39 Burst results for "Oxford"

Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Discussions of Truth

Discussions of Truth

03:21 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Discussions of Truth

"And look, if you tried catching me at that four o'clock hour, I started a bit late. And most people don't even most people that know my show, it's Wednesdays at 5. But I'm doing more shows randomly and again, Lucas woll was one of my guests last week that talked me. He's fighting the Biden administration. He's trying TSA is fighting multiple government agencies over here these masks mandates. He's been injected. He's been injected with the quote vaccine. Yet he's still being required to wear masks. He's had enough. He's had enough. And we're going to bring on Michael faris here momentarily who heard the episode that I did with Lukas last week. And wanted to join the program and I invited extend the invitation. We're also going to bring on another individual that will be joining Michael. And this fellow is named Tony edes. This would be just blow you away. What's happening to Michael? We'll get his story here in about a minute. But if you are not sharing this information, folks, and you are relying on CNN and Fox News and MSNBC to deliver you what is critical and crucial to news if you will. And that is the survival of freedom of media or press free press. I think it's called. In the United States, and then you were living you were living in a tunnel with no lights on it. You're living with your head. The closets in under a rock so this is where I get back to Gonzalez, a Cuban born story and this is Ian, what's happened to what happened in Cuba is exactly planned to happen in the United States. The CIA surrounded Gonzalez's theorist. The CIA would never do that to its own people. The CIA folks is not controlled by Americans. That's what you need to understand. The Central Intelligence Agency, agency is ran by European bankers. Does not represent the United States people or its constitution. Just like Paul Craig Roberts, sat on this show, former Oxford fellow from a Stanford film. I mean, are those credentials not a higher enough for you? Ladies and gentlemen, are those credentials not high enough for you? He said there is no constitution in the United States. Something appears that you have constitutional rights. And what cervano says is that the United States has been evaded by a communist regime. This is a communist takeover. So folks need to get an organized yourself, you need to gather yourself, you need to clean out the garbage in D.C. that's infiltrated your government and D.C. may clean out those politics and you hold those politicians. Accountable and keep their word. All the mechanical transparency we're going to be on Michael right now. I think I've got this I think I got the right phone number form. This is Michael farson, and this will appal you. This will just blow you away what's happening to this man. Michael faris. Yes. He and trachea here. Welcome to discussion to truth, sir. How.

Lucas Woll Biden Administration Michael Faris CIA Tony Edes United States Michael Gonzalez Lukas TSA Msnbc Fox News CNN Cervano Paul Craig Roberts Cuba IAN Stanford Oxford D.C.
Get to Know Os Guinness, Author of 'The Magna Carta of Humanity'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:59 min | 4 d ago

Get to Know Os Guinness, Author of 'The Magna Carta of Humanity'

"Who is us? Where has he where was he born and what has he been doing most of his life? Well, I'm the great great, great grandson of Arthur Guinness, the original brewer, and very proud of our family heritage and the integrity and generosity of the firm down the centuries. My own branch of the family, my grandfather, was one of the first western doctors in China, actually he survived the box arrives, and he went into the Forbidden City and treated the Empress dowager and the last emperor in the early part of the 20th century. My parents were born in China, and importantly for this book, I was a 7 year old in the Chinese revolution. So I remember the day. You have memory? You have memories? Absolutely. And it's important to this book because I remember the day when my dad said to me son, we're in trouble. Chiang Kai-shek has abandoned the city. We were in the capital, and the Red Army's coming in. And I remember the reign of terror began, and I was there for two years under that, and my parents were kept another two years on the house arrest. But the important was many years later I was at Oxford, and the graduate student, and had general one night with Isaiah Berlin. In other great places of freedom, Jewish. And we discovered he'd been a 7 year old in the Russian Revolution. And I was a 7 year old in the Chinese revolution the two big communist ones of the last century, so he compared notes thank God the English speaking people who stood up against totalitarianism, but in the mid 70s, when I was with him, it would have been unthinkable. That America would be tempted by anything like a radical socialism, let alone a cultural Marxism. And yet, that's where we are

Arthur Guinness Chiang Kai China Forbidden City Shek Red Army Isaiah Berlin Oxford America
Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Weekend Edition Sunday

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:11 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Weekend Edition Sunday

"Several counts as well All three men are white but to many people their convictions are a reminder of how felony murder has been used to toughen sentences of juveniles and people of color That discussion later today on all things considered Tune in by telling your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name The cryptocurrency world is full of inside jokes bad ponds and other word play It's also full of trademark disputes In the latest one the estate of fantasy writer J.R.R. Tolkien sued a cryptocurrency developer for naming his blockchain invention JRR token Tokens being a common cryptocurrency term Ross The developer Matthew Jensen said in legal papers that his currency amounted to a parody of the literary legend's name what's more he said those first three initials did not refer to John Ronald reuel as with the Oxford Don but instead journey through risk to reward The world intellectual property organization was unmoved by Jensen's statement siding with Tolkien's estate it stated that the parody attempt was clever but not humorous Basically destroying this argument as if it were a ring falling straight into the fires of mount doom Government mule has been making high energy southern rock for more than a quarter century and while just about all rock and roll owes a lot of its sound to the blues the new release from government Newell goes all in with a heavy load of blues and well that's pretty much the album title Heavy load blues Lauren Haynes cranny award winning former.

J.R.R. Tolkien Matthew Jensen NPR The World Intellectual Propert Ross Tolkien Oxford Jensen Newell Lauren Haynes
Students in China Are 'Crushing It' Academically

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:38 min | Last month

Students in China Are 'Crushing It' Academically

"We had some wonderful supporters of the show, callers listeners who gave a very large donation to one of our charities last year. So we invited them here to have lunch with me. They came into the studio last week. And I didn't know anything about them upset their great supporters. They just returned from four years in China, where they were running an international school day. It's a bit like, you know, the Soviet Army, an international school has to have a Chinese headmaster and a western headmaster. This lady was the western principle and her husband was one of the teachers. And she told me this story her students were just absolutely to use the vernacular crushing it academically. And they were traveling to Oxford in Cambridge, being given scholarships going to the best schools, all of them getting the best grades in the stem subjects. None of them started the humanities. It was all biology, mathematics, engineering, and so forth. And they just dominating the global academic environment. Isn't that indicative? It's not Parton parcel of this worldview that the current regime has and how the people beneath the regime are gobbling up global assets. 11 million Chinese kids take the college entrance exam each year. That's a gaucho. 50% of them are going to get university places. In other words, the Chinese government sets the threshold for failure at 50% because they know that's going to give the maximum motivation to their kids. And they work their hearts out for years, only half of them will pass. That is a brutal and ruthless meritocracy. The devil takes the hindmost. Here, we can't tolerate failure. Every kid's got to be above average. Everyone's equaled some are more equal than others, and we people who have a political lobby behind their particular ethnicity or sexual orientation. And whereas the Chinese tend to major as you said, in the stem subjects, take the toughest stuff, only 7% of our kids take engineering. We graduate 40,000 mechanical engineers a year. That's why Tim Cook says he can't build an iPhone in the United States. So the Chinese think the world is going to be there. They're on all of what the United States used to be. And they want to be the United States of 1890 crushing Britain and eating Britain's

Soviet Army Chinese Government Parton Oxford Cambridge China Tim Cook United States Britain
Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on The Rev & The Rabbi

The Rev & The Rabbi

01:44 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on The Rev & The Rabbi

