35 Burst results for "Ottoman"

Chris Cuomo's Former Boss at ABC News Accuses the CNN Anchor of Sexual Harassment

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Chris Cuomo's Former Boss at ABC News Accuses the CNN Anchor of Sexual Harassment

"We are doing this show in. Houston we do. The first aaron houston and historic popped up about a cuomo accused of sexually harassing Former boss and if you remember. Chris cuomo was involved in that horrible at unethical. Immoral scandal of helping out his Disgusting brother the governor and never reporting on it. Like if you wanna have your brother. That's hanging whatever but the scandal was. He wasn't reporting on her telling me biding their meat mistake. People and what a disaster taken off the air new york post but about an hour ago former abc executive producers accused. Chris cuomo of sexually harassing her. This is this is not family. Friendly content I guess it was a party and he grabbed her rear end in front of her husband and co workers. What's what's the cuomo guys. What is that. The woman shelley. Ross said she was at a park. What i was at a party with my husband who sat behind me on an ottoman sipping his coke because i spoke with work friends. Mr cuomo entered the upper west side bar. He walked toward greeted me with a strong bear hug while lowering one hand to firmly. Grab and squeeze. Her took us He said i can do this now. That you're no longer my boss quote. She said he said it was a kind of cocky arrogance. She's no you can't. I said pushing him off of me at the chest while stepping back revealing my husband who had seen the entire episode at close range. It's we quickly left while job. Well i think you know the end of this. When the end of the sentence say in texas there might be an incident if you grabbed the rear end of a woman and squeeze it like

Chris Cuomo Aaron Houston Cuomo Air New York Post Mr Cuomo Houston ABC Shelley Ross Texas
Contrast to Marxist Belief, Our U.S. Military Are Noble Soldiers

Mark Levin

01:57 min | Last month

Contrast to Marxist Belief, Our U.S. Military Are Noble Soldiers

"Some four million American soldiers were mobilized to fight Germany, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria in the Ottoman Empire. Over 116,000 Americans perished. Parrish. It won't work to more than 16 million American soldiers fought the German Nazis, Japan and Italy over 400,000 lost their lives. Sicily and Zia Atlantic. Normandy. Operation Dragoon the Bulge, he would Jima, Guadalcanal. Tearaway SaiPan, Okinawa, Too many to name During the Cold War with the Soviet Union. American soldiers fought the spread of communism, including in Korea. With the Soviet Chinese backed communists in the northern part of Korea Peninsula invaded the South. Over 5,700,000 Americans were engaged in that war, nearly 34,000 lost their lives. Almost three million Americans served in uniform in the Vietnam War, which was intended to prevent again the Soviet and Chinese backed Communist, in other words and part of that country from taking over the South. Over 58,000 American soldiers lost their lives. There have been many battles since. Including but not limited to Iraq and Afghanistan. And the war on terrorism. Contrary to the American Marxist slur that America is an imperial colonising force. Our soldiers are noble warriors. Of fought and died and still do. To protect and liberate the oppressed from one end of the world to the other. And, regardless of religion, skin, colour, ethnicity or race of the victimized And unlike some of our enemies, we do not seek to conquer other countries for the purpose of occupation and territorial

German Nazis Zia Atlantic Korea Peninsula Parrish Saipan Bulgaria Hungary Austria Sicily Normandy Okinawa Germany Soviet Union Italy Japan American Marxist Korea Vietnam Afghanistan Iraq
The Origin of the Elgin Marbles

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:41 min | Last month

The Origin of the Elgin Marbles

"Greece in the early part of the nineteenth century wasn't yet an independent country. It had been under the rule of the ottoman empire since the mid fifteenth century and this was the geopolitical situation in athens in eighteen. O one thomas. Bruce seventh earl of elegant was appointed as the ambassador extraordinary and minister. Plenipotentiary of his britannic majesty to the sublime port of selma third sultan of turkey prior to arriving in the ottoman empire. He asked the british government if they were interested in. Hiring artists can make drawings and take plaster casts of the sculptures at the parthenon. The british government was in no way interested. However even if the government wasn't interested. Thomas bruce still was so using his own funds. He hired a team of artists to document. The artwork found at the parthenon so far all of his plans for documenting. What was at the parthenon. We're perfectly fine. If he had just stuck to this. I probably be doing an episode today about something else. however he didn't didn't just stick to documenting the artwork. He soon began removing whatever sculptures that he could in total he took twenty one full statues fifteen meta panels which are carver. Tabular architectural pieces and a full seventy five meters of the parthenon frieze which decorated the upper interior of the parthenon. All of this marble sculpture was sent them all. To and then to england they became known as the elgin marbles named after the earl of elegant and because they were all made out of marble they are also known as the parthenon marbles. This was all done at the personal expense of the earl. At a cost of seventy four thousand two hundred and forty pounds or what today would be worth five million pounds or about six point eight million dollars.

Bruce Seventh Earl British Government Thomas Bruce Selma Greece Athens Sultan Thomas Turkey Carver England
The Jews Settle in Cuba

Cuban Family Roots PODCAST

02:09 min | Last month

The Jews Settle in Cuba

"Jewish settlement in cuba the first jewish inhabitants were known as morales in fifty eight. The bishop of cuba wrote to spain declaring that every ship back in havana was filled with hebrews new christians. These were jews recently converted to christianity in fifteen o to inquisition proceedings. Began against the merano's in cuba. The secret juice of cuba arranged for trade between the thirteen colonies. And the use of jamaica barbados and other caribbean islands. This unable the colonies to sell goods and by military and civilian supplies. The spanish constitution of sixty nine removed all restrictions on the settlement of juice in latin america and at that time over five honda spanish jews engaging commerce in cuba and five to six jewish families were amongst the wealthiest in cuba jews were among the founders of the commercial king sugar fields and the first refineries in eighteen sixty two through eight thousand ninety five many american us join cubans in their fight for independence. The first jewish cemetery in cuba was established by the united states. Army for the american jewish soldiers who died during the spanish american war in eighteen ninety eight in nineteen six. The cemetery were sold to the united hebrew congregation primarily by american jews. Most of the members of this congregation which was later named temple. Beth israel where americans who fall in cuba or came from key west and other parts of southern florida. After the end of the war between nineteen too many sephardi jews began to come to cuba amongst them young turks who had participated in the earlier revolt against the sultan of the ottoman empire other cames from mexico north africa and the mirrored iranian. They spoke spanish and had olive complexion and blend that well with the rest of the

Cuba Morales Havana Caribbean Islands Barbados Spain Jamaica United Hebrew Congregation Latin America Honda United States Army Israel Florida North Africa Mexico
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"Thanks for listening to dictators next week. We'll begin a new season exploring the lives and careers of the most murderous and corrupt popes of the renaissance among the many sources. We use for today's episode. We found talaat pasha father of modern turkey architect of genocide by hans lukas. Kaiser extremely helpful. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from podcast on spotify. We'll see you next time. Dictators is a spotify original from podcast. It is executive produced by max cutler. Sound design by dick schroeder with production assistance by ron shapiro trent williamson carly madden and freddie beckley. This episode of dictators was written by tony goodman with writing assistance by joe gara- and neuro battelle fact checking by adriana romero and research by bradley klein. Dictators stars kate leonard. Richard rosner. Hi it's carter. From podcast every thursday on conspiracy theories c. I a edition. We are uncovering secrets hidden. Deep within the archives of the central intelligence agency to bring you a special collection of episodes from shows across our network. Follow the news spotify original from podcast conspiracy theories c. I a. edition. Listen free only on spotify..

talaat pasha hans lukas max cutler dick schroeder ron shapiro trent williamson carly madden freddie beckley tony goodman joe gara neuro battelle adriana romero Kaiser bradley klein kate leonard Richard rosner
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

