21 Burst results for "Ovarian Syndrome"

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:47 min | 2 months ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"And so then their hair starts to change. They'll notice that they may have a receding hairline, they'll notice some thinning on the top of their head, they also may notice that they're growing hair in places that they don't want to on their chin on their belly, they're a normal fine hair on their chin and belly is starting to get darker and harder and so that makes me a bald and grow a beard. I was terrible. It's no fun. You get it in the places you don't want it, and you lose in the place you want it. Yeah, it's no fun. And so what you're saying is that this thing of insulin resistance, and we'll get about what's causing that in a minute, causes your testosterone to go up if you're a woman and your DHEA, which is another hormone that's like an androgenic or male like hormone that actually causes hair loss. So this isn't really a hormonal ovarian problem, per se, right? It's not like a it's not like a sex hormone problem, although it becomes that. We call it polycystic ovarian syndrome, but it's really a dietary problem. Right? Because it's driven by insulin resistance. It's driven by that high level of insulin that occurs when we're when we're eating the wrong foods when we're eating that really processed refined carbohydrate diet. We were eating a lot of high sugar foods. There are also some toxins that are associated with insulin resistance like BPA, certain pesticides, so changes in the microbiome have been associated with insulin resistance, which is fascinating. But a very common reason in this country is the poor diet. So the sugar and the starch, which we eat about a 152 pounds of sugar and a 133 pounds of flour, which is almost a pound of a per person per year. If you're doing that and you have this belly fat, it's causing your insulin levels to go up, which then screws up your sex hormones. And leads to the hair loss. Right, and it causes this polycystic ovarian syndrome, which is this a whole bunch of stuff going on where women will notice they lose, they're losing hair on the top of their head, they're growing hair where they don't want it, but it also messes up their period. They'll notice their periods are all out of whack. They're irregular, and then for some women, they have problems with fertility and it's this cascade, so the hair loss is telling us, they may be most concerned about the hair loss, but there's all sorts of other issues that this can lead to. It's a real issue for a lot of people. And it's so fixable. And it's often the stage is often set when they're so young, right? So we see this a lot when at a young age they're getting fed. They're giving being given food for whatever reason that's really refined and processed or too high in sugar and then it just leads to this cascade that is hard in terms of like you said their self esteem and their causes that the weight gain around the belly and the hair loss and it can be that stage can be set at such a young age, unfortunately. And there's really a way to diagnose it that we use in functional medicine because sometimes it's a little tricky to diagnose they're not all following the same pattern, but if you do a glucose tolerance test measuring insulin, you can see high insulin levels. That's the most sensitive. You can look at testosterone, free testosterone, DHA, other things that we look at to help something called DHT. So we look at a very comprehensive hormone panel that looks at your risk of having this PCOS issue. We look at your FSH, LH, which are hormone levels from your brain, and they can be altered. So we basically get a very different picture. And then we can dig into why is it your diet? Like you said, is it the BPA from all the plastics? We consume gut issues. So there may be other factors that are driving it. But it's really important to sort of dig into that. And then it's easy to treat with diet and lifestyle. Sometimes some supplements. Let's talk about thyroid, because that's a big issue we've covered in thyroid before, but I would like really to sort of dive into this issue because it's often overlooked. And it's often subtle. And it's often confused with just sort of aging or normal decline that we see in people. So how common is thyroid and how do we do it differently in functional medicine? And how is it related to hair loss? Yeah, you know, one of the most common signs of an underactive thyroid is shifts in your hair. So we see more thinning of the hair, the hair can become more dry and brittle, and the eyebrows can shift. So when we see that, that loss of the outer third of somebody's eyebrows, you're thinking thyroid. Part of your eyebrow just kind of disappears. Yeah, yeah, and you're like, okay, I've got to really pay attention to this. I've got to look deeper at this person's thyroid. And like you said, it can be really subtle. Because sometimes if you just do a TSH for screening and you don't get a good enough detailed history, in TSH might look fine, which is the thyroid stimulating hormone, which is the standard screening test. Sometimes thyroid issues are missed. And so we often sometimes are often. I mean, listen, it affects one in 5 women. And one in ten men and 50% are undiagnosed. And of those who are diagnosed, I would say probably half of them are not adequately treated. Right. And so we're seeing a pandemic, honestly, of thyroid issues in this country. And the causes are many, right? It could be gluten. It could be environmental toxins. It could be genetics, there's a lot of factors. Nutritional deficiencies, vitamin D, selenium, and so forth. But we know how to deal with these differently in functional medicine. We look at it differently. And so if you go to your doctor and your TSH level, which is all they'll do, if it's

polycystic ovarian syndrome insulin resistance
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

05:04 min | 3 months ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"You do not a medical doctor, so I tell everybody I want them to not their heads because when we start going into astrology used to be part of medicine and when we start talking about the predispositions and the chart, it sounds very medical and I want them to understand that I'm getting this from the astrology not from some kind of weird medical background that I have. And then I say to people, if you haven't actually thought about investigating this, maybe it's useful if you do. So sometimes what happens is that I'll pick up a thyroid issue that they have an investigated and that thyroid issue then can be sorted out and then the fertility can continue, but they could fertility was never going to be a success if they hadn't addressed the thyroid issue. So it's still important to have the conversation and to say these are general predispositions and it's almost like your astrological DNA you might be carrying a marker for diabetes because your families are full of diabetes. So everybody in your family's got venous square the moon. But it could be contributing to your infertility and that is an insulin issue which is giving you polycystic ovarian syndrome. And yet at the funny thing is that most people kind of know and they go, you know, I knew I should have had that test. I know that something's not right. It's at that moment where you go, oh, yeah. And because it's somebody that's outside of the situation that's and it seems to be random. It's got that random field to it. That's when people notice in there and they do something. Yeah, and that's always one of the most important experiences with astrology is oftentimes when you're sitting with a client. There's that experience of telling people something that they already know about their life or they've already experienced, but it's something that they've normalized or taken for granted and hearing it from an external third party from a stranger that should have no background on the person's life and having it reflected back in that way just through looking at the chart is an important and maybe the most important part of the whole process of doing even just a needle consultation on its own. So it sounds like that's like a piece of it is just sometimes mirroring back something a person already knows about their life, but they're not really fully taking into account or they're not doing something about. Exactly. Exactly. But it also, it deepens the trust that they have with you. And then what I always find is that we often get the situation where so let's talk about being certain. So we get people with moon certain and they are hard in themselves. And they are sometimes emotionally isolated. And the extrapolation to where you could take that signature is that they take themselves there. They go, I don't deserve. So it becomes a case of I don't have because I don't deserve. And so what I say is I've usually tried to establish enough in the chart enough of resonance, if you like, or enough of a sort of mirroring where they feel that the next thing I'm going to say is also truthful. So when we get to the point where I say remember that thing about not deserving what your child is going to choose their own chart. And I firmly believe that the birth chart is a lens through which you perceive your life. It's not necessary your real life. It's the way in which you choose to see it. So what we tend to do is we tend to edit art or reality, and through the lens of the chart. So I'll say, you know, so long as when your baby comes, they're going to have their own birth chart. And it doesn't matter if you are the perfect mother if they've got mean certain. They're going to find something to find fault with. But it's okay, because so long as you've fed them and you've sent them to school and you've been consistent, a consistent parent. That's the best that you can do and the rest is up to them and how they perceive their reality. But the feeling of relief you can actually see it on their faces. And I say, if I've said anything truthful about you today, it's because you gave me your birth time place. That's all I have to work with. And your child will come with their own birthday at the time and play. So you will always be good enough. And it's amazing to see them just relax into that. And I often wonder, sometimes I wonder is that all it took or is it just part of that process, but I just find it a useful conversation to go always to the deserving part. Yeah, that's really important point about sometimes it's never clear how much when people describe their relationships with other people or especially relationships with the parent and you can see that signature and the birth chart, how much that's reflecting an external truth about how, let's say the parent related to the child and whatever dynamics the parent actively did versus how much it's just the child's perception of the parent and their experiences with them that is their own actual subjective experience, but it may not objectively be as true if a third party like observed the relationship or something like that. Really good example of this, Chris, is that I have two goals two children and they were born 20 months apart.

