35 Burst results for "Overdoses"

The Justice Department Moves to Block the Purdue Pharma Sackler Bankruptcy Deal

NPR News Now

00:59 sec | 4 hrs ago

The Justice Department Moves to Block the Purdue Pharma Sackler Bankruptcy Deal

"Justice department is appealing a controversial bankruptcy. Deal for drugmaker. Purdue pharma the company produces the opioid oxycontin. The justice department wants the settlement to be put on hold until legal challenges or settled. Npr's brian man has more justice. Department officials have repeatedly blasted one provision of this plan that grants immunity from opioid lawsuits to members of the sackler family who owned the drug company. The sackler have agreed to pay roughly four point. Three billion dollars as part of the deal in court documents made public early thursday morning. The doj asked for a temporary halt on implementation of the bankruptcy plan including payouts of any money while the appeal is being heard the justice department. Also ask for expedited hearings maryland washington state and washington. Dc have also appealed the purdue pharma bankruptcy supporters of the plan approved earlier this month say it will fund desperately needed drug treatment programs at a time when overdose deaths are

Justice Department Brian Man Purdue Pharma Drugmaker Sackler NPR DOJ Washington Maryland
Study: Black Opioid Overdose Deaths Increasing Faster Than Whites

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 6 d ago

Study: Black Opioid Overdose Deaths Increasing Faster Than Whites

"Among black. Americans rose nearly forty percent across four states in two thousand eighteen and nineteen. That's according to a new study published in the american journal of public health. npr's redo chatterjee reports. There was no rise in overdose deaths for other racial and ethnic groups. Death certificates from nearly seventy communities in four states show a thirty eight percent rise in opioid overdose deaths for non hispanic black individuals in the two years. Before the pandemic the increase was highest in kentucky and ohio in comparison opioid overdose. Deaths stayed the same for other racial ethnic groups in most states in new york overdose deaths for white individuals when down. Although recent studies have found that overdose deaths continued to surge foster in the black community in two thousand twenty. The new study calls for an urgent need to address this disparity in part by making sure that evidence based treatments reach the communities than them most rita judgy.

American Journal Of Public Hea NPR Kentucky Ohio New York Rita Judgy
Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

Awards Chatter

01:48 min | Last week

Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

"Today's episode. We remember the magnificent character actor. Michael kenneth williams. Who was found dead on monday of a suspected drug overdose at the age of fifty. Four williams was a five time emmy nominee for best supporting actor in a limited series or tv movie for bessie in two thousand fifteen. The night of in two thousand sixteen and when they see us in two thousand nineteen for best informational series or special for vice in two thousand eighteen. He was an executive producer of the show. And for best supporting actor in a drama series this year for hbo's lovecraft country indeed. Even before his tragic passing he was the favourite to take home. His first statuette on september nineteenth williams also appeared on the sopranos alias. Boston legal happened. Leonard and many other acclaimed. Tv shows as well as in films. Such as two thousand seven's gone baby gone two thousand nine the road and two thousand thirteen twelve years a slave which won the best picture oscar but he was best known for his work on to other. Hbo drama series for which he criminally never was even for an emmy the wire on which he played omar little and boardwalk empire on which he played chalky white the wire which was created by david. Simon is considered by many including me to be the greatest show in the history of television. And he the greatest character on it a gay shotgun-wielding stick up man who terrified even baltimore's most hardened criminals whistling hunting. We will go as he stopped the streets and famously warning one challenger you come at the king you best not miss. The new york times described the character quote one of primetime preeminent anti heroes in a tv era defined by them close quote

Michael Kenneth Williams Williams Bessie Emmy Omar Little HBO Leonard Boston Oscar Simon David Baltimore The New York Times
Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

Awards Chatter

01:58 min | Last week

Remembering Michael K. Williams & His Legacy

"Today's episode. We remember the magnificent character actor. Michael kenneth williams. Who was found dead on monday of a suspected drug overdose at the age of fifty. Four williams was a five time emmy nominee for best supporting actor in a limited series or tv movie for bessie in two thousand fifteen. The night of in two thousand sixteen and when they see us in two thousand nineteen for best informational series or special for vice in two thousand eighteen. He was an executive producer of the show. And for best supporting actor in a drama series this year for hbo's lovecraft country indeed. Even before his tragic passing he was the favourite to take home. His first statuette on september nineteenth williams also appeared on the sopranos alias. Boston legal happened. Leonard and many other acclaimed. Tv shows as well as in films. Such as two thousand seven's gone baby gone two thousand nine the road and two thousand thirteen twelve years a slave which won the best picture oscar but he was best known for his work on to other. Hbo drama series for which he criminally never was even for an emmy the wire on which he played omar little and boardwalk empire on which he played chalky white the wire which was created by david. Simon is considered by many including me to be the greatest show in the history of television. And he the greatest character on it a gay shotgun-wielding stick up man who terrified even baltimore's most hardened criminals whistling hunting. We will go as he stopped the streets and famously warning one challenger you come at the king you best not miss. The new york times described the character quote one of primetime preeminent anti heroes in a tv era defined by them close quote given this week. Sad news i thought i would resurface an interview that i recorded with williams just over a decade ago. Shortly after the first season of boardwalk empire

Michael Kenneth Williams Williams Bessie Emmy Omar Little HBO Leonard Boston Oscar Simon David Baltimore The New York Times
Why Is There a Disinformation Campaign Against Ivermectin?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:27 min | Last week

Why Is There a Disinformation Campaign Against Ivermectin?

"Rogan said he defeated co vid in just a couple of days. Thanks to the use of ivermectin now. This started a sequence of disinformation. Let's actually go to eight. I 'cause established this whole idea of this information. A whole sequence of disinformation stories around ivermectin. Saying that it's a horse de warmer. Now that's actually an off label. Use ivermectin won a nobel prize for its use on humans. In fact a two thousand nine hundred. Cdc memo on ivermectin said that all refugees in it they should take two doses of ivermectin orally. In fact it says right here on the cdc's website which they don't want you to read top of malaria guidance. That ivermectin can be very helpful for you. That's the cdc's own website. A study in the american journal of therapeutics published june. Twenty two thousand twenty one said that the apparent safety and low cost suggests that ivermectin is likely to have a significant impact on the sars covy to pandemic globally and hydroxy. Clark is also anti-malaria drug and personally every person that i've given hydroxy chloride quinn to help them get connected with. They've turned the now that that's not. Okay that's not empirically scientific enough to convince me but fao cheat. Made sure he had to go out. Vouches dis- disinformation artist. You notice how vouching never actually has a real symposium or takes legitimate questions play tape when it comes to a public health issue like cova nineteen in which it is essential to get correct information out one of the enemies of public health his disinformation and unfortunately we do see that in some quarters. Disinformation you mean. Disinformation like this disinformation. Where all the sudden a story was going viral. We re tweeted an amplified by rachel maddow. Same that oklahoma's hospital. Emergency departments were backed up and they could not serve gunshot victims due to ivermectin overdoses. What as soon as i saw that story. I said this doesn't sound right or rachel. Maddow spread this on social media. And this guy right here. Here's the original news clip. It turned out to be absolutely

CDC American Journal Of Therapeuti Rogan Malaria FAO Quinn Clark Rachel Maddow Oklahoma Maddow Rachel
Joy Reid Promotes False Story About Ohio Patients Overdosing on Ivermectin

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | Last week

Joy Reid Promotes False Story About Ohio Patients Overdosing on Ivermectin

"They're falling apart. People are taking horse space diver Mactan Jim overflowing ODS everywhere. Oh, Diz! ALS all over the place. Everyone. Oh, ding! Oh, my God. I took horse piece They Oklahoma hospitals. It's so much so the Rolling Stone story so much so horse Pacers in Oklahoma. That they're not even taking gunshot wounds anymore. Jim, You believe that you walk in You're like I've been shot. What happened? Nine millimeters and chest the bucket to make it hold on. We got a horse paste. Er, there's our Sir Horse Pacer. Come on over a gunshot guy bleeding. I'm collapsed Lung. We'll get to you in a couple hours. Go back home. Take an aspirin. Call me in the morning. Horse Pacers. Come on. So joy Reid is so stupid. She didn't even think to have someone call the hospital. About the horse Basters overdosing Joyce. Too dumb. So Joy, of course, brought the story on her shelf for the umpteenth 1000 time getting completely humiliated because she doesn't follow the Bongino rule. What's the Bongino rule? Anytime you see a stupid story about coronavirus or Donald Trump? It's probably a lie. Wait 72 hours and it will be the bunk. If Joy would apply this rule. If joy would have went right to the police. None of this would have ever happened. She doesn't seem to get that joy. If she would just wait the 72 hours. This kind of stuff wouldn't happen, Jim Play cut. Six. Here's Joy Reid hilariously dolling out the misinformation as she repeats the horse space talks. Check this out, so things are clearly bad. But they're being made even worse by people who have refused to take the vaccine and instead are swallowing horse paste. Emergency room in one rural Oklahoma town is being overwhelmed by people overdosing on ivermectin, the horse deworming medication. It's gotten so bad that gunshot victims gunshot victims are having to wait to be treated. Yeah.