07:34 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"Able to convince the ottomans that he had defeated their true enemy within the empire. Furthermore he allowed muslims from the surrounding territories to move into armenian homes and essentially replace them within the empire. An effort to re islam affi- his domain and while muslim civilians may have benefited from new spreads of land. It was high ranking members of the c. u. p. and the military who claimed the most valuable spoils for themselves these included more than ninety million square meters of fertile farmland forty thousand buildings and factories and twenty-six mining concessions in fact the mining and cotton industries which had been the domain of armenians where now completely expropriated by the ottoman government in early nineteen. Seventeen talaat was finally and officially named the grand vizier or supreme leader of the ottoman empire. Though he'd been the defacto leader in the preceding years he was now firmly and inexorably in control. And while this might sound like a major event all it really meant was that the unnamed few who oppose talaat had simply given up and accepted him but even with an iron grip on the empire to lot was still fearful that there were enough armenians remaining to either regroup outside his purview or to attempt an uprising so talaat rededicated himself to figuring out how to rid the empire of its remaining armenians in the process of plotting the final stages of his ethnic cleansing talaat was able to seize on yet another event outside the empire. Fifteen hundred miles north of istanbul in the streets of petrograd russia. The bolsheviks had successfully overthrown the provisional government and established a socialist government within months of taking power. The new bolshevik government signed the treaty of brest-litovsk with the central powers ending world war one for russia. The treaty of brest-litovsk actually helped taught ottoman territory which had been previously seized by the russians was given back to the ottomans for talaat. This was a major symbolic and ideological victory. It demonstrated that his alliance with germany was paying dividends. And that his pledge to reclaim portions of the empire was coming to fruition. All of which led to lot to take another page straight out of the dictators playbook and foment his cult of personality despite a very mixed military performance to lot and the c. up began a coordinated effort to portray talaat as the savior of the empire. He had wrested it from the pernicious influence of the armenians and fended off a british naval invasion at gallipoli with this new identity to lot actually laid out a coherent agenda. This included reforming the autumn in legal system and fixing the economy which he and his acolytes had crippled through their own avarice and incompetence meanwhile he was honored throughout germany and austria n. stowed with the order of the black eagle at the time. This was the highest honor conferred by the german government. Now it seemed even the international community was beginning to take him seriously. But the adulation and respect were extremely short lived during this period. Ottoman troops had been attempting to reclaim land outside what was designated in the treaty of brest-litovsk and closer to the middle east. None of these operations were supported by germany and drove a wedge between talaat and his german friends and a more immediate problem for both sides was the entry of the united states into the war within a year. The tide in europe had shifted in the allies favor and after several brutal and decisive victories it appeared that the central powers were all but defeated by the summer of nineteen. Eighteen talaat was at odds with his german allies and watching in fear as allied troops advanced from nearly all directions toward the ottoman empire as it turned out to lots rain as grand vizier. Supreme omnipotent leader of the ottoman empire would be a brief one coming up to the victors. Go the spoils to the loser. A self imposed exile in berlin. This episode is brought to you by delo. Nothing cares better with fight night than the undisputed king of import beer but dentals been the gold standard since one thousand nine hundred. Five appeals made with only the most premium hops. Giving it a chris golden lager taste. It's a beer that came from small beginnings and never gave up. That's the fighting spirit. That's what makes a line which is why it's no surprise that madonna was the official beer of ufc so next fight night. No matter who's in the octagon mishel you choose the beer. That's always in your corner mondello because it's proved for those with the fighting spirit stock up on model for the next fight night head to delo. Usa dot com to shop delivery and pickup drink responsibly. Beer imported by crown imports chicago illinois. This episode is brought to you by the a v. Eight is the original plan powered drink the one that started it all and it says delicious as ever making choices. You can feel good about that help. You live well like using original for convenience satisfying snack one five. And a half ounce can of beat original has only thirty calories but it has one full serving of vegetables and is a good source of vitamins. Anc it's perfect to carry on the go snack or to have on hand after workout shoes. Va for big plant. Power goodness in one. Small can now back to the story for ten and relentless years the c. u. p. party had ruled over the dying ottoman empire at the top of the ladder was forty four year. Old grand vizier. Talaat pasha though. He rarely brought greatness to the empire. His populist posturing and deadly use of propaganda had allowed him to become the most powerful man in the nation but over the course of a few short months in nineteen eighteen that power came crashing down. Initially it looked like to lot could avoid disaster even though the end of world war one was disastrous for germany and austria hungary. Not that much was different in the ottoman empire. Little if any fighting had occurred within its borders and to lot himself was still remarkably popular but by mid nineteen eighteen. The empire was at a crossroads. Thanks to peace negotiations as part of the central powers they would be forced to see territory and subject to ultimately this meant talaat had to admit that his grand plan to restore. The glory of the ottoman empire was all bluster except he couldn't. The prospect was to humiliating so.

talaat brest affi ottoman government litovsk delo germany german government russia petrograd istanbul chris golden gallipoli mishel mondello austria united states
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

08:37 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"The recapture of dearness set up a series of negotiations between the c. Up and the greek government but talaat was intent on going to war to recover previously lost greek islands during this time see. up leg. Breakers began terrorizing greek orthodox christians also known as room living in the ottoman empire. They ultimately forced nearly one hundred thousand people to flee to greece internationally. This aggression against the room seemed to go largely unnoticed and certainly unpunished. But it set the stage for future ottoman lead pogroms throughout the empire. These pogroms would go largely unnoticed since they just so happen to occur. During the largest and deadliest conflict the world had ever seen world war one after the assassination of austrian archduke. Franz ferdinand in sarajevo on june twenty eighth nineteen fourteen eastern europe's conflict with the ottomans took a back seat to the conflict threatening to envelop the entire continent. I the fear of war decimated the european economy and countries began scrambling to forge alliances against the central powers which included germany and austria hungary but for talaat and the ottomans the outbreak of world war. One wasn't that big a deal. Their country had already been at war with its neighbors for several years and its economy was already in the gutter if anything. Perhaps a war presented an opportunity to lot decided that a global conflagration was the perfect background for making new friends and decided to ally the ottoman empire with a more powerful european country. But it wasn't just talaat making the large scale military decisions there were. Two other pasha's involved is smile and var pasha and ahmed. Shyamal pasha ahmed shyamal. If you recall from last week met lot while the two were in exile in salonika meanwhile ish mile end. Var was an early member of the c. u. p. party prior to the sultan's abdication once the c. Up came into power. He quickly rose through the ranks of the military and became the minister of war together. This military minded triumvirate became known. As the three pasha's and while technically all three were in power it was really talaat. Who masterminded just about everything. They did in their infinite wisdom. The three pashas chose germany to cozy up to despite germany agreeing to oversee the monitoring of christian communities in the empire relations between the two governments. Were actually fairly friendly. So the pasha's figured that fighting alongside the germans was a natural step forward. Of course the ottoman military was hardly a powerhouse capable of helping the central powers takeover europe ottoman forces ultimately numbered. Only around three million while germany had around thirteen million. However the alliance with the ottomans did offer the germans. Several strategic and geographic advantages for one thing they could now move german warships into turkish waters enabling enabling naval attacks on two of their enemies. Russia and greece for the ottomans. Meanwhile the german alliance eventually put an end to germany. Overseeing the ottoman christians now talaat and the c. u. p. were free to oppress and persecute whomever they wished. But i the war represented a real tangible opportunity for talaat and the power hungry see. Up to expand their empire all eyes were on germany no one was paying attention to whatever little invasions the ottomans could pull off. But that didn't mean they could pull off much with very little actual military experience to lot. And the other. Two pasha's bit off. More than they could chew the agenda for the ottomans involved a nebulous poorly planned series of invasions ranging from egypt to the caucuses and in almost each case. The ottoman army got absolutely dominated. There was one shocking victory during this period however orchestrated by ahmed. Pasha the battle of gallipoli beginning in january nineteen fifteen and masterminded by winston churchill. The entente powers sought to sail their warships into the strait of gallipoli. Their ultimate goal was to invade the ottoman capital of istanbul. Somehow a rag tag group of german warships and a contingent of ottoman and german soldiers managed to repel the attempted invasion. After a year of bloodshed and heavy casualties. On both sides the entente powers retreated. The battle of gallipoli would become perhaps the most famous modern ottoman military triumph. It was also a monumental in wildly significant victory. that seemed to give credence to to lots nationalist. Populist promises in the wake of gallipoli tell talaat was no longer viewed as a simple pasha or leader. He was now something closer to a savior. One who had earned his citizens respect and admiration and one who could now act with virtual impunity. The ottoman seemed unable to achieve another military victory. Light gallipoli as they suffered defeat after defeat abroad to lot and the two other pasha's knew that it could bring down morale throughout the empire. What they needed was a distraction. Someone to blame for their defeats as we've seen so often on dictators. Every despot needs a scapegoat whether it's the intellectuals or the uneducated the communists or the bourgeoisie the questions or the jews for talaat lot. The perfect scapegoat was the armenians. It's unclear whether talaat actually believed that. The armenians were the only thing preventing him from making the ottoman empire. Great again but what is clear is that he sought to spread this propaganda far and wide. The armenians represented a perfect target. They were a minority. They had already been the victims of oppression and murder and most importantly they had nowhere to run coming up to lot orchestrates. The armenian genocide the c. i. a. They're the first line of defense for the united states analyzing intelligence to thwart any possible threats and keep a safe. Some of their involvements are made public and others arms. hi it's carter from par cast and in honor of america's birthday. We're uncovering the cases you are never supposed to know about in the new series conspiracy. Theories see i edition from international assassination plots and mind control experiments to catastrophic cover-ups and secret societies fit for film sift through the agency's most questioned in controversial affairs each week conspiracy theories. Cia edition exposes the covert operations intended to protect us from conflicts. But end up creating conspiracies. Where does the truth lie where to the lies end. And how much do we really want to know. Follow the new spotify original from cast conspiracy theories cia edition. Listen every thursday. Free and only on spotify. This episode is brought to you by industrious at industrious. They don't want anything to get between you and your great day. That's why you can enjoy a great day at industrial on them. Just go to industrious office dot com slash spotify and book tour again. That's industrious.