polycystic ovarian syndrome diabetes Chris
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

Health Babes Podcast

05:31 min | 4 months ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

"I mean, it really is the underlying mechanism for so many of the chronic conditions that really have such a huge toll for Americans and really for people all over the world. Diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico, for example. Wow. Wow. And then even Alzheimer's, right? The type three, right? So it's just so, so scary when you think about it, especially when like with you talking about earlier, people walking around not knowing that they're even going down this path, right? What about women's health? Like things like PCOS and can we talk a little bit more about hormone imbalance with blood sugar? Absolutely. I think PCOS polycystic ovarian syndrome is probably the most well-known and prevalent example of this. And really, that is a situation where high levels of insulin are signaling to the ovaries. It's actually pretty interesting that even when most of the cells of the body have become resistant to the signal of insulin, therefore insulin has to be produced at higher levels. But the ovaries actually continue to be very sensitive to the signal. So the ovaries are still hearing that signal loud and clear. And this is basically a child who has remained sensitive to their parents yelling and screaming as if that was the first time they had heard it, right? It's like, so what happens then is that the ovaries are put into overdrive. And what people don't understand sometimes, I think, is that the ovaries actually produce hormones. And that that insulin signal tells them produce more of those and specifically can produce androgens and kind of hormones that people think of as being more on the male side of the spectrum like testosterone. Now, the reality is that testosterone is the most prevalent hormone in the female body and our bodies are exquisitely sensitive to it.

Alzheimer's polycystic ovarian syndrome Diabetes Mexico
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:52 min | 7 months ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"In crime, drew pride, who's the host of the drew prop podcast, and we are going to dive deep into the topic of acne, which is the source of so much suffering for so many people. And it's not that hard to fix. And it doesn't mean you have to slather on all kinds of potions, lotions and creams, or take nasty pills. Mark, this is a topic that a lot of people are passionate about. And are curious about, I actually struggle with acne all throughout my high school. And for my freshman year, literally it's like as if it was timed by freshman year I came in, had terrible acne. Cystic acne. That's what made you passionate person. I know. And it continued right up until. And then literally when I got out of school and I was getting ready for my summer vacation right before college, I found out that dairy, which we're going to be talking about in a little bit was a trigger for me and my gut health. But there's many other things besides that that are connected to people's acne. So let's start off with the basics. What are some of the top things? Give us three things that are deeply connected to why acne is happening in the first place. So again, your disease is your body's best attempt to deal with a bad sort of circumstances. So acne occurs when things were out of balance. And we know a lot about what happens with acne. And the problem most traditional dermatology is you're attacking it from the outside in. But it's actually an inside out job to fix. And the things are the biggest triggers for acne today are dairy. You mentioned, which have over 60 different hormones naturally occurring, especially when they milk pregnant cows even more. Two sugar and the consequences of starch and sugar that drive what we call insulin resistance. And there's a whole downstream effect of that. And three, it's damage to our gut and they got microbiome that is caused a leaky gut, which causes all kinds of food sensitivities. It can cause acne. Now I know that and I'm actually much better because I think I really fixed my gut a lot, but if I say dairy, I would never eat dairy because I knew I would get pimples. And you know, it's embarrassing to be like a 50 year old guy with pimples. So does she have to go on TV? A big one on my nose. So I would just like instant. I had some dairy next day I'd get pimples. So it's really clear. And for women, you know, it's also a big issue because there's a whole phenomenon called PCOS or polycystic ovarian syndrome, which is a condition that's not an ovarian problem. It's a nutritional problem, induced by too much starch and sugar, and in some resistance, that causes female bodies to make too much testosterone. So you've got all these things going on, and these are the sort of most common factors. There's also lots of nutritional deficiencies and other things that are related to acne as well. So somebody is listening and they're like, well, how is that Mark Hyman could be when he was 50 years old? And having some dairy, some ice cream or whatever, and he gets a pimple, but then there's somebody else who can have dairy, and maybe they even drink a glass of milk every single one of them. And they don't get pimples. So what's going on in the difference between those two people? I think one, we're all different. I mean, this is a fundamental principle of functional medicine is biochemical individuality, genetic individuality. I mean, the human genome project and all the downstream unfolding of the genomics and the omics revolution has taught us that people are the same genetically. People are the same in their microbiome and their immune system and all the important ways that we're different. And so, you know, some people can tolerate things that other people can't. Some people have celiac disease. I mean, well, don't. A lot of it has to do with the gut. For me, it was a gut issue. And I had long story told a different podcast. I had mercury poisoning and that just destroys all the enzymes in your gut and I got a leaky gut and causes all kinds of problems. So I was really sensitive to everything. Then I would get rashes and sores everywhere, pimples. Once I fixed that, I was good. I don't remember the last time I had a pimple. Yeah, that's huge. So we talked a little bit about some foods that can trigger it, like dairy, and again, dairy is not dairy is not dairy because we just did a whole episode about some of the benefits of like goats, milk, fruits. And how some people better tolerate that, but we're really talking about when we're talking about acne. We're talking about cow's milk and in particular, cow's milk here in the United States. Well, I have a confession, actually. I'm Friends with rylan englehart, who started with his family that a gratitude cafe and also then realized that regenerative agriculture was so important and started kiss the ground, which is nonprofit to raise awareness about soil health. It was a movie called guess ground encourage everybody watch on Netflix. I was in it. And he sent me an email a few months ago. I said, Mark, there's this amazing guy who started a regenerative farm using a two cows. So a two cows at different form of casein, which isn't as inflammatory. Which is really what was naturally in cows before it was all bred out. And it's what sheep and goat have is a form of casein, which is the protein in milk. And then he says, it's all regenerative and it's a two casein. I'm like, ugh, you just said the two things that are my trip tonight. So I'll try it. Okay, send me the ice cream. Like, 5 flavors ice cream. Can I try it? I ate it. I didn't get a pimple. It was interesting. And I think it's because I think it was the a two casein. Or maybe this was I fixed my gut, but it was like really surprised because doing my head would get a bit more. Right, and it's good that you have that awareness, but for a lot of people who don't, they don't realize that dairy could be a key component. Dairy. What are some other foods? Let's talk about foods first before we go into everything else. What are some other foods that can contribute or agitate the underlining root issues that can make acne more likely to happen? So acne is a state of inflammation. Inflammation is anything that's red hot, swollen and tender, which is a pimple. And inflammation can be triggered by many, many things, including infections, including our diet and the primary problem with our western processed diet is its highly inflammatory. So just the high amounts of refined carbohydrates, the high amounts of sugar, the high amounts of refined oils, and processed oils, the lack of protective nutrients, the phytochemicals in food, the anti inflammatory polyphenols and flavanols, and terpenes, all things that we need to be eating that are regularly inflammation. We don't eat because we basically process junk food. 60% of our diet is processed junk food. And that's the average for Americans. And that includes everybody, not just people who are overweight or unhealthy, but literally everybody, when you think about it, that's 6 out of ten Americans. I mean, sorry, 60% of the average Americans, those people, maybe it's 90 or a 100%, right? So getting on an anti inflammatory diet and getting off the inflammatory foods is critical as a first step in regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in your body. And that alone may just help. And then, you know, getting off the dairy and getting off sugar also are the next two things you have to think about because those two without a doubt have been proven in the scientific literature to be drivers of acne. It doesn't mean everybody who eats dairy is going to get acne or anybody who eats sugar is going to get acne, but if you are prone to acne, it's definitely the first thing to think about. So sugar, why is sugar on that list and what are the mechanisms of how sugar would end up creating more inflammation, which then ultimately in this instance could lead to acne. Well sugar we're through a lot of different mechanisms. But if you want to get inflamed eat sugar, essentially when you eat a lot of sugar, it raises insulin levels. It causes fatty liver, which creates more inflammation, C reactive protein. It actually creates more cytokines.

acne polycystic ovarian syndrome Mark Hyman rylan englehart Mark drew celiac disease Netflix United States
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Holistic Health Podcast