Mactan Jim Pacers Sir Horse Pacer Oklahoma Lung Jim Play JIM Reid Joy Reid Joyce Donald Trump
Actor Michael K. Williams, Star of 'The Wire' and 'Lovecraft Country,' Dead at 54

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

Actor Michael K. Williams, Star of 'The Wire' and 'Lovecraft Country,' Dead at 54

"An actor best known for playing a man who robbed drug dealers on the wire has died you want Michael K. Williams has died he was found dead yesterday afternoon by family members in his penthouse apartment in Brooklyn New York the NYPD says his death is being investigated as a possible drug overdose and the medical examiner is looking into the case with fifty four years old Williams is best known for playing Omar little on the wire one of the most beloved and enduring characters on that show which ran from two thousand to two thousand and eight on HBO I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Michael K. Williams Nypd Brooklyn New York Omar Williams HBO Oscar Wells Gabriel
Ed Cowsar on Oil and Gas Startups

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

02:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Ed Cowsar on Oil and Gas Startups

"Cows are in the pastor cows overdose spree data. What's going to be with you guys. Thanks for having me. Where are you based out of again. And you told me last week when we talk. Show osprey data's headquartered in california But you know we focused on texas so texas ceo. I've worked with the backers behind this company for over twenty years houston ventures Okay am strategically located halfway between the eagle ford and the permian Out there in the hill country. But you can't cut quarter on houston lived here. Nearly twenty years saw always hear often. So i don't know that He some ventures was the backer of auspey dato. he's venture guys Fred yup great guys. So it's okay so it gives me a little data points. Talk about bullets. Once you give us a quick overview of osprey data is what's the product what he is doing. then. I want to dive into your background. And the background of the company for that ger- yeah absolutely so We're a technology solution In production we turn issues into precision action into story at the end of the day. Which you weren't want is effective More effective process or workflow than has been taking place in the past so what we do to enable that in production is we ingest the digital feed from the wells artificial lift in particular and the entire production infrastructure and You know mark that table. It's that data it's unstructured So you label. It sounded like a payroll system So you label it. With subject matter. Experts are working at the what we call our rapid label highlighter. And you give these curves meaning And it goes into machine learning environment where when it sees those curves again at psych. I've seen you before your gas locking in an esp and to get some of those issues with the pumps. The down hole pumps the artificial lift devices. You know it takes some deep learning and summer just very shallow. You're you're recognizing them based upon extremes of pressure volume temperature so depending on the issue. You're solving. It's either simple or pretty complex but once you recognize it it turns into a workflow and enables more efficient

Auspey Dato Houston Texas Ford California
Purdue Pharma Bankruptcy Case: Sackler Family Apologizes for Pain OxyContin Caused

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

Purdue Pharma Bankruptcy Case: Sackler Family Apologizes for Pain OxyContin Caused

"A member of the family that owns Purdue pharma says it is horrible that oxycontin the medicine developed to ease pain actually caused pain to families affected by addiction in a bankruptcy proceeding conducted by video conference board member Mortimer Sackler says his family had hoped it could help turn the tide on the opioid addiction crisis by altering oxycontin to make it harder to crush up to be snorted or injected but instead of reducing overdose deaths the problem got worse and Sackler testified we're sorry if a medicine we put out that was intended to relieve pain caused pain his sister Kathy Sackler testified she believed her family has a moral responsibility to help fix the addiction crisis under a bankruptcy proposal the Sackler family members would give up ownership of Purdue pharma and future profits would go largely to help abate the opioid crisis I'm Jackie Quinn

Mortimer Sackler Purdue Pharma Kathy Sackler Sackler Jackie Quinn
California Sheriff: He, Not Doctor, Diagnosed Video Overdose

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:35 sec | Last month

California Sheriff: He, Not Doctor, Diagnosed Video Overdose

"County Sheriff Bill Gore is acknowledged that he not a doctor concluded a deputy overdosed from fentanyl exposure while searching a vehicle for drugs. Body worn camera footage released last week shows the deputy following falling to the ground and struggling to breathe after coming within about six inches of the drug. The union Tribune quotes the sheriff is saying it was classic signs of fentanyl overdose. That's why we called it that. Health experts told the newspaper. Fentanyl is extremely dangerous, but inhaling a small amount doesn't lead to an overdose and say they suspect the deputy essentially passed out due to fear.

County Sheriff Bill Gore The Union Tribune
Are Covid-19 Vaccines Affecting Periods and Menstrual Cycles?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:44 min | Last month

Are Covid-19 Vaccines Affecting Periods and Menstrual Cycles?

"One thing that's not okay. Is i'm gonna say this again and again even though twitter d platforming youtube is going to be for me. I will go to my grave saying this as a woman and the mother daughter a daughter and step mother of another daughter. It has no category for women's health issues and hundreds of women are reporting Menstrual dysregulation of a severe kind. And i don't mean to like you talk about anything. That shouldn't be talked about over over a breakfast table. But when you've got just as adults when you've got women saying i'm having to periods in a twenty eight day cycle or my cycle lasted a month or many mini super weird accounts of women long post menopause resuming bleeding after being vaccinated. I have not heard that. Are you kidding. oh. I wish. I was kidding. Overdose menopausal women menstruating. But isn't this the point. Ao me the fact that we're not hearing about this or not supposed to talk about this. I thought honestly people have to get angry. It's offensive in the united states of america. When people tell you what you can and cannot talk about. It is deeply offensive and epa. Push back. they deserve to be pushed around. Folks you've got to behave like your free because you actually are frequently. So you're telling me something. I'd not heard before well i wanted to reinforce that. Even more the importance of women speaking out about these things when i started reporting on the hundreds of accounts of severe menstrual dysregulation in super weird bleeding Matt gaetz got tasked with going onto twitter. Cnn media matters to say naomi wolf is bonkers raising

Youtube Twitter United States Of America EPA Matt Gaetz CNN Naomi Wolf
Political Donor Ed Buck Guilty on Counts Related to Overdose Deaths

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:34 sec | Last month

Political Donor Ed Buck Guilty on Counts Related to Overdose Deaths

"In the drug deaths of two men. Here's Alex Stone inside the federal courtroom. There were cheers when the verdict was read. Former Democratic donor Ed bought guilty on multiple charges linked to methamphetamine overdose deaths of two men at his West Hollywood apartment. Prosecutors say Bach was running a drug in sex 10 when he was arrested in 2019. Buck was also convicted of enticing men to LA to engage in prostitution. The jury deliberated for 4.5 hours before returning a guilty verdict. Alex Stone, ABC News, Los Angeles, and when Buck

Alex Stone West Hollywood ED Bach Buck LA Abc News Los Angeles
Does the Landmark Opioid Settlement Do Enough to Help?

Weekend All Things Considered

01:58 min | Last month

Does the Landmark Opioid Settlement Do Enough to Help?

"We just mentioned the opioid epidemic. This week, four of the world's biggest healthcare companies, including Johnson and Johnson reached $26 billion settlement for their role in the opioid crisis. These corporations made and distributed huge quantities of prescription pain pills at a time when addiction and overdose rates in the U. S were surging. So what happens now? NPR correspondent Brian Mann reports full time on addiction and is with us now to walk us through this complicated deal, Brian. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me first. Could you just go over the main points of the settlement? You know these companies the drug maker Johnson and Johnson and also these three big drug wholesalers, AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson They've agreed to pay a maximum amount of $26 billion, And as part of that agreement, a huge percentage of the money will go to drug treatment programs and social service programs. Health care things like that, and negotiators say this is a big improvement over the tobacco settlement of the 19 nineties. Where, if you remember, a lot of the money has been siphoned away by governments for other things not used to reduce smoking. So this money would be paid out over 17 years, and supporters say that will mean a steady stream of funding for programs that might help with this long term process of ending. This devastating public health crisis. Now two states Washington State in West Virginia, have already announced that they won't sign on to this national settlement and the city of Philadelphia has also rejected it. Why, Why is that? Is there something that they say is missing? Yeah, For one thing, there's no admission of wrongdoing by these companies or their executives, You know, as part of this wave of lawsuits against these corporations that got deep into the opioid business. We've learned factual details about how they flooded communities with pain pills. They kept growing that drug pipeline even as addiction rates and deaths grew. Internal documents from some of these firms showed that at times executives joked about the people suffering addiction. And a lot of these officials who reject this

Johnson Brian Mann Amerisourcebergen Cardinal Health Mckesson NPR U. Brian West Virginia Philadelphia Washington
States Reach $26 Billion Settlement With Companies in Opioid Lawsuit

The Boxer Show

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

States Reach $26 Billion Settlement With Companies in Opioid Lawsuit

"A brand in four major drug companies, agreeing to pay a total of $26 billion to be released from all legal liability in a settlement agreement. As long as it's approved by states and counties that money would be used to pay for addiction, treatment and prevention and other costs associated with opioid overdoses. The deal would also means states and local governments would drop lawsuits against the companies and promise not to bring

Washington’s Fentanyl Crisis Deepens as Overdose Deaths Rise

KIRO Nights

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Washington’s Fentanyl Crisis Deepens as Overdose Deaths Rise

"What to do about the opioid crisis? Washington's fentanyl crisis deepens as overdose deaths continue to rise. This is by Nick Bowman over my Northwest. Said. In 2020, there were more overdose deaths in Washington than any other year of the past decade. According to the D O age, the state appears headed towards an even higher rate in 2021, with preliminary data estimating that there had been 418 overdose deaths between January and March. Over that same period last year, There were 378 such deaths.