"Rabbi Joe's potassic And I reverend AR banaras and we are back with Doctor John Trump of museum of the Bible with a fascinating conversation Doctor shop I want to ask you the following There's been a lot of concern over the years with museums that what they're exhibiting has to come from a legitimate source can't be stolen you know and when you have all of the different conflicts in the world it is very possible as has happened We saw this with Germany Art was taken from Jewish owners and eventually became property of museums and to a lawsuit to try to get the art back Some cases were successful How do you do that How do you trace the source to make sure so to speak its kosher That this is exactly what you want You don't want it coming from an illegitimate source Something that belongs to someone else Yeah that's an ongoing issue I think for museums around the world And antiquities dealers there are some notable notoriety that they're pretty good at masks sometimes masking what they have and what they're selling When the greens first started purchasing artifacts they didn't know much about the industry or the whole scheme of things how it worked So they were they were unwittingly I think taking advantage of initially And so like all museums they ended up buying some things that they didn't know were stolen They bought some things that were taken out of Iraq Afghanistan During the wars and then they actually bought a forgery of the Dead Sea scrolls And so that happened we were the first museum that we know of that did a self evaluation analysis and we hired a third party to come in and do an evaluation of everything What we found out was we found out what was forgery what was fake What was stolen And we reported that And so and since then there's just recently a couple of the universities have come forward saying they're going to report what they have But it's typically been it's a difficult journey to understanding this So it takes teams of scholars one of the artifacts that we purchased actually came from the leading archeologist at Oxford and then another set of artifacts we purchased which ended up being stolen came through Christie's and that came verified Of course when it came down it wasn't right It was stolen So those are the challenges And I think you just do the best you can with bringing as many scholars together as many experts together and have them cross verified and now after four years as a museum having owned some of the artifacts earlier than that but longer than that But now having done this for four years I think we're much wiser and much more discerning and much much more careful today Pretty confident that we've worked through what we felt were the problems And it's amazing because many don't realize or even understand what goes into all of this The risks involved and the willingness to take those risks which the green family has done to reduce something that I think is very very important John let's just shift the conversation You reached out to me and a group of other leaders across the country We continue to build a steering committee to work on this and it's called a blessing of the elders I'm on that steering committee And it's about respectfully identifying appreciating and celebrating the leadership of African American pastors and clergy who have impacted American culture American society through their face tradition preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ But really looking to make the world a better place with rabbi has taught me to cool on repairing the world Tell us about how it began and where things are with the blessing of the elders Well how it began I think is last September a year ago September There was some black pastors Anthony museum talking about fatherhood and the work of bringing fathers up in the black community And two of these men I just felt compelled to met them and then I took them to dinner and we just started talking about that this rich history of the black church in America that has not been told or adequately told faith of love of perseverance Forgiveness And that this beautiful story is somehow seems hidden especially today in all the trauma and challenge that it comes out of even the Black Lives Matter experience And that we've just gone through is this incredible challenge but not knowing this history not understanding and thinking from a museum standpoint the history tells us as my friend used to say he said if you can't tell me where you've been you have no business telling me where we're going And so looking at the history and so as we chatted about it what came to my mind was 25 or 30 years before I'd been in Seattle with some black pastors and just had this distinct impression that if spiritual renewal seriously took place in America it perhaps could come through the black church more than any other place.

Rabbi Joe Doctor John Trump John Let American Culture American Soci Germany Afghanistan Christie Iraq Anthony Museum Oxford Rabbi America Seattle
Liberals Violate Their Own Norms in the Most 'Elite, Refined and Sophisticated' Manner

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:52 min | Last month

Liberals Violate Their Own Norms in the Most 'Elite, Refined and Sophisticated' Manner

"I'm talking to. Victor davis hanson. The new book the dying citizen. How progressive elites tribalism oxford comma and globalization are destroying the idea of america. You're just making a point. And you were about to give us another example of what you were describing. I don't know if you remember. I do we that we have people like nancy pelosi. That violates the corentin. She insists on others to get our hair done. Are we have these. Various mayors who break out or gavin. Newsom has to eat at the french longed remember. They always violate their own norms. In the most elite refined sophisticated manner but even have the marxist shock troops of this revolution that we're fighting phyllis cuellar's fourth house. It's an all white to tahonga. That has raked in zillions with yes with. Blm black lives matter. She cares so much about the poor that she has a fourth house. Isn't that sweet. I want to ask you when you talk about. Why they're doing this in the name of equality and so on and so forth isn't it ultimately irrelevant. Of course it's irrelevant in other words if we the people don't give them permission to do this they must not do it. They have no right to do it. So what they're doing is in contravention of the whole idea of america that we the people choose our leaders to do what we need them to do. They are comfortable with that. So they're looking for a way around it. And they've been finding ways around it and i and i mentioned that in the book that what i just said is what we used to say and scholarship. The pro faucets the pretexts. That's what they say they want a quality and they're really do try to enact it out but it's really about their desire for power. Just like the bolsheviks. Jack

Victor Davis Hanson Phyllis Cuellar Nancy Pelosi Newsom Oxford Gavin America Jack
Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Learn Astrology with Mary English

Learn Astrology with Mary English

00:34 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "oxford" discussed on Learn Astrology with Mary English

"And to this day, if you go to the corn exchange in Bristol, you will see that the main clock there has two minute pans separated by ten minutes because one tells Bristol time and one tells London time. But they didn't have that in Hereford. Yes, it was about ten minutes different from London. But they wouldn't have cared. They were using sundial time. It was noon when the sun was as high as it could be. The fact that noon happened to be later than it was in London didn't really matter. So what was important was the latitude. And in the University of Oxford, where they've got the museum of the history of science. And they've got all these old astrolabes like lots of plates there from a Spanish designed astrolabe, but it has lots of latitude plates and one of them is for 52° north. And that works for London, Bristol bath. Well, it works for it's technically Hereford Oxford and Leicester, but it also works anywhere in Southern England. So the extra degree doesn't matter. It will work fine in bath. It would work in Bristol work in London as well. So they did have a 52 latitude plank as a standard one. You see, and the other thing that I was thinking about, having read your books, it's a lovely, but the thing was really bad. There weren't many women involved in any of this, then it was nearly all blocks. I mean, women weren't educated. We were supposed to be busy popping out babies and stuff. But you know, all of this is sort of aimed at blokes are there for. There wouldn't have been too many women that wrote books then. And all of that, anyway, that's patriarchy or masculinity or whatever. The word is if we want to talk about it. So there they are, they're learning under roger. And I like the fact that he's called roger of Hereford. So we don't even know what do we know what is surname was? Would he have had a surname? They didn't really have surnames back then, but he was also known as Rogers infantilis, which is a young roger or roger young. And he makes a joke at one point that there's confused scholars recently because he says I'm mucking about with computers here, which I shouldn't really do because this has been laid down by the church for centuries. And it's probably presumptuous for one as young as me to be messing about with that. So later scholars thought, oh, you must have been a young man when he wrote this, when it's like, but earlier in the same text, he says, I've been sweating for many, many years at the cathedral school..

Bristol London Hereford Oxford Hereford University Of Oxford Southern England Roger Leicester Rogers Infantilis Roger Young Church For Centuries Cathedral School
Should All Adults Get a COVID-19 Booster Shot?

Woman's Hour

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Should All Adults Get a COVID-19 Booster Shot?

"All adults have a cave boost up on. What will the government sent me thinks. Say with the health secretary Javid saying he was confident. A booster program would start later. This month is something. The joint committee on vaccination and immunisation is grappling with and we tending to scientists to. Give us the answers on friday. The face off dame sara gilbert the scientists who led the team that developed. The oxford vaccine was splashed across the front of the daily telegraph. Saying there shouldn't be a mass booster program. She backs advice to give boosts to vulnerable people. Dame sara gilbert spoke to me on friday. And i also where the people should have a booster. If they're offered one it's a very complicated situation and newspaper. Headlines tried to get of the whole situation encapsulated view words which are going to excite people's interest. That's not actually a good way to be putting across the message here. We need to think about the different people in the population. It's really clear that people would compromised immune systems benefit from having a third dog vaccine. That doesn't mean that that s gunshot apply to everybody and we also need to be thinking about when boosters will be given Because if we give them to everybody very early then we might face a situation of saying the fact that boost does house declined before we actually see a more cases coming in winter season. Which is when we would expect to see cases of ours like this so it's not something that you can put across really in the newspaper headline. It's a lot more complicated than that. What i like to think about though is where we using vaccine doses in the wild and the problem is that we simply don't have enough awesome if we have enough doses to vaccinate everybody in the world with two devices we wouldn't be having to have the discussions about should we use them in one country or another. I'm not so so very complicated because we have to think about which vaccines survivable where they all. The expiry date for them is with us. Particular batch is that we have now whether it's feasible transport them

Javid Joint Committee On Vaccination Dame Sara Gilbert Daily Telegraph Oxford
Saint Etiennes Sarah Cracknell on Making an Album in Lockdown

Bigmouth

02:13 min | 2 months ago

Saint Etiennes Sarah Cracknell on Making an Album in Lockdown

"So we're gonna talk about the short while but firstly you get everybody in the band in different parts of the country now. Euro urine oxford. If you just said pete wiggs in. Hove actually bob. Stump is bradford. How did you go about making this record. When you all geographically distributed all zoom like we have to do everything these days Yeah we used to share. I mean we to concern about the kind of feeling of the record. What we wanted it to say proper now. Kind of very complicated concept. If you that but with the idea is what would happen was the pete send may music might count with some bits of melody as few words not many words on the record and we just share ideas and then come to edit them so was it was kind of made you on a computer in the manner of the ancient art method exquisite corpse. What person does a bit puzzled. Saudi else they fiddle with it. I guess posture out your cupcakes constantly. Just mentioned that this album about memory and optimism that that time between nineteen hundred. Seventy two thousand and one. The labor party just won an election. Victory it's this little little island of of Things might not be dreadful. What generated us. We must algae feeling. Was it being separated from the rest of the land at having to do it through the window at it. I think there is an element to fat. An it's about thinking time you remember. That was optimistic. Seemed like great things happening. And it's about how your memory gets you'd over time and i think we'll probably look back home. The last eighteen months two years with that. Same kind of feeling you know. There's some bits of being looked down. The i really love the very first day over the us and did a lot of making bread out with the teens in watching boats sets and stuff in them but yet you know. I'll probably just remember as bits in a few years time in older the credits but Yet it's about memory and how it gets mixed up in your mind