The Holistic Health Podcast

04:53 min | 10 months ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Holistic Health Podcast

"Sorry, that's actually a topic. I'm going to be covering in the Homer and rescue course because I just am a big fan of black knowledge is power and it just helps you to interpret what your body is saying a little bit better or just to be able to know how to collect them information before you go to a practitioner if you need to do that or if you're going to do that anyway, you might as well have useful information. Yes, yeah, I love that. That gets my Nick is in a twist as well. It's very disappointing and frustrating when a client comes to with a meaningless bit of data because, you know, I'm like, what day of your cycle is this done? I don't even know because they're not tracking. I call or if they do, and it's like day X and it's like, well, that's actually not meaningful for any of that or it was meaningful for your estrogen, but not for you progesterone. So we can't really we have to do this again. Yeah, it is really irritating. And as you say, it's a waste of resources. Yes, it really is. So I think what we'll move on to wrap up the podcast is a few different myths around PCOS that we can think of. So I'm going to start with one that I can think of that's top of mind that we haven't necessarily spoken to yet, which is, I think there is a myth that pain is a common feature of PCOS. So people who have period pain essentially. Now, it is not necessarily true. So if you only have PCOS and not another issue, then polycystic ovarian syndrome alone shouldn't be or is very like it shouldn't be the cause or the contributing factor to you experiencing painful periods. There are certainly other types of ovarian cysts that could, I guess, cause or contribute to pain and then there are also other conditions that could contribute or cause period pain like endometrial endometriosis or adenomyosis or infections, for example, but if you're under the assumption that I have period pain because I have PCOS, then you need to keep looking because while you may have PCOS, it's not driving your pain and you want to find out what is driving that period pain. It might be a simple fix or it might be something that's a little bit more in depth that you need some help with figuring out. But I think that's period pain is something very close to my heart as someone who has endometriosis and has had excruciating period pain in the past and I think it's.

polycystic ovarian syndrome Nick endometrial endometriosis
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Holistic Health Podcast

The Holistic Health Podcast

04:28 min | 10 months ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Holistic Health Podcast

"Hello everyone and welcome back to the holistic health podcast. We are excited today about the trick that we're speaking about because it is something very close to both of our hearts, Amy, has had face OS in the past herself and I see a lot of these in clinic and I think it's one of those conditions where it's very common, and then it's also very commonly misdiagnosed. So it's a really good one to kind of all get on the same page about and start to speak to a little bit more. It's also something that I will be addressing in my upcoming hormone rescue program, which if you are interested in what that's about or you want to sign up to the wait list, please just head on over to my website or flick me a message on Instagram and I can direct you to how you can be a part of that. So what I thought I would start is just speaking a little bit too, I guess what exactly is PCOS because, as I said, very commonly misdiagnosed and I think it's the name in and of itself is very misleading and confusing. So in a very oversimplified nutshell, it really is primarily a condition or a syndrome that's driven by excess androgens which are, I guess, male dominant sex hormones. And those excess androgens or over sensitivity to androgens, which we'll talk about in a moment. Can be can come from a number of different drivers or influences which we're going to talk you through in a moment. And I think perhaps it's worth mentioning that it probably polycystic ovarian syndrome is named the way it's been named because on ultrasound, what happened is when someone gets there, the ovaries ultrasound ultrasound and I'm sure that's the technical term..

Amy polycystic ovarian syndrome
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"About my experiences and I got trolled by many, many people criticizing me for my appearance, my background, like my anything and everything and it was typically from men that were twice my age and they were white men and they were trying to pick apart every single not even anything that necessarily said or did just what I look like and the fact that I was different from them. So how do you feel about how did you deal with that? I just found it quite funny to be honest. I've spent a lot of time learning how to be comfortable with myself and be proud of myself and know what matters to me and what matters to me and my parents. It's what I do with my time. You know, who I am and I've always got to a point where I was like, do you know what I think that if I got exposed to a lot of people and I'd got trolled? I don't think it would upset me. But because I keep very good people in my life, I never really got exposed to a large amount of negative feedback. And so for it to happen and then it not affect me, I was mostly just happy that I was right and that all the work that I had been doing on myself and my point of view and my self esteem and all that had paid off. Especially when a lot of the criticisms were to do with things that I did use to struggle with like my parents, like I have polycystic ovarian syndrome. And so I have a harmony balance and facial hair and people were misgendering me calling me transgender, saying I was a man and that I shouldn't lie and you know just things that I just unnecessarily to the actual topic itself. I'm going to bring them both mere and Jessie and on this have you experienced.

polycystic ovarian syndrome Jessie
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

"A good support system is key to most things, I think. And truly being secure in myself. I know my experience. I know my journey. I know that I have struggle with food. I know that I have polycystic ovarian syndrome. I know that I have an underactive thyroid. And I know that I can't help most of these things. Some of it, sure. But most of it, I can't, in some days, that's enough to just be like, you know, you can think whatever you want about me. But you don't know me. You don't know what I've been through. You don't know this story, so what you say or think doesn't matter to me because it doesn't apply. Most of it. Yeah. And so much of our health is outside of our control, like having PCOS or having an underactive thyroid. And so that's a lot different than what diet culture makes us believe, right? That we can take control of all of our health with how we move and what we eat into an extent, yes. What we eat and how we move is definitely supportive of health, but it's not the end all be all to health. And when we view it as the only source of health, we lose sight of other things. And then it can lead us down a road that's just honestly not healthy and a lot of what diet culture says is healthy really isn't because it's just about eating low calorie and losing weight. And that doesn't quite help. Entire food groups that you need to. Eating that high of fat and no. I just think quality of life. I'm just like, everything I do in my social life, there are carbs there. So I just can't even imagine, I think, what would I do to sit there and watch everyone eat? Dieting is miserable. It's so miserable going on to restaurants. I remember when I was doing a long time ago, like ordering a burger and taking the bread off and just eating like cutting it. I'm like, this is stupid. I want bread. Yeah. So much. And I wrote in this intermittent fasting thing. I'm like, you're starving yourself for hours. That's an eating disorder. Yes. Yeah. It just can't have choice, but that's what they want. They want it to perpetuate. It's made more money off of it. Yeah, it's all a money making thing. Well, I feel like I've experienced a series. It does it really does. I love how we're talking about this. I just have been loving everything that you've said. And so I know that this struggle started for you when you were very young. So if you could go back in time, I don't know if you would want to go back in time to fourth grade, 5th grade college. I don't know. Just a time that you think would be helpful and speak to younger doctor Caitlin, what would you say to her?.

polycystic ovarian syndrome Caitlin
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"The science and the guidance that you're receiving and you're just going to take the steps that feel right for you and you're not going to take the steps that don't feel right for you. And then you don't have to take responsibility and you don't have to take responsibility. And you can walk together in that trusting. So I think that that's really helpful too. And so when you ask, what are three things that people can do? So I think that when it comes to our fertility. So we think of our fertility as a complex network. It is a complex network, like the neural network in the brain, our fertility isn't just our eggs or our sperm or what's happening in our ovaries or our uterus or hormone balance. It really is, I mean, our most important fertility organ is the brain. And nobody tells us this. And so it's really important that when we think of fertility, the first thing that people think of is what we call the bioecological level of fertility. We use it fertility pyramid. So that's those are things like what supplements should I take? What should I eat? What do I do if my hormones aren't balanced? What do I do if I've received a particular type of fertility related diagnosis like polycystic ovarian syndrome or diminished ovarian reserve? So that's a hugely important part of the fertility system, but it's so much more than that. So yes, we provide guidance about core nutrients that everyone will want to have when their prime mastering and their pregnant and their postpartum. And then we also provide guidance on nutrients, micronutrients, and macronutrients. So both food and supplementation for specific cases that are very common like polycystic ovarian syndrome I just mentioned PCOS, which is one of the most common fertility conditions like endometriosis, like fibroids, like hormonal imbalances, including low estradiol, low progesterone, if someone has a short cycle, meaning that when people hear a cycle,.

