31 Burst results for "Ottoman Empire"

Paprika In Hungary

Travel with Rick Steves

05:26 min | 4 months ago

Paprika In Hungary

"Let's start today's travel. With rick steves with the role a little pepper from the new world plays in that tasty cuisine of hungary. Note that today's interviews on paprika galicia where recorded just prior to the global shutdowns pepperoni as the backbone of hungarian cooking as the crucial ingredient in chicken pepper. Cash and hardy hungarian stews from mild to hot. We'll find out why this spicy so central to hungarian identity. How to best buys and pepper on your trip and we're going to learn how you can spice up. Your own meals was well to get this education hungarian paprika. We're joined by to guide tonight studio from hungary. And leonard and george farkas anna and george. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having us thrill to be well. Thank you from coming all the way from budapest a long trip. And we're gonna talk about paprika. I mean when we think of hungary we don't know a lot about hungry sometimes. But we think of paprika. What's the connection actually public. A strong connection because it is actually from the american continent and it was The physician of christopher columbus or columbus who brought it to the old world to i not to hungary of course but to spain that through the commercials of the mediterranean sea it got to the ottoman empire and when the ottoman empire extended its political power to eastern century up. We glad to not only bad things that we also got things like the patrika. What are the coffee so paprika and cuffy came as your time in the ottoman empire in paprika actually from america via columbus actually us. So i like teasing are two members and americans who is. That's why to travel here. Righ- flying through the But i like my publisher hungary. There's something romantic about having paprika in hungary. And why does hungary embrace paprika. What does it mean to hungarian. I have great micro-climate lots of sunshine. And what is very important that when we got the paprika was a hot spice and it was the hungarians who grew the might version of it it is from the nineteen twenties when in a small. Get in sega. It was kind of discovered. And since then if you come to our covid market hall you can always buy tubers the mild paprika and the hot fabric honky now. George when i go to budapest i always go to the big market hall right. But it's the name of that. Hologhan bashar knocking hungarian big market or century. You can't miss it when you're a tornado in credits. The first one out of five actually that they built at the time. And what you're going to find is well everything that hungarian cook would want to find. But certainly find peppers. See when you look for the peppers in the market. Well actually. you're not looking for peppers you looking for paprika is already well there is. It is basically a huge difference because many people don't realize it in hungary. Everything is called paprika. Let it'd be around fat skinny red yellow sweet and hot so i'm a little confused. Then so because Is it a pepper or it is a but we call it paprika but we also called a powder paprika yes because when i think of peppers and my supermarket we've got yellow ones and green ones red ones and that all of that. We call paprika even if it's Any shape really And then you have. It already powdered. If you're looking for the paprika that you cook with powdered yes okay. So it's a very unique technique to powder because One of the things that you have to be extremely careful with how you approach paprika once you grind paprika after all the time you spent with it to become dry and ready to grind. You have to do it very slowly makers as soon as you pick up speed you burn the paprika and that remains throughout its lifetime because once you come to cook it again you have to be very careful with a not to burn it because then you just have to start over again tour guides from budapest anna leonard and george farkas are filling in on the importance of peppery cup in the cuisine of hungary right now on travel with rick steves. Okay so when we're talking about this have rica and i think it goes back the days when spaces were really important. I mean spice was big money in the early days of training today today at that time and originally now why was spaces in general very important economically for people well. It was a very important product. It was expensive at that time. It was not so easy to fly from one continent to other a trip two months of making food more interesting or is it a matter of preserving food actually spicy i got to the highest study stock chrissy those who had the opportunity to get products from far far away and paprika also i was introduced for the highest stock resi in hungary after people realised it is not poisonous because i it was considered a supposin and when they discovered that it has healing effect. You know it here the colorado and screw after it they started to make its production but it was a rarity and it was very expensive so at first who is just for the very wealthy and then you learn it. It helped as medicine against scurvy and cholera. Yes but also medication. Very often is a privilege of the wealthier class. Not available for everybody. Some

Hungary George Farkas Columbus Budapest Rick Steves Cuffy Hologhan Bashar Mediterranean Sea Leonard Anna Christopher Sega George Spain Anna Leonard America Rica Chrissy
Who Was Vlad the Impaler

Your Brain on Facts

04:00 min | 4 months ago

Who Was Vlad the Impaler

"A time when I didn't know that Vlad. The Impaler was thought to be the inspiration for Bram Stoker's genre-defining vampire Dracula hop in your home school bus police box or phone booth with aerial antenna and let's go back to 15th century will lakia a region of modern-day Romania. That was then the southern Edge over to the province of Transylvania. Our flad was flat the third glad the second his father was given the nickname dracul by his fellow Crusade nights in the order of the Dragon. They were tasked with defeating the Ottoman Empire will lakia was sandwiched between the Ottomans and Christian Europe and so became the sight of constant bloody conflict without looking it up. I'm going to guess that the order of the Dragon failed since the Ottoman Empire was still standing in nineteen twenty-three. Dracul translated to dragon in Old Romanian. But the modern meeting is more like Devil add an a to the end to denote son of and you've got flat Dracula at age eleven flat and his seven-year-old brother Raju went with their father on a diplomatic Mission into the Ottoman Empire. How'd it go? Not too good. The three were taken hostage their captors told Vlad the second that he could be released if his two sons remained behind home since it was really their only option. He agreed the boys would be held prisoner for five years one account holds that they were tutored in The Art of War science and philosophy. Other accounts say that they were subjected to torture and brutal abuse by the time Vlad the second return to Allah Kiya. He was overthrown in a coup and he and his eldest son murdered shortly. Thereafter Vlad. The third was released with a taste for violence and a vendetta against the Ottomans to regain his family's power and make a name for himself. He threw a banquet for hundreds of members of rival families on the menu was wine meet sweetbreads and gruesome vicious murder off. The guests were stabbed not quite to death then impaled on large spikes. This would become vlad's signature move leading to his moniker Vlad the Impaler, but it wasn't the only arrow in his quiver. Facing an army three times the size of his he ordered his men to infiltrate their territory poison the wells and burn the crops. He also hired disease dead-end to go in and infect the enemy defeated combatants were often treated to disemboweling flaying Alive boiling and of course impalement. Basically, you turn your enemy into a kabob and let them die slowly and just as importantly conspicuously vlad's reputation spread leading to a mixing of Legend in fact like that. He wants took dinner in a veritable Forest of spikes. We do know that in June of 1462. He ordered 20,000 defeated Ottomans to be impaled. It's a scale that's hard to even imagine when the Ott's in Sultan mehmed II Came Upon the Carnage he and his men turned on their heels and fled back to Constantinople. You would think flawed was on the road to Victory but shortly thereafter. He was forced into Exile and imprisoned in Hungary. He took a stab no pun intended on regaining will lakia fifteen years later, but he and his troops were ambushed and killed according to a contemporary

Vlad Dracul Bram Stoker Transylvania Romania Raju Europe Sultan Mehmed Ii OTT Constantinople Hungary
Change, Loss and Timeless Love

Tara Brach

05:05 min | 5 months ago

Change, Loss and Timeless Love

"Nama stay and welcomed my friends. Really glad to have you with us. I was recently perusing two different articles. The first title was aging the secret to happiness and the second was WANNA be happier. All you have to do is get older. So same theme and they both draw on research that teams to confirm this correlation that the older we get the happier we are. Now I know that seems counter intuitive given the challenges we face that we. Lose, people we love and we lose our youth and our health and our memory. I saw cartoon this very old couple and they were both on rockers on the porch and he's responding to her. He says, now you want an open relationship. Of Billy Crystal, but it this way he said by the time, a man is a wise enough to watch his step. He's too old to go anywhere. Okay so there's this evidence that Carlos aging with happiness and the understanding that resonates for me is that through our our lifetime, we have the capacity to learn and adapt and spiritually evolve and. With the passing of time. There can be a growing acceptance of the inevitability. Of Change and loss. A growing acceptance. Of Change and loss. and. Walk. Clearly, this doesn't happen to everyone for those that do deepen in that acceptance. Nabil's living and appreciating the moments. And loving were fully. So the title of this talk, and the one that follows is change loss and timeless. Love. And the theme arises from a central teaching on the spiritual path and. That is that our capacity to live and love fully is totally intertwined with how we relate to change and loss. So. This'll be AH invitation for you to look in your own life at how you're relating to change and loss. It feels really relevant right now to explore this given, how many people around the globe are experiencing such rapid change and real loss due to global pandemic and Deepening social divides and climate change the devastation to this earth. And while it may feel like change a speeding up. impermanent. So what really makes us clutch? Is really the nature of all takes form. And we know it on the on the largest sweeps. If you think of the history of the Universe Big Bang and stardust forming and planet earth elements combining to create this amazing variety of life forms and then Homo sapiens evolving tools and art and science and war and slavery in plagues and collaboration innovation. The whole thing you know empires coming and going Greeks the Romans, the Ottoman. Empire Portuguese the British the American. You know rising to dominance and then passing we always think things are for good but it all passes and here we are. On the brink of destroying. Earth our home. Seeing species common species become extinct. galaxies. Of Stars collapsing into black holes, it's all in permanent. And then. We can sense it on the most minute level you know if right this moment. You take the time to perhaps closure is and bring your attention inward and hold still really still. You can sense that. The body everything inside a moving if you feel your hands is anything holding stelle. It might seem that way if you're very very tense but if you even begin to relax a little, you can sense the hands feet. In the face. The Heart Everything's moving. Nothing hold still there's this. Ever changing flow of sensations feelings. Sounds come and go. Your body's replacing sells millions per second. Within those cells nonstop motion.