Nick Bowman Washington Northwest
US Life Expectancy in 2020 Saw Biggest Drop Since WWII

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

US Life Expectancy in 2020 Saw Biggest Drop Since WWII

"The corona virus pandemics taken its toll on life expectancy in the United States government figures show U. S. life expectancy fell by a year and a half in twenty twenty the largest one year decline since World War two it's now around age seventy seven and the centers for disease control fines the decrease for black and Hispanic Americans was even worse a three year decline more than three point three million Americans died last year far more than any other year in U. S. history covert nineteen accounted for about eleven percent of those deaths drug overdoses pushed life expectancy lower and rising homicides were a small but significant reason for the life expectancy decline for black Americans I'm Jackie Quinn

Centers For Disease Control United States U. Jackie Quinn
"overdoses" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

Daily Coronavirus Update

06:56 min | 2 months ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

"Drug overdose deaths have risen sharply in the country by thirty percent in twenty twenty with over ninety. Three thousand deaths. A large driver of those debts were the result of the synthetic opioids sentinel as it has been frequently mixed into other drugs. The pandemic also played a role in this as people who are receiving treatment or wanted it at difficult 'accessing it early on isolation and other life disruptions also feel the uptick betsy mckay senior writer at the wall street journal joins us for the rise in overdose deaths. Thanks for joining us. Betsy thank you for having me. We have some not so good news to talk about over. The pandemic obviously was a tough time for a lot of people is a big disruption to our lives. There was a lot of isolation going on. But we're learning now that something that was already a problem before just got exacerbated by it also drug overdose deaths. They soared nearly thirty percent in twenty twenty driven largely by sentinels like synthetic heroin basically. So that's what are we seeing in these new numbers that we're getting dramatic dramatic increase. It's the largest increase in at least three decades but probably more probably in the history the country. Now you know last year there were more than ninety three thousand people who died of a drug overdose and he said you know it's driven primarily by kind of proliferation of sentinel into the drug supply. Illicit sent knows mixed with a lot of drugs. And so you know. Many times people who are using drug. Don't realize that it's actually more powerful than they know because fendt noah's in it and so you know it's been a growing problem for the past. Few years deaths started ticking up in late twenty. Nineteen but after march twenty twenty. Which if you remember was when the pandemic really struck here and and restrictions kicked in and people started losing jobs and there was a lot of social isolation over the next month the depth just really took off and so there's kind of a perfect storm of two twin epidemics in this country that have unfortunately fed off each other and left us in a really bad place. There was also the debts from the overdose deaths from methamphetamines. Cocaine went up and and as you mentioned there was over ninety three thousand debts last year from twenty nineteen. That was about seventy two thousand. So you know more than twenty thousand. Extra people died as as you mentioned just dramatic shift. There let's talk a little bit more. About how the pandemic affected this part of it part of it was people that wanted to get treatment or needed treatment. They couldn't get it in the early months of the pandemic that's right clinics either closed or went online. People were having trouble even if they wanted to go in person you know knowing where to go or being able to get there so it cut off service for some people or people face disruption children providers say in most places did move to offering therapy sessions on zoom or you know other telehealth platforms. That doesn't necessarily work for everybody. They need to face to face contact or they just don't have the technology to do it. People who lost their jobs and lost their livelihoods. Some of them ended up homeless and on the street harder to get into treatment there and then honestly the big disruption to lives you know deaths of family and friends losing a job losing a home that produces a kind of trauma. The when you think about it people who are trying to come out of addiction or looking for needs stability and needs support and just kind of getting hit from from all sides have the support systems coping mechanisms even just closing a businesses and in the office. You know this reduced social interaction that could you know. Take your mind off things or whatever however people do cope that that was also taken away from a lot of people and it's tough and you even mentioned like you said this zoom things that you could have done with with whoever Drug counselors all that. Just not the same when it's over video as it is when it's in person so we have these numbers now these unfortunate numbers now what our public health officials would lawmakers saying that they want to do about this. How are they trying to get a handle on this well. It's clear that what's been done. Today is not working. You know people. I talked to said just need a much. Bigger much. bolder approach much more. Comprehensive the federal government has made it easier over the past year and a half for people to get treatment. They've moved a lot of barriers. But there's a lot more they need to remove. I mean some of the things cited are removing the limits on the number of people a physician can prescribe treatment to you know they can prescribe pain pill or widely in some cases then they can actually treatment for addiction to opioids and the other thing is making treatment which more widely available in clinics and pharmacies. So that you don't have to go through lots of bureaucratic hurdles and the final thing and it's a pretty big thing. Is that lawsuits. That state and local governments have filed against the opioid manufacturers and distributors seeking a cost to recoup their costs for daily with the opioid pandemic. Some of the settlements are starting to be made. And they're you know. Altogether state and local governments are seeking more than twenty six billion dollars from opioid manufacturers distribute distributors around the country so some of those trials are just getting underway and some of the settlements are starting to happen in the idea. Hope anyway is that this money would be used for treatment prevention and other programs to help deal with with addiction. Yeah i mean as you mentioned that the twin epidemics of we had the pandemic going on and then this other problem these opioid drug overdoses. That have been happening for quite some time already. Just got worse throughout that whole process so hopefully things begin to change. But you know as you just kind of alluded to. There's a lot of work that needs to go into that. Betsy mckay senior writer at the wall street journal. Thank you very much for joining us. It's nice to be here. I'm oscar ramirez and this has been reopened america. Don't forget that for today's big news stories. You can check me out of the daily podcast every monday through friday so follow us an iheartradio or wherever you get your podcast. Hey it's danielle. Monaro from elvis duran and the morning show on iheartradio here to tell you chucky cheese the best place to play the summer they're welcoming families back with an all new summer fun pass starting at only thirty nine ninety nine each pass offers weekly game play and e tickets and other great perks learn more on their website in store or on the chuck e. cheese app limited time at participating locations only terms and conditions apply see website for.

betsy mckay fendt noah the wall street journal Betsy federal government Betsy mckay oscar ramirez elvis duran Monaro danielle america
Drug Overdose Deaths Skyrocket Nearly 30% to 93,000 in 2020

America's First News Show

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Drug Overdose Deaths Skyrocket Nearly 30% to 93,000 in 2020

"Than 93,000 overdose deaths last year and nearly 30% increase over the year before the number of deaths attributed to different kinds of opioids grew by just about 20,000. Pharmaceutical companies have been sued over the marketing of opioids and doctors are facing more scrutiny over prescribing them. On top of that Chinese fentanyl shipments to the US dropped after the Chinese government banned the production and sale of fentanyl in 2019, But there is evidence they are still shipping the chemicals to make fentanyl to Mexican drug cartels and Border patrol has reported a large increase. And fentanyl seizures this year. Fox is Jessica Rosen FOLD America is

Chinese Government Mexican Drug Cartels And Borde America Fentanyl Seizures Jessica Rosen FOX
Overdoses Are on the Rise in Metro Atlanta and North Georgia

Word on the Street

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Overdoses Are on the Rise in Metro Atlanta and North Georgia

"With the shocking increases in deaths associated with fentanyl. We're seeing Across the state a 105% increase. Haley Hirsch, with the State Department of Health says most of the deaths are in metro Atlanta and North Georgia. The department's lower Edison says fentanyl is so deadly because it's so potent and it's being mixed with other drugs. We are hearing reports that is being found in all sorts of street drug marketed as prescription pills such as Xanax, Oxycodone. Sabrina, Cuba, 95.5 WSB. Top local news every 30 minutes and when it

Haley Hirsch State Department Of Health North Georgia Atlanta Sabrina Cuba
"overdoses" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:31 min | 8 months ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome everyone to mayo clinic cuna. I'm dr lena. Gonzaga opioid abuse and overdose has been an issue that has plagued the united states and part of the world frankly for the past decades before covid nineteen captured our attention a concerted effort was underway to combat the opioid epidemic unfortunately during the time of covert the cogan pandemic overdose deaths have accelerated increased dramatically in many areas. However there is an antidote moloch zone is a potentially life saving medication that can be administered to those who overdose. It can be given in any setting and here to discuss this with us today as dr bonnie molested a professor of clinical anesthesiology and critical care at the perlman school of medicine at the university of pennsylvania. Thanks for joining us today after my list. Thank you thank you for inviting me. It is such a pleasure to have you here so many times. We have experts from within mayo clinic. And it's just a joy to have you here. I i'm has heard you speak and was so impressed and i knew that our listeners would want to hear from you too. Thanks again ronnie. I'm wondering if you would mind starting by just telling us a little bit about your story. Sure as you've already mentioned i am an anesthesiologist. So i routinely handle large. Doses of intravenous opioids unfortunately and tragically have lost both of my adult sons to accidental overdoses. I am deeply. Committed to reducing stigma surrounding opioid use disorders and also in saving lives As anesthesiologists we are very keen to identify opioid overdoses. We are fassel at administering narcan and we are also experts at airway. Maneuvers and rescue when people I have been spearheading a campaign with my professional society. which is the american society of anesthesiologists and This is a grass roots movement in order to get our members to not only carry narcan but also to go out in the public and teach community members how to rescue opioid overdose victims. Now you know. Certainly i'm a physician and part of what i will be talking about comes from a medical knowledge base but i will also be adding in my personal story because of the experiences that i have had so they come from deep personal involvement and experience. It's well thank you for being so candid with our listeners. And sharing your story today That's a really meaningful the pain physician. It's.

ronnie mayo clinic today both perlman school of medicine past decades before covid lena. Gonzaga united states university of pennsylvania dr bonnie cuna dr american cogan nineteen
"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

