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AstraZeneca pauses coronavirus vaccine trial, shares slip on rollout doubts

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

AstraZeneca pauses coronavirus vaccine trial, shares slip on rollout doubts

"No Work? No pay no food coronavirus lockdowns have forced many people all over the world to wonder where their next meal's will come from according to Matthew True. Scott Oxfam International's head of Humanitarian Policy About one hundred and twenty one million people have been pushed to the edge of starvation. This year not of course is across the main hotspots you would expect Yemen Democratic Republic of Congo of Gunston Venezuela, south. Sudan we're also seeing hunger coming up in otherwise middle income or developing countries. India South Africa Brazil CETERA. Look at a situation in the world where you have about sixty sixty, one percent working in the informal economy when that denied that daily income forced to stay at home they no longer get that income and that forces them into some of the negative coping strategies and that's what makes this crisis so unique. People. Couldn't travel to work which meant they couldn't make money and they couldn't buy food but this isn't just a short term problem. Is it Yeah and it has sort of long term impacts where, for instance, if you take people who are living day to day selling milk, if they can't sell milk for a few days, it gets point whether then have to do something to have food and income then have to sell their means of income. So selling the cow which had been providing them and then conquered back to generate income and same happens instead of urban areas where people who had been, for instance, taxi drivers after. So long of not being able to take fares and give taxi rights eventually then have to start selling off assets to cope and that's where we're really. Seeing potential long-term structural breakdown, and as you say, this is a problem that existed before the pandemic. So how do we tackle it this time around does it require new solutions? It does with sort of proposing three solutions. The I of course is that we need to increase humanitarian aid drastically the U. N. Global Humanitarian Appeal has called for about ten point, three billion dollars in humanitarian aid. But only about twenty, four percent of that is funded. So less than a quarter, the second thing that we can do is cancelled some of the debt that could free up up to a trillion dollars, and then of course, the final thing is. Exactly, as you say, we do need to change how system works. We need to build a more fair and more robust food system. We need to build a system that's ready to deal with the climate shocks that's able to produce sustainable food. One that supports a small-scale Farmers Informal Workers, Matthew Scott head of humanitarian policy at Oxfam International. Thanks for your time. Thank you so much

Humanitarian Policy Scott Oxfam International U. N. Global Humanitarian Appe Matthew True Farmers Informal Workers Gunston Venezuela Oxfam International Democratic Republic Of Congo Matthew Scott Sudan India Yemen
"oxfam international" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

10:18 min | 6 months ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Barriers around the world to women's economic empowerment, so countries can be aware of and take steps to remedy the laws in place to make sure that those don't. Present Barriers to women's participation in the economy. Let me. Bring in a genetic McKinley now. Can you hear me? Yes, great, thank you. So, just a quick personal background I worked in the investment business for most of my career at capital group, which is the largest mutual fund management company and I was investing globally there. Then, I retired quote unquote early by the investment community standards to be Chairman of Oxfam America. which also put me on the Oxfam International Board. And that was an amazing education. Now I have my own fund. It's called advanced global capital. I was able to take what I've learned from all of that past experience. And focus on a fund where investors put their money in its for profit, not enough for Prophet Fund. And the financing that comes into the fund goes out the door in the form of revolving lines of credit for factoring companies around the world. And the factory companies are chosen by might team. With a number of criteria, but one very important criteria is the we'd like to see. As many women owned factoring companies or women run factoring companies and we've been successful in doing that. and. We also want to make sure that the. Ways that. The interest financing or done fair for both the factor and for the small business. And I! It strikes me that we do spend a lot of time up in the cloud. Sue the very big organizations, which of course have a critical role whether it's the WTO or WHOEVER IT IS! But there's a lot of things that can be accomplished on the ground, and it might seem microbe to give you a sense of this. Our Fund is about one hundred fifty million dollars in assets under management. We're five years old. As of this month, we have financed over two and a half billion dollars worth of invoices. And we do a detailed impact report at the end of each year. I feel that having more of these on the ground activities are. Important and sometimes I think we spend too much time trying to develop frameworks and all of that stuff, when in fact we could look at what kind of architectural is already in place that is being underutilized for the benefit of women as as everybody on this call ensure knows women have a very hard time getting bank financing I just by virtue, being women, but second of all because they often don't have the latter. Factoring doesn't involve clavell. Factoring is centered on whether or not that women owned business has a invoice, which is a good invoice in. It's worth being financed so that you can have some confidence that the buyers going to pay it. That gives the factor the confidence that they can extend that transaction and the beauty to. Is that in factoring? It's not alone with to that woman business. She has an asset. Her invoice is for asset. And so if she is able to monetize that when she wants to and given these the often the ups and downs in the year in terms of when there's demand for product. If. She doesn't need the cash right now. She won't sell the invoices. If the discount rate on the invoice purchases unreasonable, she won't sell it so I. Guess I'm a bit frustrated that we haven't done enough of that. Real on the ground analysis to say what are some of the things that there's already architecture there. Let's scale that. And for me personally won frustration has been that there are a lot of transactions I would like to do in the supply chain, but there's just too much risk involved for our fund personally. And if organizations at the top would be willing to do. Transaction loan guarantees so that factors had the confidence that they could do something more impactful even though it was riskier because they had that backup. So. It's It's a frustration for me. As as I respectfully acknowledged all the hard work at the big architecture level, but I would say in terms of financing those big organizations have glaciers on offer for for financing for backup. And what the what the world needs is is not even ice cubes for these women on businesses. They need ice chips so I I would encourage us to think more about how to get the money out of these very complicated lumped guarantee requirements and down. To the ground so anyway I'll get off my soapbox. That it is bringing in some very important issues around truly having access, and truly addressing barriers than and looking to at issues around risk a penny, so we were At time. Do want to give Penny Dorothy really just A. One Minute. To share any any immediate thoughts that you have. I'll be very brief. and I think Janetta I I used to be in banking as well, and after the last financial crisis I did quite a bit of work on factoring with supply chains and I fully agree with you that there are a lot of on the ground opportunities that we can exploit but I would, but I would say and in return that I think we also need to be working on the big architectural stuff because. in order for of this stuff on the ground stuff to work, we also need to sometimes change hearts and minds at the top and so I love what you're doing. And I would say keep it up, and we're doing some of the same stuff, but from the logistics base, which can also be a challenge in frustration, but at the same time we're also gonNA. Keep trying to work with Dorothy at the I. T. C. level to keep trying to change the the the high level, hearts and minds as well because we gotta get the overall frameworks and architecture to shift in order to continue to allow those those grassroots effort. To to to to foster and become bigger over time, and to make the wall that they're pounding up against tumble maybe a bit faster than they have been so with that thing. I'M GONNA thank everybody for participating today for your interest in this topic and we're at where ups happy to have any more friends and allies. Join us in this effort, so thank you. Dorsey final thoughts. Very very quickly, and to agree with all that Benny has saved with respect to this response, but I just wanted to highlight that you know the IDC perspective we do have access to finance as one of the dealers that we are looking at in terms of the work. We're doing in in our a working towards in palm of women. I wanted to also highlight the agenda says that these a lot of capital day, but he's the quantities nowadays that accompany. The capital understanding that his business. We know that it has to be what your investment it has it has to. A A, Russian oil sense behind. On there for what we're trying to do is to speak to the different investment entities I would very much encourage A. Jenny to speak to us to see whether we can try to collaborate in certain in in certain respects. It's about as being innovative response to the higher risk that you refer to because. This, this is what we are dealing with. They will be few women that will be able to fit in your category and very limited numbers, but if we're looking at broadening that scope will have to be innovative and try to find a good solutions that are able to protect the risks, but also at the same time being able to provide accessibility to the smaller players that I equally voted in this space. What is it that we are doing? We have gotten for instance with Buckley's Scania. Whom we're working with what we're doing is building the capacity on the women's side to ensure that they can be able to reduce bankable proposals that can be accepted in the context. Of the particular funding was there, but much bigger than that he's. We're collaborating with other entities. Within the context of refined back is referred to as SD five hundred, and he is likely to do six being brought together increasing of ourselves where we have art weight with CARE International, but it's all about bringing together. Oblique financing liberating private sector resources, so what I would really encourage Jenny's maybe to get in touch with us to see whether we can have a discussion that results in some kind of collaboration going forward. Thank you wonderful. So. Please join me all in Let me think Dorothy and Penny for joining us today. Thank you all for participating. In today's discussion and I hope everyone stays safe healthy. Thank you all. Thank you..