talaat pasha germany greek government var pasha Shyamal pasha ahmed shyamal salonika greece german alliance ahmed Franz ferdinand sarajevo ottoman army europe strait of gallipoli hungary sultan austria Var Pasha
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

07:24 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"Welcome to dictators a spotify original from podcast. I'm richard and i'm kate. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from podcast for free on spotify this season of dictators. We're exploring the lives of three despotic. Monarchs who ruled in the decades leading up to world war. One king leopold the second of belgium. Franz-josef the i of austria hungary. And the three pasha's of the ottoman empire. Last week we explored the rise of mehmet. Talaat pasha we explored how his difficult childhood and his disdain. For the ineffectual ottoman sultan led him to form a political movement designed to return the ottoman empire to its former glory. This week. We'll look at two lots role. In leading the ottoman empire through world war one and his orchestration of the armenian genocide. One of the worst atrocities of the twentieth century will also explore how. This event finally brought his ignominious rain and life to an abrupt end. Coming up will return to the failing ottoman empire. This episode is brought to you by castrol edge. Become a legend when you unlock maximum performance. Castrol edge. It's three times stronger than the leading full synthetic so you can enjoy performance. That's totally epic. An oil change. That feels like upgrading from open mic night to sold out stadium tour castrol edge in garage swagger on learn more at casual dot com castrol edge. It's three times stronger. Viscosity breakdown leading full. Synthetic based on kurt open test results. This episode is brought to you. Bomb delo medella was the official bureau of ufc which means is also the official bureau fans with the fighting spirit. That means never giving up even when the odds are against so. You're watching the next big. Ufc fight shore and have a christmas. Delo especially al within reach but delo through those with the fighting spirit heads modesto. Usa dot com to shop delivery and pickup drink responsibly. Beer imported by crown imports chicago illinois. This episode is brought to you by. Va the aid. Is the original plant powered drink. The one that started it all. It has electrolytes and antioxidants but no added sugar. And only thirty calories the five and a half ounce can is a perfect post workout replenishment or satisfying snack. Choose v. eight for big clam power goodness and once small camp for over six hundred years. The ottoman empire was ruled by a single figurehead known as the sultan but after a centuries long decay and a final nineteen thirteen putsch. The once vast ottoman empire was being led by a group of young populists the committee of union and progress or c. u. p. the most powerful and influential of the young populists was a radical named talaat pasha pasha wasn't his actual surname but the designation of a high ranking turkish leader or officer after leading the nineteen. Thirteen pooch talaat became the minister of the interior. This role put his rank. Second to one person. The grand vizier in reality. However the grand vizier was little more than a figurehead. Each and every important decision required to lots knowledge and at least his tacit approval. The key to thirty nine year old to lots approval was simple. Everything had to fall in line with his main focus restoring the former glory of the ottoman empire for talaat and the rest of the c. Up that agenda wasn't the least bit practical. Their military was archaic and disorganized. There was little confidence in the government. Among the ottoman populace and many minority groups were seizing upon the chaos within the halls of government and planning their own independence movements in fact during the political turmoil plaguing the empire. Ethnic armenians and other christians actively sought out help from several european governments. They wanted these powerful nations to step in and negotiate on their behalf with talaat and the c. u. p. Most christians within the empire had been ottoman subjects for hundreds of years but as a minority population in a majority muslim empire. They often experienced prejudice and felt like second class citizens not to mention. They had no representation in the new government after international pressure from europe. Eventually the ottoman government agreed that representatives from germany could outline plan to monitor the treatment of christians in the ottoman empire. Inspectors from neutral countries would be selected to ensure that the ottoman christians were not subject to any kind of undo oppression. They would also help find ways to incorporate armenians into local politics and into ottoman society. Overall armenians were hopeful. The plan seem decent in theory. But it remained to be seen if this agreement would or could actually work in the meantime talaat and the c. u. p. set out to bring back the glory of the empire to do so they relied on. What historian hans lukas. Kaiser has described as a turco muslim definition of the ottoman nation. That was steeped in the idea. That betrayal by non. Muslims had caused the late autumn problems and losses. This nationalist ideology was at the heart of the new regime's policy though. It still wasn't clear what exactly that policy would look like. And then an unexpected opportunity presented itself one which allowed to lot and the c. u. p. to show what they were about in late. June of nineteen thirteen bulgaria invaded. Both greece and serbia. The attack was in retaliation for not receiving enough ottoman territory after their shared victory in the balkan wars a year earlier throughout nineteen twelve four recently independent bulkin nations rose up to claim ottoman land and a year later. Bulgaria wanted more. Tell us this nineteen thirteen invasion as a pretext for an ottoman invasion of his own specifically. He wanted to reclaim the city of his birth adina which had fallen into bulgarian hands likely because the bulgarian military was spread too thin. The ottomans prevailed but in doing so they spent desperately needed funds. That further crippled the already flailing economy money that was specifically designated and earmarked for infrastructure projects at home. But the ottomans had a deer back. So into lots is.

talaat Talaat pasha Bomb delo medella delo king leopold committee of union and progres talaat pasha pasha mehmet pasha josef Castrol Franz sultan hungary austria belgium kate modesto
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

01:42 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"Growing up in poland in the early nineteen hundreds raphael lampkin would witness numerous massacres and systematic expulsions of russian jews. A practice known as a pogrom observing these horrific events was likely what led lampkin to pursue a career as a lawyer specifically one who represented and spoke up for marginalized groups throughout the world. His mission was to hold accountable governments or despots who perpetrated ethnic cleansing or mass murderer as young man lumpkin attempted to alert world leaders to the rabbit anti-semitism sweeping through western europe. Unfortunately he was mostly ignored and when people finally did start taking notice. It was too late by that time. The nazis had murdered six million jews hundreds of thousands of roma and untold numbers of other so called undesirables. It was lumpkin who in his nineteen forty four book coined the term this atrocity is known by today genocide. He wrote by genocide we mean the destruction of a nation or of an ethnic group to denote an old practice in its modern development. It is made from the ancient greek word guinness race tribe and the latin side killing while lumpkin coined the term genocide in an analysis of the nazi regime. His understanding of genocide came much earlier when as a teenager. He learned about another atrocity. The genocide perpetrated by pasha.

raphael lampkin lampkin lumpkin poland europe pasha
How Is The Piri Reis Map so Accurate?

