutely sure. It's highly likely astra one will work in over sixty five. It'll certainly prevent severe disease. You would imagine. But there's no solid evidence of that. At this time you'd be going on the antibodies on the on the flip side of that just so too negative about all this. Is that when you bring on a new vaccine into the market like influenza vaccines or others which is already being tested. Randomized trials you do tend to go on whether or not the having effective antibody response and rely on that so it's not unusual to rely on an antibody response. It's just that the moment we'd like to know that it does prevent disease. So that's the story what we'd be. What's been approved. As a ninety percent effective vaccine and therefore it will prevent severe disease and be really good at malta mortar disease and maybe prevent transmission because one of the few vaccines to be tested for transmission.

Dozy Jr Paul Kelly Oxford University Pfizer Norman Australia Martin Astra Influenza Malta
WHO approves Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

WHO approves Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

"Curb covert 19 across the globe. The World Health Organization is given emergency approval toe. AstraZeneca's Covad vaccine ABC is Mark Remillard reports. Wh O says the approval will allow for the rollout of millions of doses of AstraZeneca's vaccine to come. Trees that to date have had no access. Wh o Director General Dr Ted Rose Adhanom debris ASIS. We now have all the pieces in place for the rapid distribution. Factions, but we still need to scale up production. The W. H O doesn't regulate vaccines but can assess their safety and efficacy for countries that don't have strong regulatory systems. Marco

Astrazeneca Mark Remillard Dr Ted Rose Adhanom World Health Organization ABC Marco
WHO approves Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID vaccine for emergency use

Lynne Hayes-Freeland

00:15 sec | 2 weeks ago

WHO approves Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID vaccine for emergency use

"The World Health Organization has granted an emergency authorization to the Corona virus vaccine made by AstraZeneca at Oxford University. That should allow the U. N health agencies Partners to ship millions of doses two countries worldwide as part of a U. N backed program to tame the

World Health Organization Astrazeneca Oxford University U.
UN approves AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

UN approves AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

"Today, saying that in the last five weeks the number of reported weekly covert 19 cases has fallen by nearly half worldwide vaccinations. Helping wh o director Dr Ted Rose Addendum governor insists announcing Wh O gave emergency use listing. 22 versions off the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine. Giving the green light for this vaccines to be rolled out globally. But that vaccine not yet approved for emergency use in the U. S in California, San Francisco in Los Angeles, have

Dr Ted Rose Astrazeneca Oxford U. California San Francisco Los Angeles
COVID-19 cases are dropping globally, thanks to vaccinations

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 cases are dropping globally, thanks to vaccinations

"Saying saying that that in in the the last last five five weeks weeks the the number number of of reported reported weekly weekly covert covert 19 19 cases cases has has fallen fallen by by nearly nearly half half worldwide worldwide vaccinations. vaccinations. Helping Helping wh wh o o director director Dr Dr Ted Ted Rose Rose Addendum Addendum governor governor insists insists announcing announcing Wh Wh O O gave gave emergency emergency use use listing. listing. 22 22 versions versions off off the the Oxford Oxford AstraZeneca AstraZeneca vaccine. vaccine. Giving Giving the the green green light light for for this this vaccines vaccines to to be be rolled rolled out out globally. globally. But But that that vaccine vaccine not not yet yet approved approved for for emergency emergency use use in in the the U. U. S S in in California, California, San San Francisco Francisco in in Los Los Angeles, Angeles, have have

Dr Dr Ted Ted Rose Oxford Oxford Astrazeneca Astrazeneca San San Francisco California U. Los Los Angeles Francisco Angeles
Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to be tested on children for first time

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to be tested on children for first time

"The cove in 19 vaccine across the Pond. Correspondent Wendy Gillette has the details. Clinical trial in Britain will test the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine on Children as young as six years old. 300 volunteers will take part in the trial. As many as 240 will get the actual vaccine. The rest will get a meningitis shot the range in age from 6 to 17. It's the first Corona virus vaccine to be tested on young Children. The trial will take place at Oxford University and its partner sites. New York City has settled a

Wendy Gillette Oxford Britain Meningitis Oxford University New York City
Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine to be tested on children for first time

Weekend News

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine to be tested on children for first time

"Oxford University plans to do the first test of its covert 19 vaccine on Children. AP correspondent Sara Bassett reports from London. The trial seeks to recruit 300 volunteers between the ages of six and 17 with up to 240 receiving the vaccine and the remainder control. Meningitis vaccine. Chief researcher on the Oxford Vaccine trial Andrew Pollard says that while most Children don't get severely ill from covert 19, it is important to establish safety of the VAX. Scene in young people. It is certainly possible that why do you use to try and curb the progress of the pandemic might be considered in the future regulations in more than 50 countries have authorized widespread use of the Oxford vaccine, which is being produced and distributed by AstraZeneca for use in people over the age of 18.

Sara Bassett Andrew Pollard Oxford University AP Meningitis Oxford London Astrazeneca
The Latest: Oxford University testing vaccine in children

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

The Latest: Oxford University testing vaccine in children

"The university of Oxford in the UK plans to test its covert nineteen vaccine in children for the first time the trial seeks to recruit three hundred volunteers between the ages of six and seventeen with up to two hundred and forty receiving the vaccine and the remained a control meningitis vaccine chief research on the Oxford vaccine trial Andrew Pollack says that while most children don't get severely ill from covert nineteen it is important to establish safety of the vaccine in young people it is certainly possible but I don't want to use to try to curb the progress of a pandemic might be considered in the future regulations in more than fifty countries have authorized widespread use of the Oxford vaccine which is being produced and distributed by AstraZeneca for use in people over the age of eighteen Sarah Bassett London

Andrew Pollack University Of Oxford Meningitis Oxford UK Astrazeneca Sarah Bassett London
Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to be trialed on children for first time

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:13 sec | 2 weeks ago

Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to be trialed on children for first time

"Covert vaccine trialing kids said to start in the UK The trial of the Oxford AstraZeneca shot is the first to assess the safety and immune response in Children and young adults. Plan to test that vaccine in 300 volunteers aged 6 to 17.

Astrazeneca Oxford UK
WHO backs use of Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine for adults of all ages

Morning Edition

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

WHO backs use of Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine for adults of all ages

"Guidance on AstraZeneca's covert 19 vaccine. Here's NPR's Jason Beaubien, the WH OSE Experts on Immunization have issued new interim guidance on the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine in light of the emergence of new variants of the virus in several parts of the world. The panel says that there's evidence of the vaccine is less effective in preventing mild forms of the disease from some strains. But Kate O'Brien, head of immunization at the W. H O says there's not evidence that it fails the block severe forms of the disease. The advice from sage and taken on board now by wh O is to proceed with the vaccine. Even in the setting of variants, she says the AstraZeneca shot remains an important tool, even in places where variants are now dominant. Jason Beaubien NPR

Jason Beaubien Astrazeneca Oxford Astrazeneca Kate O'brien W. H O NPR
WHO expert group recommends use of AstraZeneca vaccine

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

WHO expert group recommends use of AstraZeneca vaccine

"Are some doubts about AstraZeneca's Corona virus vaccine, it has gotten a big boost. A group of experts on immunization working with the World Health Organization is recommending the use of AstraZeneca's vaccine, even in countries that have Corona virus variants. The WH OSE chief scientist, Dr Samy s woman often noted that the AstraZeneca vaccine requires storage it refrigerator temperatures, not the far colder ones required of the Fizer vaccine. The Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine. Is One of the main vaccines. At this point in the callbacks facility, it's going to be procured in hundreds of millions of those is. Meanwhile, the South African government announced it won't deploy the AstraZeneca vaccine as widely as first planned because of concerns about its effectiveness against a variant. The first emerged in that country. I'm