Dorothy A. Jenny Prophet Fund Chairman Penny Dorothy Oxfam International Board America. WTO CARE International Sue Dorsey Benny Buckley Penny
Britain to Considers Suspension of Arms Licenses to Saudi Arabia

BBC Newshour

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Britain to Considers Suspension of Arms Licenses to Saudi Arabia

"Campaigners have one eight legal challenge over the United Kingdom's decision to government's decision to allow home sales to Saudi Arabia, which is engaged in the war in Yemen. The court of appeal today ordered the government to review the way it grounds export licenses for themselves to Saudi Arabia after routing the current procedures were unlawful. That's talk about this now with Maltin Butcha policy adviser on conflict at Oxfam international. He joins me here in the news studio your reaction to today's Michael decision, court of appeal decision, I should say it's a tremendous victory for campaign against arms trade for Oxfam supported them, but most of the people of Yemen because this war has dragged on for four years, fueled by British and other the government has said that they're going to look at this, but it does oblige them to evaluate whether those expo. Shirts could leads to violations, but it doesn't mean the immediate suspension of deliveries. Right. They can continue to deliver arms under licenses that have already been issued but they can't issue any new licenses and since licenses, generally don't have a long shelf life this. It's a significant decision. And I mean, the government presumably is going to appeal that looking at this decision, and that the mindful of it, but they all to appeal on there, because it's this isn't the end of the road for campaigners. No. That's right. It's not the end of the ride the government has said it will appeal this will go to the supreme court. Not sure when yet the good news is that until it gets to the supreme court. No new licenses will be issued for any member of the Saudi led coalition operating in Yemen. Do you think that this is enough? Because in the wake of the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi Jay, they were country. Stories around the world. Notably Germany, and Australia is announced the suspension of sales to Saudi Arabia. Is that what you'd like to see the UK government to do? Yes. We'd like to see a complete halt to sales going to Saudi Arabia, and all the other coalition countries. But it is a very significant victory in that for years, campaigned alongside. It must be said the government to put the arms trade treaty into place that entered into force in two thousand fourteen and this is the first big test of that treaty. So we're saying the court of appeals here and last week, Belgian coats, telling governments they have to abide by obligations, which they have undertaken freely, and willingly, so in the long term, this will mean that sales of arms. Really controlled by. International humanitarian law and international human rights law rather than just profit. Okay. I mean, the government have always argued that whatever arms. They do sell to countries. Such as Audi Arabia are bound, by the fact that they will not use them against their own civilian population, and so on. But the government is part of that coalition that is engaged in this war in Yemen. The UK government isn't technically part of the coalition, but they are very deeply involved in military operations in Yemen. Yes. And you're right. I mean, the thing is that they, they have a process, and what the court has found is that they on the process that they have is not legal and the way they've been operating. It is not legal. So now they have to go back look at it all, again, this should make a huge difference. And but you but what you're saying is that you will continue to find, even if the government finds all the government's lawyers find loopholes very briefly that you will continue to find against them. Twenty four million people are native divide in Yemen. There's the world's biggest cholera outbreak. Three point three million people displaced by the war we have to keep on fighting on their