polycystic ovarian syndrome
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"G in session. Here's our conversation. We are very excited to dig into lots of women's health, kinds of topics and there have been lots of conversations and questions from our community about fertility and things that lead to infertility. And so we really wanted to have an expert on to talk about some of these things. And so one of the things that has come up a lot within the community is PCO is. And so I would love for you to maybe start by telling us a little bit about what PCOS is and how it can show up in our bodies. So PCOS is basically a disorder. It's a syndrome, or polycystic ovarian syndrome. And it's basically a disorder of an ovulation. So every month you're supposed to ovulate, and that's what triggers your period. But in women with PCOS, they don't ovulate. And so you can not have a period. It's also tied to a syndrome. It can be associated with prediabetes, elevated cholesterol, and sometimes obesity. The main symptom that you're going to have is one of three things you're going to not have your cycle every month. You may have signs of excess testosterone.

polycystic ovarian syndrome obesity
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Your blood pressure after he and tell me what you think. Message me in the acupunctures my life app and tell me what happened. What will you numb because these canned soups so loaded with bisphenol. A which is of course a chemical ads linked to infertility weight gain cancer. You know what when when here hear a little secret. Make your own soup. How about that. Make your own soup now. Another interesting item. The you should look to stay away from especially once you hit thirty years of age. You really should have stopped probably when your teenage teenage years over. And that's pop tart. The the the sick amounts of sugar that ten that i mean. I don't even recommend you allow your child tap. I really really don't and for you ladies out there. Eating pop tarts believe it or not can lead to peco's which is polycystic ovarian syndrome which is heavily tied to female infertility. Okay so go and you cabinet right. Now take out the box. So boxes of pop tarts and head to the trash cans and others these these pastries which you eat for breakfast. It looks good but the health risk is way too high. in fact loaded with calories. You deaf you do it on a regular and you put some unwanted weight on you know many health conditions tied to eating these back breakfast pastries I've said this before. Protein bars eat foods that richard protein. Why they're snacks rich in protein. And if you follow us acupunctures my life won't take talk. You'd already know because we have you know postings where foods that are good for you. Foods that are bad for you And so forth and so on is much to learn following us take talk. Another is again soda. I will whenever. I'm speaking of food or drinks. You should get rid of certain things you'll notice i'm seeing over and over and over and over and over and one is soda soda soda soda. Always say whenever and discussing foods at a bad few just be prepared to hear soda and probably alcohol. Be prepared to heroes. You know because the the the horrible additives. That are in soda. It's loaded with sugar. All types of like colored dyes of course increases. Your risk of cancer and sugar is terrible for both female and male fertility. Keep that in mind. Please don't forget that because health as well. The wealth isn't in the bank. it's not safe. It's not in your pocket. it's not new purse. it's not matches. It's not a shoebox in the closet. It's not under the doghouse in the backyard. It's in you the wealth is in you. You also want to consider staying away from all real cookies. Oh i'm sure how much you loved. Oreos.

polycystic ovarian syndrome richard protein peco cancer cabinet
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

"Breaking down nutrition trends like doing listener questions and stuff like that and christina will tell you a little bit about the other stuff. That's going to be updated. He how we're going to add in some new segments like telling you about something that we're into recommendations for the week what we've been up to and also we really want to hear from you. That's another big piece of it to like. We want listener questions guests. You guys would love to have on any feedback. You have questions about previous episodes like maybe this summer. You took the opportunity to like backtrack deep into old podcast. And maybe you're really curious of maybe maybe perspective has changed by. That's happened for sure. And the beginning of each episode's going to be a little bit diff- and sometimes giving you a little bit of an intro to a topic as well right so if we have a guest for example. Let's coming on to talk about pc os polycystic ovarian syndrome right which we've had before. Maybe we give you a little bit of an intro. Of what is the neutral nutrition wholehearted eating not necessarily approach but introduction to what is or how it can be applied and then we bring a guest expert on to talk about their approach to something. Because as you all well know from listening to podcasts. The host don't necessarily always agree one hundred percent with the guests. But that doesn't mean it's a bad interviewer or anything. It means we have diverse perspectives. Right and the reason you bring on interviews and the reason you bring on guests is to get diverse perspectives right so sometimes we might agree with someone. One hundred percent. Sometimes we might agree with them. Ninety five percent. Sometimes it might not be much at all which means maybe we should have vetted the guest better right like that hasn't really happened to at all but it can happen sometimes another podcast that i've heard like this isn't a very good flow of an episode. You know another thing too that note..

polycystic ovarian syndrome christina
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Investor Mama

Investor Mama

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Investor Mama

"'cause i know as much as moms would like to start a business or create more passive income or have more. Stay home options. It's not always the easiest thing in the world to do. Could you talk a little bit about your beginning stages of your journey with this. Yeah absolutely so. I will say that. It's not an overnight process. I always try to remember that it's consistency over time that leads to the results that we want and so i always had that in the back of my mind after so. This isn't an overnight thing. I've thought long and hard about in the business aspect of things before starting this venture. My husband is an entrepreneur. He's a chiropractor. He has his own practice. He has his own business in my parents. One was in the private sector for many years and the other one both entrepreneur in business. So i had a little bit of experience. But it's totally different when you're doing your own thing and there's just a lot of experience to be learned along the way and and until you really dive in though that's the best advice i would give somebody just go for it because you won't really find your way until you just go for it and learning from those experiences is totally invaluable it. You said he mentioned that. You had some failed businesses in the past cages briefly. Talk about what they were and why they didn't work out he learned. Yeah absolutely so. I have a passion also for natural health and helping people live healthy lives. I was able to through diet. I was able to overcome polycystic ovarian syndrome. And i still to this day. Have to watch my weight for that reason. So i started a company called organic. The lights and the idea was to make dried fruit without any sort of preservatives. Or just the fruit one ingredient self and to dehydrate them and the reason. Why didn't work out honestly. I think that it was two things one was. I wasn't consistent. I didn't make enough time for it..

polycystic ovarian syndrome
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"I'm so thrilled to speak to each of you today. Especially because i am a very very passionate mother of the ingredients that come into my house. So welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much. This is alison. Were so excited to be here. Yes thank you. This is kelly so tell me what led you to start this company well This is alison. I'll take that question. And i wish it was just this short and sweet answer but all all kinds of nutshell it as tightly as possible. I'd like to sam kind of the glue that brought us together My aunt and kelly my best friend. And i started the company actually back in nine but then had relaunched with our new formula new branding and i guess. Twenty seventeen really. We never set out to sell soap. We did not grow up thinking we were going to be these business. People riding like the green you know nontoxic bandwagon. It was actually more of a necessity In terms of us. Three coming together because of my health. i was diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome back in high school and according to fertility specialists in houston i had the worst case he had ever seen a had cysts oliver. My ovaries Put on birth control indefinitely told i would never conceive children naturally fast forward to college which is where i met kelly halfway through college. I came down with these mysterious symptoms that started with what i thought was just kind of tightness in my shoulder and back but led to extreme pain. Loss of motor skills numbness. I dropped out of school due to pain and was put on a slew of drugs in a depressants muscle. Relaxers painkillers sleeping pills. And no one can figure out what was going on. My symptoms closely resembled ms and then. My aunt nearly comes along and she was this crunchy granola aunt. That i didn't know super well because she kinda gone through her own health struggles throughout my childhood but she was one of those like i one to shop at the whole foods on sixth street in austin when no one else had heard of it and you know drinking organic juice when no one else knew what that was and she started talking to me about toxins in my diet and environment and how it was necessary in order for my body to heal to be more cognizant of the things i was putting in on around my body so at this point i had nothing to lose. I was like a walking drug den. And i was twenty one years old at the time and so i did. I got rid of as many toxins as possible. Kelly's witnessing this amazing transformation. My body makes over just a few months. I'm able to get some of the prescriptions. I was on and then approaching graduation from college. Kelly and i decided let's go live with merely in the hill country in texas and just soak up everything she knows because we were just blown away by how nobody not one doctor had mentioned anything that she had talked about in terms of..

kelly alison polycystic ovarian syndrome sam oliver houston austin Kelly texas
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on If These Ovaries Could Talk