Pete Wiggs Hove Stump Bradford Oxford BOB Labor Party Saudi United States
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"By oxford university press with helen. Princeton guests in kaas. We took a great deal about curriculum. Tation so i thought we'd start off with a little message quote from christine council. She says the cool knowledge you want. People to remember is supported by an equally important hinterland. The little examples the stories the illustrations the richness the dwelling on this. But not that and the times when you as a teacher go off piste with your passion this morning. To welcome to our podcast. An incredible colleague cat howard can't ease head professional learning for large matt. He's a writer of stop talking about well being and koel sort of symbiosis and the founder of lit dr uk. A charity dedicated reduces and. See p daydream teachers worldwide eight cat. What an amazing thing to do. Huge welcome to alpo podcast and key say much for having me hundreds sleep pleasure oh we really really chaffee join us. I'm a little about about. Won't how does what she's up to and found out that he didn't start off in the teaching profession. But you sound stuff in the financial sector employees point way here so was a career change at a time when a team full one of the leading high street banks as manager for the northwest region. But my mirena was Recruitment and retention really about how we costa colleagues coming into the set a man a number eighty measuring What why they. Why last either. The the setzer all recognize h knows working. Folks it's incredibly interesting to pick up when teaching Nuances of teaching. How about how. We draw some similarities. How how teaching. Also incredibly despite you times pretentious file. An and what we can dates. Maybe thinking extent more carefully about out. Yeah we hung on people. I think within the profession. Yeah interesting transition. What was the conflicts. What made you think. I want to surround myself with fourteen road kids every day and i was sorry i was saying formed from now. I remember being suggested to me a craze when i was fifteen and kind of sloughing in the poll woman's thanks it was just far from why haven't myself stage. I ended up actually coming back from. I'm start gross. Better eighteen months and came on and Wanted t- studied grain decided living bishop Making on ever really felt Poncet that period of time is volunteered in primary school for the the rights reading notices the time whether it's volunteers i'm went to the skull and right but a series of people's and when people and not that we dan animal book and We got switzer out and he didn't know what draft we to compete sons who are essentially Imagining imagine this is your your knee experience of the world..

kaas christine council oxford university Princeton helen howard matt uk costa Poncet switzer
Chatting With the Authors of 'Change Ringing on Handbells'

Fun with Bells - bell and handbell ringing interviews

02:29 min | 2 months ago

Chatting With the Authors of 'Change Ringing on Handbells'

"My guest today a teen stuck settling and simon gay who are the authors of two volumes of books on changing on handbells the i was published in twenty twenty and the second is imminent. Can you give me an overview of the first book the basic techniques book how it's structured and what it contains it starts right from the beginning and it doesn't assume any knowledge of changing your handbells or even on tower bells. In fact the eddie chapters would also be a good introduction to the basic principles of changing itself. We hope so. It covers everything from how to find set at handbells have about buying handbells to go about finding people to ring with and then it works through the steps in changing starting from played hunting going through playing ball hand other straightforward methods and in the later chapters it gets up to kenton oxford triple major and finally w. so stop short moving onto surprise methods which will remain subject of volume two but it covers everything up to a standard repertoire including surprise methods aka and tina. Was there anything else that you wanted to add about the book. Yes i volume. The book covers territory that quite few other older books on handball ringing cover what i hope our books stands out as is really starting from first principles so you really have to know nothing about changing. And you don't even have to be a bell ringer to pick this book up and learn to ring bells so it really talks about how to find other ringers. What bell ringing is introduces each method in a lot of detail. At the other thing about it is that it has a lot of really guitar grams. Which simon has done a really good graphics program for a so everything is not worthy in the way older bell ringing. Instruction books are so that. Yeah so we definitely want to point it at a wide audience as possible. Do you get feedback on. Who's reading it. mostly people who are already ringers. And that's probably really. We haven't done. Wider marketing of potential audiences are international groups of tune. Bell ringers for example who might want to branch out into other types of ringing. A lot of people have picked up our books through the promotion. You can order a set at emails. Guitar book for discount and a lot of people have picked up their rigging that way. In the lockdown there have been more sales of our book because of the lockdown than might have been

Kenton Oxford Simon Handball Tina AKA Bell
Lee Habeeb, VP of Content at Salem, Responds to Mayor's Charge He's 'Selfish' About Vaccination

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:12 min | 2 months ago

Lee Habeeb, VP of Content at Salem, Responds to Mayor's Charge He's 'Selfish' About Vaccination

"Lee habib is a friend and a colleague he did. I collaborated on one of my books. He's vice president of content at the salem media group he is executive producer. Has a great show our american stories which tells the stories of innovators in the arts and sports and business and education and he got he got cogan and had a really rough experience. He joins us to talk a little bit about it lee. I haven't talked in a while. It was great to catch up with you last night after. I read your piece at newsweek which has gone viral a kovic nineteen patient response to the mayor's charge your selfish about the vaccination. What a ride. You've been on my friend mike. I got covert. My wife got coburn and my daughter got code. But i got it hard. Ultimately had blood clots light pneumonia. Thanks to great medical. Help i was. I was cured. And i'm fine now but while i was laying in the hospital bed recovering my mayor in my little town of oxford. Mississippi got on a national news network and she was asked by the anchor. What about people's personal choice. What about it's my body. It's my life and she said well if patients want to choose not to take the vaccine and be selfish and take up hospital beds. Well then. they're not concerned about the greater good. And i'm thinking i'm laying in a hospital bed and she knows nothing about me or my family so i said i'm going to write a letter to her and my letter was simple. I told her about my life and my family. My mother-in-law lives with us. Mike and she's seventy. We decided that she had four co morbidity. He's she smoked lung problems. We convinced her and every senior. We know to get the vaccine. We're not anti actors and we're not luddites mine. Situation was i took the first shot. And i had a very negative reaction because i'd had a surgery in my heart but it didn't sit well with my doctor told me not to take the second vaccine dose because i had more of a chance of being harmed by the dose than did from

Lee Habib Salem Media Group Cogan Newsweek Coburn Pneumonia LEE Mike Oxford Mississippi
"oxford" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:04 min | 3 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"London physiological logical. Society is the oldest organisation in great britain dedicated to the study of language formed in eighteen. Forty two one of their first objectives was to create a list of the deficiencies of the english language by eighteen. Eighty four they had hatched the idea of creating a new dictionary. That would solve the problems. They saw in current dictionaries. The process of whoever was incredibly slow. It took until eighteen fifty seven to establish a committee to create a list of unregistered words. These are words that weren't in current dictionaries or were poorly defined. If this had been the extent of what the illogical society had done. I wouldn't be doing an episode about this. The man who headed up. The committee was richard chenevix-trench. Trench was an interested in just coming up with a list of unregistered words. His ambition was much greater the report he produced with something else entirely. His report was titled on some deficiencies in our english dictionaries. It detailed all of the problems with current english language dictionaries in the nineteenth century. He noted problems. With the lack of coverage of obsolete words histories of words synonyms of words in poor examples and illustrations of words. What trench propose wasn't just a dictionary like the society had considered in the past. Trench was proposing writing the dictionary the most comprehensive dictionary of the english language. It wouldn't just be a list of words but of all of the words no longer in use and the history of all the words and where they came from. This would be a massive massive undertaking in eighteen fifty-eight the illogical society formerly called for the creation of a new dictionary which they called a new english dictionary on historical principles. First order of business was hiring someone to be the editor. Trench wasn't able to take on the assignment. As he was appointed the dean of westminster abbey. The job fell to herbert coleridge. Coleridge was only twenty nine. When he was appointed in eighteen sixty he created the outline in strategy for the entire project. He began the system to categorize the hundreds of thousands of quotes which would be required.

physiological society of londo Professor james murray oxford english dictionary proj Dr william chester simon winchester oxford Murray marie
Creating the Oxford English Dictionary

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:04 min | 3 months ago

Creating the Oxford English Dictionary

"London physiological logical. Society is the oldest organisation in great britain dedicated to the study of language formed in eighteen. Forty two one of their first objectives was to create a list of the deficiencies of the english language by eighteen. Eighty four they had hatched the idea of creating a new dictionary. That would solve the problems. They saw in current dictionaries. The process of whoever was incredibly slow. It took until eighteen fifty seven to establish a committee to create a list of unregistered words. These are words that weren't in current dictionaries or were poorly defined. If this had been the extent of what the illogical society had done. I wouldn't be doing an episode about this. The man who headed up. The committee was richard chenevix-trench. Trench was an interested in just coming up with a list of unregistered words. His ambition was much greater the report he produced with something else entirely. His report was titled on some deficiencies in our english dictionaries. It detailed all of the problems with current english language dictionaries in the nineteenth century. He noted problems. With the lack of coverage of obsolete words histories of words synonyms of words in poor examples and illustrations of words. What trench propose wasn't just a dictionary like the society had considered in the past. Trench was proposing writing the dictionary the most comprehensive dictionary of the english language. It wouldn't just be a list of words but of all of the words no longer in use and the history of all the words and where they came from. This would be a massive massive undertaking in eighteen fifty-eight the illogical society formerly called for the creation of a new dictionary which they called a new english dictionary on historical principles. First order of business was hiring someone to be the editor. Trench wasn't able to take on the assignment. As he was appointed the dean of westminster abbey. The job fell to herbert coleridge. Coleridge was only twenty nine. When he was appointed in eighteen sixty he created the outline in strategy for the entire project. He began the system to categorize the hundreds of thousands of quotes which would be required.

