25 Burst results for "Outkast"

"outkast" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:12 min | 3 weeks ago

"outkast" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Their sound which i think makes a little uncomfortable. You know what i mean. They recognized that out like this. You're supposed to stay like this right and then it's like no now. Don't get don't get comfortable going to do the little rock being the little. Edm thing you're gonna like it go from there. Yeah especially talk. We've talked about genre before. I mean there's there's maybe no group who has defied genre as much as outcast in in a way that yeah is confusing to people especially you have these communities within music that they wanna define things and i think it was russell simmons who went outcast. I came out he was like well. This isn't hip hop. He has since he's later recanted. That like i just didn't understand that they were expanding the idea of hip hop and to do that and to be so you know it's a challenging thing to try to pull off and to do it with no compromise and yet still be so massively successful. I think is such a hallmark of a true artists. Yeah i mean you know. I i'll actually renting sorta today about the fact that i'm like a lot of the folks who said southerners can't do hip out. There was there was a bias. You know what. I'm saying. Like when i came out ninety four and they got to the source of word. They literally booed off stage because they won an award from a magazine that was like the hip hop bible in the hip hop bible and hip hop was the mecca was new york. You know what i'm saying. And they were like yeah. That's cool but we do our own thing down here so in andres like the got some say that will that kick the door open and it was like. Oh okay. But i mean the ranting on twitter today l. was like for the most carpools from from york can't tell me shit about hip hop like i don't care i don't care what they have to say cause online is different. You know what. I'm saying folks have this kind of flat idea about what southern is supposed to be especially for southern black folks in southern hip hop is continuously revising inherited much in the same line that southern musicians have been reframe. The narrative from the job. is just a younger generations. Turn to do that. But they're still definitely an inherent when people talk about southern rap. They're like oh you know you have those folks who likes the south killed rap. And i'm like not a south wrap onto a whole different level like don't get it twisted her i i you know i came up on like and ludicrous and stuff and so for me. I think southern rap is where it's at or even like old ninety five south or whenever you know early like house. I'm from chicago and it's like house. Music is very influenced by southern music like southern base. And so i grew up kind of on that. And i hadn't even thought about people thinking that rap is only like a new york new york to give the the pure lyrical rack. Apparently that's the only of hip hop there is. And i'm just like that's bullshit for multiple reasons. Kinda like you could. I grew up in the late nineties. Early two thousands for me. That's the gold narrow southern hip hop on me outcast bringing out new things on the radio. The arrival of folks like ludicrous. Ti end load. John you know what i mean when he when he had east stairs flight there was definitely that connection. But i think all of that to say is that what hip hop in the south proves to me. Time and time again is that the south was not model is florida's different than what happens in. Mississippi is different than what happens in texas georgia on cool with that right like we need to let that breathe and i think what makes outcast so legendary in epic is that they allowed that experimentation debris like they're like yeah. We're from atlano. We're not just gonna stick to atlanta influences. We're gonna pull from a little bit. Everything luebbe everybody like they. They've sampled from multiple genres in southern hip hop from trap to chop grew that coming out of texas. You know what i'm saying. I think that's so important. Is that they were like. They lived up to their name. I like is. It's easier to be outcasted into your whole thing. They're trying to fulfill these roles. That people have you to check off these boxes. Usually if you just check off the boxes okay. What what's next right. Which is like you put folks like missy and conversation with outkast missy is so phenomenal. In the way that she experiments reinvents herself. And yes initially for postulate see from. Virginia is there is again. It's not a model. If you know what i mean like. Tennessee got three six mafia in atlanta organized. Noise and out in texas. You gotta pimp scene and you know what i'm saying is this important in our will be remissed company in louisiana many fresh so the me i'd be like so you just ignore us on it on my own. I know that we have a lot of our. Listeners are kind of rock based people So i wanna make sure that we give the appropriate background. I know you didn't write a biography on outcast. But i do just so that. We can have an entry way for some of our listeners. Who maybe don't know who organized noises and kind of the story of outcast They got started very young. They were friends in high school. Then i'm referring referring to andre. Three thousand and big boy were the two main members of outcast cut. Their first record stuttered playlist cadillac music when they were teenagers and they were able to do so with their connection with a guy. Rico wade and this group called organized noise and they was just kind of a collective. It was a production team. Collective of producers in atlanta who took a liking to them and the kind of dungeon is family dungeon family right. That's the in reference to where they would record in the group of artists that kind of were in atlanta and using that space and were influencing each other and being on each other's records and that includes you know maybe most notably ceelo green and goodie mob. At that time they were all kind of coming up together. They'll give me really rico ways mama's basement basement. That's what i did. The dungeon comes from it was dark and date down there right and it was humble beginnings but pretty quickly. They established themselves organized. Noise would very quickly produce. Tlc waterfalls and some major are in be hits in addition to what they were doing with some of the hip hop accent atlanta. And then from there. You know they that i record. You know it's it's maybe the. I would never call outcast traditional but if you're going to pick one of their albums that's not as introspective or genre defying as they would get you know they kind of start off their cornrows they're talking about you know pinson cadillacs that kind of thing and then it goes on him. Been cadillac record. You know monday because down on this right. Yeah i think i think on the one end it is a genre defying our because they use a funk aesthetic as compared to the jazz aesthetic that you here up north or maybe out west he had influence of the defunct was coming from the west coast. Like you know. He had put him in conversation. The west coast votes were were more distant cousins in the north but Yeah i mean exactly what you said. I'm like it's more of a traditional Traditionally close here like traditional hip hop admiral for For yeah for for then is like okay so we're gonna show you that. We have an awareness of what hip hop explosives now light but also this is what happens all week. We literally up right. It is a ninety six. It was basically like a big fuck. Y'all to everybody. It was right after being booed off. Stage source awards. They were working on it before the source awards. Obviously but i think it really submitted the fact that We're not accepted in hip hop. Except.

atlanta new york russell simmons outkast missy texas andres Rico wade twitter Mississippi missy chicago york georgia florida Tennessee John louisiana andre Virginia rico
"outkast" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:34 min | 3 weeks ago