If These Ovaries Could Talk

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on If These Ovaries Could Talk

"Dot com slash. That's modern fertility dot com slash. Oct all right so you. You're like i wanna be aggressive because you want to stay because you're having a loss that you haven't processed and and he said that sounds like a great idea. He's like cool. Let's do it. He's not even asking any history about your miscarriage. Okay now red flag reservoir So we start doing testing and i realized quickly insurance does not cover any of his Keeping my wages from states and also in school fulltime. We're on one income. So i'm like i don't care we're doing this. I don't know how we did it. We did it but he does all these tests. You know of course and tells me everything is fine. i'm fine. He sees no problems. I still have my paperwork from then that says no signs of pcs. So i'm like okay. I'm good they put me on climate. We did the whole ave drill in jackson and They wanted to wait two days after my trigger to do the intimidation and i thought that was so long and i might twenty four hours. I believe i saw. I'm looking up stuff on the internet. I'm just like well. That's not what this place says now. So thought it was strange that he didn't ask me if i wanted to do. More than one insemination it. Just it was one. I didn't get the option. But i'm finding out other clinics. Will you can ask why would like to do two or their standard is too right. Yeah my my first clinic. I went to the standard was to ask my two minds. And i've heard others that have. It's one so a second clinic i went to. It was one. But i never asked if i could do. I don't know if that was an option or not. I had already tried the two way too many times. And i've like let's try one. I'm done with this. Yes so we go in verse of intimidation. I'm super excited. You know i'm like. I can't wait walsall's lift me. And all of a sudden i got legs up ready to go And this woman walks at it. I'm like goober you. She's like oh sweetie heats and do the nation. And i'm like i couldn't have told me that be more i got here. I've been coming here for weeks. And no one said a word that some random nurse practitioner was going to do my information that i had never met. I have built a relationship with this dr And no matter how how little he told me a little information he gave me. I was counting on him him to get pregnant. Now i have to talk to you. I don't even know you and now you're going to do minds nation. I'm completely uncomfortable. At this point. I look at and she's just like like what you wanna do it. I'm like i don't have a choice of already. Triggered can wait so we do the insemination. It takes two seconds. I'm like okay. That's it and she's like. Yeah i'm like okay. She's like well. You can stay in here when you exit for a few minutes and then get dressed and you'll be good to go and i'm like okay. So we leave. We go check out. And she's like okay. That'll be nine fifty for today. And i might okay. Melissa coulda down there right right. I'm leg so you know we're paying we we They're like okay. Good luck and i'm like okay. You know but at this point. I'm already not feeling confident because i did know this person and now my whole experience has been tainted because i didn't expect for someone else to do it and i know that sounds small but it for me i was like i would have liked to tell you the now like i'm so attached to this doctor. I'm expecting to walk in and see him and his little corey face and he's not there he's not even there. I don't even see him at all in office whatsoever. it's Yeah it seems like they didn't take you into account now. it felt very impersonal. I felt like. I was a transaction. So i got the call that i wasn't pregnant after already knew that i was. I was testing up my trigger. Which i should not have done because it was a gut punch when i realized i was pregnant They called me the morning of school. I was sitting in the parking lot and already knew and like okay. We're just going to let you know you're brings us a But just let us know when you're ready to do it again and that'll be another nine fifty we can get it going and i'm like you could have just left it at. We're so sorry. Yeah yeah you didn't conceive the cycle. Give us a call. When you're ready eh. i don't have any nine fifty here about nine fifty says now i feel like i just wasted nine fifty. That's how it felt at the time. You know it was like i pay you all this money. Which nine fifty was not even tip of the iceberg of how much money we ended up spending total. You know. I wanna say it was between six and eight thousand dollars. By the time we were done. It could have been more because everything was out of pocket muscles like you know. We just can't do it right now. Honey i don't. I don't want you to be upset vicious not going to be possible so then i'm like okay. How can i figure out how to do this using the the friends sperm. No we're in. Florida announced at this point. The clinic we use california break up at the time. Oh c. t. I'm still never grieved my first loss right and i'm like after you're pregnant so i'm on this mission to like i have to do. This had another friend at the time. I had gotten really close to a male friend and he was gracious enough to be my donor and he was just so honored they usually are. I don't know why. But i'm like you guys get so excited so but thank you. I appreciate it So he was something donor we worked with him for a couple of months and i was able to conceive with him. I miscarried that one as well when you did at home to. Yes see your golden ticket is like there's pressure how did you figure out you had yo s. though is that you just kept miscarry. I just got diagnosed in december. Can you tell our listeners. I don't know if everyone knows what. Pcs is so can you. Can you walk through a little. Yes so peo is always cystic ovarian syndrome. It looks different for everybody. It's not cut and dry for one woman to another Or one person leaders to another for me personally. It has caused recurrent miscarriage. I have cystic ovaries. Which actually if you google polycystic ovaries you can see they have what they call the strand of pearls and aunts these little. It looks like rocks. your overs look like gumby. I said they kind of look like little planets in the solar system because they're so bumpy But for me it has caused recurrent pregnancy loss. I don't have a good level for gesture on lanark yet. Pregnant which is another reason why my periods have always been completely debilitating but it can cause facial hair weight gain of gained a lot of late. How did they. How did they find that out. So i changed clinics after trying at home for a year and a half. We had to do a psychological evaluation which we had never had before. I didn't know that was the thing. Why where are you going to do. Iv adjunct do a psychological values or anything just it to be a patient to be accepted as a patient. Why was a requirement.

Melissa coulda walsall jackson corey cystic ovarian syndrome Florida california google
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on A Feed Called clubmarketevents

A Feed Called clubmarketevents

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on A Feed Called clubmarketevents

"Go to sleep. Thank you so much. I'm asked actually hosting an event to geared to moms and I feel like they would just absorb everything that you're getting. So I'm going to slide into your DMs if you forgot to ask. Thank you guys. My pleasure. Just real quick as possible. So we go to a size at Rita. Hey, hi everyone. Hi. Pies are hello to all the speakers and thank you for having me on the speakers list. And am I supposed just before asking my question, I just want to give a little bit of context. I am a holistic nutritionist and now my health coach and I am I look with the organized a holistic ago. My Approach is pretty, I think, I mean, I think in all the elements of Health when I work with them, which is why when it comes with walk-ins are suggesting supplements, that something that I do too was like that's the last point of my practice. That's, that's not the first approach of the first thing I use old and have it changes in lifestyle changes, a lot of these practices to help them but my question is coming to my question. Now, I have a I have a client Bots And if he has been taking a lot of anxiety medications towards the end of the day for which helps her to sleep better off and I was wondering that constantly magnesium in something that came to my mind and I was thinking about suggesting magnesium to her, but there's always the there's this really big, and when that when been talking about organ, when recommending magnesium because it works different way and there are different forms of it. So I was just wondering you know, if you have any inputs live there, that if someone is already taking variety medications is, is it even off and magnesium or is Bill, any form help with any form of magnesium help there? Barry Jackson question to depend on what kind of angle it takes her anti-anxiety meds their own. So definitely check with the physician. So you think about letting kind of them as they're on because different applications cause different kind of changes in your electrolyte levels of magnesium is electrolyte, right? So, if you're getting like hyper magnesia, I personally hire a low. You wouldn't want to be, you know, and getting extra magnesium wage. It depends on what medications, he or she goes on. First of all, doesn't talk to a physician, but otherwise it might be something as to, when I would recommend, is magnesium help create would be the one on top in the chat, as well as you do show. There is a big fine as well as senior scientist to comes on here and be pretty regularly. So yeah, definitely, check with physician before you take them cuz they'll do your blood work if needed and and different meds obviously have different effects on your sodium levels, your potassium levels and your magnesium level. So it just because it's almost be hard for me as a medical doctor to give any medical advice on this platform cell phone number. Disclaimer, I'm sorry. No goes, thank you, thank you for that input. I appreciate that. Because I mean when it comes to type of supplement you have to think about so many things and I I appreciate the resource and not going to check. Check that out. Check the link and resources. Thank you. So I appreciate it. Thanks for yourself. We have Sylvia planks taisuke Hi. Yes. So my question is about even I've been having anxiety and everything and you know, sometime take anti-anxiety pills off. But especially I got go with in April, especially after that, you know, I just can't sleep, you know, even if I try, I get on the bed and everything else just not able to get please. So what can, you know, one, because I was reading that, it's one of the side effects, but how can I correct that? And if you can repeat the supplements again, please because I have missed out on that. Thank you. Are you sure to be? So you said you're being kind of something a bit of anxiety. So, tempting, things I consult your physician. They may need you to go through something, we call cognitive behavioral therapy or maybe find some depending on the extent of anxiety. So, I would advise here during the things that you can do is things, like, try meditation and journaling, try things, like, how long Helps in terms of regards for Sleep else. You need melatonin. Melatonin is only prescribed in the UK psychology recommend that, but I felt really that situation is one of the Magnesium supplements. I do recommend. So, essentially, you need magnesium l-threonate and then you mentioned, a few teases are allowed under Valerian, Sharm, el-sheikh, and things like green tea as well. So that's that's why I would say helps Thanks auntie we have our next higher summer. Hey hello. I just wanted to ask like could you shed some light on off how people's and scape is affect related because I have peoples and despite sleeping like 9 to 7 as the I still feel kind including the dance to add eggs. So good to be related to my sleep schedule, or like could be related to my peoples asleep. Yeah, I'm not a gynecologist, but generally people who do have like voyeuristic ovarian syndrome has been some studies that suggest the more likely to have, you know, a sleep disturbance of disorders, including things like a dimensional object to sleep, apnea or excessive daytime, sleepiness, need more frequently in people and women with polycystic, ovarian syndrome and compared to people without the syndrome. So I guess you should go investigate for them that that that would help in that in Iraq. But yeah. There's just like their.