Richard Chenevix Great Britain London Herbert Coleridge Trench Westminster Abbey Coleridge
Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | 3 months ago

Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

"We have so much to discuss with regards to the disasters occurring in central asia in the last two weeks. But let's start by those who may have just accidentally happened on this channel. Found us on rumble. Downloaded this podcast. Tell them a little bit about who. Kt mcfarland is when she started to get involved in national security issues. And then you'll climb to the heights of power in the white house under the trump administration starting in nineteen seventy. I was a freshman in college at george washington university and got partial scholarship and had to pay the rest of my way through school. So i got a part time typing job in the west wing of the white house and the white house situation room. Working for guy wasn't very well known at the time by the name of henry kissinger and he was richard nixon's national security advisor. So i started working part time in the nighttime typing pool for henry kissinger In the west wing and then worked in the nixon administration. The ford administration went to graduate school during the carter administration went to oxford university and then. Mit where i studied and taught nuclear weapons Then joined the reagan administration when we won the cold war Was part of the pentagon team Did one help win. The cold war got the pentagon's highest civilian award for that service. And then i retired. We'd want our cold war. My war was one done. And so i married. Had five. kids was living the good life in new york and long island and then september eleventh happened and it convinced me to get back into government because i had such a pretty extensive experience. I point so. I did And i ran for the. Us senate against hillary clinton the organ lost. Predictably but i did Get back involved in a lot of issues. And then he came. The fox news national security analysts for over a decade until i joined the trump administration Which i did at the beginning and so here. I am out of the trump administration of back on talking to import. People like you about issues. I care deeply about what your national security

Kt Mcfarland White House Henry Kissinger Richard Nixon George Washington University Ford Administration Pentagon Asia Carter Administration Reagan Administration Oxford University Long Island Hillary Clinton New York Senate United States
Breitbart's Allum Bokhari Shares His Personal Story

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:40 min | 3 months ago

Breitbart's Allum Bokhari Shares His Personal Story

"He's the author of hashtag deleted. Alum bakari on our one on one a deeper discussion with our guest here in america. I we like to give a chance to listen to somebody who may have just stumbled on this rumble channel. Pick this up on the radio to get to know our guests about it so tell us your personal story. What's your background. where did you come from. And how did you end up being missed a big tech swamp monster fighting breitbart dot com columnist or of the hashtag deleted. Cher cher lil of your back story if you would. So that's an interesting interesting story. I I founded the conservative views when i was at university which i suppose there's no how people normally normally people go to university him to come indoctrinated but Studying when you found these conservative oxford in the united kingdom which i would say by. Uk stands up the slightly more conservative than than most universities are. They had lots of rumors but they also have like a very robust tradition of you know conservative groups and conservative society. But i think the big thing was. I was a very nerdy hit college. Though i spent a little time on the internet and on message boards and this this was a time when the really was completely unfenced into all kinds of us out that that you simply wouldn't think county In a lecture or a or of eclectic and this is why i felt about internet free speech example exciting viewpoints out there that change your perspective and i could see very early on there. Were people who were not happy with this and wanted to end it

Alum Bakari Cher Cher UK America Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:01 min | 3 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"He's such a huge positive a Running things in austin questions but being amazing to watch him really engaged with what we what we've been doing and are yet just wanting from tara say That we do give give to the children that we're not testing. Were asking guest nine. Reto radio such difficult concept and we wanted to make something wet children's felt successful and so although we don't use the decode will tax Readers for comprehension passes we actually we. Were we really do for because online convention and giving children meaning to us Leon so they know they can understand that vocabulary using they can see that in other contacts and be applied to other areas and we have found that has been really effective for children And then some pilot schools no they do have a range of co host. And we've seen that. The children have really benefited from in given that knowledge straight away. And that's something that within our trust With north quiz. Trust who this is being developed with. That's always being a big possible trust and our curriculum that we actually give the children this this new vocabulary in that they can then use it so they don't so Join the conversation or have an understanding what's going on and we introduce neva. Capillary through flash cards as well. So you immediately. They've got just contextualized. What it is that your to about. So for example we had a tiptoe past the is one of rhymes and i showed the car to my son and he knew what to do and i immediately able to say well. This is a dose of female day. And now he knows what it was. That simple katie. I watched teachers ask children questions. They don't know the answer to time and time again and that's what we wanted to avoid dinner at. No point asking the child to do something they don't know the answer to because that sets them up to fail and that's turning them off to reading wants to empower children. I think that's such an important point. Tara that hits about giving children the ability to to learn from that place of security in place of safety on the lessons. I think to back in three really structured way and then. I think it's so useful to have that link across into the dakota bill readers because as you stated the Really super useful for pakistan phonics and reading aloud blending all the rest of it but they also obvi- carefully structured attempts of the comprehension that blue difficulty so they are the full of oxford level system. They start from very simple straightforward texts. Just a few words on each page very simple simpson's construction and move up karachi gradually building confidence as you go all. Serve the reading skills that you need to bring in alongside your phonics. So they provide that kind of support to structured scaffold around comprehension under the reading skills. Take great thank you. That radi helps makes me very confident in using scanning.

Reto tara austin Leon katie Tara dakota pakistan oxford karachi simpson
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Great oldman street. Speech and language therapist taking through all of our interventions all of the programs and she was convinced that in a knowledge of all of the phonics crumbs that she'd come into contact with you her work the ause provided the best structure to support those children that required additional walk outside of the classroom but they all very short and specifically to remove the element of of children disappearing from learning outside of this area of the curriculum. Because we don't want children then we don't want to build a gap by taking them out quite a gap. Yeah that makes complete sense. Thank you so much that. I reached the end of the questions that i had jotted down here. And i'm just wondering if If anybody who's on the twits they would like to ask a question. We're happy to have to talk further size of interest to anybody on on the recovery late of a junior school win looking to establish something a little bit more formal and follows on from all infant school. Of course the right. What would you say. Well how would you news Full children haven't yet secured that's College for example. We go children coming in this shaving. Ta who are struggling with his face to the most awesome on phase three. I'm we kind of nature of hit the ground running in india three ready. How do you say. Espn used for children. Glad that you've asked this question. Because i have written this program deliberately knowledge that is not going to be just in infants that this is happening on absolutely every element of the program. Even down to a stations. The ryan's vocabulary Absolutely everything has been written with keeping in mind that this would be appropriate children in year. Six i'm beyond and think katie will join me and saying that this. The whole program is designed Any child's pick up at any point in primary school and the way that we spoken before to school about using this outsiders year ward india to reception. Which be you've got the online whiteboards that can be used quite speedy to get through and you can use ice children in any year grave and also the interventions are easily adapted to be used in any in any group as well. 'cause you could change some of the vocabulary that you might use within the intervention. But it's all been designed with that in mind that you could. You could use in absolutely any agree. Frontierland is we've got And pilot schools of sedate teaching daily lessons within the groups that we're learning extremely and then they were using interventions and going through the lessons on anomaly pant and with some of the children that were further up cisco to support them in closing gaps. That they might have casey i. If you want to completely exactly that i was just gonna save shop at schools who using it s and how they're using across the school in say thank you say. Ross that question because it's it's a brilliant one entire stars explained. We thought really kathy by making sure. This is the program that could be used in any year group and because every member will ever remember stock levin trained in the program the have knowledge of the structure in the language that we're using that really consistent approach and The occidental Host order the interactive whiteboard resources and the hamburg. So everyone knows has access to those. So if you just a specific gap where sutton capping either face to face three phase five or you just want to review any member staff who He's within your school. They can access those via oxford out which is great because it means that cannot system either virus screen over ipad light tar mentioned and it was so important to us you know this could be used in any year and.