20:25 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Of beautiful clothes, and as far as the natives could see a head full of butterflies, giggles incomprehensible chatter in nonsense they might have a maiden aunt and toe and always a mammy or made to supervise everything. You leave you see. there's an account of the same thing southerners before the civil war summering in Brattleboro. And bringing with them. Their slaves. Turban women as one woman described that. So before the civil war southerners are coming to get away from the heat to take the waters. In Vermont towns where they were spring houses and they bring their slaves with them indeed in eighteen sixty to Brattleboro came a southerner who had a perpetual stomach problem. eighteen sixty his name was ton of Jonathan Jackson stonewall Jackson and he probably got a slave through with him. Now. was. One. Of our great shames that that that sleighs did slavery continued after we outlawed it not a lot of slaves in Vermont but still shameful. I'm wondering if he. Well. I guess even though Vermont was officially a slave free state, it was still subject to the national law of the fugitive slave. act. Continue to exist, and so even even if are are the laws within our state. at least at least on paper banned slavery. people could come into the state from other states, especially southern states with slaves as property and and if if if even those slaves were tempted to escape. They apprehended and restored to their owners because of this fugitive stay slave law. So even though we pro prohibited yes. Still tolerated slavery within our borders were still subject to a national law that that forced us to here to to to the tolerance of slavery within as well as beyond our. Borders. There's no indication though that fugitive slave law got really any support in in Vermont quite the opposite I think They weren't that many sleighs in Vermont. They said what? Seventeen ninety cents said sixteen in Bennington I mean, that would just a partial count I've heard an estimate of one, hundred fifty in the Connecticut Valley or but I just I don't know Certainly. The war was. Harry? But Still But. I think Shane. Enjoying that's an ongoing. That's an ongoing research project were there's a lot we we still do not know regarding the tolerance of of slavery within and beyond. Beyond our state especially in northern states we we know that for instance, some designers of the constitute of of the Declaration of Independence John, handcock held held slate interim Franklin held slaves, the Josiah Bartlett of New Hampshire felt slaves So it was it was an institution that was that was tolerated in many ways not just in northern, not just in southern states, but also in the northern states among prominent individuals, of of our communities as well, and so I think that's an that's and that's a research project in which the covers are gradually being being taken taken off. Were it's an ongoing narrative which were finally awakening to the fact that that there's a lot. We don't know about our past that we're now discovery that that that marks us as a state, and that marks us because people in our history as one that was complicitous to to the institution of slavery, we may not have been as we may not have had the numbers. As those in the south, but we in some ways supported the institution because it's supported our economy in many ways, it's supported are a our way of life. In many ways and so well, not knowing none of us know no state is is free from that from that from that taint of sin. The agree agree with that and it's an area that needs research for one reason why there certainly were many slaves in Vermont was because people couldn't afford them. They were it was an expensive proposition but of course, there were not many African Americans in Vermont I've read so many letters of Vermont is when they get into the army and they go south particularly young men from the northern part of the state they see their first black people, I, they're amazed by the. They they've seen they never seen anyone who isn't white. It's amazing. Howard. LemMe ask you I'm wondering do do you ever in your research? Have you ever come across any sense that? There was ever any pushback did anybody ever when when when seeing enslaved people in Vermont or when seeing visitors to remind bring in slaves it anybody ever stand up and say, Hey, by the way. We don't do that here and that's against the law against our constitution anything like that. well, I have never come across any kind of an incident where you know it a Vermont or D- instantly responded to something like that. Of course, Vermont in Congress are are are congressional delegation became a real nuisance in Congress concerning slavery in the Southern States we were always. You know bringing up resolutions and so forth and and and challenging the gag rule and Congress abid the discussion of slavery. But as far as an effort to put a stop to slavery in the state well, not really there is that legendary There is that legendary ruling from the judge over there in Clarendon that he would. He would only recognize bill of sale from all mighty when southern or US take a slave out of Vermont. which I love that quote theon Harrington. but no then my answer basically David has no. Way, to have backup per se Howard and flesh out the story. That's fascinating to be a judge judge said what about what? In Rutland County, court Theophilus Harrington in late seventeen hundreds of was confronted with a case in his courtroom where Southerner wanted to take. An escaped slave back to the south with him and he asked for a legal permission to do this and and Harrington's reply was no You show me a bill of sale from God Almighty you can do it. I love. That's one of the great quotes and Vermont is absolutely. while. You. Reverend Thomas. Do. You ever come across that one before. That's pretty it's kind of entertaining. I heard about that and and and I think that does reflect the. The sentiment that many of our monitor's hat regarding the institution of slavery but I also I also need to remind myself that. Especially in the early days of Vermont, histories shortly after we came into. A little while before. Before we came into the Union but also shortly after we came into the Union. The abolitionist, I mean the radical abolitionist sentiment. was still in its. was still in its infancy there was there was a there was a more prominently a mood among many of the leaders of our states and I'm I'm acknowledging religious leaders as well such as John Hopkins, the the first fiscal bishop of our state. But also prominent congregational leaders as well and congregational pretty much the the unofficial state religion of a lot the time who who adhere to a belief that. That even those instant, the institution of slavery was sinful their minds. They could not tolerate the existence inequality of of freed African Americans this thing and and working prominently alongside white white for Mantras or white Americans and many people prefer to colonize them in. Liberia send them back to. Colonize region that America Americans have established and western Africa Liberia and fact one of the look the the first The first students, the first African American students of of the University of month Andrew Harris. was denied access to to other colleges such as Middlebury and was admitted to the University of Vermont by the President of that of that institution of by both university only. Only. With the assumption under the assumption that after he graduated, he would go to Liberia and serve as a missionary to to that state. People people in Vermont many prominent leaders in Vermont were were were. Were not tolerant of the fact of of African Americans of freed African Americans working in a say in the state of equality. Alongside whites and therefore preferred. To to see them still has lesser human beings not qualified to to live in a in a sense of equality. So that atmosphere continued for a long time and and made Vermont in many cases. state provided an atmosphere that was in many cases inhospitable for a long time for for freed African Americans. Andrew Harris. In fact, left Vermont for Philadelphia, because at that time, Philadelphia had very sizable black population and provided a more tolerant atmosphere for for for him than what he discovered in Vermont. android. Garrison. And Lincoln it for time adhere to that Let's let's send them out of the country philosophy of course. the African Americans in Boston took garrison aside and said, no WANNA. Go anywhere. We want to stay here and. you know from what? It's worth here I come from Woodstock. And I grew up in Woodstock and believe you me derogatory terms about black people I heard that all through my childhood there was a slave in in in woodstock about the about seventeen hundred powers family came to woodstock with a slave they called Kato Boston, and so that's after Vermont Outlaw Slavery The power family produces in Woodstock certain sculptor. named. Hiram. Powers. And his orients famous work is the Greek slave which becomes a symbol for the abolition movement. So you know it's it's a funny twist their a slave owning family produces a young man who becomes a great sculptor and joins the abolition movement but they were. So there was at least one slave in woodstock and he I. Guess this John Lewis would say was into good trouble. It said the tried to burn down the jail where he had once been combined good for him. Well, we have a listener calling in. Bob Dylan once said that it doesn't take a Weatherman to tell which way to wind is blowing even though. You may not exactly need a Weatherman we have one. Little bit of extra. Extra care and concern here on the day Graham show the wetter main question is Roger Hill calling in from Good Morning Roger Hey good morning. I'd like to ask Howard cough and a little bit I. Know we're talking probably what maybe a hundred years before this point but I. my empty spot on all of this in in how it relates Vermont I'd heard a little bit here and there is John Brown and where he was buried in and that whole thing and I know we're talking about what during the civil war pre or after civil war I. I'm a little empty on that spot in Howard coffin. Could you? On that just for a second, listen off the air. Thank you great show day. Brown John Brown is one of my great heroes He's the the the the great abolitionists I think he gives his life Raids the federal ammunitions factory at Harpers Ferry Virginia in eighteen fifty nine doesn't work. He's captured and he is hanged. For treason against the state of Virginia. With Robert e Lee being the man who captures him brown was a great abolitionist. Absolutely. Believed an absolute equality of human beings and he often came to Vermont When he lived up in the adirondacks at his farm up, there came to Virginia Shop, and after he died after he was hanged his wife brought his body back by train through Vermont Tuber gems and then Crossley champlain. On the atoms terry down there. Answer. Let's. Browser, great man. Let's bring in another listener on the line I. Believe we have weighed from good morning wait good morning good morning to your guests and just another in case I missed it is been in another show but here another Vermont resident actually currents born residence. Alexander twilight. and it has Howard familiar with Alexander. Twilight. Berkshire measure with Yeah it's the other end of the spectrum of of the slavery and everything he was. Educated. locally and and Middlebury College claims to be the first African American although of mixed race to graduate as a back Loria in the entire country. He's also in cranberry my only a negative with with with toilet. That apparently, he didn't admit to being. To being African, American kinda sounds that way because I know he's handed. Publicly renounced slavery and this is way before. So if it were time, he was born in seventy, ninety five and actually passed away before the civil war. was wondering about twilight actually because Reverend Thomas, you were mentioning a few minutes ago and refreshing on the name, but there was a person who? I think he said was was turned away at Middlebury, but then then matriculated at the University of Vermont. That overlapped with with the the twilight biography chronologically if. Well to hear us live the after twilight. Okay and and even though. Vermont had. Relatively speaking progressive institutions such as Middlebury College because of because of riots in and and incidents that work. Within Northern Cities in and no neighboring states such as New York state. It it frightened even if frightened and and and caused much caution even among progressive thinkers in Vermont then so and so there was a reluctance to to feed that flame of hostility by by meeting people who were obviously African American who would there's no question about their race and were interested in furthering their education at institutions such as metal, Middlebury so Andrew. Harrison. From Interim Middlebury. College and Attend University of Vermont. And went to the University of Vermont again, under the under the only under the A. Promise and hope that after after graduating, he would he would then leave the state and become a missionary to west Africa course he did not live up to that promise. He he He he left the state for Phil Philadelphia going off here. Reverend Arnold Thomas. What's the value to? This. Well I think it It provides a broader narrative for our history that was long overlooked we pride ourselves and rightly so of of being the first state to enter the Union as a slave free state but it provides a narrative that that overlooks the fact that much that slavery was tolerated in many many ways and forms and I think as we as weaver maters acknowledged that we in some ways. Supportive that institution it It says to US nowadays, what are we going to do about the fact that we were not totally. removed from this stain of of of slavery that there is a legacy that continues to. Infect our lives because of the ways in which all the states of the Union supported in some measure, the institution of Slavery There is a continuing legacy that affects how we deal with African Americans. How we treat people of Color even Even exemplified in the fact that in in every form of of our life, the IT be it law enforcement be it criminal justice? Be It housing politics people of Color in Maine. A target of interest. We have a lot of work to do lot of work to do clearly. Reverend Reverend Arnold Thomas of the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, and Jericho thank you very much for joining me Howard coffin you as well. Really appreciate. Type. Both of you. And thanks very much. For the day Graham Show on this Friday morning. And they will talk to you all on Monday now for Governor Field Scott's regular Friday news conference on the coronavirus..