Barry Jackson Rita Sylvia ovarian syndrome UK apnea polycystic Iraq
What is Femtech?

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

01:53 min | 1 year ago

What is Femtech?

"I wanted to talk about them tack today. So what is them tack. Well fem tech really compromises. All of the new either apps online consulting or membership sites or products that. We're seeing in the women's health field and i'm really specifically talking about midlife women's health but they're certainly our apps and products for women in earlier reproductive years. Whether it's even something simple like tracking your period so you can get pregnant better or you know periods in general if if for something like polycystic ovarian syndrome which is also known as o. s. but i've seen a boom in apps an online consulting and products for women in midlife health. We're talking peri. Menopause and pause and i wanna let you know my thoughts about those. I sat down as i usually do before. I record a podcast and just take some little notes on one piece of paper and the pros list is kinda short and the cons list is kind of long so without further ado. Let's get right into the things that i think are good about fem tack okay. We'll obviously this means that people are recognizing that there is a void that there is a need for products for women's health in midlife whether that is sexual health or irregular periods in peri menopause and those strange symptoms at creep up in perryman oposite into menopause or the symptoms that you're experiencing post menopausal people are noticing. A ha. there is a need here. There is a void that we have not built and people need these products. People need this help. People need the support and let's build this infrastructure to do so

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Peri
"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on  Fearless Beauties

Fearless Beauties

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian syndrome" Discussed on Fearless Beauties

"Let's talk about melasma. What is it? How does it occur and why is it so prevalent in black skin? Well, molasses was another common disorder type of hyperpigmentation. It's not really well understood, but there's definitely a hormonal and hereditary component. It has a definite pigmentation pattern, usually symmetrical across the cheeks, sometimes in kind of a butterfly pattern. Also on the upper lip, upper forehead and the chin. And women's hormones are always fluctuating, but particularly during pregnancy, melasma sort of becomes much more evident. It's really hard to treat and it's usually an ongoing condition that requires the use of some kind of melanin inhibiting skin care, some professional treatments that will calm the melanocytes down from over producing. Being too aggressive can cause them melanocytes to get angry and produce more pigment. It's really a delicate balance. Yeah, I've definitely seen melasma and some of my family member skin, especially on the cheek area. So moving on, tell us about polycystic ovarian syndrome. PCOS, and how it can relate to acne. Polycystic ovarian syndrome or picos or PCOS is another common condition that black women have had to deal with. It's a systemic hormonal disorder. There's a disruption in androgen or sex hormone productions and things just go off kilter. Women can have irregular periods, heavy menstrual cycles, that excess oil production from the sebaceous glands. That leads to acne, also male pattern hair loss on the top of the head with thinning hair and then growth of facial hair. The body has a metabolic disorder, and diabetic symptoms are really common along with challenges in losing weight. The body's metabolism slows way down. Estrogen is stored in fat. And so our body stores the hormone estrogen, and so women who have PCOS, they're struggling to hang on to their estrogen. They can't lose weight because the body wants to keep that estrogen to put it back in balance, so it hangs onto the fat. And I do believe that the growth of facial hair from picos or PCOS is called hirsutism, I posted a few pictures on our IG a couple weeks ago and it was really interesting to read about. Yeah, that her statism is, I think it's a real self image problem with women who are struggling. I think it's challenging and it's something that estheticians can help people who suffer from PCOS. But when you have PCOS that low body metabolism means that the digestive system then gets slowed down. Black women have the higher incidence of constipation like we've mentioned earlier. And, you know, what is constipation have to do with it, but there is a connection. Because our intestines absorb nutrients to fuel our bodies. The large intestine is really upholding container for the waste and the toxins after the good stuff's already been absorbed, and it's just waiting to be eliminated from our body. These toxins have to go somewhere, and so they get reabsorbed into the body, and then they typically get released through the skin and they come out as papules and pustules back acne or shoulder acne. Yes, and acne on the back, the neck, chest, and upper arms is often linked to constipation, and to help clear that acne is treating the constipation with probiotics and a high fiber diet. Absolutely. Another medical condition that affects black women more predominantly is uterine fibroids. The fibrates are fibrous growth that occur when the endocrine system gets disrupted. A study shown that women who use hair relaxers are more prone to uterine fibroids and is thought that the toxins in the hair relaxers get absorbed through the scalp. These fibrous growths can appear inside the uterus or outside the uterus, the growth can then push against the colon and cause constipation. And then black hair follicles are curved. So when women have PCOS in their struggling with facial hair growth, that hair can grow and then curve back in the skin and cause peripheral itis, which can cause PIH and sometimes even keloid scarring. See, that is so interesting because my mom had pretty bad fibroids when I was younger. And she always relaxed her hair. I mean, back in the 80s, she was relaxing her hair. But good thing is now we are both natural, but I'm glad to know that information for other.

polycystic ovarian syndrome acne diabetic symptoms
How under-eating and over-exercising can lead to hormonal imbalances with Dr Heather Rhodes

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

05:06 min | 2 years ago

How under-eating and over-exercising can lead to hormonal imbalances with Dr Heather Rhodes