Billy Crystal Carlos Nabil
Travel to Zagreb

Travel with Rick Steves

04:38 min | 5 months ago

Travel to Zagreb

"Let's start with a look at a European capital that's often overlooked by the beach crowd who enjoy Croatia's crystal clear coastline. But miss out on the scene in its capital city. It has a distinctively modern take on old world charm and it's just a few hours inland. To tell us about saga we're joined now by local guide Darya goateed. She's joined by Ben Curtis who writes about the Balkan regions elaborate history and thinks that Croatia's best period may be now Darya in Ben Welcome my pleasure. Same. Thank you for having. US Doria. You're from Zagreb your guide in Zagreb, a lot of Americans no Dubrovnik. Venice and a lot of Americans know the Anna Zagreb is right there in the middle. What should we know about Zagreb? Nanna. Saga is I would say the mix of. All these big capitals around and all these much better known cities around from historical perspective It was influenced by different cities and countries. So we have a little bit of all of that. What's an example? How is it a little bit of? How is it a little bit of Italy says it a little bit of the Slavic World So? obas part of the hops Burke monarchy later austro-hungary for few hundred. Years. And then architecture in town is very much what we would call out through nor Central European. So the mixture of Hungarian hungarian-austrian. We don't have much Dubrovnik textures that. Is Zog. Is completely different about the cuisine that scene is also very influenced by Austria but not only that we do eat struggles and. A lot of meat and potatoes and then on the other hand we also eat. A lot of Pasta beat some. We are very sensitive on coughing, and then we also have the Turkish influence because arguable also for few centuries, just about forty, five, fifty miles Sir north from the Ottoman Empire boarder okay. It's a crossroads release across through the s the Ben Curtis here in American who has a fascination and a deep interest in this part of Europe how would you say Zagreb is unique Zagreb is unique for being this gem of a central European capital. So everybody can measure saying they know Budapest, Vienna, they know Prague, but here's this. Gym of a historical city that hardly any American visits right and even though Zagreb stars rising on the Tourism Front these days but you can go there and it's not gonna be jammed with busloads of tourists from all over the place you're not gonNA hear a lot of other North American accents and you're going to be able to experience the city where the fabric of locals you're going to be sitting in a cafe with mostly other people from Zagreb, and that's great and it's hard to find that in Dubrovnik are in Vienna these days a year. Exactly. So if you had two nights in in one Danes, is there enough to keep you busy. Yeah. For sure I think, what would you do if you're gonNA show me around for a day the it's a great kind of one day stop if you're coming in and out for some of the coast. So Zagreb surprisingly has some of I think are the best museums of its kind in Europe now they're quirky right? You don't. Go desire grab for the Louvre or something like that. But you go to Zagreb for these unusual small museums like the Museum of naive art, which is great sort of not formally trained perhaps painters but really characteristic art with peasant themes. The famous one which is kind of made headlines around the world is a museum of broken relationships which is filled with these stories of couples who have broken up the objects that they have Meant something to them and they've given it this museum and so it's just a really interesting kind of poignant sometimes hilarious trip through people's relationships. So when we think of this naive art, I love this idea because you go to most art galleries in Europe Bennett, the opposite of naive arted this refined fully embraced high-society art but naive art is by definition just unschooled hasn't Sir Working People that just had a passion for painting. Exactly but are often very, very talented even if they didn't train at the academy or something like that but they're expressing the lives and cultures and artistic visions of people from the rural areas and it's genius really an undiscovered genius that happen to come out of the farm community or something absolutely. I love that museum by the way that that's really one of the unique things in Europe and it is in the capital of Croatia Zagreb.

Zagreb Croatia Zagreb Anna Zagreb Europe Darya Goateed Croatia Museum Of Naive Art Ben Curtis Dubrovnik Central European United States Austria Ottoman Empire Venice Doria Bennett Pasta Italy Budapest Vienna
The French history behind Lebanon's problems

Between The Lines

06:00 min | 7 months ago

The French history behind Lebanon's problems

"Earlier this month, a deadly blast in Beirut killed more than one hundred and seventy people, engine thousands, and lift three, hundred, thousand homeless. And a vast landscape of destruction. Now, Lebanon was already in extremely bad shape before this blast exacerbated by the covid crosses the chronic corruption and dysfunction that had defined Lebanese politics for decades with all that had brought the economy to ruin. Many people have lost they laugh savings and investments no wonder widespread protests recently led to the resignation of the Lebanese Prime Minister and his cabinet. So the poodle listen a broader historical context. Let's welcome back to the program Joshua Landis. He heads the Middle East Program at the University of Oklahoma Josh Welcome back to between the lines. It's a pleasure being with you Tom. Now Lebanon was once a model for the Middle East by route was dubbed the Paris of the East. Now, today Lebanon looks like Syria Iraq how did this happen? Well it happened because Lebanon is an extremely divided country it like Iraq and Syria there are Shiites and sinise dividing the Muslim side but there's also about thirty three percent of the population are Christians. Both marinade there and and Greek Orthodox. So you have the same. Religious Divisions in Lebanon that you do in Syria and Iraq but in fact, you have more and that's one reason why Lebanon fell into such a bloody civil war from nineteen, seventy, five to ninety, which was. Patched up. Most recently and They've been running in what turns out to be a real puns e scheme through the central. Bank. In which they shored up the Lebanese pound by borrowing gobs of money billions upon billions of dollars and. and. Supporting the exchange rate, but it turned out that that was a Ponzi scheme because tons of Lebanese in Australia. The United States Europe were sending their dollars to Lebanon to be in these dollar-denominated accounts that were getting interest rates as high as twelve thirteen percent. So everybody wanted that kind of interest rate, but it turned out to be a Ponzi scheme in just collapsed a few months ago, which was sparked these terrible demonstrations and instability because the country is now impoverished inflation has gone through the roof and people are discovering that they don't have any money and it's it's Lit tensions between different sectarian groups, and of course, as I mentioned in my introduction many people in Lebanon I've lost their life savings and investments. To people realize that it goes back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War One this in France and Britian what do they do that essentially created free great minority ruled regimes in the Middle East, tell us mall. Yes they did and Lebanon was carved out by France which got a both Syria and Lebanon from the League of Nations after World War One. The League of Nations conceded this to France to really rule over the mass colonies, but they are called mandates and. France carved out Lebanon as an independent country. And made the borders such that they were as big as they possibly could maintaining a Christian majority so that the government would be dominated by Christians at the center ruling over Shiites Druze a bunch of sending Moslems none of whom would be able to compete in theory with the Christians and this allowed for a very French friendly country on the Mediterranean that France thought would serve it. Well, the problem is that within the years. The demographics began to change and Muslims became the crushing majority and this led to the civil war in hundred, seventy five and ever since then the various religious groups have been squabbling over. Political power. And today fifty percent of all parliament members that have to be Christians. National Pact even though Christians are probably only a third, the population which underlines how You know precarious. The entire political system is, and of course, in Iraq following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with the British mandate the Sunni minority pretty much ran the show from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire right through the downfall of Saddam Hussein, and in Syria it was the Alawite minority that ran the show and of course Stiffer differs from the Sunni majority during the recent civil war. Correct. You're absolutely right and this was a pattern throughout the northern Middle East where the colonial powers whether it was. Britain or was France would establish a minority in power given the lion's share of power, and that helped them to rule by divide and conquer, but it left a terrible legacy. That the Middle East is suffering from today because the Alawites this religious minority that's twelve percent of the country ruled Syria and today the uprising was an attempt by the Sydney majority to overthrow that minority that's clinging to power in Syria Saddam Hussein sunny twenty percent of the country Cenis and the Shiite majority and Kurds rose up to try to get rid of Saddam Hussein leading to very bloody civil war ethnic war and and that's that's one of the major causes for instability throughout. The region is this terrible fight between these different religious groups

Lebanon Syria Middle East France Iraq Ottoman Empire Saddam Hussein Middle East Program Ponzi Scheme Beirut Prime Minister Joshua Landis League Of Nations Parliament TOM Australia University Of Oklahoma
Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:49 min | 7 months ago