Unexplained Mysteries

02:18 min | 3 months ago

How Is The Piri Reis Map so Accurate?

"Born around fourteen sixty five in gallipoli. A turkish peninsula across the gene see from greece. Pirie reece's real name was haji. Ahmed mouhidin puree. The word res actually referred to a rank. He acquired later in life. As a captain in the ottoman navy. From a young age. Pirie felt at home on the sea. It only twelve years old. He joined a crew of pirates led by his uncle. Kamal for fourteen years kamala attack christian trading ships in the mediterranean sea with periods side. The islamic ottoman empire was expanding but it wanted to avoid open warfare with italy. Spain and portugal. So it empowered private captains like kamal to do its dirty work period. Uncle taught him how to pilot a ship and navigate. Using the stars together they fought battles and stole plunder. The even rescued jews and muslims fleeing catholic persecution in the spanish peninsula and in fourteen ninety five. The empire officially inducted inducted puree and kamal into the imperial ottoman navy. Kamal died in fifteen ten leaving forty-five-year-old pirie without his captain and mentor freed from obligation. He hung up his pirate boots and turned to his. True passion cartography. He returned to gallipoli and to work on a map that he hoped would capture the whole world on a single page. This daunting task took three to complete period gathered more than twenty different charts created over the preceding two thousand years. One of his sources was an ancient map supposedly drawn from the reign of alexander. The great sometime between three thirty six and three twenty. Three b c e. Many others were drawn by portuguese and arabic explorers to combine all these charts period had to match the contours of each continent's coastlines to each other like fitting together pieces of a puzzle. Even with modern technology. This would be difficult but at the time. The task was nearly

Pirie Reece Ahmed Mouhidin Ottoman Navy Gallipoli Kamal Spanish Peninsula Pirie Imperial Ottoman Navy Kamala Mediterranean Sea Greece Portugal Uncle Spain Italy Alexander
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

02:30 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"Still had a few large problems looming ahead of them. They still had no real agenda worse yet. Their final claim on power coincided with an event that would up end the entire globe the following year would witness the first shots of world war one but as ever to lot was determined to turn whatever chaos was heading his way to his advantage even if it came at a very high price like nearly wiping out an entire ethnic group all the false pretense of ottoman muslim superiority and their destiny to make the.

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

06:46 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"The c. u. p. banner even though they hadn't actually done anything besides state of populist ideology and pander to the grievances of ottoman citizens particularly muslim ottoman citizens the nascent nationals grew in number and confidence however they weren't the only people disgruntled by the sultan in the eastern provinces of the empire around macedonia. Ethnic armenians were pretty unhappy with their own state of affairs. The armenians had formed their own organization. That was almost analogous to the c. u. p. called the armenian revolutionary federation or a r f. Except of course that they were christian even though the c. u. p. was predominantly muslim. Talaat believe that an alliance between the two would be valuable and before long. The two groups did form an uneasy alliance with the air of hoping that if the c. u. p. came to power it would grant armenia autonomy as the alliance blossomed. Talaat truly distinguished himself as a leader using his charisma and populist rhetoric he was able to connect with a myriad of military members and low ranking government officials across present day macedonia and albania all of whom were amenable to his ideology. Membership spread like wildfire and c. u. P. branches opened throughout the region by late nineteen seven. The group had even begun to receive international attention especially from europe as we mentioned earlier the ottoman financial sector was controlled by a group of european bankers bureaucrats a group that was growing increasingly worried about the escalating tension within the kingdom so much so that they floated the idea of simply giving the macedonian region autonomy. The idea was faddish at best. But the notion was particularly odious to the high ranking members of the c. u. p. organization. They didn't want europeans deciding what went on in the empire especially if that decision resulted in the loss of more territory. A high ranking c. U. p. member in turkey summed up the sentiment in a letter to talaat writing since the macedonian question is the question of the existence of the turks. We presume that for a sincere government. It should be preferable to take the chance of a great war instead of losing macedonia though. This had only been a suggestion from european powers. One that hadn't been approved let alone adopted by the sultan. The simple idea aroused fury and indignation lot and the rest of the c. Up knew it needed to put a stop to such an idea before it got out of hand. So the c. u. p. breasts fired off a memorandum to the european bureaucrats explaining their opposition to its meddling in ottoman affairs. They also for one of the first times started dispersing something of an actual mandate this included the demand for a constitutional government and the end of the sultans autocratic rule if these demands were ignored. They were prepared to go to war with the ottoman government. The mandate shockingly did not lead to a new government but it did get the c. up categorized as a real threat. The sultans people began monitoring c. u. p. members even more closely but this only strengthened the group's resolve as a result of this crackdown. Talaat decided to go on the offensive. He hatched a plan to assassinate a high level ottoman military commander in salonika which was carried out by a loyal foot soldier on june eleventh. Nine thousand nine hundred eight emboldened by the success of this mission the c. Up decided it was now or never there was no turning back. They began training guerrilla fighters across the empire in preparation for an eventual conflict with the sultans troops less than a month after their first assassination. The group killed a military general senta macedonia to nip any nascent revolt in the bud for the sultan and his government. The murder of the general represented a clear and present threat. Not only that. After the generals murder many disgruntled ottoman soldiers began defecting to the c. u. p. with momentum on their side to lot and the c. u. p. leaders decided to go all in they sent telegrams to the highest ranking officials demanding that the sultan reinstate the constitution of eighteen seventy six thereby relinquishing his complete control of the government and forming a democratically elected body if he failed to comply by july twenty third see. Up troupes would march on the capital. The salton didn't really have much of a choice. his empire was crumbling. And no one not even. Non revolutionaries liked or supported him up. A fight was futile so the next day sultan abdulhamid the second acquiesced for a dwindling empire that had been under the strict control of an autocrat. It appeared to ottoman citizens that things might finally be looking up for the first time in decades people had reason to be hopeful one citizen describing the event years later wrote greeks bulgarians turks. Jews armenians albanians had literally fallen in each other's arms and with tears of joy had embraced and call each other brother but the joy they all shared would be short lived within the next few years. Talaat and the c. u. p. would assume increasing authority they would adopt a hardline xenophobic nationalism. That would herald even stricter oppression and when problems mounted c. u. p. leaders among other government officials and leaders would scapegoat one marginalized group over and over again..