"So before we get started, could you tell people a little bit more about yourself and what you specialize in? Yes. Definitely. I am so pumped to be here and to meet you. Dana. So my name is. Is Holistic Services and I specialized in taking Mormons in them simple for women in order to effectively inefficiently reached their health goals So a lot of times as women in Women's health and experiencing symptoms are hormones are kind of ignored but then like we have this deep intuition of like, no, I, think it's a hormone problem. I think Raimondo Donna balances out of whack and A. Lot of times I dismissed and we kinda. Fugler we don't really know what to do and it just kind of feels like this messy messy spot. So I commend and basically clean it up and teach your hormones. They are help you find easy root causes. You can apply simple and practical strategy towards in order to get those results in that healing and symptom relief that you're looking for. Awesome. So incentive onto Google, we have Dr Heather for here here for you guys say. So we were talking about this briefly before we started recording, but I actually had a lot of requests from people to talk about P., C., O. S., but I haven't had an expert on yet to talk about pcs. So that's kind of what I want to start with so. Four listeners who aren't as familiar or if they just don't know like the macro view of what is P. C. O. S. unlike what does that even mean and what are the implications of it and everything? Could you do a brief? Is for people yes. Of course. So if you're to. Heathrow as you're gonNA find, it stands for poly cystic Ovarian Syndrome which basically means that you are experienced experiencing cyst on your ovaries. According to most Western medical standards to have a diagnosis you've got have two out of three qualifying conditions, which is irregular or no curious high levels of male testosterone engine based hormones or cyst on your brakes that are verified ultrasound. So here's the thing about that diagnosis. There's a couple. Sit Out there that say when you gotTa have at least one of the three or got to have all three gotta have two three nobody in the westernized community really has dislike standard baseline likely for things like pressure or diabetes or whatever. It's kind of this very ray area and a lot of times because of the intensity of the test in invasiveness that's required to either have ultrasound or half blood work drawn a Lotta Times. Women experiencing. Or even PCs likes that domes are very much dismissed. So when someone comes to me and I'm thinking What I'm hearing is they're having regular cycles maybe they are having issues with their blood sugar and your ability in mood swings. Potentially date got access here growth around their chin or jaw line. Maybe it's hair loss in the male pattern form obsolete thinning hair loss access here growth acne on your jaw line is like a major indicator. So can you have those symptoms and not ever officially diagnosed with PC s? Yes. Can you have symptoms and not actually have? On your ovaries. Yes So a lot of times as women week disqualify ourselves from having strategies and the way that we will doesn't impact us because we don't have that diagnosis but I account since I was one of those people that when you apply. Basically, this concept of okay TC. Means that my hormones are really relented in their lot more sensitive than other people's and you kind of take that view of your hormones start treating it as if you do have s than you actually experience all of these results and this kind of new branch of your help by focusing on that area. So I guess in Short, he's Eos is technically. Assist on your raisin meeting qualifications for a westernized doctor. However, I think that there are tons and tons of women out there that experience TV os likes symptoms August pseudo yo s either because of certain seasons that have come up in their life or because of you know my Song Changes Habits Mind specifically came from log period of over exercising under eating. Disordered, eating stop in all of that. So I think that having what I want audience members to kind of think about is kind of broadening their perspective in thinking more about these symptoms of zero s rather than to I technically have a diagnosis of. Or. Not. Right exactly. Well, thank you for explaining that. So I WANNA. Go into one thing that you just mentioned

P. C. O. S. Raimondo Donna Dana Google Testosterone Diabetes Ovarian Syndrome Dr Heather
Unlock Your Hormonal Advantage by Harnessing the Power of Your Infradian Rhythm with Alisa Vitti

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

08:43 min | 3 years ago

Unlock Your Hormonal Advantage by Harnessing the Power of Your Infradian Rhythm with Alisa Vitti

"I'M GONNA jump right in to hormonal advantage. You know a few weeks ago my girlfriend I were having a conversation and it was before she was about to get her period and she was basically in a state where I won't get into all the words but you can curse on this podcast. And so she was like the gist of it was like this does not feel like an advantage right now. This feels like a big weight and a lot of women have thought that before. Why us we go through all the stuff then the top of that the gender pay gap and this thing and that thing and it just feels like. There's a lot of huge burden. That's there on women but in your subtitle you say hormonal advantage. Tell us what's more. I just love that. You bring right to the beginning of this conversation. The cultural narrative and mythology that we're dealing with right. We have inherited a cultural narrative that says that our periods are hormones are a curse that they're problematic that their mysterious that they're unpredictable that they're problematic and that there's nothing to be done and that you're going to enter the mythology is going to be painful and they're going to have symptoms and there's just nothing you can do. Just bide your time until menopause right. That's that's pretty much you know in the nutshell so to speak the narrative that we have the problem with this is a. It's not based on real science. Be It it. Perpetuates a huge behavioral problem for women which has them basically when you believe that something is supposed to be broken when you see it as broken you then do what you take no action right so puts them in in this situation where they don't think that there's anything to do and then they do nothing which then keeps them having symptoms. It's a vicious cycle. So you know it feeds then. It goes right back and feeds this cultural narrative this mythology. That says it's going to be a burden. It's going to be a big problem and women just feel stock and they feel unhappy and the truth of it is. It's completely false. It doesn't to be this way And and I figured out a way for women to liberate themselves from the mythology from the cultural narrative and also from the actual real symptoms to which you're so excited to share about. I can't wait to get into it. Let's talk origin story. Yeah what got you interested in this topic. And what education were you brought up with? And when did things shift for you? Okay so I mean for me I definitely have had my own run in with a hormonal issue That opened my eyes to the limitations of conventional medicine for chronic. Gyn issue so there. I was you know At Johns Hopkins planning to become an Obgyn and had sort of the apex of symptoms. With what I now at what? I now know to be the polycystic Ovarian Syndrome that no one knew that I had so you know at that time for at least seven years. I went undiagnosed I grew up in Massachusetts. I had access to Harvard trained gynecologists than of course at Hopkins. I had access to Hopkins trained gynecology. I had the best of the best and I went undiagnosed for seven years when I finally was able to get a diagnosis. It was through helping my gynecologist by bringing her a report from a medical journal that I had pulled out of the library at school to that had identified all the symptoms that I was having and I said I have this Kendra is what could you share. What the symptoms were. All I had I was. I was fifty pounds heavier than I am. Now I saw had obesity. I was covered face chest and back and cystic acne. I did not meant straight from the age of twelve to twenty two. I had maybe five bleeds two of which were chemically induced with synthetic progesterone. Which if anybody has done that knows that it is delicious experience and so you know it was and I was anxious depressed. Insomnia cle was a mess. Couldn't really function in my day to day. Life with any sort of regularity predictability. I would never know today going to be a day when I had energy was. I going to be in a good mood It was kind of a really negative scary isolating experience And then all the physical symptoms certainly didn't make anyone feel good about themselves. So you know in one of my insomnia coll- nights at the library. I like any young woman in her. Twenty s we do on a Friday night or Saturday night I was like researching medical journals in obstetrics turtles to figure out what was wrong with me because no one had any answers. Everyone was just saying. I'll just go on the pill and that'll solve these problems and I said but you don't even know what the problem is. They said that's true but we should try this anyway and I just didn't feel like that was good medicine for me to to without a known cause take medication for no accurate reason. I believe in more precision kind of based medicine so I found this journal this obstetrics journal and there was a little tiny article about The Stein Leventhal disorder that described my symptoms to a t and all the bells rang inside of my head and I said Oh my gosh this is what I have so i. I waited in the parking lot of my gynecologist office the next morning. She was literally like walking in with her coffee. And just like what are you doing here and I said well you know what I'm doing here is that I would like us to do to specific tests that we have not yet done that. I think will lead us to the conclusion that I have this disorder and she was intrigued enough and gracious enough without having an appointment to do these tests and was able to confirm my diagnosis that. In fact I did have polycystic ovaries and politico very syndrome. And when I I? I was so excited drew like Oh my goodness after years of confusion and dead ends and no answers to have something on a name for it. It was very validating since identity that I'm just crazy right. I'm not something actually going into something going on and I said excellent and I said so now what you know which is sort of like the new Englander in me like now. What do we do? Let's take action and she said well. Unfortunately there isn't really much that we can do for you. This is incurable. And you know we can. You're going to continue to have problems. The obesity that you have today is going to get worse. It might turn into diabetes You will have problems with fertility you may not be able to have children You will have an increased risk of heart disease and cancer. And I'm twenty at this time getting this prognosis after the diagnosis and asking for what support. My Medical Support Team was going offer me and she said we really just don't have anything we can. Just medicate your symptoms along the way and hope for the best but there's nothing that we can do and it was in that moment which I you know. You don't plan for these things. I wasn't like looking to react to particular way I was. It was all happening real time. But in that moment this very specific loud voice or see you know. I don't know how exactly to describe. It was just like that's not your future. An internal wisdom. Good way to describe it and I just repeated that to her. I said that's not my future. So he goes. I was terrified was very terrifying moment to just have to be facing this and so I just repeated what this voice was saying she said well what are you gonNA do. I said I'm going to go take my very expensively trained mind and figure this out and she said well. I'll be here when you want the prescription for the pill and first of all you chase me down on the Paparazzi me. And then tell me. I'M NOT GONNA listen. It was great you were forging your own journey so what happened from there. So that's I proceeded to really get deeply more into the research around functional nutrition epigenetics chronobiology Chinese medicine and really started piecing together what the endocrine system needs to be brought back online. Because fundamentally what I discovered in my research was that most of these conditions these castaway. Gyn conditions like fibroids like Dimitrius like P. C. O. S. Where there's nothing really that we have from conventional medicine to help women like us. That's why I called him castaway because we're kind of like left to figure it out. Is that this. They're fundamentally caused by systematic disruption. And if you simply start to support the endocrine system the body resolves the symptoms and it just works so efficiently and safely across the board for these different conditions. And that's that's really the origin story of my transformation. It was amazing to watch my body. Just recover fifty pounds coming off without deprivation without intense workout my skin clearing up and my ovulation and my cycle coming back. It came back at twenty two and has not left yet.

