35 Burst results for "Oxfam"

Oxfam: 11 People Die Of Hunger Each Minute Around the Globe

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Oxfam: 11 People Die Of Hunger Each Minute Around the Globe

"In a report titled the hunger virus multiplies Oxfam says the death toll from famine outpaces that of covert nineteen which kills around seven people per minute the anti poverty organization Oxfam says eleven people die of hunger each minute and that the number facing the famine like conditions around the globe has increased six times over the last year Oxfam America's president and C. E. O. Abby marksman says the statistics are staggering but we must remember that these because I made up of individual people facing unimaginable suffering Max boot adds unrelenting conflict on top of the cove it nineteen economic fallout and the worsening the climate crisis has pushed more than five hundred twenty thousand people to the brink of starvation I'm Charles de Ledesma

Anti Poverty Organization Oxfa Oxfam C. E. O. Abby Marksman Max Boot America Charles De Ledesma
The G7's Fuzzy Climate Pledges

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:39 min | 4 months ago

The G7's Fuzzy Climate Pledges

"Weekend. Summit of the g seven has concluded on the matter of the pandemic. The blocks pledge was clear. Cut it will deliver a billion vaccine doses to poor countries over the next year but another priority was climate change naturalist sir david and broke had pressed for cooperation on climate in a video message to the gathering the decisions. We make this decade in particular. The decisions made by the most economically. Advanced nations are the most important in human history. Britain's prime minister. Boris johnson suggested the leaders at the summit would meet the moment. We were clear this weekend. Action has to start with us in the end commitments on climate seemed straightforward solid emissions targets. A move away from coal a renewal of an annual hundred billion dollar budget to the developing world to deal with climate change but campaigners found the outcome disappointing oxfam called the summit a colossal failure before in the history of the g. Seven has been such a big filing in contrast to what needs to be the g. Seven summit serves as a template for the world can expect from the enormous cop twenty six climate meeting later this year and on that score the blocks pledges leave a little too much to the imagination. It's encouraging that climate change was at the heart. As the communique that came out to the g seven yesterday catrine break is the economist environment editor. And certainly there was some very lofty words in their relation to climate targets. But what's disappointing is that. They were incredibly vague on detail.

Sir David Boris Johnson Britain Oxfam Catrine
Gaza: Now What?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:37 min | 5 months ago

Gaza: Now What?

"Earlier this week. I spoke to us. my mercy. oxfam's women's economic empowerment in gaza. When we spoke on wednesday it was the tenth day of israel's airstrikes on gaza. I began by asking asthma if she could describe what it was like trying to live in gaza during israel's recent air campaign to be honest. I don't think that there is any words in the english dictionary. That can describe what we are experiencing. I know tha that each dictionary to experience. The current israeli aggression in the feed and panic and the harder is that we are witnessing and how we are interacting with that the trauma and how our families feeling is something that nowhere can even describe. Our daily life is for me. It's a whole visiting jong's sounds of our rationing and from one time to another the sound of warplanes that my nephew's nolan good. Leave the tail. I tell them that it's fireworks so now the narrative i'm sending them to keep them calm. Is that when you hear the word hovering onto our house. It means that our plane cannot throw a missile on the same place where it standing it worked a little bit. Now whenever the hear the warplane or the hit the missile. They run to their mother to cray. There are eleven years old. they didn't even know what sprayer is but now every five minutes. Run alert motherless spray.

Gaza Oxfam's Women's Economic Empow Israel Asthma Jong Nolan Cray
Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:35 min | 8 months ago

Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

"Henry donahue is the executive director of save the music a national nonprofit that helps students schools and communities reach their full potential through the power of making music prior to save the music. Henry was the ceo and head of partnerships at purpose a digital strategy and creative agency that focuses on social impact projects. Notable clients included every town for gun safety the aclu oxfam international. The ford foundation nike. I- kia audi and liverpool f c. Henry has also worked as a media. Executive focused on digital product development is held senior positions at discover conde nast primedia and lendingtree dot com spent most of the nineteen nineties on the road across the usa as a fundraiser for political candidates including us senators. Jay rockefeller from west virginia. And ron wyden from oregon at the same time. He was playing guitar in an indie rock band and running into small independent record label. Henry has an abbey in american history from harvard college and an mba from darden graduate school of business at the university of virginia henry. Great to have you with us. Sharing the story of save the music and the lessons contained within the be here could see joe thanks. Hey i'm delighted to have you. So why don't we start sharing with our listeners. The origin story of save the music. What was the germ of its mission and tell us a little bit about the journey. Yeah i mean safe. The music's mission and vision are the same today as they were back. joni urine. John sykes aretha franklin one. Dvd's categories aretha flying sleep dion and Every student every public schools should be making music as part of their education. I think you had a great overview of why at the intro. We know for decades of research that when schools have music students do better. The school does better. The community does better In normal times. I travel all around the country even in the toughest schools when you get to that band room or that choir room. You know. it's that joy and inspiration and hope for the future and all those things. So i i love going to high schools middle schools elementary schools. I love interacting advanced features van kits. It's amazing the landscape out there. Is that most schools in the. Us do have music as part of their school day. there's a quote for geoffrey canada That i'm sure i'm angling but it's something to the effect of if you wanna see what a quality education looks like. Look what rich people do about. Eighty percent of american schools have music and art as part of their school day And the programs that caught over the years. And we're we do. Most of our work are in schools that serve black students immigrant students and in rural rural students as well. What do you love about your job. Henry donahue because you loved this i love so it you you mentioned. I mean i've worked in politics and advocacy and social impact in various ways for for a long time You know at purpose Which some of your listeners might be familiar with worked on gun safety. We worked on marriage. Equality we worked on A project involving immigrants and You know the fight for the fifteen dollars minimum wage. All of which were were were deeply deeply satisfying. But when chris mccarthy who's the guy runs. mtv now came to me in we had this conversation about the h. one. Save the music which five six years ago you know still had a very solid sort of core group of program team people working there doing amazing work but has sort of been what i call know an orphan corporate asset on. Cbs empire. You know. I was presented with the opportunity to do the thing that i did for my job. Which was you know corporate impact strategy advocacy and combined with the thing that i spent my whole life in love with which which is music. Which by the way you. You don't have the benefit of seeing henry. But i do. And i see a keyboard. And i see a guitar so yeah. This is a music guy. You're a. You're a an advocate Andrew musician and you get to do both in the same job. That's pretty awesome. Yeah i think this is sort of at the core of was eighth. music does Which is i remember myself as a pretty angry and somewhat directionless

Henry Donahue Henry Aclu Oxfam International Kia Audi Conde Nast Primedia Darden Graduate School Of Busi University Of Virginia Henry Joe Thanks John Sykes Aretha Franklin Lendingtree Jay Rockefeller Ford Foundation Ron Wyden Harvard College Liverpool West Virginia Joni Dion Oregon
"oxfam" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"oxfam" Discussed on WTOP

"I'm Deborah Rodriguez. President Biden hopes to keep new, more contagious and potentially deadly covert variants from coming into the U. S. By reinstating travel restrictions rescinded by the Trump administration, Dr Anthony Fauci tells CBS this morning clearly will be helpful. We we we have concern. About the mutation that's in South Africa. We're looking at it very actively. It is clearly a different and more ominous than the one in the U. K. A. Dr Fauci is confident President Biden will be able to carry out his vow to vaccinate 100 million people in 100 days. That's the floor, not a ceiling. It's a reasonable goal. Madonna says it's vaccine is effective against variants, but it's developing a new booster just in case one drug drug maker has dropped out of the vaccine race. Merc says two shots it was working on have produced poor results in early stage studies. The pandemic has widened the wealth inequality. Gap. Eight. Charity Oxfam says the world's 10 wealthiest individuals have made enough money during the pandemic to vaccinate everyone on the planet and pay off the losses suffered by the poorest executive director Gabriella Boucher. 1000 billionaires recover their pandemic losses within nine months for the world millions of poor people. Will take more than 10 years. Oxfam wants to see a one time tax levied on the world's richest people and corporations. Vicki Barker CBS NEWS London Democrats are moving ahead with the plan to convict former President Trump on a charge of inciting supporters who stormed the capital correspondent Nicole Killian. The article will be delivered to the Senate this evening by the House impeachment managers. At least 17 Republican senators would have to join Democrats in order to convict the former president. But some are now question In the need for a trial. A former senior manager at Boeing, who blew the whistle on the Max 7 37 before two fatal crashes is worried Now that the planes taking off again whistle blower Ed Pearson fear serious problems with the electrical systems. I'm concerned that there are potential defects in these airplanes that stand back to when the airplanes were manufactured, and I believe that these defects could potentially cause future tragedies. S and P futures are up two Dow futures down 1 30 to the sweet smell of chocolate..

President Biden president Dr Anthony Fauci Oxfam President Trump Trump administration Deborah Rodriguez CBS South Africa Madonna Senate Vicki Barker senior manager Ed Pearson Nicole Killian Gabriella Boucher. Boeing executive director
"oxfam" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:14 min | 10 months ago

"oxfam" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Killed several and a people homemade garland and forced of dried tens orange slices. of thousands to evacuate. For a moment Houses it and feels other like buildings home were destroyed and it and almost crops could be flattened. But Speaking until Sarah to Al Jazeera body Ray, he Prime Minister who's Frank a U. S citizen Bonnie Marama has the gave right a simple to bring her explanation husband and daughter for the into frequent the United storms States. that are ravaging The holidays Fiji. feel The wrong. world is getting Her woman. husband off sheen. The stones Is a Christian are getting refugee stronger. from Iran. In this video, the trees Part of being a behind refugee the prime is minister like are living whipping in the wildly short term. You're in always the wind. hoping Every one you'll of us be leaving soon. must And teach so, this climate few yeah, catastrophes Decorating for Christmas. Something with like that deadly almost seriousness. feels like a PG active is one of the Pacific surrender Islands in that's most a way like at risk you're from saying, climate OK, change. we're Diplomat Here now. sacked Chandra By here Prasad she says means an the apartment government has a and long the Turkish term town plan of never to try should to hear. prevent the kind The of town damage sits that Cyclone in a dry, yasi plain brought. valley We are bordered relocating by ancient the caves villages carved into which porous are on the frontline. volcanic rock. We have identity. By It's beautiful, 40 villages, Sarah which says, are very constable. but it loses its But sheen. moving an When you entire can't leave village is complicated in 2014. for a She came lot here of reasons, as a temporary and teacher it's expensive, for American says families Prasad. living He's in Turkey. features ambassador Then to she the U. fell N. in love with You a don't machine. have the money for them. Who was staying We've in finished next year to five other your first side day. It different was stages. seven hours long and And one cafe yes, the resources here and become available. despite We're being so relocating different, it felt these really villages easy to like higher we clicked ground. right away If Fiji option wants to make agrees itself climate falling resilient, in love with her it would cost because close it was to $5 important for me to billion over believe the in next God decade. living Christianity That's according by myself. to an estimate from the I World would say Bank. that as if someone This is was way coming way for a Muslim beyond background. us, I paid and a lot here's for that. one of the big challenges Neuron with climate looking change. for someone to be a strong People in and rich solid countries in have historically whatever. done I believe the most she to cause should believe it. in that, But too, people after in poor about countries a year will of feel dating its impacts. if she The worst learned that the UN's they already refugee are. resettlement It is certainly office had assigned a him matter to be resettled of equity, in the United and States. it is a matter of To him and Sarah. justice. It was a Janine sign. fell. We Sin were is kind the U. of N a ambassador that point. Is from this bullies, going someplace serious? She says Is money it not? to help developing It was countries deal with as climate if Sheen change went has through been the security an important interviews part of international and background climate checks negotiations needed to for decades. immigrate to the United Social States. Sarah economic started thinking about Or where you they'd could land call it climate Maybe justice. Fargo, North It is Dakota really near her parents. the underlying Minneapolis, rationale for where there were friends adaptation and more finance options for jobs. adaptation finances In December of money 2016. to help developing They got countries engaged. deal But with those the impacts plans came of climate to a change. screeching halt It's usually after mentioned President in the same Trump breath imposed as another the travel type ban of finance and slashed for mitigation. the number of refugees That's allowed to help countries into got the U. S. their greenhouse gas That goes emissions completely against in 2009 the entire developed purpose countries of the refugee pledged system. $100 Manar billion Wahid a year is an for attorney those for two the categories E C l U by 2020 American Civil Liberties that comes Union. from grants It goes and loans against from our governments values and that the private goes against sector. America Ages. that Ambassador we are Prasad says aspiring that kind of to money be. would help The Fiji A. C. adapt L U is faster one of the organizations diphtheria that adapting filed class fast action then lawsuits each time to challenge the catastrophe the Trump strikes administration's says we will travel not be bans. falling further It behind. is an administration We don't have figures that has for targeted 2020 black and brown yet, immigrants but a report in particular from the Organization to prevent them for from coming Economic to the Cooperation United States. and Development To make Helminen them 2018 fearful, developed countries uncomfortable were still hidden, short of pushed that 100 into the billion shadows. target This year, by Trump more than cut $20 the number of refugees billion. allowed to The enter funding the U. has S been growing to 15,000. over the years, but one Less jury than 1/5 meth I of the quota from the World set Resources by the Obama Institute administration says. Even in 2016 still, it's just not happening lot fast of potential enough. refugees This are instead is most trying true, for other she types says, of for visas, the adaptation like getting sponsored piece of by the a pie. family member. That's the Immigration money to help lawyers countries say deal with that things can like work droughts and storms unless made applicants worse by climate air from change. one of the country's We know that named in Trump's adaptation visa ban. action likes even further behind. According to that Always C D report, adaptation funding adds up to only about 1/5 of overall climate financing. And that is, despite a promise written into the Paris climate agreement, pledging a balance in mitigation and adaptation money, he's shockingly low. These are real signals actual speak much louder than words. These are the signals off the prominence and visibility that we're giving to adaptation. Not that great Jesse Young from Oxfam America explains that Projects to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions are easier to fund. It is easier to finance things that generate cash. If you build a solar array, you build a wind farm. It generates revenue. You can securitize that you can sell a bond based on it because there's a revenue stream adaptation, on the other hand, doesn't usually turn a profit for investors. If you are Elevating a community so they don't flood or elevating a generator station or building a seawall or helping a farming community adapt to saltwater intrusion into their lands. That doesn't always generate money..