"outkast" Discussed on Pantheon

"Cares about the rock hall a podcast about the rock and roll hall of fame. I'm your host. Joke was allah. And i know entirely too much about the rock and roll hall of fame and i do a lot of research for this podcast. You know who doesn't do those things. It's my co host doesn't do research doesn't care about the rock and roll hall of fame. It's kristen stuttered. Hi kristen that's me Hello i do as much research as i've casually done as far as listening to the artists that we are going to talk about. Will that be enough. That's a fair listeners. To decide also maybe. Our listeners are are hearing and audio difference in your quality. You've got a brand new microphone exciting. I'm looking like a straight up. Nineteen forties radio announcer in in the zoom right now Got a cool aka g. mic and headphone setup. And i dunno. I think i'm sounding crispy and clear very cool all right. Let's bring in our guest today very to have her. She is a hip hop scholar. She's a she's calling in from atlanta and her upcoming book. Chronicling konia the rise of the hip hop south. I think positions are to be the perfect guest for this episode. Let's welcome dr regina and bradley. Thank you so much for so the first question. I always ask because it's a it's a weird subject this podcast. What is your level of familiarity with the rock and roll my to got on a scale of one hundred. It can be on a scale. I i don't really follow investors. Like i don't know a black artist is that bad. I think that's reasonable okay. It's very reasonable and most of you are in. I would say the majority as far as people who follow it or care about it. Welcome to my team. We represent the majority but Joe is the expert and then many of our listeners are deeply invested in what happens with this Wipe patriarchal institution. If we're yeah. I mean that's how it goes this year. You know we had whitney and Inducted this year and then last year it was janet and then presented a rosetta. Tharp was three years ago. The fact that i just know all this is mary. You're you're researching on the low christie. No yeah it's very. It's like my brain like a sieve and like as much as the information passed through as possible but a lot of it sticks around. Yeah oh and then nina. Simone got in the same year as a scissors are so it's been a very slow and terrible. Climb not not doing great in terms of living black artists either which is a bad thing about the hall is he can cross your fingers and say next year and that'd be disappointed next year every damn time. Okay so since you're the of scholar you're eligible for the hall of fame after twenty five years. Is it yeah. And the little wrinkle is. It's it's technically twenty-six but yeah they say they say twenty five sounds like some of the grammy rules about when you submit. Never mind any. Yeah i mean that like we're discrepancy becomes from. They determine the nominees at the end of the year. They become inducted At the beginning of the next year or so. It ends up technically being twenty-six although the pandemic has pushed that back so that it's all happening in the same year then. It's just twenty six now. Okay yeah and i guess before we we really get into it. A kind of review of the halls history with hip hop is kind of important for context. I suppose it's dicey like sometimes it's sometimes it's pretty good like they like biggie and to pocket run dmc public enemy all got as soon as they were eligible. And then you've got you your grandmaster flash and if you're is five were the first hip hop artists. That were inducted. Took a few years for them to get in a few ballots. Same with nwa. Same with beastie boys so there are seven hip hop artist currently in the hall and then part of the issue though is that it kind of seems like it's a one artist through per year only a token ring if you will right and you can kind of see the strategy there of you put one hip hop artist on the ballot so that you don't potentially split votes like if you want to maximize like say last year maximize big shot of getting in. You just put big in as the loan. Hip hop artists on the ballot. So then he'll have the easiest road to get in. But what happens. Is you get an artist like ll cool j. Who has been on the ballot. Five times and chronologically should have been an ready if you're going through the the history of hip hop but for whatever reason he can't seem to get in so you take a look a year like twenty nine thousand nine. The first year outcast eligible they were still like. Will we have to get the chronology right. So they put local jay on the ballot as the loan and then he didn't get in so that means no hip hop artists. Get him say boots math right there. So for operating based on how a hall works. It's you know everybody's kind of waiting their turn this upcoming year. Jay z becomes eligible. And we're assuming he will probably be a hill get in first year. It will happen without a doubt especially because he was in the biggie induction as well and there's just no way that and especially because you know beyond say would show up if he shows up and i feel like the yet. There's no way that he's not getting in. Unless i mean now. I'm doing speculating. But like unless he wouldn't come and then they're like because you have to go to cleveland. I think he'll come. I think it'll happen. I think it's a no brainer. I think that he will absolutely get in next year. I think i don't know when l. o. j. is ever going to get in. I'm like what's he going to have to do. Yeah we're gonna need it bio-pic yeah or he's going to need to dislike suddenly get back in the game and just spit fire on someone else's song out of nowhere they're like is back then people. I don't know it's outrageous that he's not in probably kind of interesting especially when you think about living black artists especially hip hop artists of these folks like they're still making good music so usually when you get enshrined that means that if iraq is over in a lot of That's not the case. So that's the only thing. I can think about what i felt kind of bad. Because in my head l. l. is the terrell of the rock and roll hall of fame. Like i don't know part of the two that spoke still so struck on east traditional ideas of genre by rock roles do x y and z in unfortunately a lot of rock and roll folks to understand it. Rock arose. Start black folks. i don't understand. i mean okay. But you know think maybe a.

kristen dr regina Tharp bradley whitney Simone christie atlanta nina janet Joe nwa mary Jay z jay cleveland roll hall of fame iraq
'Tenderfoot TV co-founder Donald Albright on the podcasting's bright (but consolidated) future

Digiday Podcast

07:05 min | 5 months ago

'Tenderfoot TV co-founder Donald Albright on the podcasting's bright (but consolidated) future

"Hello. Welcome to the day punk ass I'm Laura Riley did today's senior correspondent coming to the end of my stint killing neo regular host Brian Mercy. So on today's show, I'm very excited to g she Donald Albright Donald Founder I'm president of. TV, which is an Atlanta based production studio is hidden costs. Vanished. Monster Linden in La. Many money. Combined the has reached more than five hundred, million dollars to date and TV as they would suggest is increasingly inking deals beyond podcasting, TV and even recently striking deal. So don't welcome to the. Past. Thank you for having me. Let Veer. And Eighty joining us from Atlanta today as you've been hung down. Yes I am I've been here for. How long has it been now? Feels like this. Browse data. Yeah. Monday or Saturday I can't tell but yeah. I mean Atlanta from California originally but. Moved here to Atlanta. After after I should go into college and then I love the city. Yes I was going to ask you she's a what brought you to Atlanta. I know your your background was in music permission an are. Yeah. Yes. So I'm from the Bay Area San Jose California my mom actually moved to Atlanta when I was in high school So I went to thousand state after graduating high school for about a year and a half, and then at certain point came to visit my mom and a friend of mine his older brother was going to Clark Atlanta University a historically black college. I went to the campus. Saw Beautiful Campus I saw beautiful women and I said I have to go here one day. So I transferred transferring from Saudi state to Clark Atlanta and the you know had half my family was already here so. Ended up staying and just building. Building out my business here, and it'll be started started in music industry in Atlanta. And in that time, he builds up a pretty enviable client list to have to say like Jay z outcast, can you take back to that time? What what can have brought e to setting? Is It D. Day and statements and some of the this the standout moments from that time. Yeah I mean so many it's been twenty years It all happened very much like podcasting kind of by accident I've always been into our entrepreneur started my first company when I was about eighteen years old shirt COMP design company Printing Company which I learned from Tom, this profit organization that I was working with. So I was always been business-minded my my dad his own construction company or has own construction company. So I've always seen him write his own business as well and. When I got to Atlanta. We just for in this music scene that was very Coming up like yet outcasts yet goodie mob TLC, usher and we kind of just. Went to this party and met a few people start networking a few business cards and decided, hey, we should just. Hang out with these people and start to promote and pass out flyers in. Other the company actually started because we were losing money I was the only one with a car. So it was causing gas money to go from point eight point be so I said, hey guys, we've got a pool our money together to share in these losses in eventually someone said, hey, how much you guys charge to put up those posters and we got to come up with a number that's count started the business but it evolved from there obviously from running a promotions company out of the Dorm Room Clark Atlanta to. You know taking artists like masterpiece in Yeah Jay Z. His. In promoting concerts in the going on the road with artists like outkast and Goodie mob and that evolved into management. An are in the and the names started getting bigger and bigger and not just the names bigger. But my relationship with the artists at first, you're a little bit. Distanced from the creative process, you're only on the promotions and marketing side. That I became more involved in the creation of albums, the management of talent stuff like that. So it was it's been great I mean I've traveled the world three times artists toured you know Africa with Chris Brown in the US with With usher festivals all over the world. So I there's so many standout said it's fun to talk about it because I forget a lot of them but the it's like having two different two different careers in two different lives. Almost you know I'm really interested in how you and your kind of tie founder at tend to fit came to mate. So you okay founder is pain Lindsey, and in a prior life he was in this hybrid even describe them. But like rap rock bands cooled rights here the tree. So interested in night walk forces combined that the you T to mate and and start working together. Is another interesting story so we I I didn't know who pain was, but I knew who the band was right his right side of the tree and he. Yeah the music was so and it's all. It's all about like how you introduced to something. It really has a big impact of what you initially feel about it. So I was managing an artist's name. Lloyd, who was on what he was on Atlantic or universal at the time. But big RB artists that Atlanta and he had producer that pain in his the rest of his band and they ended up collaborating in doing a song. So pain had a song with a very popular Atlanta artist. So new the band from from that perspective and like the music and then. Probably three years later or more actually probably the five years later I got an. Email from a guy named pain Lindsay I'm I've moved on in my career and I'm managing a new artist on on the verge of breaking through and I get an email from pain saying, Hey, I'm money's pain Lindsey A mutated director and I love the shoot a video for your artist and. I didn't know who he didn't recognize the name but a friend of mine who having dinner with me at the time I read the email and he said Oh that's pain from rice out of the tree I said okay. Well, maybe I'll give this guy a shot because before I wasn't sure if you we already have people to do our videos, but because of that connection already knew who he was like. Okay that's that's cool. There's. You know there's tried out. So we shot one video for a couple thousand dollars turn out to be great. He was able to I wasn't quite sure like how good he would be. So I kind of was forcing my creative ideas on him but any and you made them come out great and then we did that times and then I said man, this guy's good I should probably just let him run with the creative ideas and have him bring the video back with his full vision and when he did that the biggest got even better. So I just knew like we have a really good working relationship being able to hear each other right and being able to collaborate creatively and in respecting each other from creative and business standpoint. So. It was like the foundation of US later becoming business partners