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

"A decade ago, Turkey's Foreign Minister Audit of Attalou used to boast his country was on good terms with everyone police fantasia want. less confrontation, less tense attitude. Especially, in the region, he spoke at the Council on foreign, relations with the will of the principal. In. Two thousand three. Zero problems with our neighbors. And the made a huge progress. All, that now seems a distant memory Turkey is growing its international influence and not always with a light touch. The country has been backing Libya's government in its civil war. Last month. The Turkish Defence Minister landed in Libya to inspect his troops and opposition warlord warned them to get out or else. Turkey prompted an angry statement from Egypt last week by allegedly planning gas exploration and Egyptian waters. And yesterday Turkish officials railed against an American company for its dealings with ethnic Kurds in neighboring Syria. That Turkey believes to be terrorists. To some, all this adventurism is reminiscent of past chapter of the country's history when the Ottoman Empire ruled all of Syria and far beyond. Turkey, has been playing an especially prominent role in Syria since protests spread into a full blown civil war. Turkey has really become a meshed in Syria since the start of the our spring, the uprisings that took place in two thousand eleven across the Middle East it back. The Islamist. Movements that initially took to the streets and then took up arms. Nicholas Pelham is our Middle East correspondent. But as those fighters were false back towards its border, it's really stepped into try and protect its southern border, stop any more refugees coming into the country and to provide some sort of safe zone for the proteges, and it's also very nervous about the current state law that emotion the northeast of the country. It feels very threatened by the emergence of Kurdish power on the southern borders, and is it reasonable for Turkey to think that those Kurdish forces are really a threat historic? The have been links between the PK, the cuts down Workers Party, which has been waging a thirty five year a war for. Autonomy and separatism inside Turkey. Many of those fighters did flee sought refuge in Iraq and in Syria, and so Turkey is worried about what it sees very much kind of PKK influenced state emerging on its southern borders. So this year it's been launching pretty heavy attacks inside Iraq, it's been sending tanks across the border. It's established positions inside northern Iraq. It's been carrying out drone bombardments, such two hundred kilometers from its border in Saint, John More, Kurds all the way along its southern border inside Syria inside. Iraq see a new Turkish assault, which is pushing deep into their territory and not just unsettling. Kurdish aspirations for sovereignty in Iraq and Syria, and this is also unnerving Arab leaders as well. Who Turkey pushing deep into territory, which was part of the Turkish Republic predecessor. The Ottoman Empire, which ruled the Middle East centuries until its dissolution about a century ago, which is to say that Turkey is expanding its influence is doing this adventurism beyond Iraq and Syria all over the Middle East of the moment. There's a this year has seen the new intervention of the Turkish, Army. Libya. They came to the rescue of the besieged government of National Accord. In Tripoli, which has been fighting a civil war against a renegade general. Khalifa. After Turkish forces established at base on the borders of Tunisia, we're seeing it's frigates make a bid for control of looking coastline and even ward off French frigates. We're really seeing a substantive increase in Turkish. Power across the Middle East and it's not just happening in Liberia. It's happening in Gaza, which is an ally of Turkey. Turkish forces there have tried to help. Cut Break Its blockade by Saudi Arabia they're. A. Few hundred to a few thousand Turkish forces that are they're wasting more Turkish interested in Yemen civil war. We're seeing interest in a Sudanese port and actually Turkey's largest overseas basis in the point of Africa. So really this is a massive increase in Turkey spread across the middle, East and do you believe that the the the Ottoman history plays into that as a return to former glories? In some way? It's very much the in the rhetoric certainly saw Mr. Osman tropes at the at the height of the Arab spring wanted to appear to be the leader of the Muslim world. He was promoting his version of governance across the region hoping to clone the Turkish model across the Middle East. But since the collapse of Islamist movement since its as from power in Egypt and the retreat of many of its forces, he's really kind of played much more on Turkey's national interests. He's ally domestically with what had been his nationals opposition. He seems to be much more concerned on trying to maximize Turkey's economic claims in the. The Mediterranean this since much more about promoting Turkey's national interests than flying it systems colors. This is really an exercise in in hard power and trying to exploit the weakness of others, the retreat of Europe and America from the Middle East. The policies of many Arab governments, and try and push Turkey to fill what seems to be a vacuum of power across the Middle East, and so is that push to serve Turkey's national interests working is, is it benefiting from this from this expansionism? If you're trying to put together a balance sheet of profit balance sheet? Sheet Turkey has benefited from Khatri investment cutters, loans, and investments have helped prop up the Turkish lira. It may be that country's also hoping to fund part of its military costs in Libya Turkeys, keen to promote its companies when it comes to eventual reconstruction of war-torn Libya, which after all is energy rich state, and so long term, there may be benefits, his critics home highlight, the cost it's estimated that Turkish operations in Syria have cost anything up to about thirty billion dollars, and of course, there is a threat that you're going to see a major escalation. Escalation in the Middle East, which could embroil Turkey. It's not just Turkey is entering the middle, East enforce. It's also Russia. Many Arab states are trying to gain Russian support to push back Turkey, not just Syria Egypt the United Arab Emirates looking to Russian support in Libya, and Egypt is sending its tanks to the Libyan borders. The UN warned that the risk of a of a regional war focused on Libya and beyond that that risk was huge. So this is a massive gamble and it looks as if the stakes are going to be increasingly hyphen

Turkey Middle East Syria Libya Iraq Sheet Turkey Egypt Turkish Republic Principal Nicholas Pelham Workers Party Attalou Saudi Arabia John More Russia Tunisia UN Tripoli
Exploring Hungary

Travel with Rick Steves

08:03 min | 1 year ago

Exploring Hungary

"Let's start out today's travel. With Rick Steves with a little old world charm in Hungary when travelling in Europe. You just have to include the great cities on your itinerary. Hungry elegant capital of Budapest is certainly impressive. But there's another side that you should explore as well and that's the country's smaller towns and cities historic Acre is an easy and popular sidetrip northeast of Budapest. It's been attracting travelers from Eastern Europe. As a place to catch your breath surrounded by the opulent architecture of Hungary to introduce us to the scene. And we're joined by Hungarian tour guides. Monica Poche and George. Farkas thank you. Did I get that right in Budapest? If you're looking for a little break you head up to egger very much. So yes how far away is it and what it would take about. Maybe an hour and ten minutes done in a highway and then on the secondary roads. And then you find yourself in gear Third Drain Connection. There is yes you will have to switch. That's one of the reasons why is not as cosmopolitan as it should be? Because when the train tracks were planned they didn't make a direct connection initially so That's a little bit of a of a downside of it but there's a great bus connection as well so Monica when you were growing up in Budapest. Did your family ever go to Edgar together? Yes actually not just with our family but I remember that During school trips during the communist era we were taken to Edgar Edgar was the seat of the archbishop pre so it has fantastic beautiful churches by the way would like to tell you during the communist era because of the nine hundred fifty six revolution aft-r in Hungary all of the churches are considered to be museums. Saw it ever also well capped? That's even during the communists. They are as squid children. We were taken to the Churches Museums. But not as living places of worship. The church survived physically. But it's a historic place Museum rather than a place of worship joining a community standard harmonised. Okay well it was very much controlled control. Why let's just turn around a little bit and say why Edgar would be the number one destination for Hungarians visit because it's part of the curriculum because that's where biggest victory happened. Hi this is Turkey Turkish time because they talk about. That was the last place to be taken in by the Turks of they go all the way thirteen. Nine thousand Turks are coming over and two thousand Gillian's actually locked themselves up. In the castle women children as early and they go and defeat the Turks. So that's the victory talk about. That's why all children are taken and they are taught. We don't talk about the fact that the send away the defeated Turks. A couple of months later turned around and came back into the town. But that's something we talk about. Obviously that's that's not really something won your battle fifteen fifty two so nearly five hundred years ago. The castle is still there and you can visit the Castle Castle. You even as a tourist. You get a sense. This is really important to the Hungarian much so very much. And my memory of Egor is a minaret and it must be the most northern minaret from the Ottoman Empire sticking up right there in the middle of this city yet. It's like a spaceship. There cannot send has no contracts they just sitting there is under go in a major restoration and so rather interesting Just recently they Reinstated the culpa. Praia a month later. They put it on their huge reconstruction was built for the the man who sings the calder calling. For prayer he actually climb up. The spirit is what about two hundred steps all the way to the top right and then he would get that acoustical benefit of being a top of everybody and to this day while they might not climb up there five times a day. Tourist can climb up there. Yes it's a tight little climb. Yes but it's a good view from there and also the reason it's important to mention because although Hungary was under the Turkish Ottoman invasion in a fifteenth century. They majorly converted existing buildings into minarets or they converted the Roman Catholic churches into mosques. They didn't be too many things. They've built these mirrors that we have. I think maybe two or three in our whole country for the minaret would just decorate a pre existing building that became a mosque. Is that what you're only by? They will buy. It's very rare to see anything from the Fifteenth Century Turkish Ottoman era. But that minaret is one of a kind of it. Gary Tour Guides. George Farkas said Monica Poche telling US why the town of Edgar Northern Hungary is one of the country's most popular getaways right now on travel with Rick. Steves something I remember from Edgar is. The market is just a wonderful market. George can you take us on a little walk? If you have some American friends with you and you want to introduce the culture. What would you find in the market at Egger? That gives us an insight into the salt of their Hungarian cuisine. And it's a great experience. Actually it's a a living market and you still see the ones that actually just went out in the morning and they went to see what's there to sell and they come onto their tunnel is stalls and then they sell day or individual small quantity backyard. I remember that it's like my little card table. And there's a hardscrabble old farmer husband and wife and they've got their turnips potatoes and they kind of looked like their produce very much so yeah so you can get that type of thing and then and then you continue on and then you start to see. The beautifully presented larger stalls with Grapes and Peaches and plums and veggies. And all that beautiful presented. The key is to have that relationship with the vendor. So you go and blink and then they know that they know us so you get the nice stuff From the front. I'm you know to really presentable one. And you're not regular year. You have to be aware you might not get what you see. Are you likely to find some of this famous Hungary and Moonshine for sale very much so Pelinka Pelinka because that's fundamentally something It's like GRAPPA? It's very legal. I would say it starts from eighty proof upwards and its shots That's how in the old days those that work out in the field started. They with just to get some energy my hunches. There's these flat little flasks. That people have definitely I I do have one with me. At that moment Hungarians would never leave the country without a Lilla flat flesh of Polanco. We also call it medicine if you have a heartache if you have a little bit of stomach problem because you're abrode no you are not taking. Bapti obese more something as but you immediately get delillo. Hungarian piling cars sanitizer society. Strong believe it or not but there are still destination centers in the country when you have some fruit trees in Hungary. Let's say plum or apricot or whatever you can take your own fruit to these destinations centers. You know it's bio and then Not filled with chemicals and then they make it for you. This bio moonshine exactly. There's actually a reconsidered approach today because In the old days when you went to house of Hungarian Oh you start to the dinner at the venue they will offer you pulling her and now modern culinary understanding. Is that if you offer Pelinka before the meal. You should be assured that the meal is not going to be good because what they say that if you have your Pelinka sort of so strong it kills your taste at your ability to ten. Then you don't taste the food so now pulling Kush should actually be digested. I suppose to Pera tiff. So if you are a host and you respect what you've cooked you want people to appreciate it you're not gonNA hide it by giving then you offered as before

Hungary Edgar Edgar Budapest George Farkas Rick Steves Monica Poche Turks Edgar Northern Hungary Fifteenth Century Turkish Otto Europe Eastern Europe Castle Castle Acre Churches Museums Egger Ottoman Empire Place Museum Pelinka Pelinka Pelinka Pera Tiff
House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

All Things Considered

01:04 min | 1 year ago

House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

"Okay in the house also approved a second measure today aimed at rebuking Turkey that resolution recognizing the Armenian genocide why is that significant so will the economic sanctions could sting if signed into law there was this symbolic rebuke as well an overwhelming vote of four hundred five to eleven to recognize the Armenian genocide this is been a big priority of Armenian American advocacy groups and they've argued that that the United States needs to recognize the deaths of an estimated one point five million Armenians from nineteen fifty teen the nineteen twenty three they were systematically killed in the Ottoman Empire which is now modern day Turkey accomplishment Brad Sherman has been an advocate for this resolution for more than twenty years we should recognize that genocide again and again long ago but we didn't because we were told that we had a great alliance with Turkey previous administrations have prevented movement on this in part due to fierce opposition from the Turkish government but it's now called because so many in Congress feel like the relationship with Turkey has