Sarah economic Fiji Prasad Trump Iran Al Jazeera Prime Minister Bonnie Marama Sheen Pacific surrender Islands Ray Frank UN Dakota Jesse Young United Social States Wahid Cyclone
"oxfam" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 11 months ago

"oxfam" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rewritten. Let's do it re worth teaches at Oxford University's Environmental Change Institute. She admits that as a kid she was a bit sheltered. I let her you know happy, pretty innocently life. So the world on the TV news and it was much bigger than the world. I lived in through that TV screen. Ray Worth saw the Ethiopian famine of the early 19 eighties, which killed an estimated one million people. She saw the widening hole in the ozone layer and other environmental problems. Tonight all economics would be the subject to help me. Have the tools to help sort it out, boy, Were you wrong Was I said re worth did go on to study economics at Oxford. She learned all the foundational knowledge he was asked to learn. She memorized the diagram she was asked to memorize. She felt she had a pretty good grip on basic theories like supply and demand, but she's frustrated. There just wasn't adoption to study anything. Environmentally. It didn't exist still re worth did get her economics degree as well as a master's in economics, Also from Oxford. She then went to work as an economist for the government of Zanzibar for the United Nations. For the anti poverty agency Oxfam. Along the way, she finally figured out what had been missing from her economics, education. Focus on humanity and the planet Japan Redrawing those economics diagrams should memorize so diligently at university doodling away. She came up with something Totally different rather than jagged lines and aggressive arrows. She came up with the circle inside another circle. It was essentially I don't know. I know it sounds ridiculous, right? A doughnut, but within that doughnut Ray worth saw. Great promise. Think of it this compass for human prosperity in the 21st century. How does this work? So imagine it don't not the kind of got a hole in the middle. Okay? Your standard doughnut. And we want everybody to be living in the donor. I'll be honest. I had a hard time getting the visuals of the doughnut idea at first, so stick.

Ray Worth Oxford Oxford University Environmental Change Institute United Nations Zanzibar Japan
Sexual abuse a problem for the whole UN system

UN News

12:02 min | 1 year ago

Sexual abuse a problem for the whole UN system

"The un's first of victims rights advocate. Jane jenkins has confronted uncomfortable reality sexual abuse. And it's haitian or s a short carried out by un personnel. Most reason report detailed eighty s cases aren't peacekeeping and political missions in one thousand nine hundred and ninety five allegations recorded at other un entities three years on from the start of her mandate which began in september. Two thousand seventeen. I spoke to him as connors. Who said that. Since it's become more apparent at the ongoing issue of sexual abuse and exploitation goes beyond the peacekeeping sector we saw in two thousand and eighteen very the early part the allegations relating to oxfam in haiti which made it clear that humanitarian engage in this behavior. I think there's been a big movement. I don't know how much i i mean. It's very difficult to assess yourself in terms of achievements. But i think the understanding that we have a system wide problem worth more than a problem and that a victims rights approach has to be taken system wide I think that's now understood. The implementation is more complicated We're moving in the right direction. These victims trust has been abused. The trust in the united nations has been abused. How then is it possible for you to convince victims that you as the as the right field rights advocate. You'll team are people that can be trusted. The field victims rights advocates. They are individuals who are able to generate trust and certainly where abuses concerned Jeff neatly are an sexual sexual exploitation. Also definitely this Affects trust in the organization but at the same time There is a little bit of research on what people feel even in the context. Where in abuse and exploitation they do feel that the united nations has more to offer in very difficult situations than even in contexts where Trust has been abused to To a certain to a high extent but in the context of the work of the field victims rights advocates. They send a lot of time with. Were we describe as community based complaints networks in other words with Community structures which are more or less comprised of the desert various in various context police. The religious bodies. I'm a children's rights bodies women's rights bodies etc and They engage with a lot of capacity building information sharing and things of that nature and they also make it clear that They are available to have complaints brought to them and more than that they do. Concrete things in order to deal with the issues that confront Confront victims and in general what they are interested in is medical attention psychological care ways to put them in a position where they can gain livelihoods and if they have children born of sexual exploitation and abuse. They really want to say efforts. Some real efforts put in place. So that The parental responsibility of the father of the child is brought to bear and That's that's really does Re rebuild trust in an anonymous way just small things. i mean. they're not really that small. If you're the person involved One of my victims rights advocates Recently worked with the ministry of women are in one of the countries to ensure the bank accounts could be established for women with With successful claims relating to the fathers of their children and that's difficult to see we failed to remember. There are practical things. You can't get remittances if you don't have a bank account. You can't get a bank account if you don't have a job so it's those nitty gritty. Little things really go a long way to rebuild. Trust i've seen it happen. I went to an example. I can give you is. I went to haiti in april. Two thousand and eighty. I met with the women with children who have unresolved paternity claims. It was an uncomfortable meeting as you could imagine. And they were very forthright. They said we've seen people like you before you come. You talk to us you tell us oh laced wonderful things then you go away. We hear nothing. And i said to them what what would make things different for you. And they talked about the fact that their kids couldn't go to school. And i said well i can't promise anything but i will do my best And i was able with the help of the victims rights advocate there at the time Moved on now to get a little bit of money pulled together which supported school fees and And school supplies for these children. And apparently he the feel victims. Rights advocate met with these women at the end of two thousand and eighteen. And they sit him. She kept her promise. And it just makes a big difference. I mean knows a. It's the things that really Work a small step can rebuild. Trust to to a great extent kind of collaboration. Are you getting from member. States from the countries contributing troops some of whom have committed these abuses is clearly a very important part of facilitating paternity tests making of accountability house. I it will depend on the relevant member state but but there have been some very encouraging encouraging steps food with regard to Several member states In particular with regard to paternity claims. This is i really do. Focus on. Accountability generally is Something that i do. Focus on within that context. I focused on what is spoken of move by the victims and that is the issue of The support that the father should give to a child born sexual exploitation and abuse. So i've i've put a big focus on that a narrow encouraging signs with regard to some states we had a very interesting A webinar with member states about three weeks ago with south africa talked about The steps it's taking with respect to Some of its troops with regard to paternity claims so are the signs are encouraging and when you have one two states who step forward that creates an interesting of the states who don't want to be left behind so to speak and in in view of that we are convening. I'm with with the conduct. Disciplined service with I am convening a working level meeting Next year on resolution of paternity claims Within the states and Hopefully we'll be able to to developer sort of coherent roadmap least forgot to the way four but all i can say is the signs are encouraging I'm i'm suppose something unusual. Un staff member. I would say things are encouraging rather than brilliant and it is a price they said. It's bringing everybody along but if you had some states who going forward that will really encourage others now. This of course should never happened. Sexploitation abuse by angle but particularly people. Who are supposed to be the protectors. Do you think now office three years. This is something that can be stopped or is it really just a question of mitigating. This fisher well it you know. It's a un staff member. This behavior is very Not only is. It is very hurtful to victims obviously to communities flies in the face of what we're supposed to be doing and of course it. It hurts other stuff members that who feel the which This is this is just a a a betrayal of the oval the ideals about seventy five. He is of a organization I am never i. I don't think that the behavior is inevitable and accordingly. I think the behavior is a behavior that can be stoked I think come. I think i think we have various levels of perpetrators however so some Some they will be Some may will be perpetrators Bound to perpetrate. If you know what. I mean But often a matter of Alva different power extreme vulnerability situations in extreme vulnerability and opportunities. So i think there'a the the issue of the power imbalances something. That's certainly we can. We can deal with addressing the whole culture of exploitation moving into that abuses. Something we can do. But it needs a lot of work and It needs some consistent work. We can see that it's possible to change behavior. It may be more difficult to chain attitude. But i think certainly from my point of view. The behavior can be stopped juicy. Very good examples. I saw in one of my visits Worker for police commissioner. Who had put in place various In in a in a particular context where Whether there was the the police who engaged in the the Police from the police contributing countries that engaged in a lot of sexual exploitation abused road right down by really paying attention to mitigation measures looking at early warning just continually raising consciousness of the total unacceptability of the behavior. And this had worked. The numbers had definitely come down. So things can be done and of course the basic issue is that we're working in contexts. Where those who do become subject to this Conduct often in a very often considered Contextual consideration of women and children in some of these contexts is is pretty bad also so they have the legal framework policy framework doesn't necessarily won't put women on women and children on the same level as men. The behavior which is engaged in by on u n personnel tolerated in the broader community. It requires a lot of work and not just in an isolated way but Also dealing with the challenges that confront those who are in extremely vulnerable situations in the countries where we operate.

UN Jane Jenkins United Nations Ministry Of Women Haiti Connors Oxfam Jeff South Africa
AstraZeneca pauses coronavirus vaccine trial, shares slip on rollout doubts

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

AstraZeneca pauses coronavirus vaccine trial, shares slip on rollout doubts

"No Work? No pay no food coronavirus lockdowns have forced many people all over the world to wonder where their next meal's will come from according to Matthew True. Scott Oxfam International's head of Humanitarian Policy About one hundred and twenty one million people have been pushed to the edge of starvation. This year not of course is across the main hotspots you would expect Yemen Democratic Republic of Congo of Gunston Venezuela, south. Sudan we're also seeing hunger coming up in otherwise middle income or developing countries. India South Africa Brazil CETERA. Look at a situation in the world where you have about sixty sixty, one percent working in the informal economy when that denied that daily income forced to stay at home they no longer get that income and that forces them into some of the negative coping strategies and that's what makes this crisis so unique. People. Couldn't travel to work which meant they couldn't make money and they couldn't buy food but this isn't just a short term problem. Is it Yeah and it has sort of long term impacts where, for instance, if you take people who are living day to day selling milk, if they can't sell milk for a few days, it gets point whether then have to do something to have food and income then have to sell their means of income. So selling the cow which had been providing them and then conquered back to generate income and same happens instead of urban areas where people who had been, for instance, taxi drivers after. So long of not being able to take fares and give taxi rights eventually then have to start selling off assets to cope and that's where we're really. Seeing potential long-term structural breakdown, and as you say, this is a problem that existed before the pandemic. So how do we tackle it this time around does it require new solutions? It does with sort of proposing three solutions. The I of course is that we need to increase humanitarian aid drastically the U. N. Global Humanitarian Appeal has called for about ten point, three billion dollars in humanitarian aid. But only about twenty, four percent of that is funded. So less than a quarter, the second thing that we can do is cancelled some of the debt that could free up up to a trillion dollars, and then of course, the final thing is. Exactly, as you say, we do need to change how system works. We need to build a more fair and more robust food system. We need to build a system that's ready to deal with the climate shocks that's able to produce sustainable food. One that supports a small-scale Farmers Informal Workers, Matthew Scott head of humanitarian policy at Oxfam International. Thanks for your time. Thank you so much

Humanitarian Policy Scott Oxfam International U. N. Global Humanitarian Appe Matthew True Farmers Informal Workers Gunston Venezuela Oxfam International Democratic Republic Of Congo Matthew Scott Sudan India Yemen
"oxfam" Discussed on Geek Freaks