Astrazeneca Dr Samy World Health Organization Oxford South African Government
"oxford" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:25 min | 2 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Maderna's vaccine can be kept at normal freezer temperatures and stored in refrigeration for up to thirty days. Once thawed additionally there will be a lot more of it available astrazeneca. An oxford have worked with manufacturers across the world to produce millions of doses already and the company says it to make three billion more and twenty twenty one but the current to does regimen. That's enough to vaccinate. Nearly twenty percent of the world's population the serum institute of india which was contractor to make covid nineteen vaccine for the developing world has already manufactured up to fifty million doses. And says it can make one hundred million a month by march pfizer. One of the world's largest drug companies has set a target of delivering one point three billion doses by twenty twenty one maternal. An upstart pharmaceutical company says it hopes to produce between five hundred million and one billion doses however rich countries have already claimed much of the expected supply of the pfizer and maternal vaccine. Those vaccines are already committed. So they are not available for most middle income and low. Income countries says dr shawn macron loria a delhi-based epidemiologist and author of a book on india's cova nineteen fight. The oxford astrazeneca vaccine on the other hand makes up the bulk of the two billion vaccine doses secured by kovacs. A consortium of one hundred ninety world governments formed to help ensure covid nineteen vaccines were distributed fairly around the world including to developing countries. How is the oxford astrazeneca vaccine different. The oxford astrazeneca vaccine uses different technology from the pfizer and madonna vaccines. That are approved for use in the us. While those two vaccines used the ima- rene genetic code of the corona virus to train. The body's defenses. The oxford astrazeneca vaccine uses a viral vector introducing a harmless virus in this case a virus that causes the common cold and chimpanzees modified with the sars covy to virus spike protein to stimulate an immune response other cove. Nineteen vaccines in. The pipeline also used the viral vector method including one from johnson and johnson and russia's sputnik five this technique has already proved successful in the past including with the ebola vaccine the m. r. a. Vaccines on the other hand are the first using that approach to receive. Authorisation questions remain while the. Uk's decision to use the vaccine is significant. Cowling the h k you. Epidemiologist says other countries may wait to begin. Administering it until after the european medical authority or ema or the us food and drug administration fda grant authorization both of which are seen as more stringent than the british regulator one. Ama official yesterday told belgian newspaper. Heads news plot that astrazeneca has not even submitted its vaccine for a regulatory consideration yet. Adding that approval in january wasn't likely they're also remain questions surrounding late. Stage trials for the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in september. Astrazeneca and oxford halted trials in the uk after a volunteer experienced an unexplained illness but did not announce the pause until it was reported in the news media uk. Regulators gave the okay to continue trials days later however the new york times reported that us regulators at the fda not notified of the paul's and taken aback by the news. It took almost seven weeks before..

oxford astrazeneca Maderna pfizer serum institute of india dr shawn macron loria kovacs delhi johnson european medical authority rene madonna fda ebola india Cowling russia ema uk
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Road Presents: The Divided States of Media

Oxford Road Presents: The Divided States of Media

08:14 min | 3 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Road Presents: The Divided States of Media

"I'm john batchelor. This is the john batchelor show. I welcome. Dan grainger the ceo and founder of oxford road which is an audio advertising firm based in la however reaches across the us to take an important step in correcting some of the successes and failures of these last years in radio in podcasting in youtube is and you will understand it right away. The lack of civility. That's a polite way of saying people. Rude and dan has a better idea is called the media round table and there's a pledge involved here but it's a voluntary pledge and the mission is to make everybody comfortable when they listen to podcasts. Who radio or streaming but particularly podcast. Because that's my love down a very good evening to a pleasure to speak to you. I do the news. I do the news civilly i am on air so i followed the fcc guidelines at the same time. I presume that it is a privilege to be in. Someone's home or in their car or in their iphone. And i do not seek to and make them unhappy or to speak rudely. That is the mission in your media round table. How do you explain it to people who are meeting for the first time dan. Good evening to you. Good evening. John and thank you for having me Very simply put. You're you're in the audio communication business. I've been in this business for a long time. I was in terrestrial radio for ten years before launching my ad agency. That one of the things i saw happen persistently is that you'd have somebody whose job is to talk for hours a day giving their opinion and every now and then they say something that either they shouldn't have said they should just sit differently or they didn't say the way it's being interpreted but it's been spun out of control and now there are sound flying around and increasingly organized forms of sudden protest. Where the advertisers. Get caught in the crossfire. Knowing my business i represent the advertisers. And i've seen time and time again that there's really no due process for handling these types of situations and what many brands do is they say. Hey you know what this is not worth the trouble. We're just not going to sponsor anything around the news. We're not gonna sponsor anything that is political or anything that is opinion or anything that is conservative. And and so being in the middle of that. I started looking around and say you know. I really don't think we're as far apart in what we want is. It appears but there's really no framework to understand the difference between what one show says in another show says or the approach that they take civility. And how can we introduce something. That gives both brands and people that that by advertising as well as people that create or distribute content. How can we give them some lineman on some core principles that we believe can affect the culture in a positive way. Because i think that you know sometimes. Life imitates art and sometimes art imitates life. And i don't think we're all setting the best example for how that looks so we've created the media round table to be a platform where leaders in in the media. Industry and in the private sector can come together and say we can do better. And here's how we're going to do it. And then we provide beyond the pledge we have some resources for people and You know give you one quick example. There's a group called ad fontes media they add. Fonterra's created the media bias chart which which puts Different pieces of content. They they evaluate them with somebody. Who's on the left somebody. Who's on the right. And somebody who's in the center politically they all evaluate the same block of content. And say okay. Here's how we believe it falls right to left in terms of Bias and then north south on the y axis you can see what is their level of civility and reliability and by using tools like this. We're the first agency to partner with that fonterra's and to bring This capability into being so that advertisers can be a little bit more informed about their supply chain in terms of what they sponsor and so that they can start to shift dollars away from that which would divide us toward that which would unite the example of came to my monroe and i. I read your pledge unity in america's in decline due to are increasingly hostile divisions very straightforward. We just had an election that demonstrated that particularly the example. That came to mind with scott tannen. Bollandbranch where they go out of their way to tell the customer that this cotton is acquired in places at practice free and comfortable and generous employment as compared to the twentieth centuries slave wages and brutality in the cotton fields of central asia that is his sales device. And so it occurred to me. Dan that yours is the sales device you customers would enjoy it to be able to associate themselves with a correct correct behavior but at the same time people who don't seek to make people unhappy they seek to bring them together. I agree with that. And i think it's a great example because what what scott in the team boll you're doing is very much in the spirit of what the business roundtable has set out to do in the last year or two here. We have the top hundred and eighty one. Ceo's in america coming together to say hey look. We are not just about shareholder capitalism. We're about stakeholder capitalism and that means that we not only care about our employees and our customers and our shareholders but we also care about the communities that we serve we care about our supply chain and how we get the products that help us do business. And i believe that if you're an advertiser it's the same principle at play. You should be able to make sure that the way you treat people and require people to be treated by. Your business is reflected all the way through your advertising strategy so that there's some cohesion here and not all these double standards. It's it's an obvious. Point dan but you have conversations with the brands with seir. Advertise with the client. Your client list includes the decision. Makers did they embrace this quickly. They see the advantage. They gain absolutely they do. I've been very pleased to see that You know they've been looking for this type of solution and frankly it's been very arbitrary in the past. You know as i mentioned you you you've had you've had binary options previously whereas like. Hey let's just throw the baby out with the bathwater. Let's just avoid formats first sponsorship right or let sponsor unless. Let's just make the decision that it is what it is. And let's kinda plug our ears and try to ignore what people might be saying about our support of these programs and we're looking to do is give them more tools in their tool kit. You know there are ways to resolve conflicts that go beyond. I'm going to shame you on twitter for what you said on your program and never do business with you again. Or i'm not gonna say anything to you know you know i believe and i think you share this with me. John is that those who create content do want to have a productive dialogue with their sponsors. The do wanna know if they're saying things in a way that's becoming problematic for those that would support the show and i think that there's a receptiveness but because everybody is always so defensive it. These things are only managed in reaction to some sort of sudden controversy and never on the front end and if we could just do a little bit of prevention work if we could do a little bit of incentive shifting so that we are not funding. What i like to refer to as the outrage industrial complex and we're incentivizing a higher level of discourse I believe that this is exactly the direction that the the marketplace wants to go. They've just lacked the the the beaten path to go there. And.