"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Up, it's not going to be good at it. I must say a lot of the governors including ours Phil Scott Vermont. Gets very high marks for absolutely not just minimizing but zeroing out the politics in a conversation about the corona virus and. The results are. Are such that. Matthew date figured out that if the if the United States. Had the same per capita death rate. As. Vermont Nationally, we'd have about thirty thousand. That's Today. As opposed to two, hundred, thousand. So. I do think that maybe there's some benefit to try to zero the politics in a discussion about something like the corona virus, but apparently, not everyone shares that view. Yeah, Hey bob I wanted to ask you. Teaching, American history. A. You know obviously the whole discussion of of how history should be taught in what? There's a there's a whole academic feeling called. What is it historic Offi like that where you actually study the teaching of history not just the history itself. The president weighed in on this yesterday wants to wants there to be a patriotic. Historical. Curriculum I guess in. Schools. Is Anything likely to come to pass on this or was that just rhetoric or what do we think? Well knows something's going to happen because he's going to sign an executive order promote patriotic education. Now you know you know executive orders and the arguments for and against them. But if you haven't executive order, then it could go through the system. Of course, there's that much federal funding frankly schools, but they could put it through as a language you know initiative and I think he did that to counter than the New York Times where they had came out with the article, the sixteen nineteen project. And it dug into the personal histories of black Americans in the US. who face present day systematic inequality in housing farming as well as this is I'm quoting from their studies while the legacy of slavery altered healthcare access for Black Americans and fueled the country's early economy and so trump didn't like the New York Times you know came out with with the sixteen, Nineteen project. So he countered with this I probably think there's probably going to be something in between because. You know it. It just can't be in a sense that you know we were a horrible country from the inception and we had slavery and we were so horrible because there is a history. which is horrible by the way, but there's also a history of The idea of what we went out against, which was England and the you know the colonies as they were. I think there's a balance stare somewhere. Like. After all. I mean. Okay. So you've got the new. York time. He got president trump. There's gotta be something in between the actual historians. Can you know balanced this so that it's not Going in either direction that there was no problems at all and that we were a complete problem, there's gotta be something in the Middle I would hope. Well though I mean. I. Think Sometimes, what happens is people get a sense that one side of this I want to call it a debate, but apparently, that's what shaping up. One side of this thing gets pushed too far. So there's a counter sort of attack and and. But. What people need to understand is after all, we are studying human beings and human beings from from very very early in our development have been a blend of good nevil and. And there have been some good things been the thing to me and I try to have I have. Family members and friends who were left us and real critics of the United States and and just have no patience whatsoever for Thomas Jefferson and I say you gotTa Jump Thomas Jefferson, catch slaves. He also wrote down that all men are created equal. And you can call it hypocrisy if you want. But on the other hand, maybe what he's doing, he's laying a seed for something he sees needing to be corrected ideally in his own life but not in his own life than sometime over the course of. The coming couple of centuries of American history and and so. The declaration of Independence I. Regard is quite a blessing on this country. Jefferson's Jefferson's ownership of slaves not so much. So he's one character in US history who's a into the mix? He's got some bad stuff and his life and some good stuff in his life and I don't know why we all can't just say hey. We suspected might have been human being. Forgiving anything or or whatever but it just so I don't know. Why I live on the border of West Virginia and Ohio down near Wheeling West, Virginia and for years I knew and followed Senator Robert Byrd who has done some amazing things for the state of West Virginia he's deceased now I served with him in the Congress Robert Byrd was a member of the Klu Klux Klan no question about it no doubt about it in his younger years. And he renounced it. Do we go back and say rip off everything with an which by the way people are saying about to say in West Virginia. You know you WANNA. Take Down Jefferson Memorial takedown Robert Byrd Modal Center take down. Don't take his name off everything in West Virginia. Because one point in time he was Klu Klux Klan but again, he recanted didn't you know spend a lifetime of doing things for people of all races and genders you know so I, think you have to look at at some of the final outcomes to. Yeah Yeah I mean I hope people. people kind of keep it keep all this perspective and recognize that. Really, what you want is to is to describe it accurate. Picture. And acknowledge progress. When this happened to you know we don't we are past the age of slavery in the United States I that strikes me as progress I'm sure it does youtube as well as most of our listeners here. Dave, I think that part of the problem is the inability today's world. Today's world the inability to to have a discussion you you really honestly can't and I can remember years where he could have the discussion about saying this and saying that and what do you think about today if you even have a discussion or something, you can be deemed you know racist or an elitist or whatever. We gotta go back to where you can have different opinions that might blend into a good opinion.

United States West Virginia Thomas Jefferson executive Klu Klux Klan president New York Times Senator Robert Byrd Phil Scott Vermont Vermont Down Jefferson Memorial bob I Matthew York youtube Robert Byrd Modal Center trump Virginia
"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Lot of. Passion and interest in but. It just felt like a good time to cried. Well it it. Certainly Estrogen session you've had this year. Must. Be Allowed to have have your last session be so weird with the corona virus and all. Certainly hosting to be able to say goodbye. Up. Beloved. Colleague. You know to something I've been or phone call it. It's a little frustrating. kind of a little difficult You know all getting through with Pasta and You know some good bills and I really admire leadership for the work that they put into this but. I. Think. We all know that a lot of benefits to walking into the cafeteria and saying, Oh, my God I've got it hold on for a minute. I've got a chat with you about this. Somebody. In the Hallway you know have a short Chad are going out to dinner with them but he You know to talk with. It's been. It's been it bitterly. Hard time and. The fact that you you've persevered. Through it and all of your colleagues as well on on both sides of the aisle I'd say. Hats off and it's not been easy. And so but well, Mary I I, I've got to I've got to run but I appreciate you taking some time with US morning congratulations on your legislative career of wish you luck in the in the coming months and years. I hope you're GONNA get a little time hyphen. Chance, to relax Alright. Thanks Mary. Take care. Now, one of the items I wanted to mention it's appointed on Day Graham show this week is the fact that Vermont has a new program. Allowing people to borrow from local libraries, moisture meters, moisture meters, these for me to say. These moisture meters can be used to measure the moisture in your. Pilot would your twelve firewood? And that's a good thing to know is a dry enough to burn get put in your stove et cetera going to be talking with. Bennett Leon, who is With the State Department of. Doing this right Benneteau environmental conservation right. That's right. Date morning. Thank you. Very much joining me what is your what your job title or description with the easy? The planning section chief for the air quality and climate. Division. And We've been adding up this program to partner with the local libraries around the state particularly in not in valley areas that could be prone to hire would smoke concentrations winter. Yeah, that's obviously something that crops up every winter in some spots around the state where people get a little concerned about. Rights Right. Outside by houses awfully smokey. and. Is that my woodstove is that my neighbors woodstove what's going on here et Cetera So, this is a system where where folks who want to can borrow. Device I I've mentioned moisture meter. What does it? What does that look like? How does that work describe to us a little bit what? What the Heck I'm waster Meteo is So. People have pretty good sense I would expect that They should season there would not verdict green although it's sometimes easier to accommodate. And other times and so using a meter, which is a hand held device with. a couple prongs it can be stuck into the would. they can actually figure out for sure what moisture content that would has and. The. It can take several months depending on the storage conditions for. Firewood, you dry out enough down into the middle of logged. to burn cleanly and efficiently. And that moisture meter with A. Freshly slit face of. Firewood log on to give you a sense of, is it twenty percent moisture content? or less, which is our recommended burning. Moisture so Twenty percent or less meaning that actually if you pick up a piece of firewood. And it you know it weighs a pound or something. The you'd actually have a fifth of. Water. There are a lot of ways to measure would moisture content and. And Yeah, that's the sense it can be a lot of would. Other. Exceed the water. In a piece of wood. So yeah, it takes a lot more energy. To burn that piece of wood if it percents boil off the water that's in it. And we like we want to courage that not only for getting more heat out of the firewood for having a cleaner burn. Because we'll have. Less smoke emissions coming out of the chimney and potentially impacting. Neighborhood And it can be Articulate matter that comes out to me and. As well as several other Air Pollutants. Yeah. Now, the moisture meter itself is. Is Is it a small device thing with what does it actually look like how much is way? What do you when you get it from your local library gathered comes into kind of a case or something does it do they? We have instructions so people know what they're doing with it. So. Yeah. We're trying to make it as simple for people to use as possible and as I mentioned, it's a hand held device. So the it's comparible to Well I don't know. An old cameron or something like that and. So Yeah I. It comes from the library with a small package of Materials like. we have a couple pamphlets about. Best burning practices and. or would storage recommendations as well as a quickstart guide for just how to turn the unit on? And use the prongs for a couple of buttons It should give you your money your content. How long does it take to get a reading? You attach the wrong to to firewood and you? Is Instantaneous or does it have to sort of take some time to register or how does that work? Doesn't take very long matters back in. Okay so it is pretty close to instantaneous. That's that is. I never as you can tell. On across one of these things before you even though I, I haven't learned over and burn firewood in a number of years. We actually went through a pellet phase hour on the heat bumps. We got lazy or something. But the. But. But clearly, a lot of folks are out there are still burning firewood and and. Certainly, long station in Vermont probably our oldest source heat. In the state and so. People are trying to. Make an effort to make sure that. When you are burning firewood you doing it right? That's the best solution. So. Better Leon of DC I'm wondering. These these are available in sort of Mountain Valley. Area's towns. Saw something there forty something of.