Geek Freaks

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Geek Freaks

"Came out like right afterwards for weeks afterwards saying like, Oh but this is because the game is decided well, it'll look better this way an oil, the brutes just kind of look like that and everybody was like, no, that's not going to be acceptable. You guys need to do something. So that opens up this other problem where okay. Well. The games coming out in November. So we wanted to change the graphics on. This is going to be this huge endeavor for our staff. We're going to have them working long hours and already kind of slow down what with the pandemic you're going to have this thing we talked about a few times of the podcast crunch culture where it's like work work work work. Twelve hour thirteen. Days Tomatoes, products done in time, and that's another thing that Spencer had mentioned like we gotta worry about the health of our team. We don't necessarily need them working these long days and then burning them out when we need one of the projects answers not good for the for the actual employs you can. You can create some real problems there and so I think on that aspect is always good. I'm always kind of rooting for employees on these because I know that game developers are unsung heroes that are constantly working. So I? Think on that side is a good idea to but I really WanNa, talk about here is. Is this a good call for Halo in the long run or back all do you think this is going to improve sales overall or Hampton sales on both halo and xbox separately squeeze or a generous go I what do you think? How's this going to affect the sales? I think he's GonNa improve those now. I. Think the worst you can do is put something out, and then like you said with the crunch culture is GonNa kill your employees on if that gets up right with social media out anywhere and even kill your fan base. But then also I would rather as a player Oxfam began to come out. But if they're gonNA produce better content in delayed a game. It's worth the wait I think that's going to attract more people with the short-term weight than in just a push out in have something that is really attracting. Or have some negative feedback Ya. Another thing to think about too is halo was about to compete against PS five. So you have you know in November 'cause we also found out that xbox coming on. November probably the first week. So you have halo competing with PS five. When it's something they put so much time into already as it is before all the changes that they're kind of like look we need to make sure that this doesn't have a hard time. So if it comes out like march to May area you have time for people to buy their PS five. In, their their bank account recuperate a little bit as a going by series x four the halo. So we could have this second wave of new Gen purchases coming in a few months I. think generally, it's a good idea i. think might be something we see in the future maybe they'll constantly kind of push one system off the other to keep them separated. Jonathan. We we know so far that neither companies releasing the price for the systems because of they're trying to undercut each other. So they're kind of waiting. I do think that what do you think is a good price point to go out and buy an xbox without a halo involved. What do you think? I'm thinking like three hundred bucks. Ninety Nine.

Oxfam Spencer Jonathan
Being vocal.

The Emma Guns Show

04:45 min | 1 year ago

Being vocal.

"Hello, and welcome to another episode of the Magan Show I'm your host and we're going to Warner, and this episode is a mini show, and it's about everything that is going on in the world right now. And by that, I mean the mud, Jewish Lloyd and racism, not just in America, but around the world. If you're a regular listener, this Mayfield coming a little bit out of the blue. Out of left field, maybe because you are probably aware I actively avoid any political debate on the podcast I want everyone to feel all welcome to listen, and so on a couple of occasions on this show when guests have expressed their feelings about the current president for example I've been quick to interject. Something like everyone is welcome because truthfully. I really dislike. The idea of someone listening to my show and feeling they are excluded are not welcome in the conversation. My podcast tends to send to around the topics of beauty, health, wellness and business, which are universally my opinion, therefore I want anyone with an interest in those topics to feel. This is a platform they can enjoy. And what I'm about to say doesn't mean that I now want anyone to feel unwelcome, but I feel it's important that I vocal about what I believe in because. If I've learned anything from last week, it's the silence or being neutral tends to benefit the people i. don't want to support more than it does. The people I do want to support. I have never stated publicly the I anti animal abuse because I believed it was implied I have never stated publicly that I believe abusive and Against Man Woman or child to be wrong. Because I thought it was implied, I have never stated publicly. I am an anti-racist because of my privilege. And a friend said to me earlier this week. If you're genuinely shocked, you really haven't been paying attention. And so it's commitment. Stop paying attention. I have in the past taken this Switzerland neutral position, and in the last week I've had Oxfam myself why why haven't I? Actively had those conversations on this podcast or just indulge them or Become involved, and in all honesty I've narrowed it down to two things. Firstly, I am a coward and I don't want to say anything that might make someone just like me. And secondly I don't feel articulate knowledgeable enough, so I let other people do it for me. To address the former if someone decides, they don't like me all my content. Because of a standby take, then I'm going to be okay with that. To address the latter, it's my responsibility now to become knowledgeable to educate myself so that I can be articulate and contribute positively to the conversations I feel strongly about and stand up for the people. The causes I want to stand up for. I have friends in this industry. Who used that platforms in a way? I M too scared to you and I am learning from their example. This however will take time. I don't believe in Tokenism, click to victim or performance of. Them it's not enough for your protest. Only extend as far as blacked out instagram posts I'm virtue signaling with this episode, or by what I've just said given recent events is really clear. It's not enough anymore to just not be racist to be actively anti-racist. We need to start stepping up and speaking out against racial injustices, and we need to stand up for the basic human rights of our fellow citizens, because it is absolutely the right thing to do. I have never considered the possibility that I was contributing to racism by participating in the conversation. I genuinely thought progress than been made, and that's so wrong of me. So. This episode is me acknowledging are I've been wrong. Admitting the need to do better and letting you know that I am making a commitment to make these changes, so I can be an ally and if there's one thing I've learned from. Four years of doing this podcast is that I am never once been alone in my thoughts and feelings so i. hope that by saying this out loud. You may be feeling similar things, and that will lead to a positive discussion. This episode is imperfect, but I felt it was important to say something I. Am aware that I am going to make mistakes as I learn and educate myself but I would rather mess up and be corrected now so that I can learn then continue to be silent. I would really love to extend this discussion to the facebook group, because that really is social media at its best, and are also wonderful, wonderful contributors and members of that group and I would love the opportunity to learn from year to learn from each other. Right now the way any any one of us can help is by signing petitions donating texting or calling, but what we can continue to do is to educate ourselves because this won't go away once. The topic stops trending and as I said I am committed to. Taking stand learning and I don't mind falling on my face. If it means that I come out of it at better person, he stands up for the things that I believe in.

Warner Mayfield President Trump Lloyd Facebook Switzerland America Tokenism Oxfam
"oxfam" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"oxfam" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The one hundred sixty billion dollars some needed Oxfam points act would be less than ten percent of the fiscal stimulus in the U. S. to deal with the economic impact of the pandemic scientific data has shown a marked decrease in air pollution in urban areas of Europe where there's a lockdown to curb covert nineteen satellite images showed lower than average levels of nitrogen dioxide in major cities Sanjay Dutt's Gupta has more details images released by the European Space Agency show Brussels Paris Madrid Milan and Frankfort or recorded a reduction in average levels of nitrogen dioxide between the fifth and the twenty fifth of March compared with the same period last year this coincides roughly with lockdowns in many European countries where road transport the largest source of nitrogen oxides has been severely corrupted output slowed at gas emitting factories findings by the agency reviewed air pollution causes around four hundred thousand premature deaths in Europe every year president xi Jim paying has exhorted Chinese firms to resume activity as the corona virus pandemic continues to diminish in the country where it started state television showed Mr xi visiting a factory in the major port city of Ningbo on Sunday saying the government would have just support policies for small and medium size businesses to protect them from the economic fallout of the pandemic on Friday the ruling polit bureau indicated the government would he checks huge sums to revive economic activity this is the B. B. C. news Libya has become the latest country in the Middle East to release detainees in response to the corona virus the internationally recognized government in Tripoli has sold more than four hundred prisoners to be freed Saudi Arabia has sold around two hundred and fifty people imprisoned on relatively minor charges to be released Iran too has released detainees although there are also reports for at least two prison breakouts Carew's economy minister has announced an economic stimulus package equal to twelve percent of the country's entire domestic output Maria Antoinette to Alva said about twenty six billion dollars would be injected in six tranches to counter the effect of coronavirus on Peru's economy proves important mining and tourism sectors will be a focus of the package the number of confirmed cases of covert nineteen continue to increase in some of the small island nations and territories of the Pacific where the comparative isolation has failed to keep them all in totally free of the virus Phil Mercer reports officials in Guam a warning the number of coronavirus Casey is unlikely to surge there are fears health services in the Pacific won't be able to cope with large numbers of infections a weeklong lockdown has begun in Tonga as the authorities tried to keep the archipelago free of cultivate nineteen Samoa's efforts to keep the virus away from me shoals of being states by a grown to five million dollars from the World Bank a rapid response unit created by the British government to tackle the spread of fake news and misinformation about the.