Atlanta Clark Atlanta University Dorm Room Clark Atlanta Clark Atlanta United States Donald Albright Donald Lindsey Laura Riley Monster Linden LA Brian Mercy California Founder Veer Jay Z. His Outkast Bay Area San Jose California
Suicide Squad: Kill the Justice League is self-explanatory

Gaming Ride Home

04:49 min | 5 months ago

Suicide Squad: Kill the Justice League is self-explanatory

"Suicide Squad kill the justice. League is about the suicide squad trying to kill the Justice League. The other big video game news from D., C. Fan Dome was learning a lot more about suicide squad kill the Justice League from rock steady games the developer of Arkham asylum city night. Suicide Squad kill the Justice League is officially its title and game is about the suicide squad trying to kill the Justice League the trailer for the game opened up on a decimated metropolis. There was a weird glowing giant purple skull ship in the distance and it cuts to Harley Quinn on a rooftop goofing off and making jokes in response to just the General Radio Chatter. Then the rest of the suicide squad was revealed along with Harley Quinn. This game will also feature Captain Boomerang with a pretty intense Australian. Dead Shot and King Shark they had some comedic banter making fun of dead shot for claiming he never misses well King Shark absent mindedly popped green lantern and Batman balloons, which is interesting to me because there have been side quests about popping balloons in the past arkham games. And then Amanda Waller came on the line telling them they had to get to work or she would blow them up. Was All pre rendered but the next part of the trailer gave a pretty good idea of what to expect in terms of Gameplay Harley Quinn zipped around using some kind of Hook Shot zip-line thing and used her bat mainly to attack these weird purple enemies. King Shark looked slow but carried a big machine gun dead shot had a jet pack did a lot of shooting and Captain Boomerang had some kind of quick teleporting ability while he was also throwing boomerangs and other weapons. And all of this happened while outkast's B O b bombs over Baghdad played on top of it. After finishing off the group, they quipped that what they did probably will knock a few years off the sentence and then Harley remembered that there was an Alpha target they needed to pursue. And that's when Superman showed up with his classic Yellow Belt and red. Underwear look. At first, it seemed like he saved a helicopter pilot from a crash, but then his eyes start glowing purple and he killed the pilot prompting these suicide squad to realize they are meant to kill the Justice League, the trailer ended with. Superman. Not really reacting to getting hit in the head with some kind of pipe that guess King Shark through and it revealed a twenty twenty to release window for playstation five. Series. Exit PC. After that trailer host will Arnett revealed a few more details about the game with the voice cast from suicide squad who were in character Harley. Quinn specifically referenced getting excited about killing Batman and Captain Boomerang mentioned the flash. After that game director Sefton Hill showed up. There was this whole silly conceit that will Arnett was being transported around to his hosting duties and Hill had joked that they had just shipped him a green screen which was pretty good joke but he answered a few more questions. The game does play S- in the chronology. So it is technically a sequel to Batman Arkham night it's going to be a lot different, but narrative is moving the plot forward. They decided to do a suicide squad game because they consider their games character-driven and the suicide squad highlights. One of the things DC has always been particularly good at villains they appreciated how flawed they were. It also gave them the opportunity to create an interesting impossible scenario, which is, of course, hunting down the Justice League. The gameplay will be a hybrid of hero empowerment action and Gunplay, which is definitely a unique for rock steady Batman does not use guns. The game will offer up to four player Co op, but will totally be playable single player. If you're playing alone, the AI will handle your other members and you will apparently be able to swap between them seamlessly. You can also go back and forth between single and multiplayer over the course of game it is also an open world. That world being metropolis. The twenty twenty to release window really surprised me. Batman Arkham night released in two thousand fifteen they lent it a lot of support post release but I think it's pretty safe to assume they have been working on it at some capacity since that game released since arkham night released. A suicide squad game was also teased as early as two thousand thirteen where there was something at the end of Batman Arkham origins. So to learn it is nearly two years away. Surprised me. I'm not really disappointed. Honestly, I'm happy to wait just surprised I would have assumed it would be

Suicide Squad Harley Quinn Justice League Arkham King Shark Captain Boomerang Sefton Hill C. Fan Dome Amanda Waller Arnett Superman Outkast Developer Gunplay DC Baghdad Director AI
"outkast" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

03:19 min | 7 months ago

"outkast" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

"Everybody this is Chris Anthony host of hit. Parade slates podcast pop chart history. Welcome tune the bridge ads work. Equipment with the title track of outcasts acclaimed nine hundred ninety album. Halfway, you may see some children did often the way. Impo Babes welcome slowly to the candy related in the Second I. Andre Benjamin raps about meeting halfway across a bridge in Atlanta, and about seeing the ghosts of black children who had died in a series of Atlantic killings in the late seventies and early eighties when he was himself a child. The Atlanta murders of one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, nine to eighty, one remain officially on salt. In fact, the investigation was just reopened last year, and they are part of the. Of the both positive and negative that Andre and big BOI rap about in a criminal even signed goes down heroes. horoscopes. And Sometimes Y. Was Show Madness for certain. Last forever but until. Is Him an Aquaman. And these mini episodes bridge our full length monthly episodes. Give us a chance to catch up with listeners and enjoy hip. Hooray Trivia this month. We are very fortunate to have perhaps the foremost authority on the artist's I covered in our latest episode. Dr Regina Bradley is an Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora studies at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia, she is the author of the forthcoming book chronicling Stankonia, the rise of the HIP hop South Co host of the southern hip hop podcast bottom of the map on WABC and Rx and host of the recent Youtube Series outcasted conversations Dr Bradley Welcome to the bridge. Going to be fun. This is going to be fun. I'm so psyched that you're here. And you know what to keep it fun to start I'm Gonna I admit steal a question that you used to use at the beginning of all of your outcast, the conversations, which I loved, which was how how you become outcast, it seems to ask your guest. This question kind of like how far back you go at the group, so do tell. How did you become outcast? Say, better than me, Chris <hes>. No, I cannot. You're damn right about that so I. Initially introduced to outcasts via the show Martin. For the While episode, and they perform been really didn't outcasted until nineteen ninety eight now incoming freshmen to Westover. High School in Albany. Georgia out the freshman, trying to make it non I'm saying. Everybody talking about this song spoke your listeners. And in the Book I. Talk About What It really means you have to see, but anyway it was. It was a wake up. Call for me. You like oh I really take this outcast group seriously, or this might be my social death to start high schools.

Andre Benjamin Dr Regina Bradley Georgia Assistant Professor of English Atlanta Chris Anthony Kennesaw State University Kennesaw High School Westover Martin Chris No Dr Bradley Youtube Albany Stankonia WABC
Many Ways to be OutKasted

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

03:19 min | 7 months ago

Many Ways to be OutKasted

"Everybody this is Chris Anthony host of hit. Parade slates podcast pop chart history. Welcome tune the bridge ads work. Equipment with the title track of outcasts acclaimed nine hundred ninety album. Halfway, you may see some children did often the way. Impo Babes welcome slowly to the candy related in the Second I. Andre Benjamin raps about meeting halfway across a bridge in Atlanta, and about seeing the ghosts of black children who had died in a series of Atlantic killings in the late seventies and early eighties when he was himself a child. The Atlanta murders of one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, nine to eighty, one remain officially on salt. In fact, the investigation was just reopened last year, and they are part of the. Of the both positive and negative that Andre and big BOI rap about in a criminal even signed goes down heroes. horoscopes. And Sometimes Y. Was Show Madness for certain. Last forever but until. Is Him an Aquaman. And these mini episodes bridge our full length monthly episodes. Give us a chance to catch up with listeners and enjoy hip. Hooray Trivia this month. We are very fortunate to have perhaps the foremost authority on the artist's I covered in our latest episode. Dr Regina Bradley is an Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora studies at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia, she is the author of the forthcoming book chronicling Stankonia, the rise of the HIP hop South Co host of the southern hip hop podcast bottom of the map on WABC and Rx and host of the recent Youtube Series outcasted conversations Dr Bradley Welcome to the bridge. Going to be fun. This is going to be fun. I'm so psyched that you're here. And you know what to keep it fun to start I'm Gonna I admit steal a question that you used to use at the beginning of all of your outcast, the conversations, which I loved, which was how how you become outcast, it seems to ask your guest. This question kind of like how far back you go at the group, so do tell. How did you become outcast? Say, better than me, Chris No, I cannot. You're damn right about that so I. Initially introduced to outcasts via the show Martin. For the While episode, and they perform been really didn't outcasted until nineteen ninety eight now incoming freshmen to Westover. High School in Albany. Georgia out the freshman, trying to make it non I'm saying. Everybody talking about this song spoke your listeners. And in the Book I. Talk About What It really means you have to see, but anyway it was. It was a wake up. Call for me. You like oh I really take this outcast group seriously, or this might be my social death to start high schools.