Talaat Nine thousand two groups turkey july twenty third june eleventh macedonia Jews two european first time late nineteen seven greeks salonika sultan europe one citizen abdulhamid muslim armenian
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"Almost from the get-go sultan abdul hamid was wildly unpopular with the people. He didn't help his case when in eighteen seventy eight. He suspended the ottoman constitution of eighteen. Seventy six written by both progressive and conservative members of the political establishment. The constitution was an evolution of the earlier tons of mud reforms. It outlined a series of policies aimed at distributing power from the sultan to a more western style government most notably it called for the formation of a parliament. The constitution was copied translated and distributed to as many ottoman citizens as possible. Naturally it became wildly popular with those who could read and understand. The sultan agreed to its implementation. Mostly fearing that. He would be deposed if he didn't. It seemed as if the ottoman empire was destined for progress and modernity except then there was a setback after a military defeat in the russo turkish war in eighteen. Seventy eight abdulhamid suspended the constitution and retook control of the government. This gave rise to violent unrest after so much strife and defeat. Ottomans were angry. And who better to blame than this power hungry ineffective leader this undercurrent of anger and resentment would soon coalesce into a broad national movement that was determined to restore the empire to its former glory and remove the sultan fourteen. Lot of fatherless. Angsty teenager revolution was all that made sense in the eighteen nineties. Talaat came under the spell of his brother-in-law a journalist who formed a group of like minded rebels. They called themselves the committee of union and progress or c. u. p. The rebel group was composed mainly of low ranking military officers and career civil servants. The cu harbored a strong aversion to the sultan and his inefficient central government. But that's about all they had. Besides being anti sultan there was no official party line or ideology even as more people joined the group had no real goals beyond dumping abdul hamid summing up the see. Up's early vision for the ottoman empire. Founding member dr med rasheed exclaimed. We have declared war on those who harassed the fatherland from within and we are sure that we will win. We call to account those who ruin our country exploited our villages and caused our enemies to insult our religion and our nation. The words were passionate if hollow and they were enough to draw talaat in to make him want to be a part of this mission. An important part with each passing year to lot became increasingly influential. Within the organization this was due in large. Part to his charisma. Charm and efficacy. As speaker of multiple languages including greek and french basically talaat was gregarious unlikable and use those qualities to get what he wanted which at the time meant distributing anti-government literature with his compatriots. They didn't have much reach nor much. Actual influence but the tracks were full of the passionate rhetoric. That brought a lot into this. Up in the first place and it was virulent enough to grab the sultan's attention so much so that in eighteen ninety six. The police broke up the group and arrested several members including two lot. Prison lasted two years. Two years of stewing and becoming even more anti sultan then in eighteen ninety eight to lot was released but forced into exile and indignity which further radicalized him. He was sent to salonika now. The greek city of thessaloniki where he picked up a job at the post office started attending law school and in his spare time carried on his fight. By founding a new clandestine organization around nineteen o three talaat befriended a small group of like minded individuals among them. Was ahmed chia. Mo who along with talaat would play a devastating role in the future of the empire at first the group was content to meet in cafes and wax poetic about rebellion amongst themselves but soon they reached out to a british diplomat stationed in salonika named robert graves with the hopes of gaining an audience graves obliged the unexpected request and was shocked when the group sought his advice on how to overthrow the sultan graves. Thought their chances were poor and told them as much after all they had no support or connections among the police or armed forces furthermore an uprising among predominantly bulgarian christians seeking increased autonomy and civil rights had just been suppressed in nearby macedonia. It was very unlikely that a rag tag group of dissidents would fare much better. Ironically however to lot left the meeting feeling even more inspired but they couldn't help but admire the gumption of the bulgarians graves had told them about and they were determined to succeed where the christians had failed in order to do so. They would need among other things to become a tighter more organized unit. After all at this point they were simply talking not planning so on september seventh nineteen. Oh six they became the crescent committee. A group like the up but one that was at first opened muslims and it was too lot who distinguished himself as a natural born leader. One member described it as more courageous and more reckless than we all. He did not fear the world around him boasting fearless leader and several devoted members. The crescent committee was on route to becoming a serious political organization especially with its intense initiation ritual all before admittance a new pledge was made to donna red cloak and a blindfold and listen while the master of ceremonies preached the ideology and values of the group then. The pledge was forced to swear a loyalty oath to the group with one hand holding pistol and the other resting on a copy of the koran. It was during this time that the society and its overtly populist message thrived and it soon caught the attention of exiled see. Up members who were now living in paris a hub for international revolutionary activity. The two groups decided strength in numbers was better than individual groups so in one thousand nine hundred seven. The two groups merged under.

Two years two years two groups Talaat september seventh nineteen salonika abdul hamid eighteen nineties thessaloniki two lot One member macedonia bulgarian both paris greek sultan Ottomans british french
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

08:36 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"From podcast. I'm richard and i'm kate. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from park cast for free on spotify this season we're following the despot monarch who rain just before or during world war one. We've talked about. King leopold the second of belgium. Emperor franz josef of austria hungary. And now we're looking at the three pasha's of the ottoman empire. This week we begin our look at memet talaat pasha who sought to return the declining ottoman empire to its former glory will explore to what's political indoctrination as a disgruntled young man and how he and the young turks overthrew the sultan mixed week. We'll explore how to lot used world war one to secure his grip on power and how he used the raging violence as a pretext to murder approximately one point five million innocent citizens coming up we head to the ottoman empire high listeners just a quick reminder that starting in august dictators is moving exclusively to spotify. Being part of the spotify family means that we're able to bring you more indepth than exciting content than ever before and we can't wait for you to join us. Power read murder. Don't miss any of it. All you have to do is download the spotify app for free and search dictators. Give it a follow and start enjoying. That's it we can't thank you enough for listening to dictators and we look forward to seeing you exclusively on spotify in august. This episode is brought to you by progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget. These days drivers who save by switching to progressive. Save over seven hundred dollars on average and customers can qualify for an average of six discounts. When they sign up a little off your rate each month goes a long way. Get a quote today. At progressive dot com progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates national annual average insurance savings by new customer survey in two thousand twenty. Potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations episode is brought to you by. Cvs health if someone you love is at risk of a fall. The symphony medical alert system by cvs. Health can help support their safety at home. With twenty four seven emergency response monitoring. It helps keep an eye on their wellbeing when you can't be there. Terms and conditions apply learn more about symphony at cvs dot com slash sympathy or. Find it at your nearest cvs. Health hub truly understand the ottoman empire of the early twentieth century and the milieu of top pasha's rise. To power is essential to understand the history of the empire and what it used to represent. When rome fell in the fifth century the eastern portion of the empire survived and became known as the byzantine empire encompassing land in greece asia minor north africa and the middle east the byzantine saw themselves as the heirs of mighty rome and in the middle ages. They were the most powerful nation in the world that is until the rise of islam in the seventh century and the birth of the caliphate. For the next five hundred years various arab caliphates in groups throughout north africa. And the middle east began seizing lands from the byzantine by the late thirteenth century. The byzantine also lost control of asia minor. Soon the region became dominated by a patchwork of towns and cities most of whom were adherents of sunni islam until the reign of us man the first around the late twelve eighties. The territories in asia minor began to coalesce into one empire with one true religion under one leader the sultan the sultan existed as the principal religious and political authority and it was under sultan ahmed direction. That the ottomans began conquering significant portions of the decaying byzantine empire. While osman the i was essentially the founding father of the ottoman empire the empire expanded its holdings even more rapidly under his successors murad the first for example conquered huge portions of eastern europe and the balkans. These conquests continued in earnest until what was arguably the crowning achievement of the ottomans. The fall of constantinople orchestrated by sultan mehmud. The second constantinople had been the capital of the eastern section of the roman empire since three thirty see but after a series of corrupt and incompetent emperors as as the devastation of the black death constantinople was on its last legs for fifty three days. Mad the second and the ottomans lay siege to the once. Great city finally on may twenty nine. Th fourteen fifty three. The city fell. It became the capital of the ottoman domain and eventually would be renamed. Istanbul with that the byzantine empire was gone. And the ottomans were indisputably the most fearsome powerful and respected in existence. The next hundred years perhaps the most distinguished in the history of the empire especially under the rule of sultan suleiman the magnificent from fifteen twenty to fifteen sixty six. By the end of sulaiman's reign the ottomans controlled large swathes of land which spanned three continents. Shoe lehman also turned the ottomans into an economic powerhouse. Not only did the empire forge alliances with a number of european kingdoms it also controlled a myriad of trade routes including the silk road which connected asia with europe. It was a true golden age but every ascendant civilization must experience a decline after suleiman's passing the momentum of the empire reversed by the early seventeenth century. The once booming ottoman economy was stagnating. Much of this was due to the fact that european traders discovered new routes and could now circumvent the ottomans and avoid their taxes and fees at the same time wildly expensive naval wars against the spanish and venetians decimated the ottoman treasury. And although there were some victories the cost was much greater in terms of money and blood. There was however a brief moment when it looked as if the decline might be turned around from sixteen twenty three to sixteen fifty six during this period. A unique phenomenon occurred in the empire. The sultanate of women for three decades several of the sultans wives essentially lead the country. This occurred primarily because they were two successive adults sultans who died after only a short time in power and were succeeded by their sons. Who are too young to rule on their own. Their mother's then helped rule on their behalf and once the trend started some of these women also became de facto leaders at home when the grown sultans were engaged in battle the most notable accomplishments from this period besides enormous empire being run by women was the investment in infrastructure and public work projects throughout the realm. The empires defenses were also strengthened with fortress fortifications but the sultanate of women and it's productive rain came to an end in the late seventeenth century after one. Ill fated endeavor. The empire's decline started accelerating rapidly once again in the summer of sixteen eighty. Three ottoman troops attempted to seize vienna from the habsburgs and didn't go particularly well. In fact the siege led to a series of protracted battles that came to be known as the great turkish war. but for the ottomans. There was nothing great about it. The great turkish.