Turkey United States Brad Sherman Turkish Government Congress Twenty Years
House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

All Things Considered

01:48 min | 1 year ago

House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

"Okay in the house also approved a second measure today aimed at rebuking Turkey that resolution recognizing the Armenian genocide why is that significant so will the economic sanctions could sting if signed into law there was this symbolic rebuke as well an overwhelming vote of four hundred five to eleven to recognize the Armenian genocide this is been a big priority of Armenian American advocacy groups and they've argued that that the United States needs to recognize the deaths of an estimated one point five million Armenians from nineteen eighteen to nineteen twenty three they were systematically killed in the Ottoman Empire which is now modern day Turkey accomplishment Brad Sherman has been an advocate for this resolution for more than twenty years we should recognize that genocide again and again long ago but we didn't because we were told that we had a great alliance with Turkey previous administrations have prevented movement on this in part due to fierce opposition from the Turkish government but it's now called because so many in Congress feel like the relationship with Turkey has degraded are either these measures gonna go anywhere in the Senate you know that's an interesting question it faces a skeptical Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader McConnell essentially gets to decide whether gets a vote a congressman McCall he's the top Republican on the house foreign affairs committee he says he's been in constant communication with the White House and his counterparts in the Senate he's confident they can come to an agreement they'll go through the Senate and I I I feel very strongly the president will sign it the president has actually lifted sanctions on Turkey as part of the administration's efforts to broker a cease fire in Syria so it will be a heavy lift to convince the president to sign and the White House hasn't weighed in on this houseboat but the Senate will get a classified briefing to more about serious so we'll be hearing more about it soon no

Turkey United States Brad Sherman Turkish Government Congress Senate Mitch Mcconnell Mccall White House President Trump Syria Congressman Twenty Years
House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

All Things Considered

01:48 min | 1 year ago

House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

"Okay in the house also approved a second measure today aimed at rebuking Turkey that resolution recognizing the Armenian genocide why is that significant so will the economic sanctions could sting if signed into law there was this symbolic rebuke as well an overwhelming vote of four hundred five to eleven to recognize the Armenian genocide this is been a big priority of Armenian American advocacy groups and they've argued that that the United States needs to recognize the deaths of an estimated one point five million Armenians from nineteen teen the nineteen twenty three they were systematically killed in the Ottoman Empire which is now modern day Turkey accomplishment Brad Sherman has been an advocate for this resolution for more than twenty years we should recognize that genocide again and again long ago but we didn't because we were told that we had a great alliance with Turkey previous administrations have prevented movement on this in part due to fierce opposition from the Turkish government but it's now called because so many in Congress feel like the relationship with Turkey has degraded are either these measures gonna go anywhere in the Senate you know that's an interesting question it faces a skeptical Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader McConnell essentially gets to decide whether gets a vote a congressman McCall he's the top Republican on the house foreign affairs committee he says he's been in constant communication with the White House and his counterparts in the Senate he's confident they can come to an agreement they'll go through the Senate and then I I I feel very strongly the president will sign it the president has actually lifted sanctions on Turkey as part of the administration's efforts to broker a cease fire in Syria so it will be a heavy lift to convince the president to sign and the White House hasn't weighed in on this how to vote but the Senate will get a classified briefing to more about serious so we'll be hearing more about it soon

Turkey United States Brad Sherman Turkish Government Congress Senate Mitch Mcconnell Mccall White House President Trump Syria Congressman Twenty Years
US to step aside for Turkish assault on Kurds in Syria

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:19 min | 1 year ago

US to step aside for Turkish assault on Kurds in Syria

"On Sunday night the White House announced that US President Donald Trump had spoken to Turkish President Richard Type Erred One and agreed that you had forces operating in northern Syria would stand aside in the event of Turkey's long threatened invasion of the area we've been in Syria for many years serious to be a short-term hip just short term hit we were supposed to be in and out that was many many years ago northern Syria is probably not a helpful way of thinking about the region concerned though is geographically the north of Syria it is practically Kurdish the area of Syria along the border with lucky has been controlled for some while by Syrian Kurdish militia called the white p g the white PG have been a key ally of the US led coalition Fighting Islamic state Turkey however considers the Y. p. g. terrorists allies of the PK eighty largely Turkey based Kurdish group who have battled Turkey for decades Turkey also wants to repatriate the two million Syrian refugees is currently hosting to the territory the wipe e. g. hold trump now seems with little consultation with anybody but other wan to have wait to in one Syrian Kurdish official by NBC News said the Americans of traitors they have abandoned us to a Turkish massacre if the why PG and Kurds in general thought their heroin in helping to tackle Islamic state would be some guarantee of American support in future they were reckoning without two things one obviously is the impulsiveness of Donald Trump who has learned what little he understands of the Middle East from Fox News which is worse than not knowing anything at ooh the other is a long history almost an ingrained habit of abandonment off the Kurds by those who profess to admire and respect them and promise to see Turku they fought with us they follow us they died with us they died we lost tens of thousands of Kurds died fighting isis they died for us and with us and for themselves but they're great people trump claims that he has not betrayed the Kurds among a series of bowl hinged and mentored tweets on the subject he has exclaimed that Inouye have we abandoned the Kurds who are special people and wonderful fighters codes will have ample reason for thinking that this is about half right the molten history of selling the cuts out dates back to the nineteen not when the Kurds hoped the dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire would at last permit them a state of their own the nineteen twenty treaty of several promised one in fact however western powers decided they cared less about this than they did about keeping the new Turkish Republic on board and the fledgling Kurdistan was quiet were encouraged by the West when there was a government in Baghdad that the West found disagreeable and ignored when there was an Iraqi rule of the West felt it could deal with in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s the west shrugged as Saddam Hussein waged a campaign of genocide against the Kurds including the use of chemical weapons in the early nineteen nineties following Gulf War One the Kurds were enjoined by President George H W Bush to rise against Saddam when they did a little help was forthcoming and the West continued to arm Turkey as it's brutal war with the PKK continued and when the United States removed Saddam in two thousand three Iraq's Kurds who had eventually being protected to some extent by a US imposed no-fly zone were the section of Iraq who did as it was hoped all Iraq would do embraced the opportunity and built a more or less functional and Western Friendly Society and there is indeed an argument that the West has no better friends or more reliable allies in the entire Middle East than the stateless Kurds as regards wine trump has done this varies the eternal Tara Khel response why does trump do anything assorted conspiracy theories are in play pertaining to trump's property interests in Istanbul his eternal Royat please Russian President Vladimir Putin for some reason and so forth but there is a simpler and likely explanation trump is now firmly in reelection mode he probably understands that he's best chance of getting a second term is to go to the people buoyed by a healthy economy and unburdened by American military involvement in countries his base couldn't point to on a map. It's hard luck for the Kurds of course but then it usually his

White House
On This Day in History: Austria-Hungary Annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina

This Day in History Class

04:06 min | 1 year ago

On This Day in History: Austria-Hungary Annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina

"Today was October nineteen o eight Austria Hungary informed the Ottoman Empire of his annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina this announcement set off what's known as the Bosnian crisis a period of conflict between Austria Hungary and the Ottoman Empire under the eighteen seventy eight treaty of Berlin Austria Hungary gained the right to occupy and administer the Ottoman Empire's provinces of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Sandjak of Novi Pazar but Austria Hungary always had its sights set on permanent possession of the provinces Bosnia and Herzegovina were widely sought after but Austria Hungary a lot of work into developing infrastructure mines factories agriculture and schools in Bosnia and Herzegovina at the same time ethnic and the end religious conflict grew within Bosnia and Herzegovina and groups in the two provinces displayed nationalist ambitions the young Turk Revolution broke out in the Ottoman Empire in Nineteen eight and restored the Ottoman Constitution Appear Seventy six and revived the Ottoman Parliament Vienna. I was afraid that the new authorities in the government of the Ottoman Empire would try to restore Ottoman political power in Bosnia and Herzegovina as a WPRO Russia Serbia for control over the Sandjak of Novi Pazar and Bosnia and Herzegovina Russia itself was stabilized after defeat in the Russo Japanese war foreign minister of Austria Hungary alloys graph flex up on Arendal saw an opportunity for Austria Hungary to assert his dominance in the Balkans Austria Hungary's ambassador to Russia Leopold Graf Ferstl set up a meeting between Aaron Paul and the Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Petrovich. It is both skis in September nineteen eight at Bouchon Arabia. What actually happened at the meeting is up for debate as no minutes of a meeting where release it is both ski. It says that Russia would not object to the annexation and an exchange Austria Hungary would not object to open the Bosphorus and Dardanelles Straits two Russian warships is Boesky insisted on an international conference before the annexation took place but on October six the day after Bulgaria declared its independence from the Ottoman Empire Emperor Franz Joseph. I of Austria announced that it was annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina the withdrawal of the austro-hungarian Armie from a Sandjak of Novi Pazar was also announced but is Boesky was not expecting the annexation to happen so soon he said that Aaron Thaw Paul did not tell him the date of annexation and that he did not know Austria Hungary planned on executing it before the matter was settled with other political power opposition to the annexation erupted in Europe Russia and the Balkans France Britain and Italy protested the annexation Pan Slavic nationalists nationalist throughout Europe. Were unhappy with announcement. Serbia insisted that Austria Hungary seed part of the Jack of Novi Pazar to them and Dan is Volsky supported them but Austria Hungary backed by Germany threatened to invade Serbia at the end of the Bosnian crisis ACIS Austria Hungary seemed to have come out on top after a boycott of austro-hungarian goods caused commercial losses Austria Hungary ended up paying an indemnity to the Ottomans and alienating many from Australian policy but the Ottoman Empire recognized the annexation which Russia and Serbia accepted opted in March of nineteen o nine the next month the treaty Berlin was amended to accept the annexation the nation's managed to avoid the war but tense relations between Austria Hungary Russia and Serbia after the latter two faced such mutilation remained and contributed due to the outbreak of World War One and nineteen fourteen.