Supreme Court Yemen Saudi Arabia Oxfam International Audi Arabia UK Maltin Butcha United Kingdom Oxfam Cholera Jamal Khashoggi Jay Michael Murder Germany Australia Four Years
"oxfam international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is in crisis. So Saint many of the economic and business headlines around the world, so say to some of the biggest beneficiaries of the capitalist system people like Ray Dallaglio who according to Forbes magazine has eighteen billion dollars to his name. Thanks to the hedge fund. He setup Bridgewater associates. Here's radio speaking last December at the Los Angeles summit conference kind of burning man meets Davos, event capitalism, basically is not working for the majority of people. That's just the reality. And. Yep. There's opportunity. So we've gotta make it more for the majority of people and you're in a situation where like today, the fed did a study. Four forty percent of the population could not raise four hundred dollars event of an emergency. I mean, it gives you an idea Polaris, and we often don't have contact with that. But that's a real world, clearly, even the ultra rich are worried about a growing wealth gap. The fact that in America, for example, much of the country's wealth is held by a very small percentage of ultra wealthy people, many economists and columnist points the election of President Trump Brexit and the rise of anti immigrant populace in countries, like Italy and Brazil as symptoms that capitalism is in crisis yet, many of those same economists will tell you that capitalism has been the driving force behind the most remarkable decline in global poverty ever witnessed in human history. What's more the latest official data here in the UK shows that employment here reached its highest level on record towards the end of last year. Unemployment is at a seventeen year low in the US and countries like Bangladesh once dubbed a basket case by. Henry Kissinger have averaged more than six percent annual growth now for nearly a decade. So what's not to like? Well, lots says we need the anemia the bond. Ceo of the anti-poverty campaign is Oxfam international. We know women we work within Bangladesh will work eighty hours a week. Who work six days a week? Who when they're sick. They are not paid when they get pregnant the fired and who don't have a right to organize on demand better working conditions. Millions of people are trapped in those kinds of jobs, and you have governments continuing to count them. Like there are people living decent lives winning. Fuck. They are not when you hear government speaker, particularly the developed world, the focus is entirely on employment statistics unemployment is at record lows in many parts of the world. Are you saying that these statistics are not painting an accurate picture of what is actually taking place on the ground? Of course, not because first of all you must count jobs that give people a good life. They must be living wages in many countries, especially here in Africa where there isn't even. Legislated minimum wage. And if it is there, it's so far below a living wage, that's what sick and leader conditions of work themselves. The fuck that some people might be working three jobs. I know women I need them in New York cleaning women, she's cleaning a hotel a ten o'clock in the morning, a three she's knocking off going to do another cleaning job on another cleaning job and she'll get home at two am. And she's got kids to take to school in the morning to be able to earn enough for her family. She's doing three jobs, I know taxi drivers here in Kenya. Who tell me they sleep just three hours a night because they plow those streets all night and all day trying to get enough money to pay the rent of a road. That's not a knife. That's not dignity. Those are not conditions for work those not jobs. People are looking for is in how we met. Measure things the only CD in class, you Montas cooled for governments to use a dashboard of indicators covering all aspects of life that master people health, skills environmental degradation. Everything is it the case that if we had better indicators that reflected these kind of conditions that perhaps policy would be adjusted to well, of course, counting the right things is important is important to count jobs and jobs that are good jobs. Decent jobs paying where what is lots just an issue of what we count. So we end point the beginning point is to be just to make businesses work for everybody who is a part of their business starting with workers going onto the suppliers the environmentally work in the communities that by the consumers so to be fair to everyone who benefits business when he'd be anemia that CEO Oxfam. Mm international. When these thesis brings us to the premise of a new book called the future of capitalism. Its author is pulled Kellyanne economics professor at Oxford University, and one of the world's most influential development, economists, his argument is that populist politics. What he calls mutinies is being driven by growing rifts between the highly educated and the less educated and also between the cosmopolitan cities and declining provinces. He says one of the solutions to those growing rifts for people living and working in big rich cities, like New York and London to pay more in tax, which can then be invested in poor areas of country. Obviously, the people who have been the huge winners from globalization reluctant to forgo any of those huge gains. Go to realize is that there are other people who Cleveland has really hurt and we better do something about it. So would you as a professor in Oxford prepared to pay more taxes and say, professor? At a university in northern England, for example, would indeed because half of my heart is in the north wing loop. I personally lived these divides and seen how really cruel. They are in any humane society where we recognize the sense of belonging to each other. We need to do something about it. But that's what's been lost hasn't it that sense of belonging. I mean people in the north of England don't feel linked really to the people in London. You're quite right. If we go back fifty years, there was a much stronger sense of shared belonging. We were all pulled together during the second World War, very clear common endeavor for common goal, and that bequeathed a generation which was willing to work together and that produce the miracle from nineteen forty five to nine hundred seventy when we got our national health service. We got a very good education system. I was very poor kid. I was able to go to a good school. Go to Oxford. Even do my doctorate all financed by the state. Which meant financed by Richard people who paying very very high taxes over eighty percent that they paid them because there was a greater sense of shared belonging and a degree of reciprocity. That people were fortunate would help people who are less fortunate because they themselves might become as fortunate and we lost that we need to put it back. Isn't that? Just what capitalism does it promotes the individual over the community. I think it's a very recent phenomenon. It's only the last fifty years the companies have this mantra that we got to be run to make profits before Matt companies had a much stronger sense of purpose imperial chemical industries when I was a kid that was the most respected company in the country and its mission statement was something like we want to be the best chemical company in the world. And then around nine hundred ninety it changed its mission statement came we want to maximize shareholder value who ever got up in the morning to maximize shareholder value and the company. Disappeared because it wasn't a motivating mission. And if we go back to earlier capitalism from the mid nineteenth century right through to the mid twentieth century. You got people are Titus salt. In Bradford who was mad at a time when the city got cholera and response to that he built salt in a new town, we've proper housing decent living conditions. That was industrialists with a sense of purpose. We need to get back to that. When you speak like that. I mean, I imagine that will be people listening. You say that sounds a lot like what Brexit as say this sense of wanting to go back to something that existed in the past and that maybe we've gone beyond that now to go back to values like that. You'd have to change it from the roots up that it's not something that can be imposed from the top down by government. It copied impose top down Marquette. There's routinely being a sort of ground swell of bottom up. Corporation that was the whole cooperative movement, which was forged during the industrial revolution in the cities of northern England because hasn't came in from the foams to these hellish cities facing new anxieties, how are we going to find somewhere to live? What happens when we die? We're going to get a decent funeral. And so they formed the cooperative movement which was shared obligations around a common purpose, and that became a world movement and still is so both on the left with the cooperative movement and on the right with responsible capitalism firms that have a sense of purpose about of of them just prophet. There were these currents that have been there for long long time. What we're seeing at the moment is a pretty recent deviation. It has happened during my lifetime and is producing these disastrous mutants Oxford University economics, professor Paul Cali there. Well, a lot of wealthy. Entrepreneurs and business owners will argue they are giving more now to good causes more in fact than ever before think of the millions billions even that have been donated by Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook to his philanthropic projects in the US education system think the charitable donations of the copper others in the US all those the Gates Foundation. None of it impresses an-and ungiven Dorados. He's the author of another book called winner takes all the elite charade of changing the world. When you look at someone like, Mark Zuckerberg? He has gotten a tremendous bang for his philanthropic. Buck for his talk of changing the world wearing hoodies using a language of communities, and this kind of aura of do Gooding then serves as a kind of blast shield to avoid scrutiny. Another example would be the Sackler family this family that owned this company Purdue pharma that is behind to a great extent the opioid crisis in the United States that has killed two hundred thousand people and made billions and billions of dollars. Mostly from selling this drug you have from the nineties onwards public officials in West Virginia. And then the nation starting to realize that a lot of people were being killed and pushing back trying to regulate trying to bring criminal charges civil charges. They're actually pleading guilty to certain things and admitting fraudulent practices while continuing to make billions and billions of dollars and then using philanthropy Guggenheim met arts swings here. And there the Harvard Sackler museum here and there to buy this aura as an family of arts patrons for a relatively cheap investment, you can obscure your role in causing some of the very problems purporting to be solving. But do you think it's really that cynical that strategic? There's a spectrum from the naive to the shrewd here. And my reporting persuades me that both are involved in Silicon Valley. You actually have more of the naive than the shrewd. You have people who I actually think are even more dangerous because they truly believe they're doing good. Now, you gotta Wall Street. Where have also done reporting. It's a very different story. You have some of the same language around doing good. Goldman Sachs has a ten thousand women program to empower women every Bank has a corporate social responsibility arm. They all foundations. But if you get those people after hours have a whiskey with them he said what's this about? They don't even go through the pretense of saying this Bank is about making the world a better place..