College for example india Espn katie ryan casey cisco Ross kathy levin hamburg sutton oxford
Democratizing Access to Hospital-Grade Disinfection with Eli Harris, President  of R-Zero

Outcomes Rocket

02:47 min | 3 months ago

Democratizing Access to Hospital-Grade Disinfection with Eli Harris, President of R-Zero

"Talk to us a little bit about our zero. What is it that you guys are doing. how are you adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes so it was almost sixteen months ago. Now with the academic. I started a a ticket hold. I got in touch with the two mentors in mind. Both entrepreneurs who i've known for about a decade and the three of us started talking about how there's certain events throughout history that just create everlasting societal and infrastructural changes in a dork way. We kinda like in what was happening of the pandemic to nine eleven. How after nine eleven. We have the department of homeland security. You have. tsa fourteen thousand agents. You still can't take a water bottle of where shoes through the airport. You go to a ballgame. You walk through a metal detector. These are all new standards that were created and adopted post nine eleven in some of these psychological star tissue after that event accelerated decrease adoption of those standards. But we never arrest fundamentally the world took on a new posture around security in all shared spaces at our thesis. Fear was at this event of the pandemic was going to broaden that word security to biosecurity to biosafety and in the standards that all organizations are gonna fold as they regard a human health in the safety of their staff their patrons of their communities at large so what we did. Kind of unpacking the disinfection industry. And we've learned quickly that this is a massive industry. Hundreds of billions of dollars market cap governed by these goliath players. Ecolab clorox se. johnson diversey. All of these companies are extremely old. Some over a hundred years old and more or less all pushing commodity chemicals and our response to the pandemic was to go around and host buildings down the chemicals. And that's what we did in. This industry has not evolved with the technology that is becoming become commonplace in almost every other industry. It's extremely antiquated in what we're doing with chemicals. I mean there's there's a lot of limitations there one is. They're not always that effective. There's a lot of human error and how they're applied there's a massive labor cost a massive op ex chemical costs at. It's horrible for the environment. So we got in touch with. Dr richard wade and dr wade actually ran cal osha for fifteen years. He taught at harvard oxford. Uc irvine. We like to call him. The michael jordan's disinfection. He's he's forgotten more about this industry than most of us will ever learn. And he's quite special but he let us on a study to really understand. What are the best tools that exist in infection prevention today. And why have we not democratized access to those

Ecolab Clorox Johnson Diversey Department Of Homeland Securit TSA Dr Richard Wade Dr Wade Cal Osha Harvard Oxford Michael Jordan
Predicting Urban Land Use

Data Skeptic

02:15 min | 4 months ago

Predicting Urban Land Use

"My name. is daniel omega. I am impede student in the computer. Science department of the university of oxford marriages on this neighbor. I in almost driving this research. Are we talking about today. I did which on my professors about two years ago. The remind masters program to kick things off. We'll start with the imagery problem. I guess to set the stage. Would you mind providing some background on urban growth especially in sub saharan africa. What's the nature of the problem. You're looking into a musician. Common phenomena in developing countries like in africa. And there's this trend of lack of planning and management which is resulting in into the encroachment of obama fabrics in the reserve special regions. Which of course will lillian do like. Unsustainable increase in population so. Mary site at that time was a jolly to study. The growth rate of how abundance are being used and house do some forecasts to inform the decisions of obama's and the relevant stakeholders so that they can adequately prepare to do the abound growth and influx of people from the radovan area. Basically so i live in los angeles california in the us. It's a very urbanized place. And i don't think there's any even an inch of land that isn't accounted for. So if you want to do something here. It has to be planned out and bureaucratic and things like that. Which i guess in some ways makes it predictable. How much predictability is there. In the way the the landscape is changing in the data set. You looked at well. I think that's a very difficult question. Because download the dust is available out there for land use in israeli in africa and elect to discuss about this in detail because gives us at a rally used to make predictions are that classify land based on land use was outside africa and i said that aside from europe. So but you give up presented data set or the Provided deducted jolly had disclaimed that did was representative gone from different parts of the world from developing countries from transgenic countries on developed countries. So based on this information so we used to sit and that trained a modell that will dictate different kinds of lung categories

Daniel Omega Science Department Of The Univ Africa Saharan Barack Obama Lillian Mary Los Angeles California United States Jolly Europe
The Blonde Leading: Britains Two Years Under Boris Johnson

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:43 min | 4 months ago

The Blonde Leading: Britains Two Years Under Boris Johnson

"At the stroke of midnight on what was dubbed freedom day in britain last week clubbers hit the dancefloor starting what is in effect a grand epidemiological experiment watched by the world restrictions on the size of gatherings social distancing and masks all lifted this weekend a major music festival called latitude happened in the county of suffolk with forty thousand. Attendees the unlocking is powered by a belief in the strength of britain's vaccination campaign although deaths remained low and cases have fallen from a peak last week. Nearly thirty thousand people at day are still catching. Covert and five thousand. People are hospitalized. The architect of this bold plan is prime minister. Boris johnson who has as of this weekend but office for two years. The dodgers the doomsters the gloomsters. They outgained to get it wrong again. The people are british politics columnists. Adrian wooldridge hardly knows what great to give for the prime minister's performance but appropriately. He puts it in the way. Mister johnson's alma mater oxford university does alpha versus gamma. And there's plenty of work to mark. This was quite frankly extraordinary. Hectic two years he's proved parliaments for which he was rebuked by the supreme court is expelled. Twenty one grandees from the conservative party. Costea ms majority and he's being reelected with a massive majority. If you look at his life personally he's had a child he's supposed to second wife. He's marriages stood. Wi fi almost died all curve. Nineteen so there's been no

Britain Adrian Wooldridge Suffolk Mister Johnson Alma Mater Oxford University Boris Johnson Dodgers Costea Ms Conservative Party Supreme Court
Scientists Predict More Extreme Weather Globally After Germany Devastated by Flooding

Here & Now

02:11 min | 4 months ago

Scientists Predict More Extreme Weather Globally After Germany Devastated by Flooding

"Chancellor Angela Merkel has been facing tough questions while touring damage from those devastating floods last week that killed at least 196 people. Germans are asking why their country famous for engineering and its leading role in climate change, negotiations could be caught so tragically off guard by the kind of extreme weather that climate scientists have predicted. For years. The past few weeks have also seen a blistering heat wave in the American West and above normal hurricane season is predicted. And the kind of extreme weather events that climate change will make more likely and more severe, are said to be coming. Fredricka Otto is associate director of the Environmental Change Institute at Oxford University in the UK Freddy. Welcome. Thank you very much. Yeah, and start with the flooding. We know that rising temperatures caused by the greenhouse effect of gas emissions means we're living kind of inside a greenhouse, which is holding onto moisture, which then? Rains down on us Now we can never attribute a specific weather event to climate change directly. There are other factors always but these downpours in Germany behind this flooding We're hearing that the rainfall was being called unimaginable volumes of rain more than 18. Gallons of water could pour down. On an area within just a few hours. You know, when you hear this kind of number, that kind of water coming down is that something? That you who studies these, You know, severe weather. Did that click like Oh, yeah, that's that's what we're going to be seeing. It's one of the very well known aspects of climate change that we see more extreme rainfall and also more extreme rainfall coming down in a shorter time. And we know from tropical countries which are hotter about There is a lot more rain coming down in a short amount of time. And when we have higher temperatures in more mid latitudes, we also see This kind of rainfall,

Chancellor Angela Merkel Fredricka Otto Environmental Change Institute American West Oxford University Hurricane UK Germany
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

01:58 min | 4 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"And we share an einstein quote so that inspired me to have a look for a couple more quotes from albert einstein. I found to that. I thought i'd share you today. The first one says imagination is more important than knowledge that one and then second one days. If you can't explain simply you don't understand it. Well enough really excited today to welcome to our word up. Oxford education podcast lauren. Stevenson knowing is a physics teacher and the assistant director of blackpool research. School which we're going to be looking at an expert adviser fool. The education down nations improving secondary signs guidance report which created seven key recommendations bridge that gap between research and the classroom which such vital vital step to bridge currently studying for an ma in education. She is a very prolific blogger with a brilliant block site that i've been having an account. Lauren huge welcome to our podcast. Thank you for having me reading of this. Have you with us. So you'll six year of teaching. So i thought really fascinating to know a little bit about you. Why physics why teaching your passions that lead you to where we find you today. Well i i was one of those people that kind of went striking teaching from university. I kind of always knew that. I wanted to work with. She didn't s-. I kind of always had a love of science and enjoyed mass. Which is why. I went on the kind of root out of the three. I did quite a lot of extra curricula at things at school and three university and it just kind of lead me down the path of working with like older students and kind of secondary six full type age and surely enjoyed it so at yet teaching straight after you invest your choice so you can straight through face and ready to go..

blackpool research albert einstein Stevenson lauren Oxford Lauren
Selfridges Andrew Keith on Post-Pandemic Retail

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Selfridges Andrew Keith on Post-Pandemic Retail