Berlin Austria Hungary Ottoman Empire Herzegovina Austria Hungary Novi Pazar Austria Acis Austria Hungary Exchange Austria Hungary Bosnia Balkans Austria Ottoman Empire Emperor Franz J Ottoman Parliament Vienna Herzegovina Russia Wpro Russia Serbia Aaron Thaw Paul Russia Leopold Graf Ferstl Serbia Russia SKI
Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

BrainStuff

06:21 min | 1 year ago

Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

"At IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with us on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems. IBM A. B. M. Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren bogle Bam here although these days wearing shoes with high heels mostly coated feminine the original Wears High High heels were men so what's the history here when where and why did people I begin wearing shoes with elevated heels we spoke by email email with Elizabeth Mohawk senior curator Toronto's Batta Shoe Museum who says she has yet to unravel this mystery. The exact origin of high heels remains needs to be discovered. What's clear however is it. High heels. Were not a European invention heeled footwear only emerged in western Europe around the turn of the seventeenth century but had been warn for hundreds of years prior throughout Western Asia Similar Hawk said evidence for early Western Asian heels as far back as Tenth Century Persia suggests a strong relationship to horseback riding and may have been connected to the innovation of the stirrup the store profoundly changed horseback riding and in particular made military campaigns on horseback more effective as as an enabled riders to steady themselves in dramatically improved the effectiveness of weapons such as the Lance and Bowen Aero. He'll seems to have been a further development of this technology as it allowed the wearer to hook his feet in the stirrups better angering him to his steed eventually heeled footwear for men spread to Europe likely three political networks works and trade but the exact evolution is complicated so why did heels only become of interest to Europeans around the beginning of the sixteen hundreds civil heck said the answer lies and things it's complex European world exploration and the destablizing the textile trade to the rise of Persia under the reign shot a bus the first from fifteen eighty the eight to sixteen twenty nine and both Persian and European concerns about the increasingly powerful Ottoman Empire in particular it was the power of Shah boasts the First Mountain Military Terry who wore heeled footwear that may have made heels appealing I to European men and ultimately to women as the he'll entered into upper class men's fashion and there was a concurrent trend in women's fashion to adopt certain aspects of men's attire some hawks said that the women who played with this trend were often quote the butt of ridicule the end there numerous offenses included their adoption of men's military inspired fashion including broadbrimmed hats ornamented with plumes doublets carrying weapons and wearing heels in the heels that both men and women wore in the early years of the seventeenth century were very low but they would rise for both sexes as the century progressed the the majority of powerful and privileged men wore heels through the seventeenth century and into the early eighteenth century in France during the reign of Louis the fourteenth from sixteen forty three to seventeen in fifteen wearing red high heels was a principal signifier of political privilege limited to the king and his courtiers beyond France red heels for men were at first associated associated with French sophistication but by the end of the seventeenth century they were increasingly seen as effeminate especially in England similar. Hawk said fueled. Oh by nascent enlightenment thinking and increasing nationalisms men's dress began to undergo a radical transformation at the end of the seventeenth century. It was in the early eighteenth century that men abandoned abandoned the he'll to women's fashions and the he'll became a signifier femininity. Those shifts included a heightened division between men's and women's tire as as well as March differences between French English men's dress some will hawk said since the Seventeenth Century Western culture has shown extreme sensitivity to men in heels especially if it's deemed that the heels are being used to increase height she notes that this negative view only increased Darwinian ideas of survival of the fittest became came translated into racist and sexist notions of natural male physical and mental superiority but heels for man made a brief comeback in the middle of the twentieth any of century SIMILAC explained the he'll began rising in men's fashion in the nineteen sixties and in the early nineteen seventies reached unprecedented heights in direct response. I feel wheel to the burgeoning women's movement the heels and men's fashion however we're not borrowed from the female wardrobe they were block and high like Louie the fourteenth and were touted as a way increasing one stature masculinity and confidence in no way did they reference the Longstanding Feminine High and Thin Heal these days however however heels on men can be construed to emphasize a lack of height rather than compensating for it which means quote that heels on men function like a bad to pay they reveal insecurity and that in our current culture is deemed unappealing iconic footwear designer Christian Lubaton concurred to a news publication a man and heals. That's a prosthesis but I sympathize. The men need help but a man and heals is ridiculous clearly. Mr Lubaton doesn't watch the cowboy channel those BRONC and bull riders look pretty good or as someone hack puts it cowboys continue to own their heels and wear them with confidence today's episode certain Kerry Tatra and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works ruinous and lots of other topics our home planet has networks dot com in or podcast. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Hello I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo the two most important musicians of the twentieth twentieth century podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by Jerry Goose did and in Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah bowling but the new song featuring original lyrics by Bob Dylan listened to bear in a banner on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast.

IBM Hawk Iheartradio Europe Christian Lubaton France Lauren Bogle Bam Persia Batta Shoe Museum Dennis Quaid Shah Bob Dylan T-Bone Burnett Senior Curator First Mountain Military A. B. M. Toronto Elizabeth Mohawk Bowen Aero England
 Venezuelan envoy rejects 'biased' report at UN rights body

PRI's The World

04:08 min | 1 year ago

Venezuelan envoy rejects 'biased' report at UN rights body

"A damning report from the u n on venezuelan security forces came out today allegations of thousands of extra judicial killings by security forces loyal to president didn't nicolas maduro the goal suppress opposition to the government the report drew on evidence collected by the human human rights chief michelle basch lead on a visit to venezuela last month's special that said today the rule of law there had been deeply eroded oh report notes attacks against actual or perceived political opponents on human rights defenders ranging from threats and smear campaigns to arbitration detention torture on ill treatments sexual violence killings uninformed disappearance parents accessing a lethal force has repeatedly being used against protestors my office has also documented excessive use of force in the context of security operations by the special election forces with multiple killings mayor young men more than five thousand young men dead in a ledge confrontations with officers last year alone according to the report venezuela's deputy foreign affairs minister william castio dismissed e u n report he said it relied on selective unbiased information nation venezuela thought they would act saturday killing fundamental level that they look if you're not by x he has said venezuela is sure that bhatia let knows the report does not reflect the reality in the country the fact is though nearly four million people have fled venezuela most of taken refuge just across the border in countries like columbia but some venezuelans have gone much farther from home as rebecca colored reports from lebanon in central davey just off the main road is to kind of a south american restaurant inside your audience flattening more male though to make traditional venezuelan of at this gentleman guard up interviewed are you on your on your end up in lebanon he's lebanese father immigrated to venezuela using this legal my father came in very very humble a background and a it was a tough times and lebanon there were threats or barber happening three ortiz father the choice of venezuela wasn't all that surprising the first lebanese immigrated there in the eighteen sixties what was then the ottoman empire then in nineteen fifteen teen lebanon unexperienced osaman tens of thousands flood made of south america and in the sixties and seventies there were the third wave of lebanese immigration in stocks now there are more people of lebanese descent living outside lebanon and then in it he went over shoemaker by the time you're father rive venezuela already kind of driving lebanese community moves on and on and on you already showed me pictures here's on his phone at their license that as well before the crisis photos of them scuba diving family vacations in weddings there two story home with a pool his family owned several car repair shops in a factory that made beds in actresses if you want a commercial business look very well in life was very warm for many many years and then a start and even when venezuela's economy collapsed you already stayed then two years ago two men on a motorcycle try just not just four year old son from in front of the county's factory he teared up when he talks about his decision to leave a year though here ride in lebanon a place you only heard about in stories from his parents his wife and child were already here you wanna know the winter is security in there are a lot of people have a three the me very well a sometimes they make fun of how i speak my broken arabic and my ex sentiment but it's not joking manner and they had extended accounting in lebanon to welcome him though he says it's still towers demography reporter me most difficult thing was starting at nyu starting from zero throwing all the progress that my business has

Four Year Two Years
"ottoman empire" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Sam Litzinger. Brenton Tarrant the twenty-eight-year-old suspected in the mosque attacks in New Zealand had traveled to the Balkans in the past three years where he toured historic sites and apparently studied battles between Christians and the Ottoman empire. New Zealand police Commissioner Mike Bush says the death toll from the shootings has climbed it is with sadness advise that the number of people who have died in this awful vent has narrowed to fifty CBS news correspondent Steve Futterman. This woman here in Christ Church. Feels lucky lucky that her son is alive. Hit. In gun or whatever the fighting was happening. Any say, oh, she was on the phone with a friend when the gunman opened fire starts screaming, and I'm driving around like amid woman, and I want my son. Her son was in the mosque. It was the worst moment parent can imagine line fear here. We order so much fear. You thought the worst? I thought my son is gone. Fortunately, for her her son survived little bruise on his eyes. But overall, he's okay. Steve Futterman, CBS news Christ's church. New Zealand President Trump says he doesn't think this attack signals arise in white supremacist views Democrats are trying to figure out what to do next. Now. The President Trump has vetoed a Bill that would have overturned his emergency declaration CBS news, correspondent coal Killian. Democrats will look for ways to prevent the president from trying to shift some of these funds that he wants to use for the border wall. They want to prevent him from being able to divert some of that funding from other projects, for instance, military construction, Mr. Trump had promised. Peterlee that Mexico would pay for the wall. CBS news correspondent Kenneth Craig's is young people around the world have turned out to demand action on climate change. They protested.