Vermont Mary Bennett Leon Benneteau Chad Mountain Valley Meteo section chief partner cameron
"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Know other housemates, etcetera who would be? More. Presence of other people than than than normal times when everybody's at home but maybe I'm wrong about that I don't know did did anybody sort of go there at all? Yeah. That's an interesting point that didn't really that that didn't come up in my conversations, but I think it certainly again, you know. There there are folks in a lot of different life situations who who are struggling with this and for some for some as you point out perhaps there, there would be more people around. The, for others for others less and for those where where there would be less it. You know it seems to be especially dangerous, but you know I don't Atari is really hard to say how that sort of shakes out. You know in terms of proportions of folks one other thing I was. Surprised about Is that I sort of thought maybe it would be more difficult to get some of these drugs during the lockdown phase It's been explained to me that that's you know that's just not the case and actually there were. Some aspects of. That lockdown. Or really a boon for dealers. Why would that be? Well A. Few reasons you know one of the court system sort of sort of slowed down and there And so two were being who were caught were cited in for court did be in distant future Burlington's point that out as one. Potential reason Another is that folks sue had insecure housing around the state have been. You know placed in motels and hotels as as ways to you know be sheltered the lockdown period. those those facilities have put a lot of people in proximity with one another and as as the OPIOID. The BURLINGTON describe it to me. It's sort of paradise situation for dealers on. It can be also especially difficult if you're in recovery when you're in a motel, there may maybe folks around you who are using, it can be harder to to not use yourself. Yeah, of course, you know provides a captive market for dealers. So this neat has since worked with providers to drop off harm prevention bags, the lock zone and other resources to motels around the state to try to to try to deal with the consequences of that of that. You're talking about how? The numbers of. Overdoses really spiked in. April may maybe the Judah. Exactly what the trend look like they're but and then trending downwards again somewhat since then is that a hopeful sign Yeah I think I. think There are folks are very cautiously optimistic, but it is. It's a little early to really know if we're going to see how much improvement we're going to see they're sort of one of their signs came up in my reporting. That may you know may be indicative of a trend The. There are programs that emergency departments, for instance, at University of Medical Center where folks can walk in and get signed up for medication assisted treatment right through that ye are so that that's considered this very low barrier and easy way to to get into the system and that program before the pandemic seeing like a dozen new people come in to sign up per month number dropped to virtually zero for for all of April, May and June. But in the last couple months they've had six people sign up. So that's still quite a bit fewer than than they were seen before the pandemic. An improvement from zero certainly. So there are sort of know small signs like that, and then the fact that the fatal overdose rate you know. seem to level off a little bit in June and July the. Tea leaves that you can try to read into. But we you know, we probably need a few more months to really now especially as you know as we get into fall here and we get both flu season and and the coronavirus building around. I think it's very I think it's a little premature to to say we're out of the woods on this yet. Also, wonder just in terms of I don't know mood or depression and these kinds of issues with people. Back there in March and April. Things look really really bleak. Future and the National News. What are we into here? What are we facing? Do we have any any leadership that's going to help us help lead us out of this Out. Of this crisis. And on and on. I can imagine some folks kinda thrown up their hands and saying, well, you know. I've been a diet Kobe as well. ENJOY MYSELF ON THE WAY OUT BY GETTING HIGH Or something. Logic. Did you hear anybody SORTA talk about that Some of this being rooted in just that kind of despair whatever. Yeah I think it's been it's been cast to me as a as a as a function of stress that everybody was experiencing and and I think as I mentioned before the alcohol sales have been around the state as well I mean, I. Think the same the same sort of stressors that have driven folks to drink more majoring may may drive those who are dealing with substance abuse to use more And I think perhaps you know perhaps in. Supporting that as well as the fact that they should mention this is not unique to Vermont in the last few months I think there is there is a initial survey that found that the over fatal overdose rates are up. in the majority of states around the country I know the Department of Health and Human Services the US Department of Health and Human Services a meeting over the summer with. Officials from all New England states to talk about what they were seeing as an uptake around the region. So unfortunately, Vermont is not Did, you get any numbers on alcohol I mean are the people showing up with I don't know alcohol. Induced illnesses and hospitalizations, and so on into in a higher to a greater number. Yeah, that's a good question day. That's one I'd have to report more I I I only know that sales of alcohol are are higher. In the state you know we also know that fatal highway crashes are up. This year and. I'm not sure the analysis it's been done yet but I, you know I'm curious to see if if you know Dui related crashes are up as well this year I mean this is there there are a lot of I think one lesson here I think a lot of collateral consequences of the pandemic that we that we can overlook when we're so fixated on on Tamdan on coronavirus cases and coronavirus debts. I. Mean this is impacting public health and and so many different ways and the opioid crisis is one of them. Yeah difficult subjects but I again, I appreciate the fact that you in seven days are staying on top of them. I think the public really does need to be informed about this stuff and. Remind needs to keep. Keep its work going about trying to address these issues and mitigating the problems etcetera. So Carrie Brower I. Thank you very much for joining me this morning conversation, and hope we can get together again soon. Yeah. Thank thank you our mandate. Already take care. About a less than a minute to go here, folks, I wanted to mention a couple of things. One is that just after the Dave Graham show here on wd later this morning a little after eleven o'clock pled the special live coverage of governor, Phil Scott and other top state officials. Talking about the state response to the coronavirus they've.

Department of Health and Human Vermont Burlington Atari University of Medical Center flu Judah Carrie Brower New England National News Dave Graham Kobe depression Phil Scott Tamdan
"overdoses" Discussed on News O'Clock

News O'Clock

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on News O'Clock

"Okay, now listen to this one and see extreme fear the difference..

"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

"As you mentioned you've been advocating for this for years It's actually happening now with cove. Nineteen how do you? How do you feel about that? Well you know I I feel good. I also feel a little frustrated that So many of my friends and community members had to die to get here. I also recognize that. We had a long struggle to be seen as human beings by the decision makers by the people in power. I don't think we've won that yet. I think they don't yet see us as human beings. I think they fear US as disease vectors. And so that's why this is happening. But you know I don't care. I don't care about their motivations as much. I just care that did a few more people I know might not die this year right then striking to hear you say that that you think that these changes are only happening because people in power are scared that drug users are disease vectors and I. I think I think the idea of us as disease vectors for the decision makers isn't just hypothetical so. I've been around for long enough that this is you know. I've lived through my second overdose crisis now in the nineties there was an overdose crisis publicly declared public health emergency in in Vancouver as well as Vancouver having the highest rates of HIV transmission in the industrialized world is commonplace on these streets. That's why these protesters are calling this. The killing fields campaign over a thousand people have died in the last five years from heroin overdose alone. It doesn't include. All the other reasons people can die from drugs. The Hepatitis C. Rate is out of this world the AIDS epidemic. It's it's supposedly now peaking in Vancouver and we had that HIV crisis here because the authorities were so stingy with needle distribution and they wouldn't change and they wouldn't change they wouldn't change and we were our community was exploding with transmission of HIV. And I think the same thing happened. I think they recognize that There's no magic wall around certain communities of drug users or whatever that that the HIV would get to their sons and daughters or whatever to and So Again. They saw us as disease vectors there in the nineties. Th You know the same thing is happening now regardless of motivation now. Do you think that you'll see some long term change? Come out of this or or are you expecting for these new rules to be curtailed. Once we're kind of through the worst of this pandemic I tell you what I know from. My experience in this fight is nothing comes for free. So for this change to permanent we're going to have to fight for it for it to be fully implemented will have to fight for it every step of the way left to keep lighting a fire under people People in power to you know. Keep it moving and yeah the the you know. The policy is supposedly set to expire in September So not very long way so this is going to be. There's going to be the next fight or one of the next fights for us is to make this permanent. Okay Garth mullins thank you so much. Thanks Jamie.

Vancouver Garth mullins heroin Jamie
"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

"I understand. There were changes like a week and a half ago that would allow for something called safe supply to properly battle. The covert epidemic. We must tackle the poison drug epidemic. So I'm grateful to the federal government for an ebeling safe supply to move ahead and now the province is hard at work to determine the rollout and so what does that mean exactly and what has changed in the last week at half well safe supply sort of a political demand. Drug user movement has been making for a long time and these Vulnerabilities aren't just for people in the downtown Eastside. Anyone any drug user anywhere in Canada is vulnerable to this on the difference. Nbc is. We've had an organized drug User Rights Movement for twenty years here. This is how come safe injection sites exist in. Canada is because we fought for them and even open them first without permission until the government eventually caught up. The crisis. Overdose crisis was was very bad. It continues on and we have called for for several years Just let us get the prescription equivalent of what we're using on the street so just about everything. You know. Crystal Math Heroin Fennel all that has prescription versions of it that are of exact known. Potency known quantity all that stuff manufactured under sterile conditions all that stuff behind the pharmacist counter. It's just the government makes rules about how and when you can get them and so we've been saying to them. Change the rules. People are dying you know. A lot of people are dying like in the last for years or so. I think fourteen thousand across Canada So and they continue to today several weeks ago. I got a call from a doctor who works on the downside said Garth what do people need. What do drug users need to socially isolate quarantine and we started that conversation Joined up with other conversations between health professionals and and people in government who were kind of trying to wrap their head around the same thing and out of it came this policy that was originally thought to be local. You know maybe for Vancouver and eventually the province bought on so all across BC now the fifty thousand people who have what they call substance use disorder like me. We can now access not just the traditional medications like like Methadone and suboxone those are like nicotine patches. That that kind of help you use something safer but You can also access dilaudid which is called hydromorphone. If you're a an opioid user you can access decks dron. If you're a stimulant user on you can access Benzodiazepines. If you know you're kind of wired onto st volume or something like that and there's even provision for people who are addicted to alcohol and tobacco so this this was kind of wide and sweeping as we could make it. He doesn't yet include the pharmaceutical versions of heroin. Or Feno or cocaine so we think this is a really good first step to actually what I was saying before just prescribing people the pharmaceutical version or a close adjacent version of what they're using on the street and it's it's our hope that people will be able to go and get a prescription for that from Dr Go Philo to fill it at a pharmacy and take home a few weeks apply and then have the ability to socially distance and also to use something of known potency so they're not overdosing and take a little bit of agency and dignity back into your life you don't have to go grind every day come up with the money go to a drug dealer all that stuff it it can be revolutionary for people and have you spoken with anybody who has been able to access this in the last week and a half so again. These are prescription versions of what people might be seeking out on the street I have It's it's implementation is bumpy So I think some doctors aren't aware and maybe some are thinking. I don't really want to do this But there are a few people like a couple of my friends have have been able to access this and in fact we We have tape of Crackdown editorial board member. Laura shaver and my friend of my years doing it for the first time and what I'm doing right now is is is legal. It is a legal process that I have been accepted to do there. We go. Wow I definitely got a taste in my mouth and just you can hear in her voice. The hope that this is her I think she called it her exit strategy from having to use street drugs. I don't know I just hope it's going to be at a different chapter in my life..