Andre Benjamin Assistant Professor Of English Atlanta Dr Regina Bradley High School Georgia Chris Anthony Kennesaw State University Kennesaw Dr Bradley Chris No Youtube Westover Stankonia Wabc Martin Albany
"outkast" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

03:52 min | 7 months ago

"outkast" Discussed on Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

"Hey, there hit parade listeners. What you're about to hear is a preview of our latest episode of the bridge. As we announced recently, sleet is getting hit pretty hard by what's going on with the economy in the wake of the covid nineteen pandemic. We need your help to continue producing this show and all the other work. We do at slate, so we're asking you. You to sign up for slate plus our membership program. It's just thirty five dollars for the first year, and it helps support us at this crucial moment sign up at slate dot com slash hit parade, plus and you'll get to hear this and every episode of hip arrayed in full. That's slate dot com slash hit parade, plus thanks, and now you're episode preview. Twice the pundits. Who? In the! Afternoon, but that's another chapter laugh. Everybody this is Chris Anthony host of hit. Parade slates podcast pop chart history. Welcome tune the bridge ads work. Equipment with the title track of outcasts acclaimed nine hundred ninety album. Halfway, you may see some children did often the way. Impo Babes welcome slowly to the candy related in the Second I. Andre Benjamin raps about meeting halfway across a bridge in Atlanta, and about seeing the ghosts of black children who had died in a series of Atlantic killings in the late seventies and early eighties when he was himself a child. The Atlanta murders of one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, nine to eighty, one remain officially on salt. In fact, the investigation was just reopened last year, and they are part of the. Of the both positive and negative that Andre and big BOI rap about in a criminal even signed goes down heroes. horoscopes. And Sometimes Y. Was Show Madness for certain. Last forever but until. Is Him an Aquaman. And these mini episodes bridge our full length monthly episodes. Give us a chance to catch up with listeners and enjoy hip. Hooray Trivia this month. We are very fortunate to have perhaps the foremost authority on the artist's I covered in our latest episode. Dr Regina Bradley is an Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora studies at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia, she is the author of the forthcoming book chronicling Stankonia, the rise of the HIP hop South Co host of the southern hip hop podcast bottom of the map on WABC and Rx and host of the recent Youtube Series outcasted conversations Dr Bradley Welcome to the bridge. Going to be fun. This is going to be fun. I'm so psyched that you're here. And you know what to keep it fun to start I'm Gonna I admit steal a question that you used to use at the beginning of all of your outcast, the conversations, which I loved, which was how how you become outcast, it seems to ask your guest. This question kind of like how far back you go at the group, so do tell. How did you become outcast? Say, better than me, Chris No, I cannot. You're damn right about that so I. Initially introduced to outcasts via the show Martin. For the While episode, and they perform been really didn't outcasted until nineteen ninety eight now incoming freshmen to Westover. High School in Albany. Georgia out the freshman, trying to make it non I'm saying. Everybody talking about.

Andre Benjamin Dr Regina Bradley Georgia Assistant Professor of English Atlanta Chris Anthony Kennesaw State University Kennesaw High School Westover Martin Chris No Dr Bradley Youtube Albany Stankonia WABC
"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:06 min | 11 months ago

"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Pop Music with hyper expressive vocals. And that's the best way to describe what I do the song that got me hooked on Sonic's Raffles and Rio by mark. But there's also a link between this kind of music that this album is from and what I do as well which is kind of in the musical environments the landscapes of the production. And you kind of here. That link and the title track of my new album called pain so I went to university in Colorado in Boulder. And when I first got there like most broke college students I was trying to figure out how to decorate my dorm which was a very kind of sad looking dorm so I went to goodwill and I was digging through their one dollar albums because I thought well at least this stuff is like art. There's so many beautiful covers in here. That least I can just put up covers of albums that I've never even heard that. Just look cool. Landed up with some weird Polish folk records from the fifty s because the girls had cooled dresses. And then I found this one album that looked like like really kind of sheikh minimal. Early eighties designed. The cover was almost entirely white. And it had this vertical window slashing through it. That was airbrushed. But it looked almost iridescent. The way this like really minimal design had been done so beautiful and I thought like there's something about this. It's really compelling. I want this on my wall so I bought this album called vapor drawings by Mark Isham and tact it up put thumb tacks through it the corners of it and put it on my dorm wall.

Mark Isham Boulder Colorado
"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:54 min | 11 months ago

"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"NPR X. Beating Andy until the G. They'd be the same thing. Welcome back sound opinions. I'm Jim Dear God. My partner is Gregg Kat and this week we are taking a close. Look at outkast's fourth album Stankonia Greg. What Song do you want to highlight next so fresh so clean? Another single these signposts of an era and again hold up incredibly well in so fresh so clean in some ways one of the more conventional tracks on the record but done so well when I first heard this song so lush beautiful in a lot away so smooth you know. I'm thinking of like Earth wind and fire or the Eisley brothers at their cool and know it had that sort of seventies romantic vibe or cool vibe like man. These guys are just the coolest people in the room. Right now you know. And this is a celebration of that swag swagger that they have unlike some of the more high minded subject matter on the rest of this. This is just pure boasting. You know in some ways away not like it's clever. I mean big boy probably doesn't get as much love as Andre. Andre is being celebrated as the cerebral one. Big Boys equally cerebral just in a different way. His lines on this song are I mean the guy owns it. You know teddy pendergrast cooler than Freddie Jackson. Sip and a milkshake in a snowstorm. These lines about how cool he is. And you can't help but a admire or laugh with him about how you know the boastful nece but being dazzled by the boastful and just a beautiful song. Just a wonderful. We're going out to the club. We're having a good time. We're enjoying ourselves to me. What outcasts was doing on this record was showing the complete breath of what it meant to be an African American in two thousand other like the entire experience of that was in this record. I hate to dwell on their ages right but I teach eighteen to twenty two year olds at college right. Yeah by twenty-five you've learned a lot more than at twenty two and I think if someone says to us what are the themes of Stankonia. We're talking sexuality we're talking politics. We're talking misogyny we're talking every element of African American culture. The whole smorgasbord parenthood introspection. This records experimental. But it's also wise. It's steeping erotica. There's a few tracks. We cannot talk also shy. Like I still don't know everything behind it. All is the struggle every song recognizing that it's different. If you're African American in America your experience is different from other people that live here and sort of spotlighting that but.

Freddie Jackson Andre Stankonia Gregg Kat NPR outkast partner Andy America
"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Something about these first three records. Jim Little they a little dragging all distinct. Yes you know. They weren't staying in one place ever the WANNA be categorized. We stressed individual. You know what I'm saying. How long the whole conformance way of living like where we? We did now young flaming to make your mark on this world. Is You especially? If you're only going to be short time to tell you built. It says you know by the time they go into the studio in two thousand. They've bought their own studio. Yeah Stan Cody Studio in Atlanta. These are two men who are in their mid twenties both around twenty five. When they're making this record which in hip-hop years is ancient fourth album most people begin to tune out. These guys are at an interesting point. And they also have their personas firmly established. Anton Patent is big boy and he is the boy. Is the master Freestyler and Andre Three Thousand Benjamin? He considers himself the Space Cowboy. Different wigs outrageous. He's the freak but he's also very thoughtful and I went back to interviews from those first three albums. You know big boys master freestyler. Not me I have to really think long and hard to write when I'm coming up with my raps but he'd also begun singing more and more on each of those three album true true. I mean they were blowing out the stylistic boundaries so it goes from that kind of okay we get this. They're kind of in this southern vibe. They're tripping on Parliament funk Adele. I can sign a family stone and updating that for the hip hop beer but by the time we get to Stankonia they're ready to blow the boundaries wide. Open that Studio Jim. You'd mentioned Stankonia. That was formerly Bobby Brown studio and they were in that studio recording tracks with TLC earlier in their career so TLC's is huge group and here comes outcast. Doing some added stop.