United States professor Oxford University England Oxford Ceo President Trump Brexit New York hedge fund Bridgewater associates Bangladesh fed Forbes magazine London Mark Zuckerberg Ray Dallaglio Henry Kissinger Polaris Los Angeles Kenya
"oxfam international" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Twelve fifteen now from the WFAN sports desk. Here's John minko. Larry Super Bowl fifty three said, it's the patriots once again against the Los Angeles Rams both games into overtime yesterday. The NFC the AFC championship game. But the one thing everyone talks about the miscall by the officials late in the ram saints game in Orleans. Here's the deal the drive for New Orleans came after a blatant interference penalty helmet-to-helmet inside the Rams five yard line. But the officials missed the penalty it forced to Saint to settle for will lutts is thirty one yard field goal that made the twenty three twenty one forty five left in regulation could ran out the clock and go for the tying field goal winning field goal there. But the Rams ended up going down the field. They get the game tying field goal to win in overtime saints coach, Sean Payton. So what do you do you? Get back up. You start doing the work. It's tough one for these players coaches, and again Rams did a great job as well. For game heart heartfelt game. Patriots also needed overtime thirty seven thirty one in Kansas City. Chiefs do weekly winning the toss for the OT and Tom Brady drives the team downfield less than five minutes end it excited as I've been in a long time. And now a lot of things one play here. One play there could change everything. But. Here's the schedule. Nixon thunder about of medicine Square Garden. That's her home to Sacramento later on today. Fifteen and forty five around the clock domico ten ten wins. Sports wins news time twelve seventeen new study from Oxfam international says there are now more than twenty two hundred billionaires in the world. That's nearly double the total from just a decade ago and the top twenty six billionaires account for a wealth equal to three point eight billion of the world's poorest people. Oxfam relied on the Forbes list of billionaires for its study. It was released a head of the World Economic Forum in Davos, that's where some of the richest and most influential people gather each year. As a remedy for the wealth disparity. Oxfam recommends that countries impose heavier taxes on personal income and eliminate tax loopholes for corporations and the super rich it suggests investing in public services, including water electricity and child care. It didn't take a superhero to recover. The one point four million dollars in Batman comic book stolen from a storage unit in Boca Raton, Florida. Authorities say the man who stole the books was arrested after trying to sell a few of them Philip Weiss Bauer of Royal Palm Beach is charged with theft and trafficking in stolen property releasing balloons is a common practice at some parties and celebrations, but they fall eventually becoming trash or worse. A danger to wildlife. The New York Post reports that a proposal in east Hampton would outlaw intentional balloon releases. Violators would be subject to a one thousand dollar fine and up to fifteen years fifteen days in jail. A public hearing on the proposal to set for.