CBS Mr. Trump Steve Futterman president New Zealand Brenton Tarrant Sam Litzinger Christ Church Kenneth Craig Killian Mike Bush Mexico twenty-eight-year three years
"ottoman empire" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

09:31 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Is the John Batchelor show. Constantinople the Ottoman empire. We see it in American history right away with the US moldy, what was Tripoli in the marine him. What was Commodore Prebble and the constitution and Stephen Decatur that was about the challenge to parts of the Ottoman empire that time at Tripoli or along the north African post coast, but that is part of the reach of the Sultan in Constantinople at the end of the first war that autumn and empire long history of contact with American with America's navy. I mentioned the shores of Tripoli, but I learned from a wonderful new sweeping book about a small piece of Constantinople where the US navy was a critical observer of the chaos of the end of the Ottoman empire. America's Black Sea fleet by Robert shank that Commodore David porter called on the sublime part in Constantinople in the eighteen thirties. And in the eighteen sixties David Farragut was there in the eighteen ninety s Americans observed the contest between the. The Armenians Christians and the Ottoman empire. Some pointing to the massacres that continued into the twentieth century and the American ambassador Henry Morgan thought to Turkey during the first war left eye book, which he he was their thirteen to sixteen in which five chapters are devoted to his observations of the sufferings of the Armenians throughout the Ottoman empire. What we now call Turkey. However, I begin this story with the author by asking about why it is that the US navy following the end of the first war following the verse I treaty following the break-up of the Ottoman empire. Why the US navy dispatched destroyers and navy personnel to Constantinople why because we had not been at war with Turkey. So what are we doing there? Robert, Bob, a very good evening to you. Thank you very much. Your book is extremely carefully written and very politically astute for this period after. The first war. Why did the navy go there? What was the reason given to dispatch although all those sailors good evening to you. Good evening. Good to talk to you. Listen, we we were sending ships to support American interests and Americans who might have been endanger in a deeply in in Anatolia or Asia. Minor the continental Turkey is we call it today. And also because America have been so gripped by what was called has become called the army Nghien genocide the terrible stories of what had happened to the Armenians during the nineteen fifteen nineteen sixteen as reported on by ambassador Morton thought and others. And so they America started the near east relief campaign to help all the survivors of the genocide in deeply in in Armenia, and in many other places of of continental the Turkey and also, of course, Americans had some business interests. Overseas in in the region. And then, of course, missionaries had been in in Turkey from the congregational church before something like almost one hundred years. The US navy has dispatched though, we're not at war with Turkey. And we're not really sharing the spoils of the division of the of the Ottoman empire. The French and the British are extremely prominent we sail into Constantinople, and you paint the picture vividly. This is nineteen twenty twenty one that the remains of Gallipoli and the and the first war are everywhere with wreck ships with possible minds floating around with evidence of pirate havens on the on the shoreline. So this is not a restored Constantinople. Does the navy regarded as a good posting or is this a punishment posting what's the opinion of the sailors large? It depends not they're not always the same. But it was of course, a very romantic very, very. Fabled place. There were a great monuments on the headgear Sophia and many many great mosques on Sunday skyline. There were stories of of historic stories reaching back to Alexander, the great and the and before that the the with the Bosphorus strait and gone into Greece. And so all of that. And then as things that came around. All that. More and more of what the the the shitty was like began coming back story speaking come coming back to the states. And so it was a very very attractive thing for many, sailors. We need to meet the commander of the American flotilla the American ships. His name is Admiral Bristol, and you describe him. He's fifty years old his wife is Helen he described him as as a combination of amiable and stubborn was he regarded as a good commander by the the men in the in the destroyers cruisers. They were they were pretty much point. He was a very strong commander. And so they were on his side by large course, they knew nothing of the circumstances. They were going into and he more and more dominated their points of view. He was an old football player from the Napa since he was awfully awfully awfully genial. But you could assume an aggressive scowl what he wanted to an all did. Yes. You you. You have a wonderful photograph in your book of the Admiral scowling, I I guess he wasn't friendly to cameras, and he was a power that is not on. We don't have anything comparable today. Bob as I read it. He was more powerful than the ambassador and his word was law for not only the navy, but reporting back to Washington, it was that the nature of the navy in those days if you were an Admiral on scene you were God. Well, he was the in fact today facto ambassador, the other solos there were much sport it to impose this wheel up on them. Then they would have been America had not had since the war, although they didn't declare war on Turkey. But he was on scene. And so, and he talked to everybody there and learned everything, and so he was able to tell Washington his point of view and his point of view on more or less dominated in Washington is what was going on there. He was very knowledgeable. I am. Destroyers went throughout the black CHEN and so on and so he was very knowledgeable and all all that he came across right? They made regular calls. And so they were there was no internet. There were no satellites that were no airplanes following in this area. So a navy destroyer making calls in the Black Sea in the GM. That was fresh information. One other information to the Admiral. Yes, one in and then he cables Washington. One other major significant figure is Kamal Mustafa who is he in nineteen nineteen nineteen twenty when the Admiral arise. Well, he writes in nineteen nineteen and canal is the is not long after he gets there canal is set into by the allies into into conduct from Constantinople to continental Turkey to help solve some things the allies wanted to, but he had a different idea. And he starts a revolution. He begins to get people around him. And he begins in the far east of Turkey to to get all the Turks instead of the the Ottoman empire. The old Ottoman empire is falling and begins more and more to subsume all the governmental functions in deep continental Turkey. And he's a challenge to the Sultan. Does bristol. Bristol does Admiral Bristol have an opinion Bristol becomes very positive. Very favorable towards him. If he sees Canales the turkeys, George Washington very early on. He gets this opinion also realizes how powerful he is likely to be and Americans have been there American commissions have visited and the show him one of the generals who American general took exploratory journal says of back and who met the canal says this is no cheap political adventurer. He really does want to make of Turkey a nation in the in the I guess you'd have to say in the place of the old crumbling Ottoman empire. The book is America's Black Sea fleet. Robert shank, the US navy amidst war and revolution nineteen thousand nine hundred nineteen Twenty-three you can you you see the Turkish revolution. Well, the Admiral and the and the American contingent about to get overwhelmed by the Russian revolution to the north of the Black Sea. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Balance of nature's.

Turkey navy Constantinople America Black Sea John Batchelor Robert shank Admiral Bristol US Tripoli Washington commander David Farragut Bob bristol Commodore Prebble Stephen Decatur Henry Morgan Commodore David porter
"ottoman empire" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"You have to recognize that Islam by its nature is fundamentally incompatible with traditional western notion of how to live. What stood out to you about this interview? Todd, that's good stuff air the benefit of hindsight. We look back at history and that's one of the great things history is supposed to be able to do. It's supposed to be able to help us not to make the same stakes twice. So we we, we can see we can connect the dots. Why did the revolutionary war alternately happen? We can see what led up to the civil war World War Two. When I asked Robert Spencer about you know, how far away are we realistically from caliphate he didn't put a time on it, but he said a fundamental aspect of what it would take for the Calvin to happen is happening right now that fall of Europe that is pretty chilling. Does it take? Does that take the rest of our lifetime? Does it happen? And after we're gone, Steve, is it perhaps happening much much sooner than that? He doesn't know, but one way or the other, he says, it is happening as we speak. That is. Remarkable to behold because there's no buffer. I mean, the history of Islam tilts towards the caliph it and at times rival are warring Calif. It's like what happened after Muhammad's death? For example, this where we get the the traditions of Sooners and she is from is which of these caliphates we're going to, you know, pick up the mantle from Muhammed following his passing. So I mean the history of Islam tilts towards the caliph it with the Ottoman empire being the most obvious example. So why haven't we seen this in our day and age because western civilization has provided the buffer towards that happening. Has made it very difficult for because the goal of a caliph it and the way you would assert yours is the caliphat to consolidate behind is you have the means and the opportunity to impose a Jimmy. If there's not had Jimmy guess would you don't have a caliph it right? So Dida Jimmy to have a caliphate or Calvin half gem? Yes. All right. So if you're a bit player on the world stage, you can go out into the street and scream caliphate Calvin caliphate caliphate all you want. You're not rallying people to your. This is what ISIS tried to do this. This is what ISIS was trying to do. They were trying to wreak so much havoc essentially, conquer Iraq and Syria with the point of saying, we've defeated the west Iraq is a proxy state of the United States, the great Satan. We've, we've, we've deposed Assad who the west, who the west is at times called vile and necessary depending on which leader and which era we got rid of Assad. We got rid of the we. We have taken over the US proxy state of Iraq. We're the caliphat. We're the winners jump on our bandwagon. That's the sensually the history of his law. Well, if you have a powerful western buffer. Very difficult for consolidation around a caliphat because they can't acquire a Gemini. But if the west is going to unilaterally disarm in front of radical Islam. And multicultural themselves out of civilization. This is what Roberts talking about, right? Jimmy suddenly becomes possible. Right? Yeah, there's there's nobody to stop them. And again, he didn't wanna be grandiose and putting in a number on it. But his clear implication was that it could be much much sooner than anybody thinks. Well, great conversation was Robert Spencer enjoyed having him here with us today on the Thursday on the day show let us know what you think about what we think Stephen dais dot com is the Email address. You can like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter at Steve dais show last name, spell DAC. And if you have time today, click like where subscribe there on I tunes or Stitcher. The more of you do that. The more that helps other people to find as well. So many of you already have. Thank you. We greatly appreciate it back at it again tomorrow until then John three seventeen. This is Steve day..