Freestyler Stankonia Jim Little TLC Anton Patent Stan Cody Bobby Brown Andre Three Atlanta
"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:33 min | 11 months ago

"outkast" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"You're listening to sound opinions and later in the show. We'll hear what song inspired solo artist formerly of chairlift Caroline polacek to pursue a career in music but first a classic album dissection of Stankonia by outkast originally released on Halloween. Two thousand talking. Thank you express. Brilliant Record I think we can all agree on that. A breakthrough record for the duo and also a groundbreaking record for hip hop and music in general pointing the way forward into the twenty first century for sure. Antoine Big Boi Patton in Andre Benjamin otherwise known as Andre Three thousand. It's hard to imagine that these were the two kids in high school at one point where they met in the cafeteria doing rap battles in east point which is far suburb of Atlanta is where they grew up. They were quote unquote discovered by a fledgling production team known as organized noise which went onto make numerous hit records with TLC as well as outcast and broke through in nineteen ninety-three with a track called players bald they got signed to that L. A. Read baby face labeled low phase And broke through with that song in followed it.

Andre Benjamin Antoine Big Boi Patton Caroline polacek Stankonia outkast Atlanta L. A.
Blanco Brown on being discovered as a child

Bobbycast

08:56 min | 1 year ago

Blanco Brown on being discovered as a child

"When all of you guys are in an apartment I get that to Iceland with all my cousins you just live where you can live right everybody's trying to to to have enough money to pay rent sometimes you gotta make your move together a bunch bunches lived in a trailer for a while much of a bunch of apartment so like I get that and also know me I was the kid in the group that was I'm going to get out and I'm GONNA use education like that was my thing it sounds like yours was music music way early yeah the first deal now seven you what am I doing I was seven years old and and how did that come about and how did you get to a place where someone could see you at seven to go I like that kid man that's a good question I I never really got to say I never asked that question I just know that we were were recording in new records like just like that I just remember who it seven years old discovers you it was new star Rex Guy by the name of Anthony Richardson an owner if he discovers somebody took us to him you know what I'm saying I really can't remember how it happened you're seven years old yeah I just know we were singing recording practicing going to school we by the way me my brothers okay so you were you guys like in a singing group group how many were there called times three because it was three of us are brothers and it was just the X. would apostrophe S. three where were you in the age group of the three brothers I'm in the Middle Okay Yeah and so you got with the goal of of what I know you're only seven but looking back were they trying to break you guys as like Jackson five but the X. as the three more so like another bad the creation can meet some singing brothers because we really saying like you know what I'm saying but Jackson five it was that would have been harder doesn't file there man they weren't legislator after they were legendary though they had to even start at yeah but I'm just saying like by the time we you were yeah they were already like Jackson Five. ABC's good like another bell vo to all those groups were around that time to where all you guys just singing because hip hop stuff to just thinking and I was the wraparound the group so wait were you rapping I was like the the the but if from immature who are the sexy talking I did the sexist seven and eight I'm telling you you know all this time I've been playing around Oh yeah I've been playing with my gi Joe's and pogs girl and I've been thinking about you I know I'm nine man that is hilarious I know I'm in third grade girl but I'm drinking milk yeah so that's kind of how growing up I was I didn't how to confidence to sing so they will give me the parts while I was more like mellow talking Canada rapin Canada singing Adams found my singing voice until like fifteen sixteen so you're fifteen sixteen are you still in school yeah definitely graduate high school yet okay so you're singing all the way through high school all the we are you known as that kid the kid in high school like we're all noticed something I was nerd I was known as the singer Okay so you're singing all the way through and as you go through up until about twelve th grade at that point what is your biggest break before you graduate high school Aw I mean we met with a guy named Dr Massenburg he was over at motown and we were about to do a deal met him at the Intercontinental Embark Eh right by mall he looked me my brothers and my mother in the face a y'all have no words Mama they've been able to take care everything we won't sign wing you sat like two weeks later found out he was no longer with Motown town that was one of the moments that was like a huge moment and then do you think he lied to your do you think he got fired in the process of signing you on if you got fire of he just some happen where he just left but I just know the deal didn't happen right and after that outkast we don't want to deal with outkast you know it was you know at that term life they would just a dope group whose from Atlanta like Guy and I remember me with them and they wanted to sign my younger brother to a solo deal so he's going to do a solo deal and then you know me and my older brother like okay cool ooh that'd be fine once he gets all the way where he needs to be he he brings home and then that didn't go away we plan to either you know what I'm saying they're signing him he ended up signing to a whole another deal and he came up with a song or a few songs and yeah I mean what what what when you meet with outkast do you actually meet with Andrei Big Boy Yep like the guy show up and they're like all right this is the plant so they were doing things outside side of outcasts way early even before they blew up they were they will Purple Label and my dad actually just takes me that pitchy like two days ago and my phone like of us in the same room with them without shirts on taking pieces with them yeah so that didn't work out you graduate High School Yep and what's the plan then for you musically 'cause high school probably big deal to graduate high school what's for me where am I hold my whole life I was told you know stick to my art I went to school for art I got a Bachelor of fine arts in so we're not college though from high school to College Okay Okay so you then you decide to go to school where are you going to school where did you go to school I went to you okay and your thought when you go to college is Blank Finish College or learn music or make friends and my really my thought would college was be the person that went to college and if that don't work out just note that music is always number one either way I went down just you know pretty much as their are had degree and what did you study in school art so you study art but you're doing music yup okay so you're studying well what does it what does study aren't though what does that mean I mean I mean you go through all our theory in like paintings yet I sculptures like an op the not even music like you're a whole different track I I did I did all that like sculpturing and websites from dream we would Mac with three D. and do all that so even less than digital art stuff too yep and then if you were to have this let's just journey off a bit and let's say the music stub you end up getting an art degree if you were to pursue that what would you have done an art Oh man you know cartoon network or something yeah voice overs with some animations I could tell just Bella anything you can yeah a Squirrel Squirrel Squirrel pretty good duck one one one one more minute okay let's do more does it isn't an easy one how about a platypus because we have no idea what applaud sounds like I don't know okay maybe but earnestly XLII music was always the forefront but I didn't have confidence to do it I didn't have the confidence in myself so I just I just wanted to figure out how to be a part of it I started engineer straight out of college I started engineering so like the sound engineering so if you're listening right now what that is you had a computer and and you're basically adjusting the levels of everything to break it down like a five years old so your your engineering music and where do you learn those skills to be a music engineer one of my homies hey daryl showed me how to use the controls twenty four and I start messing around with it and then next thing you know I was engineering engineering recording for the Wow Gospel compilations and stuff dip set itself taught yet your friend just said here here here's the kind of how to do it then you just took an indigenous

Jackson Iceland Rex Guy Anthony Richardson ABC Seven Years Five Years Two Weeks Two Days Milk
"outkast" Discussed on The Corner

The Corner

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"outkast" Discussed on The Corner