Explaining Occam's Razor

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:43 min | 1 year ago

Explaining Occam's Razor

"Today we're going to discuss a problem solving principle that many of you probably heard of and we've we've definitely referenced on the show before and that is autumn's razor that's right. It's it's one of the classics one of the hits of like the skeptical toolkit and I think it's a really one to get into because it's something that is widely known but in different ways and often To whatever extent it actually does have value. It often gets deployed in ways that do not actually make use of its value right like like an actual razor blade. It may be misused from time to time. Yes now. What one specific place that. I know we've talked about it before. Is that is in the context of Carl? Sagan's recommendations for the the tools of skeptical thinking he these out and one of them is autumn's razor. He writes all comes razor this convenient rule of thumb urges us when faced with two hypotheses that explain the data equally well to choose the simpler. Okay now why did we end up talking about this today? We we were in the studio the other day Discussing upcoming episodes. And you said that. Seth had mentioned this our producer Seth Yeah. I was in here and set a nickel Johnson was working on. A crossword puzzle was at the New York. Times he tells us it was the New York Times And he he asked me how to spell. Autumn is in razor and I took a guess at it and I can't I can't remember. I was correct. I was probably wrong but also probably hit one of the multiple acceptable spell things for razor But anyway we started talking about it and I was like. Oh Yeah we we could do that as an episode and so here we are. I'm very glad we picked this because I think one of my personal favorite genres of of critical thinking is is being skeptical about the tools of skepticism. You know is sometimes people who identify skeptics can ca- can I get a little cocky. You know they get a little too sure of themselves about what the reasoning tools they use and it's worth putting those tools to the test. Giving them a closer look. Yeah absolutely now I have to say I definitely remember. The first time I encountered the concept of outcomes raise or at least the first time I encountered it and it on some level stuck with me and that was when viewed the Nineteen ninety-seven film adaptation of Carl Sagan's novel contact the movie. I can't watch without crying. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah well. Why does it make you cry? Oh God there's no point especially the first part where you know it. Zooms out from the earth and you're hearing the radio signals go back in time and then and then it shows the young. L. E. Airway experimenting with the Ham Radio and her dad's helping her and get so emotional. Yeah Yeah it's it's been a very long I. I haven't seen it since initially came out and in fact the main thing I remember from it is seen in which jodie foster's character. Eleanor Airway has having this conversation with Matthew mcconaughey as character. Who How old was Matthew mcconaughey at this point? I don't even know how old he is. Now is this ageless demon but anyway. Here's this character He's scared Palmer. Joss in the scene in question foster's character brings up autumn's razor in a discussion on the nature of God she. She says well which is ultimately the simpler hypothesis that an all powerful God exists or the human beings made got up in order to feel better about things and then this ultimately comes back around is kind of flipped on her later on film regarding her characters encounter with an extraterrestrial intelligence right. Is it more likely that she really had the experience? She thinks she had with With all these aliens or that. She like hallucinated. Something that would give her emotional closure. Yeah and so. Yeah I think I was in high school at the time so it was. It was interesting concept especially in the context of of atheism verses of faith in a creator deity inserted to suddenly have this tool from the chest. Skeptical thinking just thrown up on the table and you and seemingly used by both sides. Well Yeah I think this is funny. This is a great example because it highlights some of the most common features of all comes razor as it is actually used to like. It's often invoked in a kind of fuzzy way without an objective measure Just kind of invoked to back up your intuitions about the probability of something right but another thing is that this example shows how. It's not always easy to find a way to compare the simplicity of two different propositions like is the existence of God a simple hypothesis or a complicated one that I think that really depends on kind of how you feel about it like like what kind of objective measure can you come up with to evaluate that question right. It's GonNa depend so much on your like your background your culture what you grew up with. And you know how you how you've come to view the possibility of Of God's existence. Is it just kind of the bedrock of your your worldview or is it this thing from the outside that you are contemplating and also how do you view it at like the coherence of the idea? Do you view it as something. That's like That's full of all these little kind of ad hoc accommodations or something that is a holistic coherent Sort of like fact about nature. Yeah you know I it's I I think this is a perfect example. That shows like win. People used the idea volumes razor in a way that is not helpful and doesn't really doesn't really get you any closer to figuring out what's true now if you're if you're still questioning what the concept really means. Don't worry we will get to some. I think some very understandable examples of how it can be a used properly and used improperly. But let's go ahead and just start about the concept itself the the word autumn You know where this comes from. We'll get to the origins of autumn's razor so Oxfam's razor is also known as the principle of parsimony and parsimony means a tendency towards cheapness or frugality. So I like that. It's like the principle of parsimony is like you. You want to be cheap with your with your logic right yeah. I don't need more than two steps of logic between me and the solution. Don't give me one with four or five. And it was named after the Medieval English philosopher William of autumn. Of course William of Arkham So he he lived in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries from twelve eighty five to either thirteen seven or thirteen forty nine. I've seen different death dates given forum. I've seen different birthdates as well. Eighty seven twelve. Eighty eight looking at That's interesting so he was a prolific scholar. Franciscan friar we'll get more into his ideas in a minute. I you know one thing I've always wondered is where the heck is awesome. I've never heard of that. Well yeah because the word sound has kind of like a remoteness to it. It sounds alien in some ways. Autumn is very much a real place. It is a rural village. In Surrey England. You can look it up online. You can find that the website for the church in Oxfam for example and this area has been occupied since ancient times. It's about a day's ride south west of London and it was the birthplace of the individual who'd come to be known as William Volume now beyond that beyond the fact that he was born here. We don't know a lot about William's life We don't know what his social or family background was or if his native language was French or Middle English. As Paul Vincent Spadea explains in the Cambridge companion to Arkham he was likely given over to the Franciscan order as a young boy. Before the age of fourteen and here Latin would have quickly become his language of not only writing but also just conversation Grey Friars Convent in. London was likely his home convent but later he traveled he visited Avalon he visited Italy and he lived the last two decades of his life in Germany. Now philosophically William was a Nominal List and spayed writes that the two main themes of this for William were the rejection of universals and ontological reduction in these two teams are are not necessarily interconnected like you can you. Could you could believe in one but not the other and vice versa but basically like let's get into what these mate so the first rejection of universals is perhaps best considered and this is very brief and broad Certainly you can find so much written in instead on this topic but basically think of it as a rejection of the tonic idea of the realm of forms. So that idea that all chairs that we might make design and carve a symbol are an attempt to create the perfect chair which doesn't reside in our world but only resides within this realm of forms. So all chairs that we create our like an aspiration for the ideal chair another way. I've thought about it at least as I understood it was. The nominalism is kind of the idea that there is no such thing as a chair. There's only this chair and that chair in this chair over here. There is no chair right like this. This is the kind of the situation gets too. When you you get into the genre classifications of say albums artists or movies. You care a great deal about and someone tries to limit it to a classification and say oh well that's classic rock where that's alternative rock near like. No no no no no. Don't don't try and fit there is there. Is these categories. Do not apply. There is there is only you know whatever. Your band of choice happens to be. There is only tool. There is only primis or whatever right there yeah there. There is only things not category right. Now let's move onto the second theme here. Ontological reduction this is as Britannica defines it quote the metaphysical doctrine that entities of a certain kind are in reality collections or combinations of entities of simpler or more basic kind. I think your classic example here is molecules atoms. Yeah so another example. Here's while our aristotle defined ten categories of objects that might be apprehended by a human mind. These would have been translations vary on on how you wanted to find these but substance quantity quality relative place time attitude condition action and affection. William cut these down to two substance and quality. He's really getting in there. That's the razor. That's what a razor Dutt. Cia slices away. It cuts off the fat and gets down to the meat. Spayed writes quote. Although these two strands of thinking are independent. They are nevertheless often viewed as joint effects of a more fundamental. Concern the principle of parsimony known as Oxfam's razor okay. So we're getting to the razor. Yeah so William. Devoted a lot of energy to arguing against What spade calls the bloated onto logical in inventories of his contemporaries and became well known to his peers for this as such either towards the end of his life or shortly after his death a kind of greatest hits album came out on his thoughts and ideas titled On the Principles of Theology? Now it wasn't actually by William of Arkham but it featured his doctrine as well as verbatim quotes there is no ascribed author either so later generations would often just attribute it to him as well as the notion of outcomes razor however the specific phrase was apparently never actually used by him. He never said autumn in the house. I'M GONNA get the razor out and started carving on some some some some some ideas

William Volume Seth Yeah Oxfam Carl Sagan Arkham Razor Dutt Jodie Foster Matthew Mcconaughey New York Times Eleanor Airway New York London Producer Grey Friars Convent CIA Johnson Paul Vincent Spadea Palmer Joss
EU aid money for Africa may harm, not help, analysis finds

AP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

EU aid money for Africa may harm, not help, analysis finds

"European aid money in marked for development in Africa is increasingly tied to how well countries can block their own citizens from trying to migrate across the Mediterranean and may be hunting the very people is meant to help according to an analysis by the aid group Oxfam the report found that the three point nine billion euros splashed out in projects from twenty fifteen to may twenty nineteen were largely spent without public oversight and with decisions based on political reasons rather than need or effectiveness the E. U. emergency trust fund for Africa was set up in twenty fifteen at the height of a wave of migration to Europe from across the Mediterranean and through Turkey the Oxfam report singled out Libya as a particularly problematic country the European Union has come under criticism for the money and cooperation it provides to the Libyan because god which the AP and others found as deep ties to human trafficking and rights

Africa Mediterranean Oxfam Europe Turkey Libya European Union AP E. U.
EU aid money for Africa may harm, not help, analysis finds

AP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

EU aid money for Africa may harm, not help, analysis finds

"European aid money am mocked for development in Africa is increasingly tied to how well countries can block their own citizens from trying to migrate across the Mediterranean and may be hunting the very people is meant to help according to an analysis by the aid group Oxfam the report found that the three point nine billion euros splashed out in projects from twenty fifteen to may twenty nineteen were largely spent without public oversight and with decisions based on political reasons rather than need or effectiveness the E. U. emergency trust fund for Africa was set up in twenty fifteen at the height of a wave of migration to Europe from across the Mediterranean and through Turkey the Oxfam report singled out Libya as a particularly problematic country the European Union has come under criticism for the money and cooperation it provides to the Libyan because god which the AP and others found as deep ties to human trafficking and rights

Africa Mediterranean Oxfam Europe Turkey Libya European Union AP E. U.
Do You Find It Difficult Asking For Money?

The Fast Growth Podcast

06:37 min | 2 years ago

Do You Find It Difficult Asking For Money?

"Been wanted to talk to you about for awhile so most of my clients most of our clients have one of the biggest issues they have have lots of people contact them a lot of people inquire about their services but they cannot convert them into into the decline than there is a lot of struggling that the c- <hes> at today's above example spoke to <hes> one one of my mike lines <hes> her name is jessica in jessica's being running the healing breakfast for walt. She's been she's been raking specialist and she's been doing ricky for a long long time but one of the biggest roadblock is <hes>. She doesn't have a problem getting the client but she has a huge huge huge problem problem charging those clients. She's been charging so she started with thirty dollars for a session bench. Increase it for thirty five forty bucks fifty dollars. That's right so now she's at a fifty dollars per session <hes> and she's finding it really rayleigh rayleigh difficult to actually sleep. Take it to the next level writer. This is most of the people if you have this blockage that you can't josh more. You must listen to this today because really wanna talk about the blockage the money blockage you have today not to not be able to accept money not being able to ask your client for more money. We are not being able to ask your relatives or friends. <hes> if the comment the house for you help not being able to charge them so if you have this problem album must listen to this today right because this might change your life see that is the biggest issue we have some money. Problem is is not just a one off problem. It's it's consistently same baton going around in your life so if you're one of those people who can't aunt charge to the clients rod declines come to you and they asking you know we need your services than you say yes. I'm happy to help you but at the end when the time in comes in you need to actually send them the invoice you charge them. You just can't would sell what yourself together and oscar the money looking for right and this is being. This has been the most people spending that they just can't charge money. They oxfam money and i think it's a it's goes back to the childhood. <hes> there's some sort of stuff happening the childhood way you develop that relationship with money that <hes> if you ask for money something bad might happen like give you an example of jessica just had this issue whenever she asked money from her mom and dad about something like in a bucket money attained tain to school. She always found that there was a fight happen ride whenever she went to mom and ask for money. <hes> mom just couldn't give because she wasn't working. Mama's dead and dad couldn't give the money because of any reason the meaning should go out of that was whenever i ask for money defied happens right so i must not ask for money so she never actually asked money for mom and dad and she never did anything unique. She never she whenever she needed money and she went to her parents and the something happened. Some sort of some sort of bad thing happened. According to some fight happened. Some argument happened some sort of <hes> in a disagreement that grumman happened and she developed his <hes> belief that whenever i go and ask for money something bad will happen and i she lived her most live <hes> based on that belief whenever she went out and offset glide for money. She believed that you know ascii. Money's a bad thing and that's that's not. I quit for if you are in the business world. If you're in the business world you're going to be asking load of clients for money. So what is quick fix for that. What is the quick fix for that so the quickest fix we found is working really well as you don't ask for money. Let other people ask money for on your behalf c credit third person have third bush and who would be asking for money in charging money for the clients rights have for example. You just say i'm my services gonna call us ninety bucks <hes> by session from now onwards and you let other people know that other person might be working five rs and her only job or his only job is <hes> just asking clients to pay for it. That's it nothing else so you could actually ask your daughter to do it. You could actually your friend to do it. You could ask anybody to do it and their job as saying <hes> you know they setting setting the appointment or if you can't do it and then just saying that bathing wise into this place that's it. You don't even talk to your client about money so if that's the problem in writing so this is the biggest thing when we spoke to jessica jessica just chachi was just like charging thirty bucks forty bucks fifty bucks and she couldn't increase freeze the amount to the best thing works people like that. He's if you have this money blockage way. You can't ask your client for money. The best to get a third bush involve and eh the third person off declined to pay as much as the rates are right so you don't need to get involved in that. The third person will say hang on dishes the fees this much is going to cost and book an appointment. Here's a link for the calendar booking appointment. If you're interested in that are making an automated thing that on the website it clearly says one sessions going to cost this much and you put it on the u._r._l. Out there so asked by doing this you putting yourself out of the picture because there is internal issue you have it. You definitely need to deal with. I'm not saying just put under the drug and forget about it. You definitely have to get it sorted with somebody who could actually help you in that but in the meantime to get that fixed the way to get that fixes sixes you take yourself out of the picture and get somebody else in wall and let them ask for money so that you could actually do what you're supposed to write. This is the way we do it. This is the way i thought of help. Jessica as jessica is not part of this. She just wide service in third person somebody else. Her friend works five hours. A week or six hours is a week for her and she does the other work she does sending the messages sending invoices to be pulling asking them to pay for it so that makes it easy because other russian doing it and <hes> you can actually breed with more people so hope this was useful gwen applying for a and i'm sure it's going to be really good for your business.