john batchelor Dan grainger dan Fonterra fontes scott tannen fcc america oxford youtube la John monroe central asia Dan scott twitter
"oxford" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

06:34 min | 3 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Coronacast

"Everyone is continuing to scrutinize the oxford astrazeneca vaccine which just me awakes ago. Felt like how best chance at a vaccine for card and it's it's come up with results as we talked about last week. That looks really promising. And then on closer inspection. They looked a bit. We'd there was a thing where a small group of people in the vaccine trial received a half toys and they had better results. But then now there's questions about whether they would give him a half dose by accident. How do we make sense of what's happening with this vaccine trial. It's actually really hard. So we we signalled all this. I think last tuesday on corona cash. So it was quite clear then. The they done something unacceptable which was tried to average two very different trials and one going to sixty two percent result effectiveness result of preventing covid nineteen disease. Which if it'd been the first vaccine to report cited pretty good because the registration level is fifty percent effectiveness but came after a visor moderna with well over ninety percent effectiveness. And then how. They got their average of seventy percent. Sh- really sounds like confection. Which is that the got in another smaller trial. A result in people who have does food or following had got ninety percent effectiveness. And all this goes back to pharmaceutical companies making scientific announcements by press release. We could talk about this til kingdom come. There are rumors circulating this confirmation but apparently they're rushing to publish this and that there's a report of the financial times they will publish this in the lancet thursday so thursday of this week british time. We should know a bit more about this trial and remember. This is a vaccine. The promise not to make profit side of that is cheap. And they've committed to giving very large doses. i think something enormous like a third of the world's doses of vaccines are relying on astra any so. This is a lot riding on this vaccine. So six effectiveness is better than nothing but hard to justify spending money on if you other vaccines around that are ninety percent but if there's nothing else around than what do you do so they may have to repeat the trial <hes>. With a half does fall by food if you remember. There is rationale for that. Which is that. The chimpanzee virus that takes genetic material into the cell in theory generate an immune response in other words you immunize to the chimpanzee virus so the second vaccine does that you get the bodies kind of immune to actually the carrier for the vaccine so it doesn't prove to be effective the russians get round this by giving you two different carrier vaccines first. One is a different carrier. Virus from the second vaccine doors has a different carrier virus. Antibodies to the first one won't affect the second one but the the reason they chose. The chimpanzee virus was in the theory. That the human being wouldn't generate an immune response to a chimpanzee vars. It would be kind of invisible which is maybe wishful thinking about. They have studied this chimpanzee adenoviruses before so really we can talk about it. A lot on corona cast but will know hopefully the end of the week an awful lot more than we know now. But i suspect they're going to have to go back to the drawing boards and try a half those trial just to see whether or not they can get a ninety percent efficacy so we have some questions from the audience about this. But i've got some questions for you. I do these sorts of things. The maybe the deicing mix apple the on shore uncertain results so these happening or clinical trials. But the difference. This time is that the public is watching it. Play out in real time or is there a chance that these frantic competitive pace of trying to get a vaccine out is may be causing companies to have to make errors and so then what does this mean for our ability to trust a vaccine once. It comes on the market all good questions. Teagan the reason you've got this problem is almost certainly rushing and missing out of what's called a phase two trial so normally you've got three phases of trials phase. One which is looking at safety tends to be small and a few hundred people then you would normally go to face to face to trial is a dose. Finding study which is the most effective does of vaccine or drug. That's going to get you your effect. That's in a larger number of people and you. You test the dozing now. What you've missed out here in all. These trials is a proper phase to study so they've rushed headlong into a phase three study with a guesstimate as to what the doors is. Now i think from memory. There was an element of doors finding in the face. Three study in the may. Well it'd in them does finding all the vaccine trials testing the site. Which is why you've got the half does or could be a mistake. We'll find out but it could be that we got the doors wrong. And if you remember rightly right at the beginning of this whole process we said nine out of ten vaccines fail and we haven't had nine ten vaccines fail so far we've had them all surviving this process. It's just that the astro vaccine was disappointing with a to those regiment. Michael's asking about the payoff. Side of things star. He's pointed out that pfizer medina have both sort of said that they vaccines are about ninety five ninety nine hundred percent effective but they've been very selective about releasing details of their methodology and is querying why they haven't been subject to similar criticism as oxford astrazeneca. I hope decisions are not being based on who has the best. Pr so the answer to that is we. Don't know until they publish the results. But certainly pfizer. Moderna were fairly straightforward. And what they said it wasn't transparent at all they just don't trust that to one thousand nine hundred. Ninety five percent effectiveness astro if you like was a bit more transparent although there were a bit silly and averaging the two trials so you could see. There was part of the study which showed sixty two percent. Genetic study showed ninety percent now if that happened with pfizer madera. Different does is. We don't know that all we know is that the does they've published. They got really good results but the regulators will see those findings. It's there's no. There's no benefit to pharmaceutical companies of lying to regulators like the food and drug administration. Because the will be called out. The penalty is a huge in terms of reputational damage and in the financial damage. So go to get this sorted out. And they've got to be honest with the public but this is the problem with a press. Release you just. Don't get a chance to scrutinize the data.

Norman swan corona oxford astrazeneca lancet Sh astra
"oxford" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

05:54 min | 3 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Coronacast

"The coronavirus. I'm health reported. Teigen tyler an emphasis in journalists daughter. Norman swan it's monday. The thirtieth of november and norman. Everyone is continuing to scrutinize the oxford astrazeneca vaccine which just me awakes ago. Felt like how best chance at a vaccine for card and it's it's come up with results as we talked about last week. That looks really promising. And then on closer inspection. They looked a bit. We'd there was a thing where a small group of people in the vaccine trial received a half toys and they had better results. But then now there's questions about whether they would give him a half dose by accident. How do we make sense of what's happening with this vaccine trial. It's actually really hard. So we we signalled all this. I think last tuesday on corona cash. So it was quite clear then. The they done something unacceptable which was tried to average two very different trials and one going to sixty two percent result effectiveness result of preventing covid nineteen disease. Which if it'd been the first vaccine to report cited pretty good because the registration level is fifty percent effectiveness but came after a visor moderna with well over ninety percent effectiveness. And then how. They got their average of seventy percent. Sh- really sounds like confection. Which is that the got in another smaller trial. A result in people who have does food or following had got ninety percent effectiveness. And all this goes back to pharmaceutical companies making scientific announcements by press release. We could talk about this til kingdom come. There are rumors circulating this confirmation but apparently they're rushing to publish this and that there's a report of the financial times they will publish this in the lancet thursday so thursday of this week british time. We should know a bit more about this trial and remember. This is a vaccine. The promise not to make profit side of that is cheap. And they've committed to giving very large doses. i think something enormous like a third of the world's doses of vaccines are relying on astra any so. This is a lot riding on this vaccine. So six effectiveness is better than nothing but hard to justify spending money on if you other vaccines around that are ninety percent but if there's nothing else around than what do you do so they may have to repeat the trial With a half does fall by food if you remember. There is rationale for that. Which is that. The chimpanzee virus that takes genetic material into the cell in theory generate an immune response in other words you immunize to the chimpanzee virus so the second vaccine does that you get the bodies kind of immune to actually the carrier for the vaccine so it doesn't prove to be effective the russians get round this by giving you two different carrier vaccines first. One is a different carrier. Virus from the second vaccine doors has a different carrier virus. Antibodies to the first one won't affect the second one but the the reason they chose. The chimpanzee virus was in the theory. That the human being wouldn't generate an immune response to a chimpanzee vars. It would be kind of invisible which is maybe wishful thinking about. They have studied this chimpanzee adenoviruses before so really we can talk about it. A lot on corona cast but will know hopefully the end of the week an awful lot more than we know now. But i suspect they're going to have to go back to the drawing boards and try a half those trial just to see whether or not they can get a ninety percent efficacy so we have some questions from the audience about this..