"I tell my pops move into his new crib coaches out there so he finally got his nice little spot. That's not a studio so he got the Nice one bedroom and all this stuff he needed help hanging up his TV's carrying furniture so I flew out there one day and I'm in the car will and a conversation comes up. I forgot how it was. I think it spurned off like ranking just music over time like we had the RB list. I talked about pets two weeks and then I was like it's easy to rank hip. HOP RB as like it's Kinda like everyone's going to have somewhat the same stuff at the top. Here's gangs but that's like musically is like who are the best producers if you had to rank them start going through this. I was a kill is too hard to rank hip hop producers. WHO's going down. I was like you know what I'm interested to see. What Andrea says about this one thing in my partial to his list we said top I five but you always end up going to like six or seven. Dila wasn't on his list hours like nine public. Super Hip hop had all the ship yard and he was like Dila. He's like the name's familiar. I just don't know so I put on the IT might be tytler. I titled Trial but I hate eight that ship or might have been my tunes and Dylan behind the boards. He was like Oh wait he did this did try. Owing did including nine kids bonkers like he did this farside joint so a lot of them using my dad just having a like he didn't know. Dila was behind the boards for it in a way too early above a boss so I think I shifted my dad's top-five. Now's like that's interesting. I wonder where dre would rate these people because I know my top five or eighty I had it. I didn't a car but I wonder how it compares to yours. If you had to say like all right real quick five top five hip hip hop producers WHO's on your list premiere of course probably number one premiering Dila premiered diller are like hand in hand top one and two then it gets shaky after that because really it depends on it depends on what I'm listen into a time listen. kai-shek was up there point and reservoirs as well but then what happens is you kind of put a lot of these guys to evacuate era of when they were producing great music so like. Pete Rock falls in that category dray is always hard to figure out because you're like what did I do like how much drake do versus days. You know what I'm saying. Unlike it gets it gets dicey so and then there's Madly Mad Lib always falls somewhere right around my top five and and we talked about hip hop. I producers just produces overall hip hop producers but you can include their entire catalog but we know hip hop producers are like because there's a name named. I'M GONNA say hip hop no and I'll be like yeah Timbaland because he's a hip hop producer general leg as a producer. I think he's my number one. Okay look he's so versatile. I still hip hop. Some best beats our beat them. The wines that Lia's the Justin timberlake beats solo out by that she it's different so he's fine with sound like he defined a sound between him and like the Neptune's interruptions. Don't make out five album. Sorry close like they like right outside because it's still Primo premo and you know like just plays. I think is one of the most underrated producers period. I think blaze like I've said this before. I think blazed a better job on the blueprint shit what anybody says. Yes people like people like brief is one of the hardest tracks ever bleriot production. Breathe is ridiculous. Kanye didn't make the top five but I go back. I look at Talib Tallet what he did to that get by is just incredible like cutting some best beach where like for those underground hip hop dudes but they were like dope nope samples and he gave them like he early was fire. Were now con- you and this is like you know again like I said when it gets like after after one two three through the rest is dicey because they all fall in like as and they're like alka Mrs in their alchemists criminally underrated rated as producer in that didn't come up and he has come up for you yet which is crazy and it didn't come up for us for like forty five minutes to an hour and I think people would say he's overrated but it's the organ meats ninety mention. Swiss beats yes e- man the ten guide man like he's like twenty like he's like for me. All right Swiss. WHIZ defines era with those casio. Oh keyboard sounds initially refined sound after that s with us had some absolute bangers. Don't get me wrong. Swiss's Betas Fair share of bullshit as well and that's always been my thing. It's like people are looking. It's a pennies incredible. Mike but you've got to balance the shit out there. It's a wax wiz beach out there plenty. Oh Oh he's a fringe like that's not saying. He's not good owner. Compensation Your compensation like Longevity Kevin Spacey's done with the rough riders things like responding to these there but he's now table is level for like Neptune's Timbo promote Dila and my fifth was I don't know I'm drawing a blank. It wasn't just blazed but I'll pull pull up my fifth year in a second but those those four like my route rushing in hip hop for and then you know you go to the next wrong everyone else. I don't know if I put Five Aparicio was such an event vacuum yet drake. I guess dre was five by default just because his sound don't make it and West Coast hip hop and actually it was dope and then we kept going down the list someone I thought was criminal underrated. TJ quick quick is underrated the problem with quick. The problem is that his on strangely enough is not for everybody. I think either really really dig. Dj Quick or that that signature sound that he has in west coast wingfield. Certain people just don't like it. and it's crazy love to win win. Why G DROP THAT ALBUM. muster came out now Z. Damn this is like that that quick cell. You're on that first. Why Joe is that's like even you know the game had good albums through the early two thousand west coast albums but until then why in it's still damn and some td projects like that that sound was missing that quick style of sound on the West Coast was missing because to me it was all like Dr Dre sounding beats or East Coast beach for the game and then after he went to down South Rick Ross Albee's in in house Dan but now that quicksand the West so quick is underrated to me. I just don't know and I mentioned muster. Just now any of these young kids even cracking top fifteen twenty 'cause we we go hip hop lyricists. You can put k. Dot Arguably in your top ten. Ah People Give Drake love for top twenty eight off a catalog longevity..

Dila producer Dr Dre West Coast Pete Rock Timbaland Drake casio Andrea Kanye Kevin Spacey Dylan Talib Tallet Dot East Coast Justin timberlake Rick Ross Albee Lia Mike
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 1 year ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
Bushwick Bill, Bushwick And Bill discussed on On The Mic

On The Mic

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Bushwick Bill, Bushwick And Bill discussed on On The Mic

"Today. Some, some sad news for hip hop fans, especially hip hop fans of a certain age, Bushwick Bill when the main members of ghetto boys passed away at the age of fifty two had been suffering from stage, four pancreatic cancer. When the ghetto boys came out, it was it was such a pivotal time in hip hop. History Ryan as music started to evolve and, you know, we have the term in hip hop, gangsta, rap, which I've never been a fan of. But it defines a certain genre of him on and the ghetto boys were definitely from that ilk. But what was different about them is not necessarily things they were rapping about, but were they? Were wrapping from gathering Lewis originated in Los Angeles. In that area, NWEA the Dr dre ice, cube the whole group, but the ghetto boys were from Houston and southern rap and southern gangster rat is different, as you would think, food from the south would be different cars from the south will be different based on where you live and the ghetto boys were the spear of that movement, and southern rat, and for, for the news today that Bushwick Bill died at the age of fifty two, I think, for a lot of hip hop, fans definitely gonna be a sad day. No, it really is. And I think you brought up, what was the very pertinent point to me was that they were from the south, you know, and at the time it was, it was east coast and west coast, east coast was the birthplace of, and then when you got in w became, you know, west coast was a big deal, but for us that was what you listen to, you know, when, when he came on day by day, it's more, you know, those things got you excited in for us. It was. Something that even if you couldn't relate to the life, they were talking about you relate to the things in the places that they were mentioning. And so it's, it's a huge loss, and I think not only people from the south or from h town from wherever you were listening to music from at the time, I think everybody will have some type of feeling about losing someone who is really a legend in creating a space for rappers from the south bay. You know, wasn't necessarily a huge deal before them. The a lot of respect being paid the Bushwick Bill. Some of you may not be very familiar with the group to get a boy's Bushwick, Bill himself. But what made him also unique in the red game is that he was a little person, right? And all about hip hop music at a certain era was about being hard and tough. And whether it's tough MC toughen streets. But you got this little person out there, who was, you know, talking everything you hear about the streets gave a different persona to certain people. And for little people around the country, they were in the hip hop, music. He represented them in a way, they'd never been represented before just way Ryan was talking about how the south was being represented right in music. But a lot of people paying respects to him including ice cube. He put on Twitter, quote, rest in beats to my homeboy Bushwick. Bill from the trigger happy blank, ghetto boys. He never backed down, even though he was low to the ground, a true original, you know, that's what was so. So funny, though, Eve's about his voice was that, that was the last thing you thought about what you thought Bush would Bill. You're right. You know. And I don't mean thing you saw lasting right? Right. I don't mean just as voice in a way it sound saying the voice, he created a rat like that wasn't even how you saw Bushwick, Bill. I remember one of my favorite mart episodes is more and God jumped Morton is I jumped on my little people, and Bushwick. Bill was the leader of that group. And the way he was talking to Martin Carrie. Himself. He was six to in his mind. Right. And that was the way he wrap. That was the way he carried himself. And after a while that was the way you felt about him. And so I think it's I think is really awesome. That, you know, these other great rappers these other legends and rep are kind of giving him his do as to what he meant to hip hop, who else thinks they're six to a closer to five to who's L Dunkin, but see. She got us a real six to kind of personality persona too. So I get it. I don't mess with her. Don't let it have some hills and be stopping into somebody's living room, real quick. To the contrary. I actually think have short man syndrome, which is where most of my attitude comes from, because I'm just all bark and no bite odor. I know a lot about the. Definitely scares you off enough to even try. Crazy. Right. Right. Right. Just don't wanna know because then you gotta make a decision, L, let me because we're talking about Bushwick, Bill passing away the age of fifty two in what the group ghetto boys min at the time, and most things music, always bring stuff to you. And we were talking about being from the south all three of you Ryan and I grew up in the south unit Lanta Atlanta had its own different aspect of southern hip hop music, and that whole thing, but the link of that, and the representation from the south being able to have voices could be heard on both coasts. How do you put those things together in the wake of Bush Bill passing away? Yeah. I mean you know you you've mentioned it. I think that Atlanta, especially old Atlanta hip hop. It's anonymous with fake outcast but even before head, you know, the dungeon family in general, and DJ's that used to come from here, and the sound that we kind of we had to kind of take Miami sound for that because it was the farthest south that really resonated nationally. So I mean it just meant a lot because you felt like it I would go back to the source awards booed off stage, and they just kept saying the same thing, which is has something to say and I just like that feeling so incredibly proud, you know, we didn't really have sports teams to cling onto in Atlanta growing up, so being able to have like Outkast who was hours. She talked like us and talked about things that we understood to happen. And later TI and paving the way for guys like future in to change. Now I mean it's incredible to sink, like how far has come in terms of hip hop, and how they're really powerhouse when it comes to putting