Jessica Jessica Money Bush Ricky Walt Mike Writer Oscar Mama Fifty Dollars Thirty Dollars Five Hours Six Hours
Britain to Considers Suspension of Arms Licenses to Saudi Arabia

BBC Newshour

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Britain to Considers Suspension of Arms Licenses to Saudi Arabia

"Campaigners have one eight legal challenge over the United Kingdom's decision to government's decision to allow home sales to Saudi Arabia, which is engaged in the war in Yemen. The court of appeal today ordered the government to review the way it grounds export licenses for themselves to Saudi Arabia after routing the current procedures were unlawful. That's talk about this now with Maltin Butcha policy adviser on conflict at Oxfam international. He joins me here in the news studio your reaction to today's Michael decision, court of appeal decision, I should say it's a tremendous victory for campaign against arms trade for Oxfam supported them, but most of the people of Yemen because this war has dragged on for four years, fueled by British and other the government has said that they're going to look at this, but it does oblige them to evaluate whether those expo. Shirts could leads to violations, but it doesn't mean the immediate suspension of deliveries. Right. They can continue to deliver arms under licenses that have already been issued but they can't issue any new licenses and since licenses, generally don't have a long shelf life this. It's a significant decision. And I mean, the government presumably is going to appeal that looking at this decision, and that the mindful of it, but they all to appeal on there, because it's this isn't the end of the road for campaigners. No. That's right. It's not the end of the ride the government has said it will appeal this will go to the supreme court. Not sure when yet the good news is that until it gets to the supreme court. No new licenses will be issued for any member of the Saudi led coalition operating in Yemen. Do you think that this is enough? Because in the wake of the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi Jay, they were country. Stories around the world. Notably Germany, and Australia is announced the suspension of sales to Saudi Arabia. Is that what you'd like to see the UK government to do? Yes. We'd like to see a complete halt to sales going to Saudi Arabia, and all the other coalition countries. But it is a very significant victory in that for years, campaigned alongside. It must be said the government to put the arms trade treaty into place that entered into force in two thousand fourteen and this is the first big test of that treaty. So we're saying the court of appeals here and last week, Belgian coats, telling governments they have to abide by obligations, which they have undertaken freely, and willingly, so in the long term, this will mean that sales of arms. Really controlled by. International humanitarian law and international human rights law rather than just profit. Okay. I mean, the government have always argued that whatever arms. They do sell to countries. Such as Audi Arabia are bound, by the fact that they will not use them against their own civilian population, and so on. But the government is part of that coalition that is engaged in this war in Yemen. The UK government isn't technically part of the coalition, but they are very deeply involved in military operations in Yemen. Yes. And you're right. I mean, the thing is that they, they have a process, and what the court has found is that they on the process that they have is not legal and the way they've been operating. It is not legal. So now they have to go back look at it all, again, this should make a huge difference. And but you but what you're saying is that you will continue to find, even if the government finds all the government's lawyers find loopholes very briefly that you will continue to find against them. Twenty four million people are native divide in Yemen. There's the world's biggest cholera outbreak. Three point three million people displaced by the war we have to keep on fighting on their

Supreme Court Yemen Saudi Arabia Oxfam International Audi Arabia UK Maltin Butcha United Kingdom Oxfam Cholera Jamal Khashoggi Jay Michael Murder Germany Australia Four Years
"oxfam" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

06:11 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Has been slammed for failing to heed warnings about sexual abuse by its program workers in Haiti and for its internal culture of tolerating poor behavior. The damning findings come from a newly released report by the United Kingdom's charity commission following an eighteen month probe and OXFAM's actions in Haiti after the devastating two thousand ten earthquake the investigation concluded that the aid group ignored, or downplayed concerns raised by whistle blowers, who complained that staff were hiring local prostitutes for parties did not sufficiently investigate claims of physical abuse and other misconduct. It received from two girls age twelve and thirteen reporter Simon Mark says Moore. An eighteen month investigation into Oxfam by the UK's charity commission has concluded that the organization had a culture of tolerating bad behavior. The investigation was sparked by revelations that Oxfam workers engaged in the sexual exploitation of earthquake victims in Haiti that the charity, then covered up the scandal to talk about keeping people safe from home. They haven't fully that's up. We've that's Baroness Tina style. She heads the charity commission and launched the report into OXFAM's conduct in London opposes in place, but they haven't applied them cokely's that they've allowed a coach develop tola rating behavior of people on the ground that they stunned for the people that they exist to know, charity is more important than the -nition. It's exist to pursue. The people exit and no charge. He can trade that good against keeping people safe from home. Oxfam GB has now received an official warning and miss respond with a plan of action to implement the reports recommendations charity conceded. The events in Haiti were a terrible abuse of power with spotlight. I'm Simon marks. San Francisco supervisor mad Haney today announced the plan for legislation that would protect live music and event spaces in western south of market from being shut down or pushed down by rising rents KPFA's, Ren Farrell reports. Supervisor might Haney says this legislation will help protect the creative spirit. And engineered that comes from San Francisco, nightlife, he's to a crowd of about one hundred people inside the mezzanine alive music, and event space. That is scheduled to close at the end of the year. What we've introduced is all across western western Soma, if our legislation is to pass. We will actually have controls that require added protections for nightlife and entertainment. So if you want to displace a venue, you're going to have to go in front of the planning commission, and justify why you need that change of use the planning commission is actually going way. Whether it's in the neighborhood character in the community interest of whether whether you can replace a, nightlife venue, and if necessary if disagree with that decision it can be appealed to the full board of supervisors last November, the mezzanine announced, they'll be shutting down in October of twenty nineteen because the building owners will not. New their lease planning instead to increase the rent on the building by six hundred percent in fill the space with offices, the mezzanine is one of the few independently owned the largest female owned music venue in San Francisco. Debra Jackman, the owner of the Muslimeen spoke to the crowd about the importance of protecting events bases in the city. Nothing brings people together of all sizes shapes and races, and sexual orientation, none of that matters when they come here to love music, and be friends and be here together San Francisco's rich history of providing spaces to come together to express themselves are, are finding themselves under attack. If we do not want the city to lose, it's flavor. It's very undercurrent than we need to stand together strong and say that we won't be pushed out the mezzanine would not be the first venue to pushed out of San Francisco, the elbow room in the mission district and the hemlock tavern on Polk street. We're both shut down and replaced with condominiums in two thousand eight. Eighteen. Ben blaming of the entertainment commission bemoaned these losses in Spokane favor of Hanes legislation. I'm tired of watching our cherished arts and music venues, destroyed. And displaced, the people doing this will say it's just business, but this is not just business. We're watching the heart and soul of our city. Get ripped out and sold to the highest bidder. And that is not just business. We're here today to say enough is enough Haney expects that his legislation, which will only apply live music and event spaces in western south of market will be approved by the other district supervisors. He says that this will be a crucial step in protecting San Francisco's culture reporting for KPFA news. This is Brian Farrell. San Francisco supervisor Hillary Ronen and met Haney wanted tax millionaire companies to pay for mental health and substance use services in the city, they're proposing to put the measure before voters in November, the excessive CEO salary tax or millionaire's tax would put a small point one percent surcharge on companies that have one hundred one or higher ratio of CEO pay to its median worker, salary, surcharge, would increase two point two percent when a CEO earns two hundred times more than their median employee point three percent at three hundred. Point four percent at four hundred. And it would alternately cap it point six percent at six hundred or more time. C E O pay than their median workers pay supervisor Matt Haney spoke to KPFA news about the tax, San.

San Francisco Haiti mad Haney Supervisor OXFAM KPFA Oxfam Matt Haney CEO United Kingdom Simon marks UK reporter Brian Farrell Simon Mark London Debra Jackman Ren Farrell
DR Congo Ebola outbreak: More than 2,000 cases reported

A Public Affair

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

DR Congo Ebola outbreak: More than 2,000 cases reported

"The health ministry in the Democratic Republic of Congo says it's now recorded more than two thousand cases of Bola in the east of the country. Since the outbreak began last August two thirds of them have been fatal from confessor guys co any reports the ministry of health has gone two thousand and eight confirmed in trouble cases of Ebola in eastern DR August's that part of the country has known details of conflict mistrust of health workers, and insecurity remain. The two main challenges facing are response teams had workers struggling to identify and follow up on suspected cases and have been dominated for attack themselves. Oxfam sees its teams still meeting people on a daily basis who don't believe equalize is real. This is the ten and deadliest Ebola outbreak to hit the, the virus has more than one thousand three hundred victims in the past ten

Ebola Democratic Republic Of Congo Oxfam
"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"On the side of the roads. And so these small choices in just everybody's lifestyle and kind of normalizing different behaviors like bringing your own bags not using straws, you know, not buying strawberries in January. All of these things can have a bigger impact is do it three times a day. So to say too, I someone to be like, I don't have an impact. It's like when you make that many decisions day in your voting with your dollar, you do you. Absolutely do and you do it multiple times a day. Well, and you just make such a good point that, you know, often we hear like stat of politics food, isn't political. It's like food is inherently political. I mean, that's the whole reason for your campaign in a world that produces more than enough food to feed everyone in the world the fact that there's one in nine people going to bed hungry every night is uncomfortable. Yeah. And that's one of the things that we aim to tackle. There isn't a food to feed everyone. There is enough resources around the world for people to be able to grow and produce our food and still be able to feed themselves and their families. But it's not happening and little choices like this can make a huge difference in making making that a better place. That's such an important point. I know we've talked about this on past episodes of the podcast, but that it's not a production problem. Global hunger issues are eight distribution problem. And. For especially I think people who are in food like ourselves who are do it less from this like global scale on the local scale, it is unconscionable for us to not say anything about like the global food crisis. Can I also say it's also a power problem? That's the way. Oxfam. Sees it who has the power in our global food system. It's the giant companies that produce and sell us our food. It is not the people who are actually producing our food. That's why they're the ones who don't have enough resources and are the ones who are going hungry at the end of the day. And that's why fifty cents on every dollar that you spend at the grocery store goes to the grocery store and most of the rest of that goes to the company that produced the food that you that you bought. Yeah. It's crazy to think about how poorly compensated that people who feed our country in our world are because is there. Anybody more important. And then our youth going to bed hungry and a lot about us as a nation city in Los Angeles of all places where we can grow food on art like sidewalk men's your round bananas or office right now. We're very proud of the fact that we were able to grow. Let's go outside and like just look at them together sometime. I'm still biased orbit. I'm are looking those are the looking bananas shopping Chopin's, please come to my office and look at my banana from not a weirdo. In Los Angeles. With everything you guys have around the world. And there's so many people who need help. How do you guys sort of prioritize like this is where we need to focus our efforts right now. And then six months from now, it's maybe somewhere else like how do you do that? Well, we have to balance the long term problems with those that come up. So it involves a lot of planning. And that's that's an analysis of where the problems the greatest, and where can an organization like Oxfam Abdo most value while leaving ourselves free to go in and tackle a NAMI in the Philippines or an earthquake in Indiana. And we have been doing this a long time we've been around for decades. And it's building on those resources the experience that we have and the partnerships that we've made with organizations on the ground around the world. And so, but it is a tricky balance and global poverty is an enormous problem that if you can be overwhelming, and so it's about breaking it down into where are the needs the greatest and where can Oxfam give the greatest make the greatest impact. It's so important because I feel like especially in the United States. We have grown to be such a we have no class consciousness. Everybody thinks that they are middle class..

Los Angeles Oxfam Oxfam Abdo United States Indiana Philippines Chopin six months
"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"Of your dollar this way in comparison to the supermarkets and the farms getting the money that way, like I feel like most people just kind of bring it up as a way to eat food this kind of grown in your region and that maybe as nutritionally compatible with your lifestyle because everything's in the same season. But rarely do I hear it articulated is like no like they get way more of your money. Doing the hard fucking work. And then they pay the people who are working in the field with them more money because they have more money to spread around a I see c. the logo on fruits and times the fair trade logo. And I try to buy that when I can. But I'm always I just go to farmers market. Give them money. That's that's open. The file. One time at night word an airport, and I saw a tote bag. Do you remember this and it said by local and I was like Jesus Christ. Where was that a made in China? No local the zone. Roll going and common. My brain broke. Okay. But with another one of the tenants of bay each campaign eating less meat is a big one. Yeah. They're producing his such an enormous drag on resources, plenty of resources, we have water air soil and didn't even know that cattle was seasonal like some of them can be. Yes. And now we do it year round. So we use eight percent of the world's clean water supply just to support livestock production. And so we're not asking people to stop eating meat. There's a way to do that especially also buying. That's another place where buying locally makes an enormous difference. But the global meat production process is such an enormous drain on resources and just eating less of it can make a big difference. It's little little things. The idea of eat for good is little things can make a huge difference on the environment. And so you may feel like what is it that I can do while this is one really simple series of ways to do them. And it's so powerful when you think about how many people just if you make a small mindful choice, and when people like, oh, it doesn't matter if we stopped doing this like nothing's going. Like think about all the things we've changed over time like the plastic bags here. Not like they used to be in all of the sides of the freeways and all over in the ocean. And all of that. And you hardly ever see that any now if you got a plastic bag you get arrested. So you're asking jail where did you get this era Zona? But aren't just like, cassette tapes, all the litter from cassette tapes. Do you remember when you think about this? And now that that technologies obsolete like we don't have nothing replace that..