Obesity Menopause Cystic Acne Massachusetts Harvard Johns Hopkins Hopkins Progesterone Insomnia Stein Leventhal Medical Support Team Dimitrius P. C. O.
Why are smart women falling for pseudoscience health gimmicks?

Food for Thought

09:15 min | 3 years ago

Why are smart women falling for pseudoscience health gimmicks?

"Strange beliefs around. Women's bodies have a long history and every every day we have bombarded by new wellness claims from restoring the balance of our hormones to the self healing properties of salary juice and unsurprisingly thinly. The wellness industry is now worth a two point eight trillion worldwide. It has never been so difficult to distinguish fact from Fahd leaving many of us feeling extremely confused including myself joining me today to help uncover only the truth is personal trainer. bestselling selling author and women's Health magazine columnist. Alice Living Heller Alice. Hi Hello I think when they're all so many small women out left falling for harmful and pseudoscientific claims. Let's just our Ryan. Why do you think this is happening? I think it's a pretty interesting. It definitely been in the position where I've fallen for some stuff myself to I think it comes from a genuine place of us all wanting to live healthier live longer. I think we've suddenly the nego access to all of this information which he didn't necessarily have before where we're able to read about all of these things like on our health or wellbeing wellness wellness. Become a thing that was never a thing ten. You know ten years ago And he's become very difficult to decide for from fiction because I think many any many people enter. And I'M GONNA use even though I I use in brackets but the wellness industry with the best intentions of wanting to help people to achieve that elusive thing. That as ultimate health and happiness if it so exists And I think it's difficult because I think the people that we are listening to ball all people like yourself who oversee qualified experts You know anyone can enter and this is the dangerous thing is anyone in Canada onto social media call themselves whatever they one give themselves whatever kind of title they deem to be appropriate and then saw spouting of information in a very authoritative way which for the average person seems seems legit so it's really difficult for the average consumer of social media to know what is fact and what is fiction completely. I think you hit the nail on the head when you said said it comes from potentially a very warm loving place they can end up with a little trouble in some recent trends. I think have been. They've been a bit city but interesting thing. So one study suggested one in five women have have washed inside their vagina in the past year. And apparently it's called douching douching if it was a French word douche shower cooled yet latouche I mean. Do you know anything about this. Have you seen as we know that the vaginal tissues the my son's tissue the body. So I think it's a really interesting and I actually think it's a wide issue. That doesn't just stem from that particular piece of research. I think if we look brands we've seen how consumerism has driven us to create that we don't actually necessarily need and then make us believe that we ultimately do really need them and I think that's the really difficult Area where it's not just feminine hygiene products. It's loads the things within the industry that we don't need we've lived without for years and years and years and suddenly we're being told that the we we absolutely need this to live like I said live healthier and live longer And there's a price tag attached to it. Am I just think it's a very elitist worrying kind of trend that seems to be in Increasing yeah I think the thing with these kind of Feminine Hygiene Products is the research has shown time and time again this gynecologist. Who say this is not necessary? The Ph of your China will maintain itself and you do not need to wash yourself with any luxury products you will. You will naturally do that yourselves and and I think like unfortunately it goes back to what you're talking about in the first conversation. Which is the the the marketing pitching around? This stuff has been so good but people believe that the unfortunately they're gonNA trust something that they see in the shelving boots over gynecologist. He's saying you don't need this completely. I mean some of even said it's a contraceptive to which is worrying. And I read as well that it cannot be throw off the balance of the good bacteria in the Vaginas like Alice said. I think it's a bit of a money making to Ooh head but you have to be careful because the Internet can sail a lot of things in different societal norms. Tell us one thing different cultures but at the end of the day if you are looking for contraceptive I'm just begging anyone. Listening go to see who jeep but also it kind of taps into a deeper issue of the fact that we we should be in some in some way ashamed of of a joiner and ashamed of you know. There's lots of stigma attached to our The area things like Oh you know if it smells or well you know all of these things and we made to feel ashamed. Thought which can handle things like your sexual relationships your self confidence. It goes much much deeper than just it being about it. Not being necessary and interesting when I was reading up about it About you know these Feminine Hygiene Dogs. The gynecologist on their website says you know if if a woman should choose to wash her for China with something. It should be this and it's like no like you can't very gray tom in a very gray statement to make in that he's not necessarily saying you have to have it. But if you should choose to and I just think we really need to be a lot clearer in what we need and what we don't need for our bodies and making it a lot simpler for people because as you know in the nutrition walled things have just so overcomplicated and we. We're being made to feel as though we have to spend and lot of money on achieving elusive thing called like optimal health. And just not knowing the nutritional is just not the case. Narin you correctly said that I praise on the vulnerable and also what I call the worried. Well as well as something. That happens a lot that I see that it preys on one of our insecurities as females as well. It's you're right. It's much deeper rooted. This is definitely not my fail but deep-rooted psychology that perhaps would definitely not good enough or inferior striving for perfection which which is which is worrying but else. Have you seen that dangerous recently that we should be aware of. I think something that I've seen online. which actually a couple of people I've seen call out which is great and people in authority in position? You have to do so which is even better but One of them is whom I in balancing now. I think this is a really really interesting area because I think it particularly played preys on women and vulnerable women who feel as though in George George case like seeing who feels like they've almost done everything to try and lose weight and nothing's he's walking and then this person comes along and says but I can dance your hormones and suddenly. It's like the the cured and they are so much better and they're able to lose weight and I think this this idea of home and balancing from people that are not under control adjusts on not doctor is unwell. People with any qualification bought. Maybe being a personal trainer is quite concerning completely. I think especially with the whole my balancing. It's also linked to Ah for instance you yourself a very open about having polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and I think for women out there the large majority of them indefinitely listeners. Go about the episode we recorded with Anita the Gyna- Geek so many people software endometriosis and different female related problems. And this is all my saying I can help help you fix that balance this out by taking these supplements and I mean I was. Why do you think that it's it's the products? Now targeting women and especially those under the age of eighteen seen as well as seems to be everywhere I think because there's money there I think it's because we have become Like I said earlier. We've we've we've come to to believe that we need to spend money on our health and the more money we spend on the battery it must be and I think big big brands have caught onto the fact that people. Aw Aw all willing to spend money on their wellbeing and their health and so every. Brian going is trying to make themselves a wellness brand in some way. If you look at campaigns from from you know all all sorts of onto the sun they'll always try and have like a wellness line goal because they realize that it's a great marketing style US Brandon. You'll be healthier theon happy. I just think everyone yeah. And particularly when you mentioned the under eighteen like it's really concerning A lot of this stuff is targeted at girls. That are not You know they're not even out of puberty. That bodies are still changing the cylinder that are still deciding who they are and who they want to be and to come in and already make thank them conscious and aware of things that they don't need to be made aware of that age structure Such tricky like time anyway It's no wonder that we have the issues that we do and I think there is completely multifactoral and when it comes down to. I think social media doesn't help the media doesn't help but I also think marketing foxing products particularly that focused on things like weight loss or health to a certain degree. Goals are goes on boys that are under eighteen is this is really

Alice Feminine Hygiene Products China Health Magazine Fahd Ryan Brian Ovarian Syndrome Canada George George Anita Ten Years