richard fifty three days early seventeenth century Three early twentieth century fifth century world war one late thirteenth century eastern europe today two thousand europe seventh century islam kate progressive dot com Istanbul This week six discounts late seventeenth century
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"By nineteen o eight. The ottoman empire was at the weakest point it had ever been in. Its five hundred year history. If the early sixteenth century was its zenith. The early twentieth century was its nadir for the past hundreds of years the empire had steadily lost territory to the greeks and europeans now backed into a corner. It appeared as if sultan hamid the second. It's leader was ready to preemptively seed portions of macedonia for a group of nationalist political dissidents known as the young turks. This was the final insult. The young turks were determined to restore the empire to its former glory. There first step overthrow abdul throughout the summer of nineteen o eight. The young turks struck fear into the heart of the political establishment carrying out a series of assassinations on high ranking generals and government officials. Then on july twenty first. They sent a series of telegrams directly to the sultan they demanded that abdul abdulhamid reinstate the teen seventy-six constitution which gave vastly more power and autonomy to the populace two days. Later abdulhamid shockingly yielded. He not only agreed to the demands of the young turks but also provided a mansion for the group's high ranking members including defacto leader a moustachioed thirty four year. Old named talaat within months the young turks would sweep into the ottoman government a wave of virulent nationalism and revolutionary fervor however it soon would become clear that they lacked any concrete. Mandates be on their pledged to make the ottoman empire. Great again only a few short years later. This toxic brand of chauvinism would lead to one of the worst atrocities in human history. The.

two days early twentieth century nineteen o eight early sixteenth century five hundred year abdulhamid thirty four year abdul abdul abdulhamid ottoman summer of nineteen o eight one first step ottoman government teen seventy-six constitution july twenty first second few short years later greeks turks
The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

Jewish History Matters

02:05 min | 6 months ago

The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

"Today i'm joined by adam teller. Who's going to be speaking with us about the century jewish refugee crisis following the sixteen forty eight on. It's key pogroms. Aman how it helps us to understand the transnational transformations of jewish life in early modern times as well as when we want to think more deeply. Broadly about refugee issues on water scale both in history and also this is something which is still very relevant today. Adam teller is a professor of history and judaic studies at brown university. He has written widely on the economic social and cultural history of the jews in early modern pulling lithuania and his most recent book. Which we're going to talk about today is titled rescue the surviving souls the great jewish refugee crisis of the seventeenth century. This is going to be the starting point for our conversation today but in many ways it's not just about the book we're gonna be talking about the big issues that surrounds it. It's really an exciting book. It was recently a finalist for the national. Jewish book award in history is a pleasure to have adam here with us. Thank you so much. Adam for joining us on the podcast. Welcome really glad to have you. Here it's a real pleasure. Thrill pledged to be here. Jason absolutely i want to get us started by thinking about kind of what is this history in the first place when we look at the story of the malinowski pogroms and aftermath in the mid seventeenth century. What is going on here. And why does it matter when we wanna think about early. Modern jewish history well in the early period poland lithuania which was then called. The police between commonwealth was the largest wealthiest most develop jewish center in europe with in world terms. It was only rivaled by the ottoman empire and had gone through about one hundred fifty years very strong social economic cultural development. Making it this powerhouse. In the history of european jewry and the place where all of your looked in a number of different fails perhaps most particularly in terms of the jewish law. But not only that

Adam Teller Aman Lithuania Brown University Adam Jason Poland Europe
President Biden Recognizes Massacre of Armenians as Genocide

Dark Secret Place

02:07 min | 6 months ago

President Biden Recognizes Massacre of Armenians as Genocide

"Talking about international reaction from From around the world has specifically from from turkey about prisoner biden statement earlier today the hundred six anniversary in what's known as genocide day. The president said quote each year on this day. We remember the lives of all those who died in the ottoman era armenian genocide and recommit ourselves to preventing such an atrocity from ever occurring again beginning on april twenty four nine hundred fifteen with the arrest of armenian intellectuals and community leaders in constantinople by ottoman authorities. One million armenians were deported massacred remarks to their deaths campaign to extermination than he. He goes on important thing. Is he says armenian genocide and the turks almost immediately. The turkish foreign ministry almost immediately reacted. The president actually had a phone call with president earlier. This week. I don't recall the readout of it. But the g word wasn't in there and it really has gotten to the point for the turks. The are the last people in the room stomping around and that it. It really doesn't matter what they do. They're not the reason we tread softly for the last sixty years with. Because turkey was a key cornerstone there in the balkans in nato. We pre position nuclear weapons on on turkey. We had our first generation of ballistic missile nuclear nuclear missiles in turkey at the time the cuban missile crisis. They were key and they were they were key goud right up until the dissolving of the soviet union and then we. We've seen this rise in turkish nationalism. And here's sort of the problem. Is that the. Turks are fiercely fiercely fiercely proud of their own history and they're turkishness but but denying that. This actually was a campaign that the turks portrays ono no no. It was a civil war. And you know things happen. It was

Turkey Turkish Foreign Ministry Biden Goud Balkans Nato Soviet Union ONO
Biden Recognizes as 'Genocide' the Killing of 1.5M Armenians by Ottoman Turks

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

Biden Recognizes as 'Genocide' the Killing of 1.5M Armenians by Ottoman Turks

"Biden is recognizing the mass killing of Armenians more than a century ago is genocide. Clinical reporter Monica Alba has more on the official White House statement. Stay where he says each year we remember the lives of those who died in the Ottoman era Armenian genocide. Re commit ourselves to preventing such an atrocity from ever again occurring. Turkey is long disputed the mass killings amounted to genocide. Turkey's foreign minister responded today with a tweet. Words cannot change or rewrite history.

Monica Alba Biden White House Turkey
Turkish Official Slams Biden for Calling Atrocities Against Armenians 'Genocide'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 6 months ago

Turkish Official Slams Biden for Calling Atrocities Against Armenians 'Genocide'

"That his country completely rejects the statement in Turkey's president retch up type. Erdogan has called the idea of an Armenian genocide ally President Biden and many historians estimate that around 1.5 million Armenians were killed by Ottoman Turks. Beginning in 1915. CBS is

President Biden Erdogan Turkey CBS
Joe Biden Declares Massacre of Armenians a Genocide

Financial Awakening

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

Joe Biden Declares Massacre of Armenians a Genocide

"Today. President Biden could be the first U S president who formally recognized the Armenian genocide stays recognized as the start of the killings of 1.5 million Armenians during the Ottoman Empire President spoke Friday with Turkish President Erdogan. The White House did not say if the issue was discussed. Turkey does not recognize the killings as a genocide.