Norman swan corona oxford astrazeneca lancet Sh astra
"oxford" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

05:02 min | 3 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"Good vaccine news just keeps on coming on the backs of really promising news. From the pfizer. Biontech and madonna now oxford astrazeneca have announced the preliminary results from their phase three trials which showed overall seventy percent efficacy as reminder madonna and visor biotechs. Vaccines both currently show around ninety. Five percent efficacy but seventy percent is still very solid. That's about where dr fauci had been saying. He'd be very pleased to see. But i overall seventy percent. Because there's a weird quirk of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. That i as someone who is not an immunologist. Don't quite understand but hopefully we'll get more information on it in the coming days. Here's what i can tell you for now. The vaccine like the pfizer biontech one would need to be distributed in two doses however the first dose just needs to be half a dose for some reason. Doing a half dose on the first injection makes the whole vaccine overall more effective than if you got to hold doses quoting stat news. The preliminary results on the astrazeneca vaccine were based on a total one hundred. Thirty one covid nineteen cases in a study involving eleven thousand three hundred sixty three participants. The findings were perplexing to full doses of the vaccine appeared to be only sixty two percent effective at preventing disease while a half dose followed by a full dose was about ninety percent effective. That ladder analysis was conducted on a small subset of the study participants. Only two thousand seven hundred forty one a us based trial being supported by operation. Warp speed is testing the two full dose regimen. That may soon change. Astrazeneca plans to explore adding the half dose full dose regimen to its ongoing clinical trials in discussions with regulatory agencies spokesman told stat in an email and quotes and quoting from the new york times. The oxford scientists said they were still trying to understand why the vaccine was more effective at a smaller first dose. The first is supposed to prime the immune system while the second is supposed to boost its response while it seemed counter intuitive for a smaller i dose to be more effective. They said that strategy. More closely mimic. What happens with a real infection. End quotes peter openshaw professor of experimental medicine at imperial college. London explained to the associated. Press that vaccines. don't work. Like normal drugs where a higher dose produces more effects. The immune system is more complicated. Openshaw also notes that if indeed people do only need half a dose for one of the injections that's great news because it will be even cheaper to produce for more people. This was the vaccine candidate. That i was most excited about early on because it seemed like they kind of had a head start quoting the new york. Times astrazeneca's macos vaccine is designed to genetically altered in a dinner virus found in chimps. So that it harmlessly mimics the corona virus and provoke an immune response vaccine deploying. That technology has never won approval but the approach has been studied before notably in a small two thousand eighteen study of an experimental vaccine against the virus that causes middle east respiratory syndrome or mergers that viruses related to sars cov two the novel corona virus that causes covid nineteen so when covid nineteen emerged the team of scientists at oxford's jenner institute that had been leading the work on similar corona viruses. Had a head start once. The genetic code of sars cov two was published in early january. The oxford team sped to adapt their platform to the new corona virus and begin animal testing and quotes the other win in oxford. Astrazeneca's corner is unlike the pfizer. Biontech vaccine this latest one does not require any special refrigeration just standard storage and transportation temperatures of two eight degrees celsius or thirty six to forty six degrees fahrenheit and it can be stored for up to six months. The moderna vaccine requires cooler temperatures of negative four degrees fahrenheit but then can be stored at normal refrigeration temperatures after thawing in can be stored as such for a month. The pfizer biontech vaccine. Meanwhile requires dry. Ice to store at negative seventy degrees celsius or negative ninety four degrees fahrenheit s- that makes the oxford astrazeneca vaccine much more appealing for areas without the infrastructure or funding to sustain the pfizer. Biotech cold chain. And with that in mind. Astrazeneca is applying for early approval wherever it can as well as an emergency useless stained from the world health organization so that it can be made available in low income countries they plan to produce three billion doses next year and are committed to providing it at cost around the world through july. Twenty twenty one. The vaccine costs around three or four. Us dollars significantly less than the others late stage. Trials are continuing in the us. Japan russia south africa kenya and latin america and further trials are planned for other european and asian countries. So definitely more good news but watch this space for more

smithsonian institute oxford new york times robert craddock dr anderson greeley university of arizona steven anderson david horvath nasr mount saint nassar hawaii suzanne smrekar scarpa university of northern colorad Helen nasa moore
"oxford" Discussed on KILF Morning New Podcast

KILF Morning New Podcast

06:38 min | 4 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on KILF Morning New Podcast

"Haven't odd affection. The english language odd. In that specific. I really am and it makes it very difficult for me to have conversations with people because people don't say exactly what they mean the kind of imply what they mean and i have a lot of trouble and i'm constantly going through this with my wife and i'm going but that's not what you said. You said this. And she understands and she and she gets me but you know honestly the problem is i'm not trying to be. I'm not trying to be snarky. I'm not trying to be. You know you just want people to use the words. What promotes not even that. I i literally or figuratively literally. Do not understand what you're saying unless you say exactly the right word and so we see this. You know the language changes. And i understand that but could heavens. Here's the here's the definition of the word woman Currently found in the oxford english dictionary. Okay woman now. An adult female human being. Okay that's my understanding and now it's not necessarily that. Because of the whole binary write downs and then wikipedia. Wikipedia was the best definition that imagine a woman is an adult female human. The term woman may also refer to a girl the plural women is sometimes used for human females regardless of age typically. A woman has two x chromosomes and is capable of pregnancy and giving birth from puberty until menopause. That's wikipedia good good definition okay but now oxford university press amended its dictionaries after pressure saying that its definition was derogatory and sexist right. A woman is now listed as a person's wife girlfriend or female lover instead of just demands and the man entry includes similarly gender neutral terms. See this comes back to where we started. I don't understand what you said. A woman start just through. The woman is now listed as a person's wife so it could be either a man male or female. Yeah basically a human's a human's wife could be anybody. But that doesn't describe the gender specific specification of woman a girlfriend or female lover. Okay but it still doesn't have anything to do with the actual x x chromosomes but this is interesting. Oxford has stuck with a definition of each with the b. Now i don't want to say. I the b word the b word. Say with the be right. Okay okay okay. As synonymous with women. Yes but that's okay. It's okay to still call a woman. The b word. Maria beatrice juvenile party petition. She was outraged by this. She says bitch didn't mean to say it be word is not a synonym for woman. It is dehumanizing to call a woman a b word but it is but one sad albeit extremely damaging example of everyday sexism. She goes hunt celaya. Strong woman always considered a niche with the be. I mean seriously. I know i understand i. How many times have i been called that. I don't know. But i would never use that word to describe you or any other woman. I people think i am well. Sometimes maybe no. I don't know i don't know but Because because i haven't you would never say that about a guy who with a strong opinion or thought. No that's true. Got got mad at something here. You wouldn't be considered that. But if i did i would be considered. There's no word to that. Well i mean you know the generic terms boy. It's hard to talk about bad language with the generic seven letter term that starts with a an ends with whole for example you can refer to a man or a woman anal but that's the way that's one of the words use. This was this woman. Maria juvenile party. A point saying you don't you don't make synon- man synonymous with bleep head well. Dictionaries consider that a stupid irritating or ridiculous man. I don't know i would hate to. I would hate to have the job of trying to write a rewrite a dictionary. But i suspect what happened here. This is happening at oxford by the way in order to get a subscription to oxford. You use subscription. Yes you can't just go online and type it in. I happened to find it because somebody who had a printed version. No well i don't know they may have but you can go online. Look up any dictionary. Oxford dictionary. They want two hundred ninety five dollars year us any rate. I suspect what happened was that there was probably some intern and undergrad working for the dictionary. People doing like a thesis project going a problem here with the word woman ma. How come they haven't changed the word man. Oh well then. I guess no i guess they have. They changed the man's entry to include similarly gender neutral terms. That really doesn't even bother me that much anymore. I've gotten over that but it's just it's just you know it's impossible to keep up while the rest of us are trying to learn most sexist that a woman is only known as a person's wife girlfriend or female lover that's it you don't have a significant other. That's right so then you're not considered a woman right good question to me. That's also discriminatory a there a lot of issues with bees who don't have significant other. That's true at sorry. See you're getting more wound up about this one than i am. I didn't realize struggling. Never learn how to communicate..