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"ottoman empire" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The remaking of the map of europe now the remaking of the levant this is the ottoman empire one hundred years before it fell apart at the first war napoleon is marching with thirteen thousand of his soldiers on damascus where he's heard there's a turkish army gathering he follows the course that alexander followed i in reverse up the coastal route to java which he besieges and he's onto akra the english no that he's out there and they mean to counter him did they see napoleon at the time as a special commander or today think this was a prank from the directory and not name his him as the enemy andrew near the very much worried about him as an individual because of course the italian campaign of proves that he was quite extraordinary general than say actually they went out of their way to try to count the letters backwards and forwards between the paleo and his and these offices and frowns and when they did capture them on many occasions they published an insult to the huge embarrassment of the various offices including the who pretty uniformly said how much they aged egypt we make note of the fact that while he was in cairo he i was told we believe of josephine's infidelity with if ally charles and he is genuinely laid low but that she does that to them all the time i got i got used to the fact that he was living inside of a novel of his head and both of them were always threatening to kill themselves after a while it just became like love poems andrew yes i think that they was that high raymond form love love discussion i mean they it was when he discovered about hip elite show that of course he took home the first is he's twenty to mister c's pauline away who was the wife of one of his officers and and that was that was actually that was more comic operetta pauline herself you tell the story of how she wind up a wound up to be after she passed from general to general he handed her off of being very wealthy with brazilian timber wearing pants smoking a pipe and living till ninety one i would say that she had the better of all of them i think she had the loss law frankie yes you obviously had a hell of a life i'd love to read autobiography we're marching bloodily towards the showdown and opera this is where the english commodore smith arise with two chips to make sure that napoleon is not successful this is a gun battle because sieges in those days where how much cannon and yet again i am i notes andrew always i wonder whether napoleon is in a dream he reads books he takes a library with him to cairo he's always studying what the greats have thought or made of these events and so while he's caesar and alexander in cairo now he stands on the same hillside where a richard the third besieged is that correct was he was eventually richard richard the i was he thinking richard as as low as he supervised the siege totally he was always thinking about history i mean he he was when he crossed the sinai of course he was writing about movies and trying to work out when these various things he was a man who's ultimately suffused with history it occurs to me when i read your story of napoleon that he wishes that he'd wrote the biography that you're writing trophy because he's studying history to come up with a character for you to follow it through the letters as he's studying history mir's within mirrors now the battle dhaka is bloody minded one point this is the age of napoleon bonaparte and mozart and everyone on stage all the time commodore smith challenges napoleon to a one to one duel to settle acro and napoleon's response is striking how does he turn him down he says that he wouldn't mind having do with the greatest british general up until that point he but unfortunately moore whose dad nashville he wasn't gang to fight and he said he wasn't gains have a deal against a single english royal navy commodore there is a battle that takes place away from aqua at the time fought by a subordinate to napoleon but eventually napoleon arrives just at the last moment this is the battle of mount tabor where they face off what would have been the army from damascus and defeat it and didn't make a do of the fact that he was.

europe one hundred years
"ottoman empire" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

Wall Street Business Network AM 760

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

"Desert and killing infidels and they wind up perhaps either dead or they wind up cleaning the toilets someplace or they wind up blowing themselves up i don't think that the vast majority of muslims in this country in the world really feel that they want to wipe us all out and have a completely muslim sharia based world i i don't see that happening the muslims that i know that i talked to and certainly the people that are in the middle east many of them have a different attitude but i don't i don't believe those people are warlike or violent or bloodthirsty to the point where they want to kill us all off you know the the the world has a population of seven to seven and a half billion people and not all those people are going to wanna live under the black flag islamic state my position is that actually are victory in this war is pretty much assured because of the overwhelming majority of people in this world don't wanna live under that kind of rule on that kind of oppression so even in the in the in the middle east i think most of those countries in the middle east where people maybe feel oppressed and and maybe urine for some type of return to an islamic empire it kind of hearkens back to what they look at us the good old days you know for fourteen hundred years from six thirty two until about nineteen twenty four with the collapse of the ottoman empire those countries in the middle east the way we see them today didn't really exist under the various caliphates and and dynasties and that part of the world individual countries like iraq didn't exist syria didn't exist these are our sort of artificial labels that we put on these countries by the great powers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and as a result many of those people a real fundamental distinction here is that many people in that part of the world self identify i as a muslim because their history has been as a muslim before it was as in egypt iraqi or a series of our lebanese so i think it's essential to understand part of the world view that.

iraq syria middle east egypt fourteen hundred years
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ideologue and a writer he wasn't a politician wasn't someone he wanted to be a positive wanted to become a member of the knesset he wasn't seen by his own movement to someone who is a heavyweight could actually become a minister or a parliamentarian and he was very frustrated by that and he returned to academia he moved to the us he spent most of his adult like in the us with netanyahu as a teenager and bibi netanyahu the third generation of netanyahu's is the first one who actually made it into public life so let's rewind for a second because a couple of times you you use the word zionism and i just want you to if you could define zionism in the context of the establishment of israel well is a program it was a program that became started to be articulated the end of the nineteenth century where we see heritage as being the fowler of political science he wasn't actually the first zionist ideologue but he did put zionism into a more organized framework he sets up the congress designees movement and it was it was a programmatic movement was a movement which was that to establish a sovereign state in the ancient jewish homeland of which was then called palestine some people called it other things it was at the time just a province in the autumn and republic ottoman empire until nineteen seventeen when britain overtook it as part of the first world war and the program is a program was always hotly contested both within the movement is the best way to to to to further the movements aims is it through diplomacy is it through building a kibbutz settlements in industry in palestine is it by through through force of military by raising a jewish fighting force which would which would which would actually conquer palestine from the british and safeguard from its arab neighbors who didn't want to see zionism becoming a reality so in that sense netanyahu's father and grandfather and to this day the ideology antonio is part of is the right wing gives is it's a very militaristic nationalist brand design is which has which was influenced by various movements in in the early twentieth century in europe jet ski it's it's founder some people accused him of being a fascist he himself disavowed fascism and said he we have nothing to do.

writer us palestine bibi netanyahu israel britain europe founder
"ottoman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello welcome back my name is dr christopher jerry and this is great big history podcast today we do imperialism from eighteen fifty two 1914 i e when white people conquered the world by 1914 europeans owned eighty five percent of the globe which means basically you had the ottoman empire in the middle east china south america in the united states and mexico not owned by europeans your views on everything else so causes cause of imperialism why do white people get on boats and unlike exploration the 1500s or colonialism in the sixteen seventeen hundreds when they went and lived in places why do they now just going conquer places end sucks things out of it while the number one reason his industrialization industralization requires a massive amount of resources minerals and markets and its people to sell stuff too and it needs resources that europeans don't have so industrialization required a way of getting at this stuff two european competition so why would i conquer the congo because i want the stuff in the congo i want the rubber i went to the copper i want the iron but i don't want any other europeans to have it either so i wanna close off my empire to other people now we are going to live in a world of free trade which makes all of this nonsense um people people said about the iraq war all we have we should conquer iraq and then we'll take the oil in fact that was one of the arguments the oil will pay for the war will just take the oil um down trump i believe said that as well we should just taken the oil we should stayed and taken the oil um.

united states congo free trade iraq dr christopher jerry middle east south america mexico eighty five percent
"ottoman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello welcome back my name is dr christopher jerry this is great big history podcast and this episode where do the ottoman turks or we're going to do port one of the ottoman turks at least the rise of the ottoman turks and why this successful so on our map the ottoman empire will dominate the middle east parts of north africa parts of southeastern europe a and do so from roughly the twelve hundreds after the mongols come through uh they take needed little ramp up time until basically 1919 fifteen so before we get the ottoman turks we have to start with the situation turks cedric turks ran the turks the turks mean a language group i mean what happened in the early middle ages is oil leak classical age is in central europe not central europe central asia from the ukraine all the way to mongolia to china turkish speaking people one they defeated deep persianspeaking peoples and this is a lot of the and no create what becomes a lot of the stands you know turkmenistan obviously um and what happened is one of those groups one of those turkishspeaking groups entered into the middle east probably as mercenaries for the a bassett's that's a history one on one thing and then went into the took over much of the middle east they they went is kind of like the matrix or like terminator they started as soldiers and they went wait a minute we're more powerful in the people working for why we listening to them and so they started beat up the arabs and then they entered into uh asia minor.

cedric turks asia ukraine mongolia dr christopher jerry africa europe turkmenistan
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJR 760

"Old notion of the ottoman empire observe the report of the house foreign affairs committee back on the 20s what was once the land of milk and honey has become through met misrule and oppression a devastated in sparsely settled land so when the turks controlled the socalled west bank they destroyed it when the jordanians controlled jerusalem they destroyed it it's quite evident that the house committee blamed the turks the dysfunction and oppression and view the creation of the jewish state not just as a biblical fulfillment in a place of refuge for persecuted european jews but is the only means of preserving democratic rights for everyone when hear more this is interesting christians jews muslims whoever congressman frank apple they republican new jersey spoke on the floor noted that for over two thousand years no other nation or people claimed the land is their homeland despite the prevailing isolationist sentiment among the politicians during that era they unanimously and passionately spoke of the need to recognize palestine as the land of the jews for the purposes of justice liberty and humanity and you can read the entire tired congressional record if you wish during consideration of the resolution on the house floor on june thirty represented a wall of chandler republican new york delivered a lengthy in riveting speech summing up the purpose and background of the revolution a resolution and i might add these are all gentiles these are all christians his speech makes it clear that the intent was to always have one state controlled by jews and that it was universally understood the jewish government will be better for all sides in terms of democratic values and that a few g hottest agitators for seeking to undermine the agreement sound familiar he predicted that jerusalem would be the seat of the jewish government his words were quite prophetic an ominous chandler directly address the smattering of the arabs living the area here's what he said about that the the arab shall be permitted to remain in palestine and a jewish government and domination with their civil and religious rights guaranteed to them through the.

turks frank apple palestine new york jerusalem the house congressman chandler two thousand years milk
"ottoman empire" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"The british should apologize for it was a terrible thing i'm glad the british under prime minister theresa may are saying well no not at all we're proud of our role i would make one point here and i'm hearing egregiously from historian martin kramer i do so as often as i can seen as well this was an empire doing it to throw it has a legitimate 21 empire effort ruled the world in 1917 eight seventy seventy seventy get far back at you what your empires that's what role the world nationstates came later as a result of the british repeating the ottoman empire in the look kauppi arab nation grew up that had nations say put it never been there before and i think this is also important is what the british empire it was the international community oh that time which means we ally who defeated the central powers role will be now coral or or or one asthma welcome points out of the league of nations precursor to the un also embrace so did the un and let me the prince diplomat you have on i think wrote over wrote more eloquently event did offer bao it would be a data and and reparation to it by the protection of the allied powers in the renaissance of the jewish nationality hit back land from which the people of israel were exiled so many centuries ago that were going on now that's one hundred out of her serie were to and the fifty one nations of the league nations is accepted it voted for it and it was put into the preamble as was at seen remo raided the the at if there were were won the agreements with the turks with peace treaties they put the the balfour declaration into that as well so to say that this is simply the pure move as some are as you rightly pointed out and and the arab states xianmen a places like syria iraq gold emerged out of that period but no rabia saudi arabia jordan your which by the way the where we now call.