"What can you tell us about. What's being planned to accelerate if you will the return of shoppers in a very. You know people are still a bit afraid of being in crowds and in the public. I think that what we creating within the selfridge's stores in all older locations. We're in for all four. Locations is a destination and so it's about being able to create a space where people want to go for the day. You can go. You can have a dinner. You can be on the soul cycle. You can have a full head to toe facial treatments and the fact that there is no where else that brings that together with the spirit of community and being able to talk to the local community through these hubs is something that's unique to us. So when each of these stores each of these destinations we're working with local creatives. We're working with the local charities around the charities that support our vision around mental health the homelessness and sustainability. And we're able to bring that together so that people can really feel eleven of connection that is unique to those stores and so the experience that you get within selfridges oxford street is then curated differently to reflect the experience in manchester in exchange square and likewise in birmingham because each of these communities has diversity. It has its own entrepreneurial kind of environment around it and it's important for us to be able to reflect that so what we're seeing. Is that footfall. All of the locations is improving with deepening the relationship with the customers particularly with the domestic customers in these cities where really building market share throughout the uk with that domestic customer and that combined with a really compelling digital of means that you've got the synergy between the two which really is working for us

Selfridge Manchester Birmingham UK
Study Shows Mix-Match Method Boosts Immune Response of COVID-19 Jab

The Naked Scientists

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Study Shows Mix-Match Method Boosts Immune Response of COVID-19 Jab

"An important and eagerly to study into co vaccines published his initial findings. This week the kamkoff trial run by the university of oxford has been looking at the effectiveness of mixing and matching between different cova jabs to see which works. Best for instance is a dose with astrazeneca's vaccine followed by an orange vaccine the jab. At least as good or even better than two doses of astrazeneca to find out matthew snipe recruited just shy of nine hundred over-fifties who included people with preexisting health conditions and members of ethnic minority groups. This study was commissioned back in december last year before we even knew vaccines. We're gonna be using but it was already anticipated that what what we had to vaccines. And what if the problem with supply at one of them could be then swap over there and completely station. 'cause his with the vaccine since all about looking see how we could make the immunization roll out and make it more robust to cope with any unexpected events. But when you did the study what did you. Measure measure the antibodies. And also t cells. The white blood cells that are unimportant on the immune system and the participants didn't know which vaccines they received. A a blinded study from that point of view. So that was really kinda good way of getting accurate data on what reactions they were experiencing and any safety concerns. They have uncritically. How long did you leave between the doses. Because that's the other issue isn't it. We've seen this go from one month when we first started rolling out vaccines to twelve weeks in order to maximize uptake quickly and then to be shrunk back to eight weeks for certain groups in the community again. Now what did you look at. That's right with being kind of thanked by this long when we plan to study with a full week into full and then as we're back to get going they got changed to make that up to eight to twelve weekend so for about half of participants getting vaccines at a full. We can devote an half receiving it a twelve week into so we get depressed. The whole broad range there and get an idea to save changing. The interval makes any difference in the interactions between the

Astrazeneca Matthew Snipe University Of Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

02:32 min | 5 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Profession new probably fool on their knees by about now. We still got another three or four weeks to go. What do you do. What do you do to down. I think first and foremost it's important that you have to get to a point where you value your evenings and weekends and and is time for when that your time. You know that that's for me. I call erin time or family time. There are two things that i really enjoyed to. Which which i like to cook a bike so i do bike wedding cakes and cookies and things and my family absolutely love my biking but also to cook as well and cook different different cuisine like learning about different tastes and but yet the wedding cake saw are from nine hundred side. Yes that's incredible. That's if i scrolled a bit further down your twitter feed going to be honest with you. I haven't done them in a while but and there is somebody who has asked me to do. Once that will be on twitter very very soon properties by baking if anyone bakes of which there are lots on twitter. That dykes i liked. I mean you just eat all the less. Does that with all the scraps of the leftovers. Which is just the night and the other thing that i really enjoy to enjoy during which is great for mental health. Day is exercise. Now i probably don't like accelerated. But but i've got a spin bike. I just a got my so speak because he of may and i literally just blasted music and for forty five minutes. I'm just in that zone. The day that you know you might have to pack day then the lettuce out. Yeah just let it go so those are probably my escape. 'isms really well. The two quite usefully connected because spinning. You can go an early. The cake a uptakes fantastic. Well aaron. it's been an absolute joy to chain. I hope we stay in touch. Because i think you've got such a fascinating career. Thanks thank you. We hope you enjoyed listening to this. Podcast from oxford education. To find out more about your read the and have your say please visit. Www oxford secondary dot com forward slash smarts..

twitter erin dykes aaron oxford
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:17 min | 5 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Hosted by oxford university press with helen. Princeton guests in this podcast. We talking about the early years and those earliest experiences that our children have. And i found a quite by emma goldman who feminist writer lecturer that i felt really responded well to the narrative of what we discussed she said no one has yet realize the wealth of sympathy the kindness and generosity hidden in the soul of a child. The effort of every true education should be to unlock that treasure and we also talk about treasure baskets so i found a lovely chinese proverb. That defies the idea of landing that wants to share as well. The chinese proverb says nanning is a treasure that will follow. Its owner everywhere huge. Welcome this.

oxford university emma goldman Princeton helen
'Robust' Immune Response Seen in 'Mix and Match' COVID-19 Vaccine Study

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

'Robust' Immune Response Seen in 'Mix and Match' COVID-19 Vaccine Study

"Metro rides. You can get more information. The w t o p dot com There's a new study from Oxford University says that mixing and matching vaccines may not be a bad thing. According to the research, alternating doses of vaccines made by Pfizer and AstraZeneca generates a robust immune response against the virus. CBS News Medical contributor, Dr David Agus says You shouldn't go kicking yourself. If you didn't mix. There's slightly more side effects. When you mix the vaccines at the present time. It's not recommended. Unless you have to do it. The key is going to come when we have the boosters. Sometime in the fall, and so do you get a third of that same shot or do you mix my gut is it will be the third of the same shot if it's possible because again, I think the side effects will be less where we're going to get a very potent

Dr David Agus Oxford University Astrazeneca Pfizer Cbs News
Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

"We're talking about one of the most widely taught widely read and widely praised poets at the twentieth century. Her burke brought the minute show of women's lives into the spotlight challenging the idea that to right from the female perspective was uninspired and undeserving of attention. Let's talk about adrienne rich when she was born in baltimore in nineteen twenty nine adrienne rich's parents thought she would be a boy they'd plan to name her after her father. Arnold a doctor. Instead arnold decided his daughter adrienne would be a literary prodigy by the age of four. Adrienne could read and write by six. She wrote her first poetry book by seven a fifty page play about the trojan war. This is the child we needed and deserved her mother. Helen wrote in a notebook. Helen had been a concert pianist and had given up her career for marriage. And motherhood as much as adrian's childhood was marked by long hours in her father's library her mother's sadness and lack of agency left a lasting impression to in nineteen fifty one while a senior at radcliffe college. Adrian experienced her first big break her poetry manuscript. A change of world won the yale younger poets prize. The prize came with a publishing contract. W h auden wrote the foreword and reviewers loved it. At twenty two years old. Adrian became a critical darling soon thereafter. She won a guggenheim fellowship. Which funded additional studies at oxford. There she met alfred. Conrad a graduate student from harvard. Despite her father's disapproval and married alfred. Nineteen fifty three

Adrienne Rich Helen Burke Adrienne Baltimore Arnold Radcliffe College H Auden Adrian Alfred Oxford Conrad Harvard
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