Oxford Wikipedia Maria beatrice oxford university menopause oxford intern
"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

The Lemar Show

05:44 min | 4 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

"I was used to work and I enjoyed it now. So otherwise I wouldn't above it cuz you know, it just really hard. Yeah and stuff. I still parted by the way don't get that right. I'll try and work out the answer and it didn't come in five. You didn't come in 10 minutes. It didn't come in an hour, but you know, but at the time, you know again cuz I now am now enjoying this stuff. Yeah, you know, I got into Oxford. Yeah, I'm giving this a good girl. Yes. I'm going to buy but I'm gonna make sure that I I try and give a hundred percent. So even if I wasn't in Oxford it would have been if I was somewhere else it would probably have been the same. Yes. Yeah. Yep. No, the questions would have been the same but my application at this point, you know used to working hard. I wasn't driven by any fail failing or anything like that. I just wanted to just yeah, I was enjoying it. Yeah, so I was in a confidence level must have been high no, no. No because you trying to do this then you think I want to get it done and go to the club, right and then you can't work it out, but you have to say guys, maybe I can walk to the club today, but I really want to come but I've got to submit this stuff so you should think so. Maybe I'm not as good as I think that's why you know in that scenario, but they're still people that were just flying flying through or wage hard for everybody back in I think it was hard for everybody cuz back in those days. We couldn't really talk about the answers with each other because if but could you know, you couldn't if they owed a No-No by the way, you've worked out the answer and and it was quite obvious that you guys could cuz there's no collaboration was a big deal because they that's the idea. You have to teach yourself out to learn you have to teach yourself and that's the whole point wage..

Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

The Lemar Show

04:41 min | 4 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

"Hey, what's good people? Thanks for joining again for another show today. I've got one of the most balanced people. I know he goes by the name of Eddie. I've known him since I was about Seventeen, very close friend. He's the only person I know friend or otherwise, he's gone to Oxford University. He got a scholarship to go there and I thought you know because he's only person I know why not get him on and have a chat about life about balance and how about the experience of going to a place like Oxford? Maybe it will inspire someone else out there? Who's planning on giving us young? All right. Let's got off data..

Eddie Oxford University Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

05:24 min | 6 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Coronacast

"Although as I've said, it may be overrated as a cause and why you're worried about it with the Oxford vaccine here is that the Oxford Valley seen actually is a virus that you're injecting to your body. So it's not the COVID. Nineteen virus they're injecting. It's a chimpanzee Admiral Virus, and that carries genetic material into the cell to tell the cells produce the fragments of Covid nineteen virus to induce an immune response. So if this vaccine is causing transverse, my life is it's more likely to actually be the carrier virus than the covid nineteen itself because the nasty reaction that could really kill a lot of. covid nineteen vaccines is this thing called antibody dependent enhancement where you get an overreaction, the immune system to the covid nineteen when you're exposed to the COVID nineteen virus. So what they got to find out with this person is, are there in the placebo arm in the active arm Is it really transverse mile lighters? What are the antibodies that have actually been shown other any other symptoms? And did the person actually get infected with real covid nineteen after the trial had started because that's what causes a D E and if the answers to those are well, they weren't infected with covid nineteen the s they wear in the active arm, but the antibody response wasn't strong then they probably would proceed with an idea but what do I know so this? Nasty Immune reaction that you speak about is something that we saw in non human primates when they were testing the size one vaccine is that right? Let's try this and create a lot of concerns. They haven't seen that reaction in the phase one studies, which is just showing whether or not. If I give you the vaccine, is it safe but you wouldn't expect to. See in the phase, one studies because people weren't getting affected by the COVID nineteen viruses is when you get infected with the Covid nineteen hours after you've been immunized that this appears is going to be a lot of nervous people watching this gag. So the I mean the government was putting out timeframes, Australians getting vaccines as early as January next year which experts. Have said is pretty ambitious surprising, but assuming everything's okay with this person, how much time will these add to the white for the Oxford vaccine and if it's not a K. is that the end of it is, is this enough to shut down the entire thing? So the answer is maybe by the time GONNA CASCO's airs all sorted out and his back on stream. Or typing or takes two or three days to sort not very long. So it's not to delay it for ages, but then the safe, there's an independent independent safety committee always isn't these trials and they're going to have to deliberate not might take a little while..

Covid Oxford Valley Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on The Microscopists

The Microscopists

02:42 min | 6 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on The Microscopists

"And the system that we had didn't log. Do civ2 biology. I mean one trivial way in Oxford where this was going on. There is a science area where all the Departments are pretty close to each other in reality. The engineering science department isn't actually in the science area is pretty close. It's a two three four five minute walk but it involved the four or five minute walk and it involves crossing a road and biologists didn't like crossing the road and biology in particular. I didn't like crossing the road still didn't until the last few years when we started doing experiments with see any guns and so on page finally we got those things across the road and I might say talking about biology wanting to be nice and calm these C elegans khong And the donor of these things they'd look at them in this petri. Dish. They are quote grazing on a lawn of bacteria. Well my goodness crazy on a loaner bacteria across box Road was not an easy thing. And so it was hard for them to get with the biology to us. Yeah, our stage scanner wasn't conducive to biology if I'm completely honest although later on we were able to do what I think was really quite remarkable things with the stage kind of but it was fighting the technology. It was also a new which meant to say. It didn't work every time it was also knew right at the beginning before the same image captures software in that we had a long persistence television screen. So the scanning wasn't fast. The scanning wasn't real time. You had to turn the lights out. The lab so it was a relatively painful way to get the specimen and I really don't blame the biologists for not cottoning on to what we were trying to do because it was hard and the biologists limited reasonably their main interest was biology and we couldn't provide them with the wow image or the month bility to see biological processes or to see cell division to watch it happening to do 3D reconstruction because we bought a Jetta stage yet..

Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

06:39 min | 7 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"I up a potential vaccine for covid nineteen has shown positive results in its most recent trial. The vaccine was developed by a team at the University of Oxford. It produced a strong immune response in the body, and it appears safe for people to take. The latest data from its early stage human trial has just been released in the Lancet. Medical Journal. The findings have raised hopes in the fight against covert one, thousand, nine hundred, but what happens next? To find out our health policy editor Natasha loader spoke to Professor Sara Gilbert of. Jenner Institute, she leads the team that is creating the vaccine. We've just published a paper on the first thousand and seventy seven participants in the child half of them had the Negro virus vaccine and half of them had a meningitis vaccine in the control group. And what we're looking at is the people's responses to vaccination. We call. It reacted missy, and that's measuring things like did they have sore arm of the nation? Have a headache or feel tired appeal feverish an all of that is recorded for both groups, and then most importantly measuring immune responses to the vaccination, so we're looking at antibody responses and t cell responses on all of this is done in the first trial in healthy adults between the ages of eighteen and fifty five years when you saw the results of your trial. What was your reaction where? Where you pleased with the immune response it generated, or is it difficult to tell whether that's immune? Response is going to be good enough to create a working vaccine. We were very pleased with immune responses, but on the other hand they will, also exactly as we'd expected because we've been using this way of making vaccines using the semi-knock Specter for some years now, so we saw what we'd expected, which is really good news? We're getting the type and the magnitude of the immune response that we'd had expected to see based on what we done previously. The other question is whether that's enough to protect people against corona virus and nobody can answer that at the moment. We don't know what level of antibodies what level of t cells we need to protect people. So what we have done is looked to away increasing immune responses that you get after the first vaccine by giving some people a second dose and we were pleased to see did increase the antibody responses. They went up to a high level. It seems like a good strategy to use two. Two doses of the vaccine in our efficacy trials so that we have the strongest immune response we can generate, and that's most likely to give us efficacy all learn the long-term. It may turn out that we go back to using one does to what extend you counting on T. cells to generate a sufficiently strong immune reaction to the virus t-cells, a really important in protection against viral infection. They work with the antibody response, so antibodies can neutralize the virus when it first and the body stop, them. Them from getting into cells where they can start cause damage, but the such toxic t cells can identify cells that have been infected and taken over by the virus and destroy them so that the virus spreading the body and both of those types of immune response apart natural immunity to viruses, and we would like to see both induced by vaccination from what you've seen of the trial data so far. T think the vaccine is looking like a safe one. Yes, certainly from what we've seen so far. Far We using high doses of this vaccine, so we do see people reacting to the vaccine, I think the most common symptom was fatigue, but they have so as well. We found it by asking the volunteers to take Paracetamol for twenty four hours after vaccination that symptoms of somewhat reduced. Many vaccines fail during testing. How confident would you say? The vaccine is going to actually work well. All depends on the level of immune response. This needed to protect against corona virus infection which we don't know. We have tested this a number of preclinical studies against a very high virus dose animals immunized, and then exposed to very large mounts of Boris on what we saw is that there was no new Monja. Those animals would probably be much representative of a young and healthy human than an older person with responsive immune system, and so a really important part of the child's is now testing the vaccine in groups of older adults who we know don't typically respond so well to vaccination. Could you give me your best guess as to sort of how long protection from the type of vaccine you're making my last. It looks like a certain in younger. Younger adults we could expect years protection, but it all depends on the level of immune responses needed. We don't expect to get lifelong protection from a single vaccination. We will have to monitor over time the decline in response and start to make decisions about when boost should be given soon. Could you convince sense of what happens next in terms of developing your fax seen so at the moment? What we're doing is continuing with the trials in older people, giving them either one or two doses of the vaccine, and then measuring their immune responses afterwards, and we have to wait for a month before we take a blood sample and measure the. The antibody response after vaccination, and then if we're giving them a second dose, that's a at least a month. The first is that we need to wait another month to get some samples. So all of this does take time, and that's ongoing at the moment, but in parallel to that we also lacks much larger numbers of people eight thousand so far in the UK on top of the thousand that go back in the face, one city hall for them. Get the corona virus vaccine and half of them get a control vaccine, which is in this case of accion against meningitis over time when enough people have been infected, the statisticians will as. As it's called and blind, the study looked to see which group size infections with falling into, and that will tell us. The vaccines actually effective at preventing people from being infected. Do you think you'll be fast to get her regulator with results? Well, let's looking like a distinct possibility at the moment because we have the three phase three trials running. We haven't had any safety signals in the child that means that we can't carry home within good immune responses, and we have Charles running currently in two countries where there's high rates virus transmission, so it may well be that way the first to have a result that we can present regulators. So Pfizer. Her said they would hope to have a working back seen by October, so that sort of implies that sort of timescale for years.

University of Oxford meningitis Lancet Medical Journal Jenner Institute missy headache Specter Professor Sara Gilbert Paracetamol UK editor Natasha loader Charles Boris representative
"oxford" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

06:35 min | 8 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Carol Hill. This is the world, a glimmer of hope in the fight against the corona virus today. Scientists at Oxford University published the results of an early phase vaccine experiment, the journal The Lancet reviewed and published the Research Richard. Horton is editor. There I think these results are extremely encouraging and I'm very optimistic. It's right that we now have to go into what. What we call phase three studies, that's to say studies where people are exposed to the virus whether Bara still being transmitted in communities, and we need to know that this vaccine can actually prevent infection in those populations, but this news today should give us cause for encouragement Richard. The whole race for the vaccine can get complicated, and it feels like last week we. We heard about a different test for different vaccine. What did we learn last week? And what does this new information? Ask To what we know about? What kind of accent will work well Roy now we heard something like two hundred different vaccine candidates under developments around the world, and around twenty of those are actually in human clinical trials now so what we're doing. Doing is we're spreading options? There are different types of vaccines with different designs different ways of eliciting an immune response, and this is good to have diversity, because not every one of these is going to be successful, so the more options that we've got in backseat candidates, the more likely it is. We're going to get back seen in the next twelve months. I. The results of this first experiment doesn't mean that this is the beginning of the end of this pandemic art. Don't think we have enough to say that. This is the beginning of the and I. Think this is getting to first base of a journey to get a home run on this for vaccine. We still have faced three studies to go We still have to prove that it is absolutely safe when given to human beings over the long term, so there's many more steps that we need to fulfill, but the first step is extremely positive Now you keep mentioning face three as being vitally important. What happens in phase three? Why is it so important? If phase three clinical trial, what you're hoping to show is a significant difference between the two groups, obviously, whereby those who received the Oxford back seen have much less risk of infection and those who received the control vaccine. So that's what we're hoping Dole and those trials are already ongoing in Brazil in South Africa, and in the United. Kingdom and we hope to get a result later this year, and if you get a good result from face three is, it is all systems. Go you start disturbing the? The vaccine absolutely if we get a good result from face threes, and we are in a pole position to stop producing the vaccine worldwide, and making sure that those who are at greatest risk of this infection, get the vaccine I those the people who are older people who have chronic illness, health, workers and people from black minority ethnic communities, and if we can get the virus ramped up, and and to those individuals as soon as possible. Ben were in a good place to prevent any further damage miss. Richard Horton is an editor of the Lancet where the Oxford vaccine trial results were published and reviewed. Thanks very much Richard Going Solo appreciate you time. The so called drug war in Mexico has been raging for well over a decade, hundreds of thousands of people have been killed. Many of those assumed to be dead, simply went missing never to be seen again by family or friends now as the world's Lancia reports, the Mexican government is reporting a grim new figure on the number of people who disappeared. Mexico's government has a team dedicated to looking for missing people. It's called the National Search Commission and last week. They released a staggering figure. More than seventy one thousand people have gone missing since violence related to drug trafficking scaled up about fourteen years ago, they must. Elective Oh interesting interestingly. Martha, Leticia Garcia is with a group of women in the city of while Hata who are looking for missing relatives, the stage, a demonstration outside of their local government forensics lab after the National Search Commission released its new findings. STYLIANOS got default. We want them to please go looking for our children, Garcia says she. Another mother spoke to a local news website called looks. Good he extended voluntary. Another woman wearing a face mask says she's looking for her son. COULD HE STAN? Alexander by Lynch? Rees, she says. Went missing on ears eve and that went her brother went looking for. Could you stand three days later? He went missing to. Other women stood by holding large photos of their missing sons and grandsons. There are dozens of groups like there's across Mexico. Yeah, that's that's symptoms of the generalized nature of the Problem Alejandra. Niger is a professor of international relations and Human Rights at eight, this or university in Guadalajara. He says the Mexican. Government's newest number on missing persons is consistent with the country's reality, a sophisticated society functioning parallel to start equality, an ongoing armed conflict on says that's why groups of relatives all over the country plea publicly for authorities to find their missing loved ones or go looking for them themselves, so authorities don't find persons. They don't even do very good job looking for them. The ones who actually are doing the job are the family members mostly mothers. The Mexican government's numbers and says reveals the two groups that are the most frequently targeted young men and young women and girls, so that suggest strongly that these these related to the Illicit Sexual Slavery of women. On then regarding men, it's basically junk. We could say the active age in criminal organizations, although many don't have any direct link with organized crime. Six years ago, forty-three university students went missing one night, and a small city in southeastern Mexico. There's has become the most emblematic of missing persons..