China eight percent
"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"He spent fourteen years leading campaigning and advocacy work for political campaigns and labor unions across the United States. So please welcome to the pod. Oliver Godfried from Oxfam. What's up super excited to be here? Appreciate the option. Yeah. Dude. Thank you for being here. Like, you're incredibly busy. So anytime we've had any kind of communications with you guys at axiom or anything like that always feel like I need to be not on my best behavior. But like. You're talking classy. Talking to the vice principal. So you got to lose. Get a little nervous. I want you like like when you're applying for colleges or something and you needed a letter recommendation. You're just like, no, I'm gonna. I'm going to be the best Michelle I can be. We're all nerds trying to tackle global poverty. That's all. Yeah. But when you give it appreciate intimidating. So how did you come to work for Oxfam? And like, your your advocacy because I can't imagine like a twelve year old me being like when I grow up. You know, what I mean what what was the roadmap there? Yeah. I guess there isn't I don't know people who have executed kind of your path. And so it's hard for me to envision like how they get started. So well, twelve years old I wanted to be a baseball player, but I learned pretty quickly that that was definitely not happening. But my parents were great at teaching me the importance of activism, and if you believe strongly in something he thought something was wrong. You gotta go out and do something about it. And so after college I went and worked on political campaigns for a long time. And that was really great because you could find a candidate that you preciado to try to get them into office. And when politicians are elected to office, they have the ability to do really good things if if if they have the right priorities and oxygen was the logical step after that. It's about mobilizing the power people to try to tackle big global problems. And I really appreciated the way that Oxfam conceives a problems the way that we tackle problems. You know, we try to lift people out of poverty over the long term and build resilience. We don't just come in after a global disaster and try to fix the problem. We try to address the root problem that causes it at the beginning. So that the next. Natural disaster strikes. These people can rebuild from the cells, and we don't need to get involved. So it's about building long-term solutions. It's about activating the power of people to solve their own problems, and to help others, and I really just appreciate it that really thoughtful and dedicated way to do it. And I was like I want to be part of that. What age did you get involved? So I started volunteering on political campaigns when I was in high school, and even before that, you know, my parents were dragging me to political rallies, and I went to go so you had to give ship pretty early. Well, humored my parents for a little while. But you go to enough of those things and you start to believe that. And you realize you know, what what's posturings motor? That's That's awesome. So for our audience who may be aren't familiar with? Oxfam. Can you kind of walk us through like how you're saying? How you work with people on a local scale to tackle these much larger problem, we're global organization we work in ninety countries around the world really just trying to get at the injustice of poverty. I don't know if I could name. Don't ask me today. Brands are like ninety fuck. There's more than twenty. But yeah, you guys partner with local agencies, right? We partner with local agencies and all those countries. What we try to do is help people build a better life for themselves. And we'll also do is hold the powerful accountable. One of the root causes of poverty is who has power, and who doesn't and so whether that's governments around the world, whether that's big corporations, the idea is we want to make sure that they are living up to their responsibilities to help people living in poverty. And then as I said when there are disasters earthquakes, hurricanes sometimes man made problems where there on the ground providing aid and helping those communities rebuild..

Oxfam Oliver Godfried United States partner baseball principal Michelle I fourteen years twelve years twelve year
"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"It has like five stars painted on the side of it. But only one is colored in gold looks it looks like you're giving the restaurant one star. Remind me I'll put this up on our website posts episode. It's it's one gold star. And then four empty starts. So it looks like a yo preview of one star. On the side. They know what they're about. You know, why you're not White House quality? We're not trumps favorite Carl's. But anyway, anyway, so the acquisition or loss of a star can have dramatic effects on the success or failure over restaurant. And it's considered one of the absolute highest honors in the food world. It's again a Michelin star. So these guides mostly focused on high end fine dining establishment. And thus the more laid back dining experience like we. Enjoy purpose. All LA's. Yeah. Is looked down on. But. Yeah. And we're always getting should on a food city for some fucking reason. The Michelin guides have only covered Los Angeles for two years two thousand eight and two thousand nine and then they closer shot blaming it on the recession and crew. Okay. But in an interview given to Esquire and twenty eleven then director, John Luchon rut, criticized the caliber of LA diner, saying quote, the people of Los Angeles are not real foodies. They are not interested in eating well, but just in who goes to which restaurant and where they sit. How all calling the people of LA shallow and Fay. We've never been called that. I can just see this dude is like smoking like the longest cigarette. John, John, Luke narrate that people Los Angeles they on real food these. Don't even like the butter noodles that the cream you French tire salesman. Doc outta here in salt or out of our city. Yeah. So fuck this guy and fuck the Michelin guides. I don't give a fuck that. They're coming back to Los Angeles. Get the fuck outta here. We don't need your goddamn stars. We'll stick to yelp. But like the average person. Don't go to calls junior on on. Fairfax. I'm sure the one is probably fine. Fairfax don't go there. Yeah. They have a well-established bias towards high end French cuisine, which is not how we get down here in Los Angeles. And we talked about this with Todd Richards, when he was on talking about a soul cookbook that the bias towards European Centric foods as seen as more high end, well and more please teaches and they can charge twenty five dollars a plate while people expect Chinese food to always be affordable and different. Tires soul food. Ing sort of any sort of like non-european seen as downmarket foods, irrespective of the care and the quality of the ingredients and the dishes and all of these things. And I think that's part of the reason Michelin has trouble understanding the food scene here in Los Angeles bitch. We have a really vibrant multicultural like multi food platform like way of eating and because it's southern California. We don't give a shit. If one of our fanciest restaurants in the city isn't a goddamn strip mall. No, it's good food people will flock one of the best places to get Mexican food in Los Angeles area is at a gas station in north Hollywood..

Los Angeles Michelin John Luchon Fairfax California White House Carl LA diner yelp salesman Esquire Fay Todd Richards Hollywood European Centric director Luke twenty five dollars two years
"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"And you you're not gonna get shit done. You're gonna love going to laugh at your dog for forty five minutes. I'm looking at her outlined. Do not see the recipe we're gonna have to rectify that. Scurrying grab up online because instable, but I just think that is such a bad ass contribution out to Alice be I'm saying toke. It might be talk 'less Santo close. I, you know, congrats. You're you're a real one. We we respect changed the game. So that's my hot women's history. All right. Well, let's get let's get into some some more topical news. And speaking of eating junk food, this is not necessarily brownies, but our president can't seem to stop himself from feeding athletes fast food, one time wolves enough. Yeah. And this. Yeah. So the championship football team from North Dakota state, the bisons visited the White House last week in what is now becoming a signature move of Trump. He voluntarily shuns, the chefs in the White House in favor of McDonalds and chick fillet, I would be livid. So the I like the first time that he did this. He said it was because of the shutdown, and then he was like I paid for all this, you know. And now that doesn't he kinda got a pass on it. You know, clearly now, it's see Choice I. the government's open the chefs are in the kitchen. Yeah. So he spun this as a deliberate choice as a way to support American business saying, quote, we like American competence. Who's the way he says, we allot the I know? Yeah. Got me about that. Fucking thing was as oh the chefs in the White House aren't American enough? The chefs in the gut damn White House if I were. A trained chef and you go like he go through culinary school. You know procedures you get a residency at a restaurant. I mean, it's late nights. It's early mornings like is hard 'cause cooking professionals hard fucking work. Yeah. In then you get a job an appointment at the White House fell just irrespective of administration highest office. You're entertaining dignitaries from around the world like it's so prestigious, Sherry Michigan Chick-fil-A today would be so that you can go home. Could you just make us chicken sandwiches, right? Yeah. Deng fried chicken, and John like barbecue and get coleslaw baked beans and stuff that would have been adorable and super American and like fine. No report the Baptists. I just it's it's crazy somehow making it worse. Trump added that he picked this menu. Because quote, I know you people unquote who what the fuck does that mean. Everybody on the team. She by who the fuck who's you people? To me. It just suggested that the athletes couldn't possibly enjoy anything fancy fancy your Donald's or check. Well, trash people like trash food. Right. And that's what all you pores. Are. This is what you guys you used to gin could've just had them mcchicken chicken sandwiches there or fried chicken. And got what was even more bizarre about it is that Trump also was giving a speech commiserating with the victims from Monday's last week tornado in Alabama and Georgia right in front of several mounds of sandwiches, and Hamburg, he even acknowledged it. He was like a guy we gotta go ahead and get through this real quick. Because this foods getting called. Shutout to everybody who got struck by that tornado. Nets dig in. It's so again, like these athletes the food's cold now, he's showed it's getting like he fucking as someone who eats fast food is much as he does this go the quality window on this food is closing very fast. It started low and it's getting lower. Shout out to the hurricane. Try a tornado. Whatever Whatever. the climate change victims. No, he would never. Love it. So I don't know. I I saw that in my immediate thought was I remember the first time. He did it blamed it on a shutdown bragged about how he paid for it himself. I gotta tell you weird flex what a weird flex. Yeah. But clearly, it's choice. Yeah. So this is preferred way doing thanks on the other end of the food spectrum story for you. Okay. So Michelin is coming bachelors Angeles..

White House Donald Deng Trump Alice Michelin McDonalds North Dakota Sherry Michigan bisons president John Hamburg Alabama Georgia forty five minutes
"oxfam" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:38 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is in crisis. So Saint many of the economic and business headlines around the world, so say to some of the biggest beneficiaries of the capitalist system people like Ray Dallaglio who according to Forbes magazine has eighteen billion dollars to his name. Thanks to the hedge fund. He setup Bridgewater associates. Here's radio speaking last December at the Los Angeles summit conference kind of burning man meets Davos, event capitalism, basically is not working for the majority of people. That's just the reality. And. Yep. There's opportunity. So we've gotta make it more for the majority of people and you're in a situation where like today, the fed did a study. Four forty percent of the population could not raise four hundred dollars event of an emergency. I mean, it gives you an idea Polaris, and we often don't have contact with that. But that's a real world, clearly, even the ultra rich are worried about a growing wealth gap. The fact that in America, for example, much of the country's wealth is held by a very small percentage of ultra wealthy people, many economists and columnist points the election of President Trump Brexit and the rise of anti immigrant populace in countries, like Italy and Brazil as symptoms that capitalism is in crisis yet, many of those same economists will tell you that capitalism has been the driving force behind the most remarkable decline in global poverty ever witnessed in human history. What's more the latest official data here in the UK shows that employment here reached its highest level on record towards the end of last year. Unemployment is at a seventeen year low in the US and countries like Bangladesh once dubbed a basket case by. Henry Kissinger have averaged more than six percent annual growth now for nearly a decade. So what's not to like? Well, lots says we need the anemia the bond. Ceo of the anti-poverty campaign is Oxfam international. We know women we work within Bangladesh will work eighty hours a week. Who work six days a week? Who when they're sick. They are not paid when they get pregnant the fired and who don't have a right to organize on demand better working conditions. Millions of people are trapped in those kinds of jobs, and you have governments continuing to count them. Like there are people living decent lives winning. Fuck. They are not when you hear government speaker, particularly the developed world, the focus is entirely on employment statistics unemployment is at record lows in many parts of the world. Are you saying that these statistics are not painting an accurate picture of what is actually taking place on the ground? Of course, not because first of all you must count jobs that give people a good life. They must be living wages in many countries, especially here in Africa where there isn't even. Legislated minimum wage. And if it is there, it's so far below a living wage, that's what sick and leader conditions of work themselves. The fuck that some people might be working three jobs. I know women I need them in New York cleaning women, she's cleaning a hotel a ten o'clock in the morning, a three she's knocking off going to do another cleaning job on another cleaning job and she'll get home at two am. And she's got kids to take to school in the morning to be able to earn enough for her family. She's doing three jobs, I know taxi drivers here in Kenya. Who tell me they sleep just three hours a night because they plow those streets all night and all day trying to get enough money to pay the rent of a road. That's not a knife. That's not dignity. Those are not conditions for work those not jobs. People are looking for is in how we met. Measure things the only CD in class, you Montas cooled for governments to use a dashboard of indicators covering all aspects of life that master people health, skills environmental degradation. Everything is it the case that if we had better indicators that reflected these kind of conditions that perhaps policy would be adjusted to well, of course, counting the right things is important is important to count jobs and jobs that are good jobs. Decent jobs paying where what is lots just an issue of what we count. So we end point the beginning point is to be just to make businesses work for everybody who is a part of their business starting with workers going onto the suppliers the environmentally work in the communities that by the consumers so to be fair to everyone who benefits business when he'd be anemia that CEO Oxfam. Mm international. When these thesis brings us to the premise of a new book called the future of capitalism. Its author is pulled Kellyanne economics professor at Oxford University, and one of the world's most influential development, economists, his argument is that populist politics. What he calls mutinies is being driven by growing rifts between the highly educated and the less educated and also between the cosmopolitan cities and declining provinces. He says one of the solutions to those growing rifts for people living and working in big rich cities, like New York and London to pay more in tax, which can then be invested in poor areas of country. Obviously, the people who have been the huge winners from globalization reluctant to forgo any of those huge gains. Go to realize is that there are other people who Cleveland has really hurt and we better do something about it. So would you as a professor in Oxford prepared to pay more taxes and say, professor? At a university in northern England, for example, would indeed because half of my heart is in the north wing loop. I personally lived these divides and seen how really cruel. They are in any humane society where we recognize the sense of belonging to each other. We need to do something about it. But that's what's been lost hasn't it that sense of belonging. I mean people in the north of England don't feel linked really to the people in London. You're quite right. If we go back fifty years, there was a much stronger sense of shared belonging. We were all pulled together during the second World War, very clear common endeavor for common goal, and that bequeathed a generation which was willing to work together and that produce the miracle from nineteen forty five to nine hundred seventy when we got our national health service. We got a very good education system. I was very poor kid. I was able to go to a good school. Go to Oxford. Even do my doctorate all financed by the state. Which meant financed by Richard people who paying very very high taxes over eighty percent that they paid them because there was a greater sense of shared belonging and a degree of reciprocity. That people were fortunate would help people who are less fortunate because they themselves might become as fortunate and we lost that we need to put it back. Isn't that? Just what capitalism does it promotes the individual over the community. I think it's a very recent phenomenon. It's only the last fifty years the companies have this mantra that we got to be run to make profits before Matt companies had a much stronger sense of purpose imperial chemical industries when I was a kid that was the most respected company in the country and its mission statement was something like we want to be the best chemical company in the world. And then around nine hundred ninety it changed its mission statement came we want to maximize shareholder value who ever got up in the morning to maximize shareholder value and the company. Disappeared because it wasn't a motivating mission. And if we go back to earlier capitalism from the mid nineteenth century right through to the mid twentieth century. You got people are Titus salt. In Bradford who was mad at a time when the city got cholera and response to that he built salt in a new town, we've proper housing decent living conditions. That was industrialists with a sense of purpose. We need to get back to that. When you speak like that. I mean, I imagine that will be people listening. You say that sounds a lot like what Brexit as say this sense of wanting to go back to something that existed in the past and that maybe we've gone beyond that now to go back to values like that. You'd have to change it from the roots up that it's not something that can be imposed from the top down by government. It copied impose top down Marquette. There's routinely being a sort of ground swell of bottom up. Corporation that was the whole cooperative movement, which was forged during the industrial revolution in the cities of northern England because hasn't came in from the foams to these hellish cities facing new anxieties, how are we going to find somewhere to live? What happens when we die? We're going to get a decent funeral. And so they formed the cooperative movement which was shared obligations around a common purpose, and that became a world movement and still is so both on the left with the cooperative movement and on the right with responsible capitalism firms that have a sense of purpose about of of them just prophet. There were these currents that have been there for long long time. What we're seeing at the moment is a pretty recent deviation. It has happened during my lifetime and is producing these disastrous mutants Oxford University economics, professor Paul Cali there. Well, a lot of wealthy. Entrepreneurs and business owners will argue they are giving more now to good causes more in fact than ever before think of the millions billions even that have been donated by Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook to his philanthropic projects in the US education system think the charitable donations of the copper others in the US all those the Gates Foundation. None of it impresses an-and ungiven Dorados. He's the author of another book called winner takes all the elite charade of changing the world. When you look at someone like, Mark Zuckerberg? He has gotten a tremendous bang for his philanthropic. Buck for his talk of changing the world wearing hoodies using a language of communities, and this kind of aura of do Gooding then serves as a kind of blast shield to avoid scrutiny. Another example would be the Sackler family this family that owned this company Purdue pharma that is behind to a great extent the opioid crisis in the United States that has killed two hundred thousand people and made billions and billions of dollars. Mostly from selling this drug you have from the nineties onwards public officials in West Virginia. And then the nation starting to realize that a lot of people were being killed and pushing back trying to regulate trying to bring criminal charges civil charges. They're actually pleading guilty to certain things and admitting fraudulent practices while continuing to make billions and billions of dollars and then using philanthropy Guggenheim met arts swings here. And there the Harvard Sackler museum here and there to buy this aura as an family of arts patrons for a relatively cheap investment, you can obscure your role in causing some of the very problems purporting to be solving. But do you think it's really that cynical that strategic? There's a spectrum from the naive to the shrewd here. And my reporting persuades me that both are involved in Silicon Valley. You actually have more of the naive than the shrewd. You have people who I actually think are even more dangerous because they truly believe they're doing good. Now, you gotta Wall Street. Where have also done reporting. It's a very different story. You have some of the same language around doing good. Goldman Sachs has a ten thousand women program to empower women every Bank has a corporate social responsibility arm. They all foundations. But if you get those people after hours have a whiskey with them he said what's this about? They don't even go through the pretense of saying this Bank is about making the world a better place..