Los Angeles Rams Patriots Oxfam New Orleans John minko NFC Oxfam international Rams WFAN Sean Payton Philip Weiss Bauer Davos Boca Raton Tom Brady Royal Palm Beach medicine Square Garden The New York Post Nixon theft
"oxfam international" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Here's Jerry Recco. Larry it's so routine at this point it's actually hard thinking about a Super Bowl without the patriots. They'll be there again Super Bowl fifty three in Atlanta, February third when they take on the Rams, of course, New England winning that overtime game in Kansas City last night. It was thirty seven thirty one Rex Burkhead with the game winning touchdown in the OT. Rob gronkowski looks at the club and says just so much chemistry within huge heroics to trust that. We have any other. We love playing with each other. And we have just to go out there and always be while he's be on the same page when we need to be is is huge be the third straight Super Bowl appearance for the pats. And how for Bill Belichick and Tom Brady this one two punch it'll be their ninth Super Bowl. They will take on the Rams like they did in Super Bowl thirty six L A advancing with an overtime win in New Orleans. Of course, it did come with controversy the passing interference call. It wasn't called Sean Payton. Calling the league head of officials and finding out should have been called. Obviously. It's disappointing way to lose a game. Frustrating, you know, just getting off the phone with the league office, the glue the call and that call puts it first and ten Rauner Neath replays. It's game changing call and it wasn't to be for New Orleans. So Elliott Vance's the NFL announcing four games in London next season one in Mexico jets and giants not involved in today. Nick host the thunder twelve thirty nets and kings three thirty islander shut out the ducks three zip. And Australian Open tennis. Serena Williams into the quarterfinals sports fifteen and forty five around the clock. Jerry recco. Ten ten wins. Sports wins. News time ten seventeen. A new study from Oxfam international says there are now more than twenty two hundred billionaires in the world. That's nearly double the total from just a decade ago and the top twenty six billionaires account for a wealthy qual to three point eight billion of the world's poorest people. Oxfam. Relied on the Forbes list of billionaires for its study that was released a head of the World Economic Forum in Davos, that's where some of the richest and most influential people gather each year as a remedy for the wealth disparity. Oxfam recommends that countries impose heavier taxes on personal income and.

Rams Jerry Recco Larry it New Orleans patriots Oxfam Rob gronkowski pats Oxfam international Rex Burkhead Sean Payton Bill Belichick New England Serena Williams Forbes Davos Kansas City tennis Elliott Vance
"oxfam international" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on AP News

"The highest numbers in a decade but it's no worse than it was a week earlier a sign that the epidemic is peaking the number of doctors visited risen every week since november the centers for disease control and prevention also reported forty three states have heavy flu traffic that numbers also unchanged from a week ago the flu remains at epidemic levels and peaking were not the season is still several weeks from being over warren levinson new york the british aid group oxfam international has been rocked by allegations staff members sexually exploited people in crisis zones does a piece charles dental desmond reports the group's head now as the reports shame the charity executive director winnie beyond yema says the reports are a stain on the group she's appointing an independent commission to investigate the allegations that staff members use prostitutes in earthquake ravage haiti and possibly other crisis areas the commission would look into oxfam's culture and practices and set up a vetting system for its staff she says bmo also told the bbc she's here for all the women who have been abused she says she wants them to come forward and for justice to be done for them charleston with asthma london a starlight lounge presents any progressive box oh what a great audience much dim the lights for this next one too much that veritas gotta get things just right like progressives name your price to tell us what you want to pay and we help you find coverage options literature bojan and now though the israeli wait the lights are back out again drew you and now it's completely dark progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates pricing coverage match linde by law the do not disturb.

york oxfam international desmond winnie yema haiti bmo bbc flu warren levinson executive director charleston
"oxfam international" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on KOMO

"The more ultra processed foods gate the higher your cancer risk fence just one of the new results from a study out that says such foods include chips can't soup soda tv dinners various junk foods the study by france finds that with every 10 percent of a person's diet is made up of ultra processed foods the cancer risk rises twelve percent these study does not prove the foods cause cancer does that there is a correlation with higher cancer risk the head of oxfam international says reports that staff members sexually exploited people in crisis zones shames the charity charles taylor desmond has the story executive director we need the enyeama says the reports on a stain on the group she's appointing an independent commission to investigate the allegations that staff members misuse prostitutes in the earthquake ravage haiti and possibly other crisis areas the commission would look into oxfam's culture and practices and set up a vetting system for its staff she says the nam also told the bbc she's here for all of women who have been abused she says she wants them to come forward and for justice to be done for them charles london komo news time to 44 check on the road sanders we got our issues already komo aaa traffic every 10 minutes on the fours and once again here's bridge overdosed while we do ask them holiday traffic and we're starting to see slow traffic getting out of seattle and then again from everett right into marysville southbound i 5 you'll see delays from the boeing freeway her head southward one 28th where an overturned crash was blocking the right lane now would still have to the right shoulder so you're still thing very slow traffic through that scene also seeing some sewing southbound i five approaching lake city way unsure if there is an incident going on there was one at ravenna that must be it that is now clear to the shoulder so that.