federal government Canada heroin Garth Overdose Nbc Vancouver Dr Go Philo stimulant Laura shaver editorial board member Methadone hydromorphone cocaine nicotine BC
"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

"Tight fitting community doing here. Because they can't get together you know everyone is feeling Senate you know you know like I know. I think a lot of us went went into panic shock and right now it's grief they're grieving each other's grieving is. Is that what you've been hearing too? Yeah I mean. I should preface this by saying I don't live in the neighborhood right now. I live about ten minutes east of the neighborhood and I haven't been I mean I've been there very briefly just in the last Twenty five or twenty seven days that I've been in self-isolation so I'm kind of I'm kind of out of it. You know but I know the services that I work with the harm reduction services are operating at a greatly diminished capacity. Some are closed You know there's A. Pp's shortage is like masks and that sort of thing. And so there's there's less access for Safe INJECTION SITES PEOPLE. There's there's a sort of slightly less availability of harm. Reduction supplies like new syringes. And all that sort of thing so Yeah I I I can imagine that it's feeling pretty bleak and because of that sort of thing overdoses are going back up around here right and I understand the city of Vancouver reported eight suspected overdose deaths last week the most in a single week since August two thousand nineteen and I heard Trae Helton from the overdose prevention society which is in the downtown eastside. Talk about how challenging. It is right now to meet the needs of people coming in. Smoking is now nonoperational due to fears that it could be. I'm transferred to Transfer from people hailing drugs in an enclosed space. So that shut down completely are indoor space where we had twelve injection than tables is down to six is. Is this what you're talking about when you're talking about the potential impact of the services being scaled down? Yeah I think so I know trey and my You know my hat's off to him. He's going to work every day and tried to keep people safe but It's it's a hard slog right now. He was saying to which I found interesting but also really difficult to listen to. Is that you know the the safe injection site is trying to employ social distancing measures as well. We were dramatically seeing people Just because we've only so many people in our times we're encouraging them to using the alleyway and and harm reduction supplies and Watching them as best we can so Yeah it's It's pretty scary. Yeah that's right and it's the same thing at our drug user union the Vancouver Area Network of drug users on. This is a place where people organized and come to meetings. That's not really happening anymore. We have You know injection room. In the back. They used to be able to accommodate six. It can just have three now So there's a lot less people that can come in and Kinda use the drop in and use the services it's it's massively reduced and and when you think about all the services like that that are reduced or a lot of our shot people are just having all that many less places to go I know you've talked about this. On recent episodes near podcast why drug users are particularly vulnerable to cove in nineteen? And can you tell me a little bit more about that right? Now if you get wired. Like addicted to opioids or stimulants or whatever It's not like you can just quit easily. it's something that's your driven to every day and withdrawal symptoms can be Extremely extremely rough So people got to go score off their drug dealer every day to kind of just keep an even keel to just keep going and it's very hard to not do that and so giving people options to be able to not go to the illegal market is really important. We've called for that for a long time because the drug supply has been contaminated with With Fenton all with all kinds of other stuff and so it's really even more important now because in a drug users can't socially distance themselves right. I was listening to your reason episode of crackdown. And I know that you spoke with a friend named Ray who is more worried about dope sickness withdrawal symptoms essentially. It was really it really hit home to me when it comes to being really really bedridden and six for two weeks best-case scenario. I would pick that over two months of agony or a month of agony. This you know other option of not having your medicine if you're too ill to get there you know. Yeah it's true. I mean I've known ray for a long time and a lot of people are in that same boat as as a criminalized person As someone who's just sort of excluded from society in a lot of ways you recognize that you don't have control over very much and so you may not be able to Socially distance yourself you may not be able to really have that much agency in in whether you're exposed to covert nineteen or on but you kind of know for sure if you don't do your hit in the morning or you don't get to The pharmacy to pick up your methadone. Or something your absolutely GonNa get dope sick. So it's like the certainty of this very nasty sickness. A dope sickness Versus THE POSSIBILITY. The you may not have any control over over covert nineteen. And that's a that's a really difficult choice.

Ray Vancouver Area Network of drug overdose Senate Vancouver Trae Helton trey methadone Fenton
"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Front Burner

"This is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm Jimmy. Push Physical distancing something. We're all being asked to do to stop the spread of cove in nineteen that may be straightforward to do for many of us but for thousands of Canadians who don't have adequate housing. It's pretty close to impossible. Ob- you can't self isolate if you have a home how you wash your hands when you're leaving when you're on the street all day and in Vancouver's downtown Eastside a dense neighborhood that struggles with issues of homelessness mental health and drug poisoning that impossibility comes with great health risk. It's like we're being shut down from the outside world of like not only definitely gone through a horrendous few years of of the drug poisoning crisis. Now you've got this with this pandemic Vancouver's downtown Eastside is vulnerable to major public health. Crises overdoses and Kovic Nineteen. Today we take you there this is from. I have garth. Mullins with me. He's a documentarian and host of the award winning podcast crackdown. It was created to cover the OPIOID crisis from the perspective of drug users. Themselves tigard. Thank you so much for being with me today. Hey Jamie thanks for having me on the show. It's really our pleasure. Thank you so much for people listening to this. Who may have never been in? Vancouver's downtown Eastside. Can you give them a sense of why the neighborhood is particularly Vulnerable Dacoven? Nineteen I've seen articles with headlines like the ticking time bomb in the downtown eastside. Yeah I mean it's it's dense neighborhood and there's been a housing crisis in this city for over a decade so people are just packed close together and There's not a lot of options and others. You know a lot of drug users live in the neighborhood and all over British Columbia and Canada. Really and anytime. You're wired to something you know like you. You have an addiction. You have to get it every day. It means you have to go see a drug dealer. Every day you know so or pretty frequently. And so that makes social distancing really difficult so there's a kind of combination of things that are at work it's check day that means long lineups and close contact. Some residents increasingly desperate as essential services. Have shut down. Everybody's making a big do these halls. You can't get a meal. How stupid is this GonNa hit on here storm? It's GonNa hit on your heart hard and heavy raise. Probably half these people me included right and I'm hoping that we can pack all of that a little bit more today. I know Vancouver coastal health. The health authority that oversees the area. They don't specifically identify where cases are unless there are outbreaks like on a long-term care home. But do we know anything about the number of cases that may be in the downtown Eastside? Right now would just like any community. You got to presume. It's there you've got to presume the viruses there But about ten days ago maybe two weeks ago The podcast was able to confirm a one person who tested positive for covert nineteen and we talked to a lot of people who were at the scene where this person was approached by health professionals and and offered some kind of quarantine and that sort of thing. So we're quite confident that that had happened. And of course the health authority can't report it but I think it's important for people to not wait for a task to show something I think we have to presume. It's there and also the the fact that Cove nineteen testing is rationed gives everybody this false impression that it hasn't gotten to their community yet when I just think the opposite is what we should assume right this impression that it hasn't gotten to their communities yet until they start to see deaths. I mean this is what we're seeing all over the world You mentioned before that. This is an area where people are packed into small spaces. Our producer lane spoke with Erica grant to support worker resident in the neighborhood and she lives in a single room occupancy hotel. Sro is twenty eight rooms three floors. I live on the third floor and there's only tunes wash of three men's washrooms. It's Kinda hard to sell face too late when share the Washer with seven. Other people And Erica wants to see more rigorous sanitation of housing like hers more Shelter Space opened so people can actually physically distance and I should say that the mayor of Vancouver has made commitments towards this. The city is setting a distribution center for supplies. A meal delivery program we have secured a contract to provide two weeks of commercial cleaning for the twenty one highest priority private single room occupancy hotels we have secure contracts to provide two weeks worth of meal delivery to approximately eleven hundred residents in private. Sro's what do you make of these measures? Do you think enough is being done on this front? So woefully insufficient. It's shocking this city. Right now today has twenty five thousand empty condos and houses downtown Vancouver has empty hotel rooms. There is a housing solution waiting to happen. Like right there and the fact that people are considering in in parliaments and legislatures all over the country. They're thinking about Curtailing civil liberties to keep people inside for pretty good public health reasons. Candle considering lockdown We are looking at all possible different measures. As I've said repeatedly nothing is off the table. But they're not considering maybe infringing on property rights a little bit. This is the time to think about expropriating. Empty homes and giving people a place to be you think about an SRO. I've lived in an SRO before you get a very small room. There's kitchen. There's any cooking facilities. You've Jerry Rig together yourself. The bathroom is down the hall shared with everybody on your floor onto floors. It's very hard to socially isolate in an SRO. It's impossible in a shelter in a community center with a bunch of army caught. Spread it in a gymnasium. That's not possible either and certainly people who are You know camping in tents park..