prime minister theresa martin kramer un israel remo syria iraq saudi arabia
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john batchelor with my colleague and co host and friend thaddeus mccotter wjr the great voice of the great lakes this is the el al report with malcolm hoenlein conference of presidents major american jewish organizations the generous support of el al airlines the national airlines of israel one hundred years we begin immediate lee with a memory and a commemoration and a celebration one hundred years i know thanks to an informant these last hours when the ads act troops for general allenby leaving cairo on their way to conquer from the ottoman empire what is now israel passed through best sheva on october 31st 1917 there's more coming in 1917 malcolm or awkwardness with it but i thought this was spectacular because malcolm we're talking to an australian audience and a new zealand audience as well as thenisraeli audience and here we are in new york celebrating i'm told there will be anzac troops present for the ceremony it will be a spectacular ceremony for the people of bathsheba which i know because i've been there thanks malcolm is within rocket range of the cutthroats so he had has spanned one hundred years under attack or in the in the in the in the fire of enemies of israel in the united states and is pleased to welcome the anzac troops isn't that that a wonderful obscure holiday malcolm the we've now emphasize in new york and how the world works perfectly good evening to you about com good evening actually it it is being marked in israel in a very notable way with all sorts of events being planned and the leaders of both new zealand and israel are there this was a battle that was fought or on october thirty person 1917 and the in fact mountain division cut the road from bishop it to have grown and that was the the commemoration of of what happened there in the battle of versus the ottoman empire and australia new zealand the united kingdom i think and ottoman empire in germany were on the other side so they get me there were mena troops says well i can remember the photographs malcolm a game and i don't know if they would they were or so much as they were in the.

john batchelor lee cairo new york bathsheba israel united states thaddeus mccotter malcolm hoenlein el al australia germany mena one hundred years
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"I'm john batchelor with my colleague and co host and friend thaddeus mccotter wjr the great voice of the great lakes this is the allow report with malcolm hoenlein conference of presidents major american jewish organizations the generous support of el al airlines the national airlines of israel one hundred years we begin immediately with a memory at a commemoration and a celebration one hundred years i know thanks to an informant these last hours when the and zach troops for general allenby leaving cairo on their way to conquer from the ottoman empire what is now israel passed through best sheva on october 31st 1917 there's more coming in 1979 malcolm or quietness with it but i thought this was spectacular because malcolm we're talking to an australian audience and a new zealand audience as well as than israeli audience and here we are in new york celebrating i'm told there will be anzac troops present for the ceremony it will be a spectacular ceremony for the people of bathsheba which i know because i've been there thanks malcolm is within reach market range of the cutthroats so he had has spanned one hundred years under attack or in the in the in the in the fire of enemies of israel in the united states and is pleased to welcome the anzac to abc's net that a wonderful obscure holiday malcolm that we've now emphasize size in new york and how the world works perfectly good evening to you about good evening actually it is being marked in israel in a very notable way with all sorts of events being planned and the leaders of both new zealand and israel are there this was a battle that was fought or on october 31st and mateen seventeen and be a in fact mountain division up the road from beersheva to have grown and that was the commemoration of of what happened during the battle of versus the ottoman empire and australia new zealand the united kingdom i think and ottoman empire in germany were on the other side so david muir where indian troops as well i can remember the photographs malcolm a game i don't know if they would they were or so much as they were in.

john batchelor cairo malcolm new york bathsheba israel united states beersheva david muir thaddeus mccotter malcolm hoenlein el al zach abc australia germany one hundred years
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJR 760

"While in the middle east their their vows that neighborhood one more subject i would like to bring up and that is the kurds the kurds are muslims and they've align themselves with the united states and there are democratic people they have a civilized society they're the largest ethnic minority without a country they're repeatedly brutalised by one regime after another whether turkey or syria or iraq where iran i support the kurds and i support their vote in support of an iraqi kurdistan these are a good people there's roughly forty million kurt in iran iraq syria turkey after the ottoman empire fell and they were the victims of a secret agreement between the french and the british in 1960 they were left out while they requiring up the middle east the kurds were left out the kurds supported us in iraq against saddam hussein the kurds supported us and they're still supporting us in fighting isis in the middle east they are warriors they want their liberty they want their liberty and they are a role liable and have been for decades a reliable ally of the united states our country under our secretary of state tillerson and he's not the only one has admonished the.

united states turkey syria iran kurdistan kurt iraq saddam hussein middle east secretary of state
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJR 760

"A message from the michigan high school athletic association promoting the value and values of educational athletics from the underground command post deep bowels of a hidden bunker somewhere under the brick and steel of a nondescript building we've once again made contact with our leader mark flo hello everybody mark levin here our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one now president trump met with turkey's islamofascism recipient tape it a gun the man is in a slum on nazi he brutalized as his people he locks up opposition were there raped where they are tortured or they just disappear he throws in with iran lightly lightly he throws and with putin lightly he has his own ideas have been ottoman empire the good old days you know he rejects ataturk if you know any history turkey you can check it out and this is what i don't get this is why don't get the president does something that's absolutely brilliant with respect to north korea which i'll get to in a moment something i've been advocating here we been advocating here hopefully is going to do the same with iran and rip up that deal but he meets with aragon here's what he says he gives him very high marks says it's a great honor and privilege because he's become a friend of mine to introduce president ertegun of turkey he's running a very difficult part of the world he's involved very very strongly and frankly he's getting very high marks he is destroyed the turkish republic he's destroyed it so it's absolutely appalling to me that the president would say this absolutely polling to me and yet he said so this is very troubling to me it awan now ertegun that tell us spelled please that's how i choose to pronounce and you saw his thugs in washington dc attacking the kurds right there in broad daylight beating them up kicking them pouncing on them most of them now have been arrested or have had warrants put up for their arrest and yet the.

mark flo mark levin trump turkey putin president north korea aragon michigan high school iran
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Hello everybody mark levin here our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one now president trump met with turkey's islam of fascist recipient tell keep it a gun the man is in a slum on nazi he brutalized as his people he locks up opposition were raped where they are tortured or they just disappear he throws in with iran lightly lightly he throws and with putin lightly he has his own ideas have been ottoman empire the good old days you know he rejects ataturk any history turkey you can check it out and this is what i don't get this is why don't get the president does something that's absolutely brilliant with respect to north korea which i'll get to in a moment something i've been advocating here we've been advocating here hopefully he's going to do the same with iran and rip up that deal but he meets with aragon here's what he says he gives him very high marks says it's a great honor and privilege because he's become a friend of mine to introduce president ertegun of turkey he's running a very difficult part of the world he's involved very very strongly and frankly he is getting very high marks he is destroyed the turkish republic he's destroyed it so it's absolutely appalling to me that the president would say this absolutely polling to me and yet he said so this is very troubling to me it awan now ertegun that tell us build the satellite choose to pronounce and you saw his thugs in washington dc attacking the kurds right there in broad daylight beating them up kicking them pouncing on them most of them now have been arrested or have had warns put out for their arrest and yet the.

mark levin trump turkey putin president north korea aragon iran ataturk
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Hello everybody mark levin here our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one now president trump met with turkey's this lama fascist recipient tape it a gun the man is in a slum on nazi he brutalized as his people he locks up opposition were there raped where they are tortured or they just disappear he throws in with iran lightly lightly he throws and with putin lightly he has his own ideas have been ottoman empire the good old days you know he rejects ataturk if you know any history of turkey you can check it out and this is what i don't get this is why don't get the president does something that's absolutely brilliant with respect to north korea which i'll get to in a moment something i've been advocating here we been advocating here hopefully is going to do the same with iran and rip up that deal but he meets with aragon here's what he says he gives him very high marks says it's a great honor and privilege because he's become a friend of mine to introduce president ertegun of turkey these running a very difficult part of the world he's involved very very strongly and frankly he's getting very high marks he is destroyed the turkish republic he's destroyed it so it's absolutely appalling to me that the president would say this absolutely polling to me and yet he said so this is very troubling to me it awan now ertegun that's how his belt but sets how i choose to pronounce and you saw his thugs in washington dc attacking the kurds right there in broad daylight beating them up kicking them pouncing on them most of them now have been arrested or have had warrants put out for their arrest and yet the president.

mark levin trump putin president north korea aragon iran
"ottoman empire" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman empire" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show constantinople the ottoman empire we see it in american history right away with the birth of the us navy watt was tripoli in the marine him what was commodore prebble and the constitution and steven decatur that was about the cia our two parts of the ottoman empire that time at tripoli or along the north african post coast but that is part of the reach of the sultan in constantinople at the end of the first war that ottoman empire a long history of contact with america and with america's navy i mentioned the shores of tripoli but i learned from a wonderful new sweeping book about a small piece of constantinople where the us navy was a critical observer of the chaos of the at the ottoman empire america's black sea fleet by robert shank that commodore david porter called on the sublime port in constantinople in the eighteen 30s and in the 1860s david farragut was there in the 1890s the americans observed the contest between the armenians christians and the ottoman empire allen some pointing to the massacres the continued into the 20th century and the american ambassador henry morgan thought to turkey during the first war left a book of which he he was their thirteen to sixteen in which five chapters are devoted to his observations of the sufferings of the armenians throughout the ottoman empire what we now call turkey however i begin this story with the author by asking about why it is that the us navy following the end of the first war following the versailles treaty following the breakup of the ottoman empire why the us navy dispatched destroyers and navy personnel to constantinople why because we had not been at war with turkey so why are we doing their robert baba a very good evening to you thank you very much.

john batchelor us tripoli commodore prebble constantinople america robert shank henry morgan robert baba steven decatur cia david porter david farragut versailles navy