United States professor Oxford University England Oxford Ceo President Trump Brexit New York hedge fund Bridgewater associates Bangladesh fed Forbes magazine London Mark Zuckerberg Ray Dallaglio Henry Kissinger Polaris Los Angeles Kenya
News in Brief 1 February 2019

UN News

02:46 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 1 February 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. Hiring details continue to emerge thousands of families who've risked their lives fleeing fighting in Syria's last Aycell terrorist held in Clave as u n humanitarian warned on Friday that children are still dying on their way to an overcrowded camp for the displaced amid access problems and perishing cold in just the past week more than ten thousand people have fled conflict in hygiene in eastern, Missouri. Governor at u n refugee agency spokesperson Andrea Mahachi told journalists in Geneva since fighting escalated in hygiene and early December more than twenty three thousand fled to Al hop camp, effectively tripling its population, he said and many more are expected civilians on the run describe fierce fighting and said that they were blocked from leaving by issue or Daish extremists families fleeing the hygiene and Clave and surrounding areas. Have also told us of herring journey to safety. They travel at night with barely any belongings often having to Wade through the minefields and open fighting brave UN teams in. Partners leading the fight against deadly bowler disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC along with government. Authorities in peacekeepers have been key in helping protect communities at top World Health Organization official said on Friday. It's now six months since DRC's deadliest ever outbreak began Dr much de so Moretti WHO regional director for Africa said that challenges persist in overcoming virus hot spots in the northeast of the country. We have some five hundred stuff on the ground at the moment, and the great majority from the DRC and also from WHO offices across the African region. Some of these people have been fighting Bala since the first twenty eighteen outbreak began in the west of the DRC in me. These brave people. I'm colleagues really do make us all proud today. Abolish cleaned four hundred sixty one lies in North Kivu and Ichiro provinces and tuned in fifty eight people who've recovered from the onus the UN refugee agency UNHCR has put the biggest human waste treatment facility ever built in a refugee settlement into service in the Cox's Bazar region of Bangladesh, which is home to hundreds of thousands of religious who fled me and maul the new UNHCR and Oxfam funded facility can process the waste of one hundred fifty thousand people a day, which is roughly the equivalent of the populations of the cities of savannah in the United States or Dijon in France, nearly one million Hindu refugees live in settlements in Cox's Bazar, including Kutupalong, the world's largest refugee settlement, which alone is home to more than six hundred thirty thousand being able to treat large volumes of waste on site rather than having to transport it. Elsewhere is critical to the safe and sustainable disposal of waste in emergency situations. The UN says. Matt wells, U N news.

DRC UN United Nations COX Unhcr Andrea Mahachi Missouri Syria Al Hop Camp Bala World Health Organization Matt Wells Geneva North Kivu Wade Africa Moretti Bangladesh Savannah
"oxfam" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Babe. This was this was the debate earlier before you arrived, babe. I would be babe. If you if I Lau you to call me babe after multiple days, the waitresses, not babe. I mean, I'm we do. That's why I tried to like do an up up like upswing with it was so funny when you did it to me earlier. Hey, babe. Could I get a Margarita Villanova something? Was wasn't should because. Well, maybe we should do. Chad go out on a date with me as Chad with you as him. All right. So let's imagine if you are if you agree to this scenario, you are an Aspen is a real life scenario can hypothetical scenario hypothet-. Well, okay. We're not an asked them. We're thought he was like like if I agree to this guy named Chad. I was like. That would be amazing. Yes. Yep. The private jet is lead into. Surprise. Okay. So let's say you're you're at you're in Aspen. Right. You had a long Dave skiing snowboarding whichever you prefer snowshoeing. Drinking hot chocolate with whiskey, and we feel so you're at you're like the four seasons bar and the and anyway. I. Myself as Chad sits down next to ready, right? A wait. Whoa. Fisher poets, CHAD'S bartenders name changes every time. I know it does doesn't call me something. Traff drive. I'm fine. Works. Yeah. Hey, sorry. About uses taking does now. Thanks school. Man. I didn't mean to call you that. But hey, travels up man. Hey, hey, could I get a macallan eighteen on the monks? Are you? Okay. Neal's. Thank you for asking. I was doing. I'm trav-, Dr tribes awesome. He's the best cool. If you need anything can killer MARTINI. Things dirty, man. Just let me know if he's bothering you at all I can remove him. What the fuck now? I actually what the fuck about that tip yesterday. Man. Fuck you. Traff. Oh, I give them like a fifty. But yeah. How how? I'd love a tequila soda type of tequila either. Me Don Julio block. Oh, it'd be great. Damn girl. Sorry. You got good taste. I'll man wasn't that powder out there. Like that was fucking amazing, right? Yeah. Runs. Did you hit? It didn't snow today. It was fake snow from the mountain. But it was they they did a pretty good job. Did you hit the bunny round? I was not on the bunny run. I was on triple double black diamond. Yeah. Did you go down? Oxfam's, raise OXFAM's. That must be some back road trail. I've never heard that one. Yeah. It's like win. The most obvious conclusion is like right there in front of you, you know, and but you choose to not accept it sometimes. But sometimes you do. I got skating on thin ice. Sometimes, you know, a razor thin, whatever. I don't really like go for brunettes, but you really fucking hot. Thank you. You really fucking hot. Thank you. Thank you drink. Anyway. I'm chad. I yeah. You've said that at the beginning of the conversation. Chad what's up girl? So what's your name girl? Name girl. Serve owl. It just like girl yet. So you g U R L E sounds like you got me to issue. Okay chat. Thank you has been. I know. That was..

Chad Aspen Neal Oxfam Don Julio
"oxfam" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"It's widening. It's hurting our economy slowing economies. That's oxfam. Executive director Winnie beyond Yima. Her proposed solutions include more taxes on the wealthy. The Oxfam report says the number of billionaires almost doubled since the financial crisis in two thousand eight but tax rates have fallen to their lowest rates in decades to hedge funds with major investments in EBay wanted to sell or spin off stubhub Elliott manager in starboard value. The two companies are worth more separate than together. Ebay bought stubhub in two thousand seven for three hundred ten billion dollars and Starbucks is expanding its delivery service after testing it out last fall in Miami. It added San Francisco this week, and it plans to roll out over the next several weeks in Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Washington DC, and it's also planning to tested in London soon. Starbucks has part. With Uber eats, which charges to forty nine per delivery. Consumer and business news. Joe McConnell NBC News Radio the dean's list with Janice. Dean. I'm Ana Elliott infra Janice, a loving union more than half a century in the making makes the dean's list Curtis. Brewer and Barbara cotton were high school sweethearts in the early nineteen sixties. They went to prom together. But tragedy interfered with their love story. Barbara's mother died and Barbara devoted herself to taking care of her five brothers Curtis went off to college. And we kinda lost each other. We're told me never broke up until Barbara reached out fifty years later on classmates dot com. And so I answered a bat. I answered a real quick correspondent for awhile. And then would you? That's all I got out. Should yes. The.

Barbara cotton Starbucks EBay oxfam Curtis Janice Oxfam Dean Joe McConnell Ana Elliott Executive director Yima NBC Winnie San Francisco Miami Brewer
Ivanka Trump receives 5 trademarks from China amid trade talks

The KFBK Morning News

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Ivanka Trump receives 5 trademarks from China amid trade talks

"Employees need to be careful about what they post online and be respectful if they're applying for a job today because that comments you right on Facebook. Or the impression you leave with a perspective employer. Could come back to bite you down the road slightly more than two dozen wealthiest people on earth own as much as fifty percent of the world's poor. The development charity. Oxfam says in a new report that the twenty-six six richest billionaires on the planet own as many assets as the three point eight billion people who make up the world's poorest, OXFAM's annual wealth checkup says a one percent wealth tax would raise close to four hundred twenty billion dollars a year. The charity says that's enough to educate every child not in school and provide healthcare that would prevent three million deaths. Annually the time right now, he's five fifty five F B K wanna be your own boss here. Some common sense tips from a man whose made that happen for himself ready to make the jump and start your own business. Joe Lopez Gago says you better be sure about everybody that thinks they're going to start a business and coast through that process is kidding themselves. There's a lot of long days and a lot of long nights. And you really have to love what you're doing Lopez Gaiga who runs meal delivery service kettlebells kitchen, also says don't go it alone.