Vancouver Eastside Sro tigard Erica grant Canada garth Mullins Jamie British Columbia Jerry Rig producer
"overdoses" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Science Friday

"She is the America's bureau chief for nature the number of gifts from opioid overdoses continues to rise in the US the CDC estimates that forty seven thousand people fatally overdosed in twenty seventeen. That is up nearly ten percent from twenty sixteen and while some experts are looking for ways to reduce opioid dependence. Others are looking for new ways to prevent the deaths for example, opioid overdoses are easily reversed by administering the drug naloxone. If the person overdosing is treated in time now, how might you catch an overdose in time. Well, turns out there's an app for that in adversity of Washington PHD candidate Raja, Lakshmi NANDA Kumar has. Helped develop some some software that turns a phones microphone into a kind of sonar that can detect when a person's breathing has slowed or even stopped. The research was published this week in science translational medicine, and she joins me now to explain the project walk up to science Friday. Tell us how this works. What is the idea behind it? Said this application by transforming the phone into an act of phone our system, so you can imagine like a bad are dolphin communicates v send inaudible sound signals using the phone speaker. And these signals get reflected off a person. And in this case, they are moving chest and everything so these reflected signals from the chest are carded using the phones microphone when it's process you can actually get the signal, but what major the site the tackle this opioid crisis with technology this way. As you mentioned opioid overdoses, a massive public health epidemic today, and the people of studies have shown that a hundred fifteen people die every Tate who to opioid overdose. So us computer scientist, we want to use stick -nology do do solve this problem and connect people to these lifesaving interventions like naloxone. So let's say, okay. So the the the software on the phone is sensitive enough to detect the change in my chest heaving up and down. Breathe. Yes. So it can detect using just a speaker and microphone it can deduct up to a seven millimeter motion. So we are talking about this minute. Breeding motion. You have tested this out. Yes, we tested that. Incite advan core. British columbia. It is a supervised injection festivity. And we. Tested, it with it on two hundred people who come to the facility and engage in this highest behavior. Okay. So let's say that the software detects a possible overdose. What happens next does it immediately? Call nine one one. That's a great question. So what we do is stock when we see that the person has stopped beating the phone fullest emits, an alum say basically stimulate and wake up the patient if they fail to wake up and engage with the with the phone, we then call automatically connect them to a preset emergency contact like it could be a family or a friend with naloxone are sometimes emergency services..

naloxone Lakshmi NANDA Kumar US CDC bureau chief America Washington scientist columbia Tate Raja ten percent
"overdoses" Discussed on AdultSh1t

AdultSh1t

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"overdoses" Discussed on AdultSh1t

"Before and after and everything leading up to his overdose and it's i've lost friends to overdoses and whatnot and it was it's just tragic and it really does paint the picture for all size both of it being like you getting mad at them and and then feeling bad and not wanting to enable a not knowing what to do and it not feeling real all of that stuff along with what it's like to really grieve and it's just a really beautiful book and they were reading it on the plane and kate would literally be laughing out loud and then like and i'm like oh my god you're going on like a roller coaster phenomenal book you should get it it's it makes me just i watched it like all of his episodes of parks hartson wreck all the ones that like he was credited to have written i mean he wrote on all of them but we actually vicks or the animal control i watched all of his episodes to just like tam go to us yeah really good i'm going to order it and read it because kate won't give me her copy actually gonna be on audible hey which will be a sponsor netflix i think it was last week do you have any shouts yes i do at rory millville happy belated birthday but he was your worry no but also hike uhhuh and at its chesa also happy birthday because they believe your birthday will be win this comes out osha in happy valley i don't have any.

kate netflix rory millville
"overdoses" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Becoming their addiction broaden the lacson access is more beneficial and it's facts increasing access to drug treatment then might be a necessary complement to the laaksonen accessing curbing the opioid overdose epidemic now if you had taken me a side before any of this came out and you said as a is a drug that takes people who've overdosed and are about to die and makes it so they don't die enough to stop the opioid epidemic stupid and if you'd said well if we're going to roll out that drug should also be rolling out a comprehensive drug treatment strategy i would say of course that is common sense and so that is conclusion of this paper and so for all the controversy over some of the individual findings and i think the controversy has called into question some of the findings in a serious way i actually think that both the paper's authors and the people who they are in a dispute with largely agree on where things should go which is one we should not outlaw naloxone too that in order to treat something as complex and difficult as the opioid epidemic you need a comprehensive treatment strategy look if you are looking at heart disease and you said well when people are having a cardiac event we can do an emergency bypass and you said to me what's going to happen if the only thing we will out is free cardiac emergency bypasses all across the country with nothing else and i would say well you're not gonna fix the heart disease problem you're going to keep some people from dying during acute event but they're gonna die later from heart disease i mean you need to help them with their their diet and their health and their exercise and knowing that the signals of one to go to a doctor and all kinds of different things that are important for people who are suffering from from this kind of element and i just wanna know that's also the conclusion here so there's a lot to again to here but but i also want to turn down the temperature on the debate because i think those a an end point here that is more consensus oriented than one the writing in the rest of.

lacson access naloxone heart disease
"overdoses" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"Overdoses speech wearer she said that basically hey everybody do what's best for kisha make sure you do what's best for kisha tonight she's she's like she's speeds to try to eagled eventually destroy bus at the alas usually are saying do what's best for your day and go through flu we're and europol the kisha those i could solve lahood i was like wow this woman is beautiful tvs to hire love watching her she's awesome and also she makes for green podcast because i was cracking aguas can you guys talk through your alma roads impressions rediscover quieter in quieter you can barely hear you it was amazing the more unresolved questions so the hills of that was very interesting when we went to go look at the memory wall when kisha left brandy glanville i coulda sworn i heard her say so that means five thousand dollars every time one of these people leave and i think that we had had a lot of questions about what the contract was for how these people are getting paid is that fair to assume melissa that the celebrities in terms of their stipend they make five thousand dollars per addiction i heard on line i don't know how true this says that i heard online that they each thought linked two hundred fifty k or something like that just to be on the show in in addition to that it getting five thousand each eviction i don't know the true it is but it would make sense because how would you get them on the show or just five thousand prediction is brew.

kisha flu lahood brandy glanville melissa Overdoses five thousand dollars two hundred fifty k
"overdoses" Discussed on FT News

FT News

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"overdoses" Discussed on FT News

"As of despair this was overdoses suicides alcoholrelated illnesses and even though you could have caused broadly relate that to austerity in the sense of inner the failure of the traditional model of globalization these people being unable to find fulfilling work but perhaps one count quite claw status austerity in the way that your report was defining it banned but i wonder what your view was a figures very very difficult to extrapolate the difference between an economic downturn a government policy in terms of austerity i think i'll study has tried to touch on that point by comparing the health out because the people in high versus modest us thirty countries and again it's a little bit inconclusive to be quite honest with you i would say however so i'll think tank overseas very interested in aging and how'd you secure an ageing population that is also kind of sustainable for the government for individuals in the longrun a for us it really is about healthy ageing save countries as part of this aspera chia coaching prevention spending which is the key element to providing for a healthier older population than that in our view may well at she store problems for the feature say well some of these health cut six at chuo say she expenditure cuts may not have translates into immediately poor outcomes from what hannity rates for example doesn't necessarily mean that i've the longerrun they went have some profound impacts for individuals one of the pap's most worrying aspects of across the date that we looked at with the level of rising need for health care across europe so these countries that cut the furthest have the highest levels of a met need as a result and that we think is a worrying indicator for the future a k will plans chew on that the fund benz full report on the international longevity center website and you'll get oil from seven level and yet to health team an empty dot com slash health and you'll sutphin ling said to son of your free friday health breathing.

economic downturn overdoses hannity europe sutphin ling
"overdoses" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"overdoses" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"To be active at all levels and so that burden dealing with state legislative races around the country and we're we're we haven't lost sight of governors races and we have lost sight of uh even metro council races are city council races uh that's where we've lost so much ground and we pride ourselves with redistricting fi i think um i think the new regime at the dnc is is uh much more committed to that kind of approach and thought that's positive but obviously there are still very new and we'll see what the uh what they can accomplish and what are the issues that are important in kentucky well i would say right now the most important issue in kentucky as the opioid crisis uh we're one of the states that has been hit extremely hard uh in my district worst it's the as in some other places that's the number one cause of death right now and we're losing uh in my district a person a day to overdoses and that's not even the the the tragic cost of those people who don't die uh but who show up in emergency rooms on an almost daily basis for taxing our healthcare system who are disrupting their families on uh it's it's just uh a a horrible situation one statistic that came out the other day was that in my district alone no member congressional districts are about seven hundred fifty thousand people in my district alone over the last four and a half years there have been two hundred and i'm sorry hundred and ninety seven million doses of prescription painkillers prescribed while which is like two hundred fifty four every man woman and child in the district so we've got to get a handle i mean they're also sorta of segments of the drug problem and uh in some parts of kentucky we still have uh we still have a mess problem uh in western kentucky we don't see the opioid problem but we still have uh huge meth problems so we've got addiction all over the state and uh the one thing that i think we can much more easily get a handle on his these prescription drugs and we need to we need to work on that very very hard.

dnc healthcare system painkillers kentucky kentucky