france executive director haiti oxfam bbc seattle marysville ravenna oxfam international charles taylor desmond komo everett boeing twelve percent 10 minutes 10 percent
"oxfam international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I think we'll have to wait and see avner daria who thank you very much should be annulled again distribution of the bbc world service of many lessons made possible by american public media producer and distributor of awardwinning public radio content apm american public media with support from c 3 iot enabling corporate industrial digital transformation with artificial intelligence cloud computing and iot big data software solutions learn more at c 3 iot dot com the largest network of reporters are correspondence bbc world service keeps you informed using events from around the globe the bbc world service's here at wnyc a am and fm you're listening to the bbc world service with me add butler where today as several ram oppose prepares mike his first formal address south african president we us what this means for the rainbow nation stagnant gross corruption high unemployment and persistent inequality there is a lot in his inbox so what comes first for south africa that's business daily in a couple of minutes bbc news for jerry smith the britishbased aid group oxfam international is asking people to come forward if they have allegations of exploitation by its staff in haiti and chad the charities head winnie he be a nema has had a new commission she's setting up will atone for the past barnaby joyce the deputy premier of.

producer butler president oxfam international haiti barnaby joyce avner bbc mike south africa jerry smith
"oxfam international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The feet chain is next on the bbc world service women sitting the people he won't put genetically engineered animals on your plate and gauging reaction to the very first of these products to hit the monkeys a fast growing salmon why did it take the best part of thirty years for this fish to make its journey from the laboratory to the dinner table should we be worried about it escape into the wild and has he's hoping the regulator we floodgates the food chain is off to the news bbc news were jerry smith hit the international charity oxfam is setting up an independent commission to investigate allegations of sexual exploitation by starve the head of oxfam international winning beyond yuma told the bbc that what had happened in haiti and charged with sustained the would show i am the agency for years from the bottom our hearts she said i'm asking for forgiveness the victims of wednesday's match shooting at a high school in florida have been honored during a candlelit vigil people chanted no more guns and demanded tougher firearms laws nicklaus cruz a former students has admitted killing seventeen people in the attack a former teacher christian toro and his twin brother tyler have been arrested in new york after bombmaking materials were found at their home christian toro's accused of paying students to take fireworks apart to get gunpowder australia's deputy prime minister has strongly criticised his own prime minister in a row of extramarital sex barnaby joyce said malcolm tembo's remarks were unhelpful the us secretary of state rex tillerson is meeting his turkish counterpart looted chapter shoulder for talks in ankara tensions have risen between the two nato allies ever clashes in syria south africa's new president's harambe oppose it will deliver a state of the nation address today is expected to set out his plans for the economy and for ending the corruption scandals that forced his predecessor jacob zuma to resign a new study shows the number of a rang a.

barnaby joyce south africa syria nato ankara nicklaus cruz oxfam international jacob zuma president malcolm tembo prime minister australia new york tyler christian toro florida haiti
"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"All right we're going to have to leave it there this via nima thank you you're welcome when he beer nima is the executive director of oxfam international we reached her in new york city we have more on the story on our website cbc dossier slash aih all all the opioid crisis continues to threaten lives both in canada and the us according to the national institutes of health more than one hundred fifteen americans die of an opioid overdoses every single day and so far a simple solution to the problem has of eight at lawmakers but according to a recent study there may be one surprising way to reduce opioid overdoses increase access to marijuana now this of course runs counter to the united states governor knss government's position attorney general jeff sessions has said he wants to limit access to marijuana both medicinal and recreational david powell is an economist at the rand corporation and the lead author of the study we reach mr powell in philadelphia mr pow wet link did you find between opioid deaths and marijuana laws are the main part of our finding we go to spend three of matter so there's been from previous research showing that adopt a medical marijuana laws in states is associated with a reduction in opioid prescriptions among for an populations and opioid related overdoses and in the general population uh we really wanted to dive into the mechanisms behind those reductions um and especially we wanted to focus on the role of dispenser dispensaries so we thought that dispensaries might matter because that's really how you increase access to medical marijuana no faith with adopt medical marijuana laws but don't say anything about the supply chain they don't uh protect dispensaries they don't have any dispensaries they actually don't see reductions and opioid related overdoses um but states with uh legally protected and operational spent three that they actually do see pretty large reduction but opioid related overdoses key let's unpack than it did so.

executive director united states jeff sessions david powell rand corporation marijuana oxfam international new york canada attorney philadelphia
"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"All right we're going to have to leave it there this via nima thank you you're welcome when he beer nima is the executive director of oxfam international we reached her in new york city we have more on the story on our website cbc dossier slash aih all all the opioid crisis continues to threaten lives both in canada and the us according to the national institutes of health more than one hundred fifteen americans die of an opioid overdoses every single day and so far a simple solution to the problem has of eight at lawmakers but according to a recent study there may be one surprising way to reduce opioid overdoses increase access to marijuana now this of course runs counter to the united states governor knss government's position attorney general jeff sessions has said he wants to limit access to marijuana both medicinal and recreational david powell is an economist at the rand corporation and the lead author of the study we reach mr powell in philadelphia mr pow wet link did you find between opioid deaths and marijuana laws are the main part of our finding we go to spend three of matter so there's been from previous research showing that adopt a medical marijuana laws in states is associated with a reduction in opioid prescriptions among for an populations and opioid related overdoses and in the general population uh we really wanted to dive into the mechanisms behind those reductions um and especially we wanted to focus on the role of dispenser dispensaries so we thought that dispensaries might matter because that's really how you increase access to medical marijuana no faith with adopt medical marijuana laws but don't say anything about the supply chain they don't uh protect dispensaries they don't have any dispensaries they actually don't see reductions and opioid related overdoses um but states with uh legally protected and operational spent three that they actually do see pretty large reduction but opioid related overdoses key let's unpack than it did so.