Richard Horton Mexico Mexican government editor National Search Commission The Lancet Oxford University Carol Hill Bara Leticia Garcia Oxford Roy STYLIANOS Dole Ben Niger Rees STAN Guadalajara
"oxford" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

"Coming up on five minute. News Astra ZENECA TEAMS UP WITH OXFORD UNIVERSITY TO DEVELOP CORONA virus vaccine. Uk ethnic minorities suffer extra Kovic deaths and trump uses pandemic to speed up opening of public land to industry. It's Friday may one. I'm Anthony Davis British drug maker. Astrazeneca has teamed up with the University of Oxford to develop and manufacture a vaccine for corona virus in a move that could allow for rapid vaccination around the world if the treatment proves to be effective. Human trials of the vaccine developed by the university's Jenner Institute and Oxford Vaccine. Group entered phase one testing last week with hundreds of people aged eighteen to fifty five volunteering across five trial centers in southern England as covert nineteen continues. Its grip on the world. The need for a vaccine to defeat the virus is urgent. Pascal Seurat's chief executive of Astra Zeneca said in a statement. Yesterday it is definitely a risk to launch into the development of a vaccine but now is the time to take those kind of risks by June July. We will already have a very good idea of the direction of travel in terms of its potential efficacy. He said Professor John Bell Regis professor of medicine. Oxford University described the partnership with Astra Zeneca as a major force in the struggle against pandemics for many years to come but bell said the challenge is to be able to manufacture at scale once it is approved by the regulators. We also want to make sure that the rest of the world will be ready to make this vaccine at scale so that it gets to populations in developing countries for example where the need is very great. He said it comes amid a global race to find a vaccine against corona virus with governments lobbying companies to secure I access when one is ready there are seventy treatments under development will wind Oxford University. Said both partners had agreed to operate on a not for profit basis for the duration of the pandemic with only the cost of production and distribution being covered people from some ethnic minorities in Britain a dying in disproportionate numbers from Kovic. Nineteen possibly in part because they are more likely to work in healthcare and other sectors most exposed to the virus. A leading think tank said today per capita deaths for people in Britain who had black Caribbean heritage with three times that of British citizens who are white. The Institute for Fiscal Studies said per capita deaths among other black groups would double that of the population overall while those of Indian descent also suffered more fatalities than average the. Ifs said taking into account the fact that most minority groups and much younger on average than the white British population per capita death rates across almost all minority groups looked disproportionately high. It said in a report parts of the extra death rate could be explained by ethnic minorities higher likelihood to live in London or other cities hit hard by the virus but geography was not the only factor data from the United States who shown African Americans are more likely to die from cove nineteen highlighting longstanding disparities in health inequalities in access to medical care the trump administration has ratcheted up its efforts amid the corona virus pandemic to overhaul and overturn Obama era environmental regulations and increase industry access to public lands. The Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt sped efforts to drill mine and cut timber on fragile Western landscapes. Meanwhile the EPA headed by the former coal lobbyist Andrew Huila has weakened critical environmental laws and announced in March that it would cease oversight of the nation's polluters during the Kovic nineteen crisis. The rollbacks appear to follow a playbook put forth by influential conservative think tanks urging the White House to use the pandemic as justification for curtailing or eliminating environmental rules. An oversight while millions of acres of public lands across the country have been shut to visitors. They remain open to oil and gas companies and despite plummeting oil prices. The Bureau of Land Management has announced no plans to cancel or even scaled-back upcoming auctions. That would make hundreds of thousands of acres of public lands across the Western. Us available to energy companies. One of the most controversial sales would offer up one hundred fifty thousand acres in southern Utah. To energy companies environmentalists however. Say the push to drill near the iconic Red Rock Landscapes of arches and Canyon lands is not only destructive but also unnecessary in light of an oil glut. That is swamped storage. Capacity driving oil prices last week into negative territory for the first time in history. In addition to ramping up oil and gas development on public lands the of energy announced plans last week to revitalize the US uranium mining and processing industry. Such a scheme say environmentalists puts uranium-rich Grand Canyon. National.

Oxford Vaccine Astra Zeneca OXFORD UNIVERSITY Pascal Seurat University of Oxford Ifs United States Britain Uk Anthony Davis wind Oxford University England Professor John Bell Bureau of Land Management Grand Canyon Utah Caribbean
"oxford" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The Oxford club Mormon church health of Mormon church officials are issuing a health warning to members new guidance from the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints says copy is prohibited no matter how its marketed vaping is banned in marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by competent doctors the focus is on young members of the church word of wisdom is a set of rules about what foods and drinks are good for Mormons and what substances they should avoid for past generations just entering coffee shops was considered taboo the new warning says drinks with names that include cafe mocha latte and ending in Chino usually have coffee in them and are against the word of wisdom I'm AT Donahue Peter Fonda the son of a Hollywood legend became a movie star in his own right both writing and starring in counter culture classics like easy rider has died of lung cancer he was seventy nine years old breaking news and analysis at town hall dot com the trump administration hired a longtime student loan industry executive to be the federal government's top watchdog for the one and a half trillion dollars student loan market barber Cameron will serve as the consumer financial protection bureau's new student loan ombudsman the bureau said Friday it's a job is designed to protect student loan borrowers from poor practices in the student loan industry manning levels of student debt remains a hot political topic was some twenty twenty democratic presidential candidates calling for national student loan forgiveness program this wall one in ten student loan borrowers to follow behind ever paying their loans Patrick false reporting New York City police apprehended a man suspected of placing two devices that looked like pressure cookers in a subway station yesterday the man was caught on video with on it with a card putting the cookers in two locations police the terminal devices were not explosives more on the stories at townhall dot com I'm Rhonda roster the revolution swept him and all this used to back down anyone took on the White House on the Democrats the Republicans even took on MSNBC he got so good at taking people live some of those people decided to take him out they reach district and spend millions of dollars to defeat him well evolution is re loaded and he's leading this is the Joe Walsh radio this is the best of Joe.

marijuana Chino Donahue Peter Fonda executive White House MSNBC Oxford club Mormon church heal Hollywood town hall barber Cameron Patrick New York City Rhonda Joe Walsh seventy nine years trillion dollars
"oxford" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"By the Oxford club Jim chest go with your money now by now you're well aware of plant based burgers but how bout plant based eggs yep Kroger recently began chirping about the availability of it's just a good brand that some of its locations it says the product made with among beans will soon be offered on the twenty one hundred Kroger Ralphs and Fred Meyer supermarkets just take is sold as a cholesterol free a liquid that you'll need to cook in the skillet solid gains in the final session of the week on Wall Street the Dow industrials jumped more than three hundred points today but the blue chip index was still down about one and a half percent for the week the S. and P. lost one percent for the week on a forty second anniversary of Elvis Presley's death comes or that Netflix will develop an animated adult action comedy series about the rock and roll legend variety reports that Elvis is former wife Priscilla and Sony pictures animation are among the partners that will take the show to the streaming giant the series will be called agent king in which L. was who work for a secret government spy program while continuing with his day job as the king of rock and roll that's your money now summer is here en masse got the barbecue out already the grill that's why he trusts super poligrip so he can enjoy his steak with full confidence sounds like there's a party going on but something's missing and thanks to a bright smile is anything but a surprise Michigan is one of the best places in the country to do business but you don't have to take our word for it take penny poppies president and CEO of consumers energy instead all of the innovation is occurring around robotics a I it's happening here in Michigan we have chemical companies we have pharmaceutical companies we have medical device manufacturers Michigan is a magnet for innovators and dreamers big things are happening in business here find out why by searching Michigan here.