President Biden Erdogan White House Turkey
Amazon Plans Return To 'Office-Centric Culture' by Fall

Armstrong & Getty On Demand

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

Amazon Plans Return To 'Office-Centric Culture' by Fall

"Seattle based amazon. Perhaps you've heard of it told. Employees in a company wide announcement is planning quote a return to an office centric culture as our baseline. Does everybody have to talk like that is days. What's the matter your money. If you say office centric culture perhaps working in the building. The transition away from remote work is expected. Wrap up by ottoman. According to the announcement tuesday working in offices the note said quote enables us to invent collaborate and learn together most effectively. I have read some really interesting science polling on the whole remote work thing. And and the consensus is it does up productivity. It seems do also a burnout and it limits. Creativity and Well creativity is probably the best word among

Seattle Amazon
Hollywood Monsters  with Mallory OMeara

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:01 min | 9 months ago

Hollywood Monsters with Mallory OMeara

"History is written by the winners by men early editors of science fiction anthologies choice to exclude by women and in doing so made many believe that women did not write science fiction in the genres earliest years. This is just one example. And by no. Means the only one mallory mira self-confessed monster lava and film. Ned discovered a similar story in one of her favourite monsters. Millicent patrick was one of disney's earliest female animators and went on to design one of the greatest film monsters of the creature from the black lagoon but a jealous smell. Coworker ensured that there was no prestigious career. A rating millicent. Mallory decided to set the record straight in her book. The lady from the black lagoon. Hollywood monsters and the lost legacy of millicent. Patrick and reestablish. Millicent of monster design mallory. Thank you for joining us. But before we get stuck into things would you please introduce yourself to our listeners. high Yeah thank you so much for having the ottoman cited to to talk about this with you. Three i m author of lady from the black lagoon an fulltime author. And i'm also fellow podcasters. I host the show reading glasses every week with my friend. brea grant. what did you hope to achieve by. Unearthing the story of million patrick and setting the record straight about her contribution to monster design. Well a few things honestly the impetus behind me working on in in writing from the black lagoon was just i wanted to know. Millicent has been my hero. Since i was a teenager and i wanted to satisfy my own personal curiosity i found out about her when i was seventeen and it just seemed creature from the black lagoon like nobody even knew if she was still alive. She didn't have a website. She didn't have a wikipedia entry. Nothing about her online. So i personally just really really wanted to know at as i started digging into her life and her work and in this book i i also just. I wanted people to know that we've always been here. You know i. I actually started working on this book before the metoo movement happened and while i think it's amazing that there's such a huge push right now to get more women in front of the camera behind the camera writing doing everything women everywhere in cosigned for me but i also think it's really important to have people know that women have always been here. We have a legacy here and millicent. Patrick is proof. That and if i could only unearth her story and bring it to the world than i could could prove it is funny. You say that. Because i remember i was a massive star trek fan still but i remember in high school being completely obsessed with original series star trek and then discovering that d c fontana was a woman and i was like women have been there from the beginning. We right star trek. Yeah so i. I definitely can get on board with excitement. It changes everything. I mean finding out that a woman who designed this incredible monster that i became completely obsessed with it changed my life. It made me realize up until that point all of my heroes in the monster world. Where met you know tom. Savini rick baker. Dick smith jack pierce. It never even occurred to me that women did those things and seeing just one single photo of seeing a woman working on the creature from the black lagoon. It broke my brain open. It was like being struck by lightning. And it you can. You can make a direct line from that moment in time in front of my computer. Seven seventeen to me becoming a filmmaker later on up reading a bit about medicine on. You mentioned that you back. Then she didn't have a wikipedia entry. She does have one now on your on it as well. Yes i mean we're competing is basically all from the bottom up until that point there was no there was really no biographical information about her and the stuff that was out there was largely false Sometimes because of Militants own she liked to fabricate biographical information about which was very fun for me to deal with as biographer But it's now now actually people who she is and she has a wikipedia. Entry people You google tons of stuff comes up. It's really it makes me really really happy. So how did she become raised from history in the first ice so the her boss at the universal studios monster shop and she worked there in the early nineteen fifties was a man named bud west more and he was part of a very very famous big family of makeup artist. The west morris His father actually. George west was the man who invented the idea of a makeup department so they were huge. Deal in hollywood at the time he had a massive amount of power and influence not just at universal but in the film world is a whole unfortunately he was also known for taking people's credit being very jealous of the other artists that worked with him if they were more successful or more talented than he was which wasn't hard to do And she designed creature and they shot the movie and it became very clear that the movie was going to be a huge hit. They the universal studios publicity department wanted to send millicent on a press tour to promote it and up until that point in history know in the fifties. There was no twitter. There was no. Imdb there is no way for people to really look into the details of of credits on films. You know back then. There was no like ten minutes end. Crawl at the end of a movie like we get now. There was only like these cards that gave the heads of department Credit for the things that they did so no matter. What but didn't design at on a movie increase in the credits creature. It says makeup. Bud west more So he never was challenged. People always just assume that he designed everything that came out of his shop

Millicent Millicent Patrick Brea Grant Patrick Mallory Savini Rick Baker Jack Pierce NED Disney Hollywood Dick Smith Fontana West Morris George West TOM Google
Which Matters More, a First or Last Impression?

No Stupid Questions

09:19 min | 9 months ago

Which Matters More, a First or Last Impression?