executive director united states jeff sessions david powell rand corporation marijuana oxfam international new york canada attorney philadelphia
"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"All right we're going to have to leave it there this via nima thank you you're welcome when he beer nima is the executive director of oxfam international we reached her in new york city we have more on the story on our website cbc dossier slash aih all all the opioid crisis continues to threaten lives both in canada and the us according to the national institutes of health more than one hundred fifteen americans die of an opioid overdoses every single day and so far a simple solution to the problem has of eight at lawmakers but according to a recent study there may be one surprising way to reduce opioid overdoses increase access to marijuana now this of course runs counter to the united states governor knss government's position attorney general jeff sessions has said he wants to limit access to marijuana both medicinal and recreational david powell is an economist at the rand corporation and the lead author of the study we reach mr powell in philadelphia mr pow wet link did you find between opioid deaths and marijuana laws are the main part of our finding we go to spend three of matter so there's been from previous research showing that adopt a medical marijuana laws in states is associated with a reduction in opioid prescriptions among for an populations and opioid related overdoses and in the general population uh we really wanted to dive into the mechanisms behind those reductions um and especially we wanted to focus on the role of dispenser dispensaries so we thought that dispensaries might matter because that's really how you increase access to medical marijuana no faith with adopt medical marijuana laws but don't say anything about the supply chain they don't uh protect dispensaries they don't have any dispensaries they actually don't see reductions and opioid related overdoses um but states with uh legally protected and operational spent three that they actually do see pretty large reduction but opioid related overdoses key let's unpack than it did so.

executive director united states jeff sessions david powell rand corporation marijuana oxfam international new york canada attorney philadelphia
"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"All right we're going to have to leave it there this via nima thank you you're welcome when he beer nima is the executive director of oxfam international we reached her in new york city we have more on the story on our website cbc dossier slash aih all all the opioid crisis continues to threaten lives both in canada and the us according to the national institutes of health more than one hundred fifteen americans die of an opioid overdoses every single day and so far a simple solution to the problem has of eight at lawmakers but according to a recent study there may be one surprising way to reduce opioid overdoses increase access to marijuana now this of course runs counter to the united states governor knss government's position attorney general jeff sessions has said he wants to limit access to marijuana both medicinal and recreational david powell is an economist at the rand corporation and the lead author of the study we reach mr powell in philadelphia mr pow wet link did you find between opioid deaths and marijuana laws are the main part of our finding we go to spend three of matter so there's been from previous research showing that adopt a medical marijuana laws in states is associated with a reduction in opioid prescriptions among for an populations and opioid related overdoses and in the general population uh we really wanted to dive into the mechanisms behind those reductions um and especially we wanted to focus on the role of dispenser dispensaries so we thought that dispensaries might matter because that's really how you increase access to medical marijuana no faith with adopt medical marijuana laws but don't say anything about the supply chain they don't uh protect dispensaries they don't have any dispensaries they actually don't see reductions and opioid related overdoses um but states with uh legally protected and operational spent three that they actually do see pretty large reduction but opioid related overdoses key let's unpack than it did so.

executive director united states jeff sessions david powell rand corporation marijuana oxfam international new york canada attorney philadelphia
"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"All right we're going to have to leave it there this via nima thank you you're welcome when he beer nima is the executive director of oxfam international we reached her in new york city we have more on the story on our website cbc dossier slash aih all all the opioid crisis continues to threaten lives both in canada and the us according to the national institutes of health more than one hundred fifteen americans die of an opioid overdoses every single day and so far a simple solution to the problem has of eight at lawmakers but according to a recent study there may be one surprising way to reduce opioid overdoses increase access to marijuana now this of course runs counter to the united states governor knss government's position attorney general jeff sessions has said he wants to limit access to marijuana both medicinal and recreational david powell is an economist at the rand corporation and the lead author of the study we reach mr powell in philadelphia mr pow wet link did you find between opioid deaths and marijuana laws are the main part of our finding we go to spend three of matter so there's been from previous research showing that adopt a medical marijuana laws in states is associated with a reduction in opioid prescriptions among for an populations and opioid related overdoses and in the general population uh we really wanted to dive into the mechanisms behind those reductions um and especially we wanted to focus on the role of dispenser dispensaries so we thought that dispensaries might matter because that's really how you increase access to medical marijuana no faith with adopt medical marijuana laws but don't say anything about the supply chain they don't uh protect dispensaries they don't have any dispensaries they actually don't see reductions and opioid related overdoses um but states with uh legally protected and operational spent three that they actually do see pretty large reduction but opioid related overdoses key let's unpack than it did so.