07:11 min | 5 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Can support wellbeing definitely because we not just you know your wellbeing when you're at school as we've talked about there a lifelong learning now. You've got chosen and the ability to go and learn to points. I sometimes see people say you know. I mean my full cheese unless you doing. Ma or msu. Oh absolutely not but you know this is something. We've done to constantly encounters throughout our lives and again back to that that sense that of having some agent say over what you're doing and and again the medical support easy to do that you. You're not powerless. And just wasting for somebody to come along and tell you cannot. She stopped to explore unpick. Tixx controlled direction. I'd even within the parameters of what we do within the school system. There's lots of potential. A may i wouldn't be from actually the covid gas in the time we will be at home will have enhanced stat self-reliance because we haven't been in grapes in classrooms in in lots of cases and and some of young people i've i've had a gcc's student going through it and it was all about her own self reliance and taking what the school will giving her and then cracking on absolutely and someone that really well some will have found a different way to approach. That may even things like the remote teaching a spike a state to look teaches day in day out and work with remote proficient some of those students who often quite quiet in classroom remove. Sit back and let somebody else Perhaps also the question or tight lead in the lesson. They were coming forward even if it was on as opposed to on kind of the audio. Were coming forward on chat. And they're putting their ideas or asking for support and then that was leading to them being able to email and being half those compensation so all of a supper by they were saying. Well actually. I need something here. Unkind to alert you. Thought whereas in the kallstrom may well those as potentially saw doggone let somebody else's question is interesting is net new ways of working and trying to capture the best of all of it and i suppose in many ways it's about establishing the right climate so that there's a feeling of understanding and happiness about what what it is asking people today since the Type risk as well with if you will verbalizing or by explicit the processes that might be guy who hate. Sometimes you'll make mistakes. Thinking isn't something to be perfect steps. And i think that's something that's why pulled us teach as teaches total. And so what. I'm doing piece. Roy seem like a choice. And they got a whole select. Don't want to do that so no them has to that and again on explain what choices not explain my reasoning and that will help say the To might changes and to not always get it perfect. i absolutely. I'm happy to be wrong. Because that's the state of learning. You know a few quick fire questions at the end are just to help us all. Leave this podcast with few recommendations and a few interesting pointers to what we can what we can do this summer and what we should be doing in the classroom so top end cutie tip for medical condition i would say really reflect on your own beckel processes yourself is most likely that teaches inky tayo or wherever you are. Your career will have a loss of tacit knowledge and things of just become so embedded said that. You won't be aware of them. So i think taking that time to really think through your In your mexico conceived processes will help each than translate that students and give them the paracha in a my shakes exit to that. That's brilliant advice. I love advice. Because i think you're right. I think we do get to a point where it's so innate. You know this is just how i do it. This is my process because by the time we get to teaching the classroom. But we've we've aced education. We've gone through and and done all the steps and been good at it too then unpick that. I think that's great advice. So that we understand those steps a cabinet wellbeing quick finau some read recommendation. They're always good. As but i think the lying in the guard on the air with terry patchett is he's gonna might yukiko. He's gonna make you saying you might make you cry. But i just a wonderful risa and a lots to explore it. Would it would keep me going for opted summers Back centuries back trust pretty okay. So tape wrenching. Best classroom will teach snack radius snack. And i'm not freddie many advising people for their wellbeing that they don't have time for lunch and that was started. We'll finish ashley quite tight state. And now i'm getting my nutrients Guardia bassey's be my best snacks the classroom. I can have a quick swig but back to the jaw. Go back to it later. Let's see cool again. Tell skin he'll it. Said it looks like a spice strengths powder you mix but lots and lots of flavors pretty. I'm up to come to find that. Ben and we're all thinking about the seminar there you know the weather's warmed up. So what would you best end of term activity be you could set us so your students and then surfaced off probably the chief of both because he knew we often think that she didn't send coruna school will be full of energy at the end of term. They might do that for the first five minutes. But late justice teaches do full on their nose and quickly have have a really long sleep. And i think that would be my best advice if you have celebrations quite enjoy the guggenheim hopper reading really loan. Say don't feel guilty of outset and then that why each might most of the rest of your holiday because you don't want to carry that taught mystery with you. That's great advice. Keep yourself comfy. Maybe blanket comfort via snuggling wellbeing absolutely. So it's been fantastic taught you about such a fascinating array and it comes from such a a knowledgeable and so thank you for sharing your wisdom and your expertise with us today. You're more than welcome it a fussing because she sai at. It's been lucky to talk about it with your great. And i think there's a blog coming along so keep your eyes peeled for his blog on. Ap sites thanks. Thanks take care. We hope you enjoyed listening to this. Podcast from oxford education to find out more about the read the curriculum. And have you'll say please visit. Www oxford second dot com forward slash smart..

terry patchett Ben first five minutes Roy both today freddie mexico oxford education Www each yukiko oxford second dot com Ap this summer gcc guggenheim Tixx bassey
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

01:44 min | 6 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"This morning. I am really excited to welcome to the podcast. Sophie bartlett sofi is a year five six primary teacher. She's the english and curriculum needs for school. She's over the twenty seven thousand followers on twitter which gives a quite a lot of clout in the world of social media. And how does this. She came up with the hashtag. Teach like a champion champion bit of a play on a championship. We love that. We're gonna have to hear about that safety. Welcome to the podcast. Hello hi night. Thank you for having me. We so you can be with this. 'cause you're busy busy planning a wedding. Yeah we're trying to the bed time especially at my last year. That third time lucky last time lucky not going to be sunny and birds are going to say absolutely on our wedding day last year. It cold with rains that maybe it was a good thing. Get married las really. The gods shining dance to we just talked about teach champion. Just tell us a bit about that to kick yourself. I think from being on on twitter so long you so i found that it was really helpful but it also made me really anxious about teaching because i felt like everyone was always touching the best stuff in it. Made me feel like. I didn't teach not do that. And it just made me panicked. So i risk thought tweeting. Some of silly things happen only embarrassing. Things will the things a role and that she bit more traction easy for me that the united really good lessons what my friends suggested. Why don't we give it the hash. I teach trump Trying to find one and then people just started joining in is a really good way. Also just a bit of a dose of reality. Everyone has rubbish rubbish days. And it's nice to know that other people are doing the same things as you and it just feels like a big old saw from twitter. Sometimes you know what if you had a rubbish you go to each other and it was just a little bit of light relief. Basically

last year twitter first third time latin fifteen hundred eighties english Sophie bartlett sofi twenty seven thousand follower greek trump united five six one dance
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

05:16 min | 6 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"Podcast hosted by oxford university press with helen. Princeton guests in this podcast. We talk about the word mental. So we'll gonna look at the etymology behind that word. So i came to mean wise advisor. Or sage counselor probably through greek. Mythology mental was a close friend of a deceased who placed mentor in charge of his son. Telemacus away fighting at the trojan war and the goddess of wisdom fina took on the form of mental in owed help telemacus stand up for himself. The name paps ultimately means adviser as it is derived from the noun mentos which means intent spirit passion this.

trojan war helen oxford university Princeton greek
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

02:37 min | 7 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"A couple of offending you. Actually the all report cost. Yeah that's been really interesting. She's been interviewing kind of a real variety. Actually it's not it's not just by thinking it's actually fish since as well off people that vice nice ice and yeah issues and then teach them i j smith. He's been doing on the faculty to poke off. It's kind of the he kuzyk curriculum power curriculum button. Actually he's been looking at tamari as well. Then this kind of general education one. I think they really great when you want to do some walking or running he can put pocock on and just kind of listen to them without hunter. Out of it really. Yeah agree shopping and onion this. I often effingham. I only in the kitchen just listened way. What about advice for an cutie wall any advance. Any advice thing in thinking about then you'll an expert in your subject and the children in front of the probably on me about how you gonna kinda transmit that knowledge iva t agent his use of the knowledge. And you probably don't realize how you've gotten allege you've got somehow unpick or your taste and oil knowledge as i students in front no matter what their idea had understand that level and i think so many people we've been told that from the beginning that would kind of really helped us because a roadblock recently kusasis malaysians. We where we all because we've done a degree and and we've done all teacher training. We need to comfort the unpick where we go all of on a leash from and you have to teach that and the complexity of that for us. And i think that's really important frankie teeth to remember. Yeah that's really lovely visu wave describing it. You know i still We've just had easter weekend. I saw a video clip of a lovely big chuck egg being mashed and then it all came back together. And i'm just reminded that when you say that. Actually it's right. You know all those fragments of knowledge come to form the practitioner that we are. How do we get there and to unpick that. Great advice for nike. That's the next block. Still don't in fabulous. Thank you so so much for joining us. Thank you tell him. It's been great brilliant thanks. We hope you enjoyed listening to this word. Podcast from oxford education to receive bonus material relevant to the discussion please visit. Www dot o. u. p. dot com slash education slash podcasts..

nike j smith easter weekend u. p. dot com oxford education malaysians
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