Bushwick Bill Bushwick Bill Ryan Atlanta Bush Pancreatic Cancer Houston Los Angeles Twitter Lewis Miami EVE Martin Carrie Outkast Lanta Atlanta Morton
Super Bowl Ads 2019: Stunts, Self-Deprecation And Celebrity Sightings

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Super Bowl Ads 2019: Stunts, Self-Deprecation And Celebrity Sightings

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast. Some Super Bowls are thrilling and summer like last night when the New England Patriots beat the Los Angeles Rams and the lowest scoring Super Bowl game in history. Of course, the game is only part of the spectacle, where the halftime show and the commercials anymore. Exciting. We have a tweet review here from one Rachel Martin of NPR news who writes, you wrote Rachel well that was horrible. Don't think you didn't love it very much NPR. Tv critic Eric Duggan's has his judgment the most unexpected moment in the Super Bowl. Halftime show. Didn't come from headliner. Maroon five or guest Travis Scott, it came courtesy of characters from the cartoon SpongeBob squarepants who introduced Scott's part of the performance. Musical genius who needs no introduction. The cartoon clip was a shoutout to sweet victory. Assam spongebob. Squarepants once played on an episode that parody the Super Bowl was a hip surprise. And a halftime show that also included appearances from Outkast member big BOI and a gospel choir. Maroon five frontman, Adam LeVine, stripped off, coats and shirt until he was bare-chested showing off his tattoos while singing one of the group's biggest hits moves like Jagger. Gives me. Show. It was professional mildly. Exciting the kind of ineffective Super Bowl halftime show that the NFL might have been hoping for after its controversies over players kneeling to protest police brutality. But it was also kind of boring like most of the Super Bowl commercials press to avoid social media backlash. Many of the ads in Sunday's game were not edgy groundbreaking or even all that funny. Consider one but lights commercials which featured medieval characters from last year's but light Super Bowl ads preparing to watch a joust a beautiful day for a date. Date things out lucky. Loincloth cold Bud Light comfy thrown I don't have the plague anymore when they're but night is killed by a character from game of thrones called the mountain then a dragon sets fire to the jousting arena. And the whole thing turns into a game of thrones commercial. I'm not quite sure how scenes of carnage and fire cells cans of Bud Light. Maybe it makes you thirsting Harrison Ford fared better in an ad that showed fictional failed products, featuring Amazon, Alexa, including dot collar. Ordering dog the Barco you'll want. I'm not paying for England dog food ordering gravy yet. There is nothing funnier than watching Indiana Jones chases small dog around his house, Pepsi earn some multigenerational cool points by having chance the rapper remix. The backstreet boys hit I want it that way. And the Washington Post scored with a serious ad ended reinforcing the value of journalists and journalism as images of reporters like slain columnists, Jamal kashogi appeared on screen. Tom Hanks provided a reassuring narration when our nation is threatened. There's someone to gather the facts. To bring you the story. No matter the cost knowing keeps us free. Now, I might be a bit biased. But seeing some of the most expensive real estate in television used to remind America that journalism is a key to democracy seemed like the best use of a Super Bowl ad that I've seen in quite a while Americans.

Comcast Bud Light Squarepants Los Angeles Rams Adam Levine NPR Rachel Martin New England Patriots Travis Scott Jagger Outkast Tv Critic Tom Hanks Assam Washington Post Harrison Ford America Eric Duggan
"outkast" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning is she had such extrordinary versatility as a musician Yes are we Franklin started? Her career at as, a teenager, singing gospel music, I don't know would. You call that her career or just hurt life she. Was born singing you, know moved. Into jazz, made incredible jazz records now, appreciated after, being so an, underrated in the past and then of course invention soul I. Mean she brought together gospel elements jazz elements popular music elements and you know the sound of. The south in the sixties the most conflicted moments in twentieth century American history might say the most intense place to be she made that that, moment in history legible through, intimate portrait, of of her heart in song from those great years that she recorded for records and. Then. She moved, on you know and and experimented with all kinds of of pop music all the way into hip hop she Ever ever stopped and also she could sing opera, she could sing an aria, and she, did it well keep can you talk a little bit about what she meant to other. Musicians The Franklin is was is, was the, gold standard for everyone I think there are few. Vocalists who hold that status for their whole lives she, worked with the greatest producers she collaborated with people like criticize, Mayfield you, know she set the standards for, someone like Stevie. Wonder she is at the lead for everyone for younger musicians. All the, way to her later. Recordings working with scrap legends like Andre three thousand of Outkast Lauryn Hill Mary j. Blige. They all turn to Aretha as their mother as their president you know that's what she watch it's amazing to be relevant for, so, long to so many. People across so many generations I cannot. Think of anyone else who has. Done it quite like her or even even remotely like her. A lemme ask you I I know you are I know you are Feeling the hurt this. Morning is there a particular Aretha Franklin song you're thinking, of there's so many that I love for some reason this, morning I, turned to the sun ain't no, way it's just. The tenderness in her voice the way that this song turns. Deep pain, and loneliness into jewelry. And transcendence which is always a racist recipe for us but her recipe for great NPR's. An powers reporting on Aretha Franklin who passed away this morning at her home in Detroit Michigan at the age.

Aretha Franklin Stevie Outkast Lauryn Hill NPR Mayfield Detroit Mary j. Blige president Michigan Andre
"outkast" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"He's half of the hip hop duo Outkast. Fifty fifty here. There's a number in his name. Big number number. I can't watch them suffer. We were looking for Andre, three thousand. Okay. Okay. That's all right. Okay. We have a couple more plenty of time. This legendary singer. Songwriter co wrote a children's musical with MAURICE sendak. Making that. She's also the subject of the Broadway show beautiful. Rebecca Carole king. Yes. All right. Here's your last clue. This American icon was apparently a picky eater, growing up in New Jersey. Little kids to eat. Mom things on my plate, not dumb Ramon or be. He was born in the USA and also sing songs for the newly born. Caesar, Bruce Springsteen. Yeah, that's correct. Pose a are showing how did our contestants do well done? Caesar? You won that.