Jim chest Kroger Kroger Ralphs Fred Meyer Elvis Presley Netflix Priscilla Sony pictures animation L. Michigan president and CEO Oxford club penny forty second one percent
"oxford" Discussed on FT News

FT News

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"oxford" Discussed on FT News

"Hello from the newsroom of the financial times. In london. I'm Katie Martin Oxford University's just launched its first social enterprise spinout aimed at helping companies identify hidden poverty among their workers and take action to alleviate the problem. The initiative uses a new definition of poverty that takes into account factors other than income. John hammock is co-founder talks to Andrew Jack about the initiative. Tell us John. What exactly is OFI the Oxford, poverty and human development initiative OFI is a center at the Oxford department of international development at the university of Oxford. It is a research and policy center. And it created something called the multidimensional poverty index, which is a way of measuring poverty in all its dimensions poverty every in the world is measured by income. But that's not a good proxy for poverty. And so what OFI did is developed a methodology which is now used by many countries to measure poverty in its social dimension such as -education, health and housing. So would be a more sophisticated in useful definition, more generally of poverty. If income really isn't enough. Well, if you talked to any poor person, they're going to tell you that they're poor by income perhaps. But that doesn't define their whole situation. They're usually poor by housing education, nutrition health, and what the multidimensional poverty index says is it takes the national definition of that poverty 'cause we had Oxford cannot define the poverty of Bangladesh to find the poverty of Colombia or Africa country. And so they themselves come up with their definition of the poverty and the social aspects that they're think are crucial in their country. And that's becomes this local definition of poverty. Create some problems in terms of trying to compare then between regions or countries. Yes. And that's why we've also created a global multinational poverty index, and we do that with the United Nations and that then compares one hundred and three countries and their poverty, and that gives you a standard by which the compare all countries and that is different than the national measures. So what we? We've done is. We created to just like an income income has a national measure by country, but there's also international World Bank measure that compares countries to the international measure you've developed what would be the three thrill fool bake common. Denominators or drivers of the index. The common denominators of index are education health, and then what would have to be called social protection issues like 'electricity water and those kinds of issues it's mostly related to those. Because those are the ones that have comparible data over one hundred three countries, give us a sense, then when you start to use this mall nuanced approach to public-, how does it change the sort of common perception of the world's poorest nations, for instance? Well, I mean, it's very clear that when these studies are done most for people in terms of individuals are in South Asia, and in China, and so it gives you a sense of where the poor people are. But the thing that really has been excited about the OFI workers that we're now finding that a lot of the multi. Poor people are people who are left behind and middle income countries. So it's not just countries that we normally think of that are poor. But rather countries that are also middle income countries have large number of very poor people within them if you look at their social poverty, and what we've done now is to try to take this methodology and applied it to the private sector, and that's the innovative area that we're moving into how does that work? How does that work in the private sector? Well about two years ago. I got a call from a Bank in Central America called the back chromatic. And they said, do you think they're any poor people in my Bank? They all get paid. Well, so we did an initial study. And they found that twelve percent of their employees were not mentally poor. They're reporting housing there were because their family members couldn't get work there were poor because of health, etc. So because of that experiment, we then decided to set up a business. I a multidimensional poverty index that we're focused on business exclusively. And that's why we set up so feel Oxford which is a spin out company. It's the first socially responsible, spin out company, the university of first social enterprise. The university is spun out lots of full profit entities around for example, drug developments and the like, but this would be the first social enterprise that's existed been spun out in a legal entity. That's correct. And as you said, the university has a lot of spin outs that they've done in the private sector. This is now to set up a social enterprise using business principles to run it. But the objective of this is to measure, the poverty of the employees and the families of private sector companies in order for them to know, what the poverty is of their employees in order to do something about it. And as we have already seen in Costa Rica was we've modeled us in Costa Rica for the last two years with our partner or placebo there, and they have shown very clearly that businesses that measure, the poverty, their employees and do something about it. Make better employee's more efficient more effective, and they're very excited about this project in terms of companies using OC. How would you what would they pay something to you for access to your data the way? The has worked so far is that the companies work with a local organization in Costa Rica's got only onto possible and the companies pay or result a fee for working on this with them. And they then do their own interviews of their own employees and their staffs because we don't have that data. They have the data. They then get the information. And then they do the policy in the work around how to solve that issue. So the program is new we've only been doing this for a year, and what we're doing now is launching this as an effort of Oxford University to try to bring it out of Costa Rica into other countries in two other companies since you you'd be providing us to question as the questions the data points to ask. And then the companies individually would then go out and do that the room workforce's. Yes, we provide the platform the technical assistance to the businesses the businesses, then will know how to use it we provide assistance during the first process make sure that it is done correctly. And then also we are going to provide. We haven't done this yet. But we will provide a seal which Sophia Oxford. We'll give companies that are doing this. And do a good job. They'll sort of get a seal to verify that they've done this. And I think that is something that companies are very excited about because it will show that they're actually doing something to not just improve the lives of their employees. But doing something if I- poverty. Example that in Latin America, the result has been that the company having looked to the data has started to develop some particular interventions to tackle the hidden poverty that they found amongst employee's. That's correct. Our local partner there or he's not CD ROY is a business association. They're now working with us with forty two businesses. But to give you an example of that Bank. I mentioned which is back bucket. Chrome attic, it's the largest Bank in Central America. They found twelve percent of their employees were poor. They then started programs to deal with those issues of poverty. So for example, the board of directors of the Bank decided to set up a fund first of all with their own money to deal with one of the issues housing and other issue with love the people had problems just doing all the work to get to the health benefits. So they started setting up small programs to deal with the poverty of each individual as the program has gotten larger and we now have forty two businesses. We find that their similarities, and we also find it's possible to then join with the government and do public. Partnerships to tackle some of

Costa Rica Katie Martin Oxford University OFI John hammock university of Oxford partner Oxford department of internati international World Bank Oxford Andrew Jack Oxford University Sophia Oxford london United Nations co-founder South Asia Central America China
"oxford" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"oxford" Discussed on WJR 760

"We're talking doctor tammy peterson of the oxford recovery center hyper barrack oxygen therapy blake powell her son joining us as well talking about their families journey to healing and doctor tammie where we're talking about your daughter john and how she had been diagnosed with this ah acquired brain injury and now you are faced with how am i going to heal this child how is she going to even become anywhere near the purse that she had been before you belong to an online group and somebody sent you an email telling you about the hyper barrack oxygen therapy i was determined to figure out how to get my daughter this therapy and that's when i quickly realized it was not available available here in the u s o other countries standard practice even the layaway was standard japan hyper barracks on every ambulance but in the u s now for brain injuries so i've got this hope you can imagine this hope that can get my daughter's life back i just wanted to give her some quality of life back and i found that it was out of my reach while i will say nothing short of the grace of god i was able to get my daughter the therapy and it was quite attorney but she became the first child in the country to treat an hyper chamber in a hospital became very controversial later but yes he did receive the treatment while nobody expected her to get any better in fact the doctors on her first day pulled me aside telling me you're wasting our time and you're wasting her time she doesn't have a chance and hell you need to face it i wasn't given up that email hope i tried to explain to them that i had an email from a mom and malaysia so i had evidence but nobody quite saw that as evidence well after one treatment the next day i got my daughter up.

tammy peterson john attorney oxford recovery center japan