executive director united states jeff sessions david powell rand corporation marijuana oxfam international new york canada attorney philadelphia
"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"All right we're going to have to leave it there this via nima thank you you're welcome when he beer nima is the executive director of oxfam international we reached her in new york city we have more on the story on our website cbc dossier slash aih all all the opioid crisis continues to threaten lives both in canada and the us according to the national institutes of health more than one hundred fifteen americans die of an opioid overdoses every single day and so far a simple solution to the problem has of eight at lawmakers but according to a recent study there may be one surprising way to reduce opioid overdoses increase access to marijuana now this of course runs counter to the united states governor knss government's position attorney general jeff sessions has said he wants to limit access to marijuana both medicinal and recreational david powell is an economist at the rand corporation and the lead author of the study we reach mr powell in philadelphia mr pow wet link did you find between opioid deaths and marijuana laws are the main part of our finding we go to spend three of matter so there's been from previous research showing that adopt a medical marijuana laws in states is associated with a reduction in opioid prescriptions among for an populations and opioid related overdoses and in the general population uh we really wanted to dive into the mechanisms behind those reductions um and especially we wanted to focus on the role of dispenser dispensaries so we thought that dispensaries might matter because that's really how you increase access to medical marijuana no faith with adopt medical marijuana laws but don't say anything about the supply chain they don't uh protect dispensaries they don't have any dispensaries they actually don't see reductions and opioid related overdoses um but states with uh legally protected and operational spent three that they actually do see pretty large reduction but opioid related overdoses key let's unpack than it did so.

executive director united states jeff sessions david powell rand corporation marijuana oxfam international new york canada attorney philadelphia
"oxfam international" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Anc secretary general said he would respond by wednesday earlier mrs uma told his party he wanted to stay in power for another three to six months lindiwe zulu as a member of the end sees national executive committee i don't think he is reluctant to leave office because if he was reluctant to leave office he wouldn't have said he is ready to leave he's ready to resign he only just as for their eh pete at of time where he needs to wrap up as some of the things that he was already to wing but also remember that they had been a discussion about a transition which are both of us had already agreed to world news from the bbc prosecutors in guatemala's saying ex president the former finance minister who is now chairman of oxfam international have been arrested as part of a corruption investigation alberto khanom an honor better foreign tastes were detained in connection with an investigation into the purchase of buses for large public transport program during mr columns presidency serious serious differences have emerged between the us and britain over where to prosecute islamic state fighters captured in syria with details here's our security correspondent frank gardner the isis caliphate is no more but it's collapses left the uslead coalition with a fully problem what to do with hundreds possibly thousands of captured foreign fighters lobbing held by kurdish forces in syria britain's defence secretary govern williamson has been meeting his us counterpart in room today he's made it clear that the uk is not prepared to take back jihadists stripped of their british nationality by the home office with his us counterpart james mattis wants all the countries in the coalition against isis to take back their own citizens and make them stand trial in the country they set out from a close aide of wouldbe challenge yet the incumbent egyptian president in.

britain alberto khanom oxfam international bbc james mattis uk williamson frank gardner syria Anc us chairman finance minister president guatemala executive committee mrs uma six months
"oxfam international" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Of that the government shutdown had not happened on friday with the markets closed for today soak today is the day we see if wall street gets a case of the jitters while stocks were mixed at the opening bell there opt now you know there have been about a dozen of these shutdowns over the last thirty years they pretty much never have a longterm impact on the markets right now the dow is up thirty three the nasdaq is up thirty sp is up nine the rich are getting richer and who report finds that more than eighty percent of the wealth that was created last year went to the world's richest one percent report by oxfam international report that half of the people on earth no increase in wealth at all the reports being released ahead of the world economic forum which opens tomorrow in davos switzerland there's no business like the beer business and it can be a pretty tough business tried to keep up with the changing tastes of various customer demographics molson cores based in denver is out with a couple of new beverages to lure younger drinkers reds wicked fruit ranks of actually been around for awhile they have higher alcohol content and reds fruitflavored ails the newest wave of legal drinkers don't seem to be all that much in the beer so reds wicked watermelon amd the return of reds wicked strawberry kiwi will hit the store shelves on february first reg wickets singles jumped nine point three percent in sales volume last year maybe you've heard now that this is that a amazon opens a grocery store that as no cashiers no checkout out lying you go in and grab what you want and go sensors and cameras on the shelves record your purchase and that just put it on your account but what you save inconvenient you could be getting away when it comes to privacy only tracking what you are buying but how you are buying it we're you're walking to consumer expert heath or her zog says this gives amazon and potentially other.

nasdaq davos molson denver amazon government oxfam international eighty percent three percent thirty years one percent
"oxfam international" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam international" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Morning america's first news continues of this twenty second day of january taking a look at the market's at international markets were mixed today after global investors shrugged off the latest government shutdown here at home futures point to a lower opening on wall street the dollar edged up against the yen weakened against the euro benchmark crude rose to sixty 350 per barrel china's foreign ministry's defending its role in global trade after the us government said it was a mistake to support beijing's world trade organisation membership on terms that it failed to open up its economy a ministry spokesperson says china strictly complying with wto rules and is making great contributions to the global trading system beijing faces mounting complaints from washington and europe that china's benefited from global trade while hampering access s to its own markets oxfam international is once again seeking to put any quality at the heart of this week's deliberations of the rich and powerful at the swiss ski resort of davos oxfam's executive director says for example a ceo from one of the world's top five global fashioned brands has to work for just four days to earn when a garment worker in bangladesh will earn in an entire lifetime when he be says increasing the number of billionaires is quote not a side of a thriving economy but a symptom of a failing economic system here at home thousands of federal employees began their weekends gripped with doubt uncertain of when they'll be able to return to work and how long they'll have to go without being paid after a bitter political dispute and washington triggered the government shutdown many government operations will continue us troop full stay at their posts mail we'll be delivered but almost half of the two million civilian federal workers will be barred from doing their jobs if the government shutdown extends beyond today lawmakers have scheduled a new vote to try to end that impasse meanwhile the shutdown planned posted on the treasury department's website shows nearly forty four percent of the irs has eighty thousand employees more than eighty thousand employees we'll be from being furloughed.

america beijing china washington europe executive director ceo bangladesh treasury department irs foreign ministry us wto oxfam international davos oxfam forty four percent twenty second four days