05:13 min | 8 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"With <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Music> the <SpeakerChange> activities <Laughter> to <Speech_Female> actually. <Speech_Female> I was advantaged <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> because of my knowledge <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> many parents <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> on the stone the speech <Speech_Female> sam <SpeakerChange> development <Speech_Female> you know and <Speech_Male> because i had twins <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> had the contract <Speech_Female> developing speech. <Speech_Female> Sorry didn't <Speech_Female> see <Speech_Female> the contrast the <Speech_Female> right in front of me but <Speech_Female> thank you know so <Speech_Female> if if the parents <Speech_Female> don't know that when we come <Speech_Female> to expect parents <Speech_Female> to understand what speech <Speech_Female> to the <Speech_Female> cognitive development <Speech_Female> necessarily but <Speech_Female> where is the professional <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Music_Female> looks at child <Speech_Female> understand is <Speech_Female> actually potential <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah and <SpeakerChange> to kind of <Speech_Male> without <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> louise. I think you've got some <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> really good hints <Silence> and tips for <SpeakerChange> seventy <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a few. I think <Speech_Female> some of them. <Speech_Female> We've already mentioned <Speech_Female> to. It's just a kind of <Speech_Female> veto right and remind <Speech_Female> ourselves. The festival <Speech_Female> might links will be parents <Speech_Female> building <Speech_Female> relationships polluting <Speech_Female> their understanding <Speech_Female> of the importance <Speech_Female> of talking reading <Speech_Female> and then also <Speech_Female> bought with them as much <Speech_Male> as possible in partnership <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> parents <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> schools. When it's a partnership <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> league told what they have <Speech_Female> to do and then <Speech_Female> Elliot's <Speech_Female> three to early. 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The company <Speech_Female> webs <Speech_Female> pistol dictionaries <Speech_Female> teach <Speech_Female> statistic <Speech_Female> calculate explicitly. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Also think this <Speech_Female> is definitely plays <Speech_Female> pre teaching of <Speech_Female> the calculate. <Speech_Female> Yeah bring <Speech_Female> in terms of the line <Speech_Female> so children <Speech_Female> have those words banks <Speech_Female> have been familiarized <Speech_Female> with some of the <Speech_Female> the key technical vocabulary <Speech_Music_Female> to <Speech_Female> three <Speech_Female> for particular subject <Speech_Female> on topic <Speech_Female> and get them up. <Speech_Female> Get them on. 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"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:28 min | 9 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"To tackle with. Your boss will be ready. Yeah awesome okay. Let's let's think about the link between the covering reading and sort of wants to think about in terms of not just the text which we know is too but the story behind the text i know certainly is a mum semi none left primary school. Not berry signed. My youngest is seven but sent in primary days. You know the days when they came home and said spaceship landed on the top failed. That's the catalyst for the piece of what they're doing about kits all or science picker whatever. It was an the primary school. My kids went to a brilliant at doing narrative based teaching and breathe to livestream that really events and dramas that would take place on the playground. She saying that. That's important to engage. Focus build the company franchi often. I mean as i said before. I absolutely loved the trauma in the classroom acting out characters. Really get into it. And i think that helps george mike capillary but will say to visualize the by capillary. Mike influences in terms of everything. I've been into schools where they thought the five brigades come comment because during the great fire of london the to read out to the children experienced. It not helps children. Who don't have that background. They might not necessarily have experienced hind. Bought the guessing not when they come to school and one of the things i say is that sometimes yes. The children have experienced that high But when they're in your skull that being supported by and you're going to help them enrich than with range of experiences drama activities going on trips when we can or even just watch the thing with like capital as it kind of fits nicely with reading because you want to sound the word defeat you to read and comprehend But i think sometimes we can't we to save much my capillary but we have to be mindful in terms of reading but it's just one of teaching ratings regarding around moment scalper model thousand one. We got a language structure. John that children need any to make inferences and they have much of the tax that mccaffery fit said within that wide bit of raising. I think why Important now as the aspect that we on excol teach children reading what we call a cowboy hat and the drama. And all of this. And so i think it just suppose saas with kind of focusing itchy like icon by capillary and making explicit joe adjusting if children are able to read the words to understand the not really reading Yet because of course where that leads you not forgotten but if a capital which i think you're right i mean i've been teaching. What twenty something years and really. We want focused on vocabulary explicitly. I think office implicit. And that's why we love teaching english in particular. Because you know you get to unpick like we were saying what what makes people take these gorgeous kids sitting in front of us and we get to know about them because we're talking about the country yet..

John seven Mike george mike one fire of london things twenty something five brigades great english thousand one
"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford Education Podcast

03:00 min | 10 months ago

"oxford" Discussed on Oxford Education Podcast

"To secondary school in terms of their vocabulary in mass. What might that lit. Lie to to move from year five through to year eight in terms of capturing how can i i cannot teach his really equip young people for that transition in mass vocabulary a tricky one because in a sense they they move through a very different style of learning Primary primary learning at its best is quite. Investigative is quite collaborative a secondary not in all cases. I don't want to generalize this but most people second experience is a little more solitary and so they're not getting the same opportunities plus of course there's that issue of as we get older particularly into those teen years we've become a bit more self conscious about mathematical conversations. So although i'd love to have a magic wants to wave. I think the answer is simply to make sure the as they move from primary to secondary the have a they have a really good grasp of all the mathematical vocabulary they need and the year seven and year. Eight is our whole instantly. Revisiting focus in primary schools on or four on multiplication tables. Because that's when stunning. When eventually the year full multiplication tests will become compulsory thing. But it's almost like once. They're off once the pressure's off they do them less. I think if i was a year seventy ad be still doing language tests multiplication tests every day. There's nothing to stop doing. Math word of the week for example must word of the day and just repeated and reputation. It's not sexy or fashionable but actually good old fashioned repetition repeated repeated rickles space rickel. Those are the things we know that brain holds onto so. If you hear the words you'll remember use them. You'll remember them even more brilliant andrea spending to pledge to you. I've learned a lot myself. Masters certainly not an area that i've spent a huge mat talk but i. It's just brilliant. Talk about the capri looks like in the mad style shoe and see how many commonalities there are actually without the other areas of the curriculum thinking about the idea of moving from primary to secondary and equipping our young people what they need. I think it's a fascinating conversation. Thank key pleasure. It's always good. Thank you we hope. You enjoyed listening to this word of podcast from oxford education to receive bonus material relevant to the discussion please visit. Www dot o. Up dot com slash education slash podcasts..

Eight year eight year five oxford education o. Up dot com second experience andrea once year seventy dot
"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

The Lemar Show

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

"I was used to work and I enjoyed it now. So otherwise I wouldn't above it cuz you know, it just really hard. Yeah and stuff. I still parted by the way don't get that right. I'll try and work out the answer and it didn't come in five. You didn't come in 10 minutes. It didn't come in an hour, but you know, but at the time, you know again cuz I now am now enjoying this stuff. Yeah, you know, I got into Oxford. Yeah, I'm giving this a good girl. Yes. I'm going to buy but I'm gonna make sure that I I try and give a hundred percent. So even if I wasn't in Oxford it would have been if I was somewhere else it would probably have been the same. Yes. Yeah. Yep. No, the questions would have been the same but my application at this point, you know used to working hard. I wasn't driven by any fail failing or anything like that. I just wanted to just yeah, I was enjoying it. Yeah, so I was in a confidence level must have been high no, no. No because you trying to do this then you think I want to get it done and go to the club, right and then you can't work it out, but you have to say guys, maybe I can walk to the club today, but I really want to come but I've got to submit this stuff so you should think so. Maybe I'm not as good as I think that's why you know in that scenario, but they're still people that were just flying flying through or wage hard for everybody back in I think it was hard for everybody cuz back in those days. We couldn't really talk about the answers with each other because if but could you know, you couldn't if they owed a No-No by the way, you've worked out the answer and and it was quite obvious that you guys could cuz there's no collaboration was a big deal because they that's the idea. You have to teach yourself out to learn you have to teach yourself and that's the whole point wage..

Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

The Lemar Show

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on The Lemar Show

"Hey, what's good people? Thanks for joining again for another show today. I've got one of the most balanced people. I know he goes by the name of Eddie. I've known him since I was about Seventeen, very close friend. He's the only person I know friend or otherwise, he's gone to Oxford University. He got a scholarship to go there and I thought you know because he's only person I know why not get him on and have a chat about life about balance and how about the experience of going to a place like Oxford? Maybe it will inspire someone else out there? Who's planning on giving us young? All right. Let's got off data..

Eddie Oxford University Oxford
"oxford" Discussed on The Microscopists

The Microscopists

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"oxford" Discussed on The Microscopists

"And the system that we had didn't log. Do civ2 biology. I mean one trivial way in Oxford where this was going on. There is a science area where all the Departments are pretty close to each other in reality. The engineering science department isn't actually in the science area is pretty close. It's a two three four five minute walk but it involved the four or five minute walk and it involves crossing a road and biologists didn't like crossing the road and biology in particular. I didn't like crossing the road still didn't until the last few years when we started doing experiments with see any guns and so on page finally we got those things across the road and I might say talking about biology wanting to be nice and calm these C elegans khong And the donor of these things they'd look at them in this petri. Dish. They are quote grazing on a lawn of bacteria. Well my goodness crazy on a loaner bacteria across box Road was not an easy thing. And so it was hard for them to get with the biology to us. Yeah, our stage scanner wasn't conducive to biology if I'm completely honest although later on we were able to do what I think was really quite remarkable things with the stage kind of but it was fighting the technology. It was also a new which meant to say. It didn't work every time it was also knew right at the beginning before the same image captures software in that we had a long persistence television screen. So the scanning wasn't fast. The scanning wasn't real time. You had to turn the lights out. The lab so it was a relatively painful way to get the specimen and I really don't blame the biologists for not cottoning on to what we were trying to do because it was hard and the biologists limited reasonably their main interest was biology and we couldn't provide them with the wow image or the month bility to see biological processes or to see cell division to watch it happening to do 3D reconstruction because we bought a Jetta stage yet..

Oxford