Caesar Rebecca Carole king Outkast Ramon MAURICE sendak Bruce Springsteen Andre New Jersey USA
"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

The Chartographers

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

"Glitz glamour is much i don't know if i'm gonna dial it back and do this album for two years in tour for three years and go back into another hour just one show and do cool stuff favorite outkast music video oh man the artists retell oh really all right i really love that song video because i was video with the puppets and stuff to right thick some yeah and i think the video head slick rickety i mean slick rick will take a paycheck these days sure yeah yeah probably will be between that and bobbled guy the guy with the thing oh yeah but for me i always remember even though rosa like i guess song the video for be oh be with just ten miller sandy was always able grass yeah the green road always great for me didn't they do version of of bielby that had like didn't pio di do the music then something were like some rock band like play backing jets worm i'm unsure of that feel like i remember there's a robbery mesa something i remembered i haven't been going cypress hill did the alternate versions of rap and rock superstar of whatever the fuck out that was after i got onto them by fuck dr green in fact the day 'cause rap superstar had ever yeah and a rap superstar and live too big happy like this i was this awesome i i'm pretty sure it was bombs over baghdad had some rock oh i think i'm wrong appeal d i'm pretty sure that was naby ru said peo d.

rick dr green baghdad robbery three years two years
"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

The Chartographers

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

"Church talk before buddy you're listening to the church i is the happy arm it so for outcasts southern accent sounds just came to my soul i don't know we got some amazing guests here in studio is terrible riley is shannon i read man right world wait white right but eric who's last name ready for the do love the less it's amazing serpa do goop welcome here route or let you really should've listener less retired about everything needed to outcast rancor albums it was contentious wonderful in love the discussion but before we have a free forming a free falling happier minnesota when you talk about the thing we talked about at the start of every so guys legitimately what's the worst outkast song seasons god that's got damn close that the worst it's my least favorite merchant angel of idyllwild as low key cinematic piece of shit that i it is so bad it's sped also a bad notice eight minutes long and i don't think that i'm gonna put it to forget what it's called right now but it's just big boys kid doing verse bamboo your i've never i've never been van of people bringing their kids into a record i i'm not a fan of children popping up on shit sir not getting the kids out cash as gifts which okay which is the best thing i'll take which is the snow that just ends with like a minute of baby noises because i.

eric minnesota outkast idyllwild eight minutes
"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

The Chartographers

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

"Cooler was the first ridge like this is our our as a high school this is our to stick but also like real and i i think there's going to be said about that for the journey like while yes i agree it is not impossible while i agree there's a bunch of love songs and things of that instrument to be hip hop could be good to be out there's a reason one best album overall that year because it took so much from other john inc at least the love below felt like do that more but i feel as overall experience you feel something a little bit more than you would from some of the earlier albums that outkast absolutely that's what i'm coming from is i would out personally put a little bit higher just because i think the i thought the kind of volving people as that's where you're starting to see all right this is not just one two people as one unit these are two individuals and this is over you can make the claim three saxes the best rapper of all time or get that claim of like hard no big boy no i'm with you take came out was making those claims all right absolutely right okay but here's the other thing i would say is that an loved the argument and i see both sides of of the fact that although it's two solo under the same umbrella it is to solo albums and part of what makes outcast outcast is how will they worked together how there's that constant poll of light driving like i'm tired of rapping i wanna do kucic songs and then he'd be like no we need to pull his into an actual song which is how some of their genuine hits come about like because they'd be came producers became you know people like that this is them working several even kind of their own different things it's seem their personalities out there removed even though they were both albums is interesting the thing is that like the one thing about actually the first four let's just be real is that there's this personal aspect to it there's stories of like how hard it is in the streets there's also one thing that kind of struck me like literally today that it just as as i heard it everything in the place of how much respect they have for women.

john inc outkast
"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

The Chartographers

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

"He grew up to write like here he's like you'll big boy saying the word run up on them with their head now is like you have to win from that little bit still got that in him but now he's like talking about how socialism can change the country these he's grown in scope right and i think that that's like that three sacks fluence open that third but the thing is that like i don't hear as much on here and the genomic she just the flapper thing fucking amazingly and train is just a fence has the other one on my god because that and then they do the train park zoo on the first big boy solo album is like one of my all time favorite tracks from him but when you think about the other five hours in this discography this it's pretty obvious i wanted to give another chance i wanted to see if there was a revelation and i love the big boy stuff i discovered on here and that's the thing too because you know you're raking outkast's albums basically picking your favorite child 'cause it's like in the grand scheme of things none of these while it may seem like where hard on or something like that we're not saying indies albums are bad right into other episodes we were not just hard on idol thinking about what's going on whether making idyllwild right like big boys still working on on hip hop his mind is clearly focused on writing and flowing three stacks his mind is on making class of three thousand for cartoon network he's getting the character dabo down and you shooting semi pro will ferrell in two thousand six around this time his main focus ambien rapper or being an actor and a movie that starring right she's like.

outkast dabo idyllwild three stacks five hours
"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

The Chartographers

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

"All right we'll cool in that case we got at six six lots going from worst of best so southern the playlist playlist music eighteen million next on espn low idyllwild guys we're going to rank them we're gonna start as we always do the debate open opinions i have ideas i have a as you never know where they're gonna go so number six lowest ranking were specified on think about it sheng you bet on this podcast before yes but zurich hasn't so s zero gets very special honour your hotseat buddy here you're in right now so we're just talking about not saying anything but out of curiosity what would you nominate as the worst outkast album see fan of alkhast because i enjoy hip hop in grew up in joy hip hop that being said this album is not a hip hop album and that's why put number six i loud if it has to be right some of those you know it's the soundtrack to film now little did we know going into this we turn it i will we wanted the research week we watch the god damn film fascinating hope so little of the movie has anything to do with the soundtrack they sat trek is very much a songs inspired by because those who don't know it deals with rooster in personal and personal opinion play tissue son who he's like oh wanna be a star but then you have a rooster who is he's the he's the guy that's doing all the alcohol running back then and now he's club owner and the terrence howard's the bill to shoot people be a character and trumpy like it's a whole thing really is paula patents wonderful basically just just as a milan ruse atlanta with more shootings yes and nowhere near as good so the thing is that like we went into it because i really like heard awhile before i can wanted to put in context and then in the movie these bush nothing but songs from fucking speier club below and like i get it rooster a great song they give it some bourbon also in the movie in the movie big voice shows up all right he really really does he's the entertain.

espn zurich terrence howard idyllwild outkast milan atlanta speier
"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

The Chartographers

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"outkast" Discussed on The Chartographers

"I'll just julia on about out your living about enjoy on your on your transit or your travel as go around on tom out and i just get out and get something and that's the podcast all right so outcasts may let me tell you something they are weirdos they are innovators they've done a lot of stock in the thing is that unlike other artists you've done especially a lot of rap artists that where you have to think about mix tapes and all the other fucker that goes on there this is pretty straight up they have six albums they have some play listrik cadillac music from nine to ninety four they have eighty alliens from nineteen ninetysix they have some consider the commercial break in terms of equipment and nineteen ninety eight they have the big big one which was thank only ah in two thousand they have an we're going to talk about a little bit called speaker box the la below two dozen three and there was the soundtrack to their feature movie that they did i'd awhile in two thousand six now the reason i've talked about spear bucks'll la blow is that technically is an outcast album double disc grammy award winning out of the album but it is to albums frank ocean it's too albums the thing is the speaker box little they're both solo albums contained within the outcast day now i'm pretty sure you listener at home you probably have thought the same thing we have are you going to rank them together or you're gonna make a separate albums it does come into the outcast brand and andre never released solo after the fact i think fair to say that we would consider it together as a single outkast album even those to this so i just wanna know from our council of we have any thoughts disagreements or anything else like that while it is a very long hours of my would rank them together as well under one umbrella because it is outcasts and you hear a lot of both of them on each other's solo efforts within this album so it's like for me are they wanna grammy together yes that one thing all right cool yeah i'm gonna say i agree with putting together i have a.

tom grammy award julia andre
Google launches it's very own Podcast app, finally

BE Podcasting

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Google launches it's very own Podcast app, finally

"To have an maine's among other things to include audio in google searches just like thank lewd videos in the surges and so you can listen right in the google search page then and there to a podcast episode if it's in the search is really is huge news number one that google have a podcast team which was news to me so that's fantastic because it's really been all if to apple for so many years so good on google for stepping up and to step up to these degree to put so much emphasis on wanting podcast listening to double is just right for everyone in the podcasting world absolutely now nick what have you got mind not exciting but it's really a rayvey that of something i mentioned a couple of episodes ago i don't know if you remember was quite upset that i was having trouble playing podcasts on my new epa watch and i was surprised that apple didn't have a podcast app for their own march and we're still in west for the watch that don't even allow developers to create apps that allow subscriptions and sinking across devices and even volume control so i was fustrated i was trying to work out a way to go for a run and listen to a podcast i've been informed that outcast is the app that you need to do this and in fact i am using it myself so i know ease the correct after this it's an app that's been developed specifically for the watch you can download podcasts and listen to them without having fun with you which solves some of the problems it doesn't solve all the things that apple could quite easily do by making their own up but it's a big step in the right direction and if you like me and you like to get out and listen to podcasts on the go that you find then look out for outkast that's great well that for another

Maine Google Apple Nick EPA