Oxfam Joe Lopez Gago Lopez Gaiga Facebook Four Hundred Twenty Billion Do Fifty Percent One Percent
"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"And he's just so excited to meet you and everyone else. I think people they get because he's he's a real stocky boy. Yeah, I think they get a little scared. Yeah. He looks like he's a big boy, but he just wants his once love. Yeah, he just like he'll try to call on your lap like he weighs six pounds. He six, Joe thinks tweeting all. He hugged me the other day, and I literally mean hugged him Pau. He'd side of his moist and then pulled Matt in so big boy. It was the sweetest thing. My heart melted. Foster and Wally? Yeah. If you guys are interested in them, he's going to be up on our Instagram. We put them in the stories. We did a post about him, but. L. animal rescue contact him. Yeah, but near there was nothing. Nothing else really is pretty quiet. Yeah. Okay. All right. Well, I know that there's some stuff that we want to highlight that are going on. Yeah, we got some some housekeeping stuff. You wanna talk about the the Oxfam thing. Yeah. As you guys know, were really big into tracing the origins of our food throughout the food supply and the industrial chain. We talked about with nullify her diet on our previous episode, but now OXFAM's getting in the game, they've been doing some research and they're coming out with this whole series called behind the barcode and from October seventh to October fifteenth, a behind the bar code food truck is traveling from Washington DC to the whole foods headquarters in Austin, Texas, to call attention to the supermarkets, lack of response to the human suffering taking place in their seafood supply chain. And if you guys are familiar with foods, you know they like to tout their own like the hang their hat on, like this is all sustainable and like responsibly. Source? Yeah, they position themselves as a gatekeeper to making good food choices. Oh, we've done all the hard work for you. We've gotten rid of all the BPA and all the unnatural preservatives and all these things just shop, guilt free here in our store. But what axiom is saying is that they actually have some prudential working conditions for the humans that helps supply the seafood there. Hope it's a selling chose fruit truck is sewing which the they're going to be giving you guys information on how to make better more sustainable food choices. There's no food on the fruit Jordan. The most boring. Whole foods is trying to build this reputation as a sustainable and ethical grocer in the industry. But the retailer was shown as one of the worst performing and OXFAM's research showing that their policies do not match up with rhetoric, whole foods has room to improve, but they don't want to talk about it. Oxfam has been trying to get them to make some kind of statement or some kind of change on this food supply issue for the last year and a half, and hopefully hasn't responded. So along the way to Austin, the food truck will be stopping by whole foods stores and college campuses to engage customers and raise the voices of people who produce our food calling on foods to take action to ensure the supply chain workers are treated fairly and paid fairly. If your brand is like Likud responsible, we are.

OXFAM Joe Oxfam Austin Wally Likud Matt Foster Texas Washington six pounds
California museum can keep Cranachs looted by Nazis

BBC World Service

02:36 min | 3 years ago

California museum can keep Cranachs looted by Nazis

"Partner told us to leave and run is very scary because like the rock. Is going down from the mountain and our guys Child and Ryan Ryan keep Ryan and we. We run two pairs accordion Indonesia has ordered the banning of the country's largest Islamist. Group Jamaa answer route dollar after finding it guilty of carrying out. Acts of terrorism and been linked to the Islamic. State group the verdict comes a month after the group's leader Abdurrahman was sentenced to death for terrorism world news from the BBC. Officials in Afghanistan say a roadside bomb, is destroyed a passenger bus in western Afghanistan killing at least eight people and wounding forty others the spokesman for the governor in Farah province said. The bus was travelling from Herat Kabul when it struck an improvised explosive device he blamed the. Attack on, the Taliban an explosion at an. Army checkpoint in the southern Philippines has killed at least five people officials said the blast happened on the island of Basilan soon after van was stop By troops for inspection one soldier and. Four pro government militiamen died A US court has ruled that a museum, in California can keep to sixteenth century masterpieces by the German painter Lucas Cranach the elder which were, looted by the Nazis during the second World War after the war the paintings were. Given to the Dutch government which sold them in the nineteen sixties the court's ruling against the descendants of the initial. Owner is the final decision in the matter A committee of. The British parliament has said sexual abuse and exploitation in the aid sector is endemic across different charities and countries in a. Report the British MP's said organizations such as Oxfam, whereas bonding to cases of sexual, abuse with complacency verging on complicity Stephen Twigg chairs the committee the new report highlights collective failure to address. The endemic problem of sexual exploitation and abuse going back at, least sixteen years it would appear. That aid organizations have put their own reputations ahead of the protection of victims and survivors that is wrong and, that has got to change scientists in Britain have identified a new frog species intrical researchers at the, university of Manchester twenty years to determine that Sylvia's tree frog is a separate species. The MVP was I found in Panama in nineteen twenty five and that is the BBC news.

Ryan Ryan BBC Afghanistan Herat Kabul British Parliament Partner Indonesia Lucas Cranach VAN Stephen Twigg University Of Manchester Basilan Farah Province Britain Abdurrahman MVP United States Oxfam
Group intentionally crashes drone into nuclear plant to reveal security vulnerability

Phil Valentine

05:02 min | 3 years ago

Group intentionally crashes drone into nuclear plant to reveal security vulnerability

"Designed to be non lethal that's right yankee dog your head just catch on fire but did not kill you don't worry then blow up in front of you heck catch on fire but did not lethal i promise the weapon is designed to do things such as setting fire to illegal banners at a protest or setting fire to the hair or clothing of a protester it is not designed explicitly for killing like a gun that uses bullets and cannot cause the instant carbon ization of human skin and tissues he says it's a fifteen millimeter caliber weapon weighs about six and a half pounds has a range of twenty six hundred feet can pass through glance and other transparent obstacles so there you go i mean not that you would need this to suppress your population or anything you know in case they have banners that are like i don't know against the country you know against the government i don't know what else you would need this but don't be worried about it in the meantime ladies and germs greenpeace has crashed a drone into a french nuclear plant video released by the environmental group shows the zone zipping through restricted airspace above the buggy plant about sixteen miles outside of leo before crashing into a building on site it said the drone struck a storage pool for spent nuclear fuel next to the reactor one of the most radioactive areas of the site according to yannick rousselet head of greenpeace france antinuclear campaign said this is a highly symbolic action it shows it spent fuel pools are very accessible this time from the year and therefore extremely vulnerable to attack on that they are right i mean you know somebody probably needs to do something about it if you can just run a drone into it with no problem i mean you probably do have a security problem i would think richard branson ladies and gentlemen you know him as the head of virgin records virgin air virgin anything but he's anything but virgin one solution to income inequality he says is giving out free cash that's right a basic income should be introduced in europe and in america he told the new york times he was responding to the question what do you think those in positions of power should do to address social problems like income inequality a report published in january the global charity oxfam found that eighty two percent of the growth in global wealth from the previous year went to the top one percent of individuals ranked by riches meanwhile the bottom fifty percent had no increase in their wealth it's a disgrace to see people sleeping on the streets with this material wealth all around them he says as he flies in his private jet from town to town what is what this guy the guy's worth billions i would think at least hundreds of millions and he's saying but you yanks you need to be giving people money just hand out money on the streets is here's the deal folks and this is something that liberals don't quite understand and i don't understand it especially the rich ones richard branson made his money and he has he has put together some very successful companies why virgin records was probably i wasn't before virgin airlines that's how he made his money right in the record business he was probably that snooty guide the record bar you know there would always roll his eyes anytime you brought the album up to the you know you're buying their and that's probably how he started anyway so he starts off in the record business and then he introduces airliners and everything else and he's been very successful he's building a hotel here in nashville they tore down a beautiful historic house to do it but hey you know it's progress folks i mean we need another hotel another cat condo like a hole in but we got it but here's the deal with folks like branson and he lon mosque and the rest of these people they starting to feel guilty about everything but they don't feel guilty enough to liquidate everything they've got to help alleviate poverty so they suggest that the governments do it you see that way they can feel real good about themselves and advocate that the governments do this that or the other and then when the government started to do it they get their cpa's to find ways that they can pay less in taxes it's hypocrisy what they should understand as business people who have built businesses is that anybody can do this but not everybody's going.

Twenty Six Hundred Feet Eighty Two Percent Fifty Percent One Percent
Nicaraguan opposition talks with President Daniel Ortega

Rush Limbaugh

02:22 min | 3 years ago

Nicaraguan opposition talks with President Daniel Ortega

"If they meet next month's pyongyang has threatened to cancel the talks if washington continues to press for its unilateral nuclear disarmament this report from john sopo from a president who's always been quick to react and quick to retaliate today there's been absolute restraint the manager of the white house seems to be keep calm and carry on and do nothing that could inflame tensions with north korea ahead of next month's scheduled summit they're likely to be more bumps ahead but there's absolute determination that loose talk whether from pyongyang or washington shouldn't be allowed to derail this historic summit tongues have begun in nicaragua between president daniel ortega and the opposition and make new clashes and antigovernment protests across the country local media say at least one person has died and many of us have been injured in confrontations between protesters and riot police the unrest began a month ago when mr ortega socialist government introduced unpopular pension and social security cards more than forty people were killed the chief executive of the aid agency oxfam in britain mark goldring is to stand down at the end of this year the charges come under intense scrutiny since allegations emerged earlier this year of sexual misconduct by it staff in haiti in two thousand eleven bbc news the chief executive of facebook mark zuckerberg has agreed to meet members of the european parliament to answer questions about the companies use of personal data the head of the legislature antonio tajani said mr zuckerberg could be in brussels as early as next week cobra has already testified before the us congress on goal is sovereign wealth fund is applied to a british cord to order banks to reveal information about accounts held in its behalf this is the five billion dollar funds latest move in a dispute with its former boss the son of angola's expresident josie eduardo santos giuseppe lamented does santosh was sacked as head of the fund after lorenzo became president last year vowing to radically nepotism and corruption the us senate intelligence committee has voted in favor of president trump's nominee to lead the central intelligence agency gina hospital if confirmed by the full senate she would be the first woman to lead the.

United States Santosh Josie Eduardo Santos Giuseppe Congress Facebook Britain Mr Ortega Nicaragua Washington Senate Gina Hospital Donald Trump Lorenzo Angola Pyongyang Brussels Antonio Tajani European Parliament Mark Zuckerberg
"oxfam" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"So oxfam's independent prison law limping detroit moscow's last usually think this narrow supriyanto especially around rounding us while i was thinking at the time here so i went into rod for us they took me there for individuals with a prison officer signed the ball to right before you see the body photos pictures of people in the will of the students there was talk this woman is looking around the ball i was thinking looking to the uae offset questioners k miles back as anyone that's ever worked we got one ethical in under on on the course others have no i didn't even know i didn't have any ambition abide plan cometh under walsh's curious sia she went and it was guilhou who the foundation who friend who going to be but i for the different issues odious junichi spin potter i on the bar of milekic who sows weapon in the kitchen and from work in the kitchen first that work is jeffco's concoct the fetch it's not yet so fi klimovitch up but he's at manama caen do it i can only see chefs go authored knock knock that nuts data as right them is that will on meet the french dumbass lenten time and if you do it way alternate we're going to be forever so sorry but no facts you call mike in the kitchen talkline faulk from meat was heartbreaking golfing in this is a good way spotbeam a chef via unless while forwards with kinda taken a kind of fiercely goes gin old us we're going to find something to me there are unfortunate microregional for something the kitchen looking to put it onto the ball okay so at the time of devastating loss frontline join us villa but you are of comments being a kitchen knife them the boss of in coughing some slick uscic dream so is on the ball work release still go job none has that afghan paid some obv money death even while i was in prison right so that's whilst at great and then but now almost actually meet in people now because in the kitchen your closed off your way from at one but now hours a i'm in the monks the become overplay a coffee and if almost what curious about a colossal different anyone nancy modest quantum middleclass played zia and this means that raul not lentil my tummy.

oxfam moscow officer uae walsh manama caen mike faulk zia raul
"oxfam" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

The Infinite Monkey Cage

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"oxfam" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

"So oxygenating skin deeply oxygenated our third breathing oxygen is a feels nice antioxidants we've got plenty of them in our bodies already if few in fruit and vegetables you you've got plenty of them and this even some theories if he eat antioxidant pills than you might disrupt iran system site bringing a load of unruly must meet me what he go well trained army so you don't necessarily want to do that but also the summing very profound about the fact that oxford as is the reason why not pin has its the reason manatt slime is how we can be and vigorous and creative unsolved problems and be interesting but it's actually also what kills us oxfam's responsible for the diseases of old age and dementia and cancer and so on and ultimately death by the rampaging it does with all these free radicals in your body so the thing that you were breathing one estimate that breathing for year is the equivalent of of having ten thousand chest xrays at that time assisting tear and it's our bodies very impressive that can resist it but eventually went so oxygen is the thing it is the reason that we will all grow old and die and yet it's the reason that we can all live so surrey it heard both sides of the few oxygen good thing battering i feel at this is a remake of science it's a beautiful life where he gets a find out about the past and what would have been like without oxygen nothing and then the future what happens if we don't protect the things that we've got an an a wakeup little trim this solar came got some oxygen but we have to be careful now guys it's not the right thing of us i understood that breathing thing was going to be a fit the says hold your breath for it we will keep younger short reorts did not too high altitudes legs that reason.

oxfam iran