"Emails from a listener named sam cohn who happens to be a nursing student and he wants to know this our first impressions or last impressions more impactful question or you're thinking about the colonoscopy study i mean honestly there's only one cold i'll give you study will. There are many colonoscopy studies in the medical literature but only one in the psychology literature that i'm aware of exactly that social scientists would know about and that's the famous economy and colleagues study about peak and end the peak and theory. So can you tell us. About the pecan therion. How colonoscopy works to illustrate that so danny katamon and his colleagues did a study where everybody in. The study is getting a colonoscopy. You are randomly assigned. These are people who are already going to be getting on us. Yes i think. It was a collaboration with physicians. If only there were experiments that we could sign up for four which we get a colonoscopy decide. The i would prefer the chemotherapy pleased survey. I'm going to prefer the high fat diet one. This study randomly signs patients who are already signed up for a colonoscopy to either get colonoscopy as usual which i am told and as they say in the article is a pretty unpleasant experience because of the mechanics of the whole thing and the experimental condition is where the exploratory equipment of they have to put into. You is held there for a little longer than would necessarily be the case and your instinct might say oh. That's the bad version of the experiment right because you get more pain but what was so clever about this experiment is that yet. It's more pain. But because you're just having the tip of the scope to sitting there in the rectum. It's more moderate level of pain than what it's moving around during the colonoscopy itself. I think they would probably just call it a mild discomfort compared to a greater discomfort. I mean i can't imagine what it's like to have. The tip of a colonoscopy will come back in a week or two and give us the details so the reason why is interesting. Is that patients who underwent the extended procedure with the additional. Moderate level of pain actually raided the overall experience as less unpleasant and the reason why this was so important is that congressman was at the time developing a theory. Where there is the remembering self and the experiencing self and he says the experiencing self is just experiencing moment by moment. How happy my house. Adami anxious in my hungry am i but the remembering self is consolidating all of that and collapsing it into a memory and he had the theory that when the remembering self processes information and collapses a whole string of moments into one impression. Two things are going to take additional weight. One is the peak of the experience of the high in the low points and the other is the end points and so this famous study affirmed the hypothesis that the end of an experience takes disproportionate weight when we evaluate the overall experience. Now knowing the colonoscopy study what will i ask for if i had the chance to ask my doctor you say gimme the katamon colonoscopy please exactly the katamon special so it's interesting. Is that even though. This finding is a sturdy finding. I don't want the extra pain although since you're inexperienced in colonoscopy so we'll have to see if maybe you'll change your mind after you have but let's say that we want to take it out of the realm of the colonoscopy which i probably should and let's say we want to steer this back toward what sam is asking about the first impression or the last impression imagine a family vacation but say you are apparent with kids and a spouse or whatnot and you go on a family holiday. What would you rather have of the to a great beginning or a great ending y. So oh gosh. I think i would like to have a great ending because i do think the peak end effect does hold true so my ambivalence at my colonoscopy if the vacation we're say four days i would rather have a terrible first day and a wonderful fourth day than the opposite that makes sense because as you were describing the lasting thing is the memory so of course you want that to the positive one. Yeah the whole memory is going to be colored by the last moments more than like the mid point or something. I have to say. Ever since i read that paper years ago and interviewed donald reddell meyer one of the co about it. I have tried to apply the peak in theory all the time in my life in interviews with my family and random encounters with strangers. The minute something good happens. I just stop so you just leave when i learned about this. It made me think first of all of so many rituals that are part of our lives that seem to capitalize on the peak in theory. So dessert why desert last. Why don't we eat it. i. I don't know how much yoga you're doing these days so much. Okay so shiva's nina. Do you know this corpse pose at the end. Of course it feels so good to be sitting there and completely relaxing. And there's a reason. I think that every yoga practice ends with shibata so the next time you think. Do i wanna do yoga. Your memory is least colored by that. But that's challenge this notion so i think you've done a pretty good job persuading everybody. The last impressions are really powerful. But let's talk about first impressions. I mean there's this whole mountain of cliches about that right. You never get a second chance to make a first impression and so on and let's go back to that vacation if you show up with your family to this place where your vacation for four days in your first impression is terrible. Doesn't that set a tone that will be impossible to recover from and from which no final impression is possible to save the experience yet to argue that last impressions take on disproportionate. Way does not say that first impressions. Don't matter disproportionately also for different reasons. First impressions can carry more weight than the mid point or some other point in experience. So one reason is that first impression. Has this kind of path dependency so say you have a really bad day of that. Four day vacation. Everybody's now on a sour mood now. You're all fighting on day two and then because you were fighting on day two day. Three is a total catastrophe. Even those comes out you get off on the wrong foot as it were. And then everything. Kind of goes downhill from there. You know when. I first read this question from sam our first impressions or less imprisons more impactful. My initial impulse was to try to answer it. Like we're trying to do now but my my second impulse and the deeper one was to view it as i do as a writer which is to say wool. Both i think for everything i've ever written whether to book an article Podcast script whatever. I'd probably spend three to ten times more effort on the beginning and the end than on anything else because as a writer was informed years and years and years ago by my experiences a reader which is at the beginning really really matters the ending really really matters and there's also a notion expressed in various places. I don't know where i got it from. Maybe the talmud or shakespeare that the best beginnings have a little bit of the end in them. If the writing is good so i do wonder if maybe sam is pursuing an either or choice when the answer in fact should be an end answer. Both end is usually the answer to checkoff and the great multiple choice of life. The way that this question was framed. It's like when we are meeting another person or when you open a book or you start an article or you start listening to a podcast or watching a movie. It's so clear to us when we just think about those experiences. How the very beginning. It does matter because you are very quickly coming to judgments. And there is this research on thin slicing by among others nominee embody. Maybe you did freakonomics episode on this note. I read about thin slicing in one of malcolm. Glows books blink. This is the idea that you can come to very quick impressions and they're not even necessarily verbally articulated ones but just got feelings of like good or bad in milliseconds and that these very quick impressions can be predictive of later judgements. That are much more deliberative and so forth. That's an argument in favor of a strong first impression because in some cases lake with a move your book or a person if the first impression is not a good one there will be no opportunity for a final impression where the final impression will be one second after the first impression right hopefully less with people and more with like net flicks. So imagine there a job interview and your first impression of candid. It is a positive one. Well danny ottoman would remind us that then confirmation bias is gonna kick in and then for the last fifty eight minutes of the hour long interview. You're just going to be confirming your own positive impression. And so there's a path dependency in judgment and not just the path dependency in life events.

Sam Cohn Danny Katamon Donald Reddell Meyer Adami Shibata SAM Nina Malcolm Danny Ottoman
Millions of Americans Don't Think Biden Won the Election

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:46 min | 9 months ago

Millions of Americans Don't Think Biden Won the Election

"Course people are going to getting prepared for the inauguration of someone that millions of americans. Don't think actually won the election. which is problematic. Is it fair to say that. that's problematic. Is it fair to say that we can say that it's problematic and then be demonized thing that it's problematic. This is where we are in america because my parents have seen communism upfront raised me. I write about this in my upcoming book. Fish out of water. That's coming up in In two weeks or less. Actually it's coming out in vicente water. A search for the meaning of life talk about being raised by parents in the shadow of world war. Two all of their memories of growing up of my mother and father lost their fathers when they were ten years old. My dad did my mom. Did they grew up during the war. They saw communism up close They saw the evil of communism a closer. They raised me differently than most americans were raised. And i noticed this growing up when we moved to danbury connecticut. When i was nine we i noticed that all these american kids that i went to public school with because before that i was in a parochial school greek orthodox school where all the greek kids there was a similar sense of the evil Whether the ottoman turks Oppressing degree for four hundred years or whether it was the communist The civil war with the communists right after world war two they all had a sense of evil of communism and that there's evil in the world that we had to be vigilant about america and liberty. And when i moved to danbury connecticut which i write about in fish out of water i noticed that the the kids that had american parents. They didn't have a sense of this. And i kind of think that's kind of where we are why we are where we are now because many americans just don't realize how bad it can get. They've never experienced it now. If you grew up in cuba or your parents grew up in cuba or you came from the soviet union You you know how evil communism is and so. It's one of the reasons that i've gone out on a limb. Some people think perhaps rectal recklessly. But i think when you're facing the possibility of marxism whether it's cultural marxism cancel culture. That's of course how it starts. You have to be vigilant. This is really really. It's not worth hanging back This is this is very very dark stuff so it's one of the reasons that i've been so outspoken. Because i've lived this through my parents. I know what is possible. I know that things don't always turn out. Well

Danbury Connecticut America Cuba Soviet Union
Paprika In Hungary

Travel with Rick Steves

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Paprika In Hungary

"Let's start today's travel. With rick steves with the role a little pepper from the new world plays in that tasty cuisine of hungary. Note that today's interviews on paprika galicia where recorded just prior to the global shutdowns pepperoni as the backbone of hungarian cooking as the crucial ingredient in chicken pepper. Cash and hardy hungarian stews from mild to hot. We'll find out why this spicy so central to hungarian identity. How to best buys and pepper on your trip and we're going to learn how you can spice up. Your own meals was well to get this education hungarian paprika. We're joined by to guide tonight studio from hungary. And leonard and george farkas anna and george. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having us thrill to be well. Thank you from coming all the way from budapest a long trip. And we're gonna talk about paprika. I mean when we think of hungary we don't know a lot about hungry sometimes. But we think of paprika. What's the connection actually public. A strong connection because it is actually from the american continent and it was The physician of christopher columbus or columbus who brought it to the old world to i not to hungary of course but to spain that through the commercials of the mediterranean sea it got to the ottoman empire and when the ottoman empire extended its political power to eastern century up. We glad to not only bad things that we also got things like the patrika. What are the coffee so paprika and cuffy came as your time in the ottoman empire in paprika actually from america via columbus actually us. So i like teasing are two members and americans who is. That's why to travel here. Righ- flying through the But i like my publisher hungary. There's something romantic about having paprika in hungary. And why does hungary embrace paprika. What does it mean to hungarian. I have great micro-climate lots of sunshine. And what is very important that when we got the paprika was a hot spice and it was the hungarians who grew the might version of it it is from the nineteen twenties when in a small. Get in sega. It was kind of discovered. And since then if you come to our covid market hall you can always buy tubers the mild paprika and the hot fabric honky now. George when i go to budapest i always go to the big market hall right. But it's the name of that. Hologhan bashar knocking hungarian big market or century. You can't miss it when you're a tornado in credits. The first one out of five actually that they built at the time. And what you're going to find is well everything that hungarian cook would want to find. But certainly find peppers. See when you look for the peppers in the market. Well actually. you're not looking for peppers you looking for paprika is already well there is. It is basically a huge difference because many people don't realize it in hungary. Everything is called paprika. Let it'd be around fat skinny red yellow sweet and hot so i'm a little confused. Then so because Is it a pepper or it is a but we call it paprika but we also called a powder paprika yes because when i think of peppers and my supermarket we've got yellow ones and green ones red ones and that all of that. We call paprika even if it's Any shape really And then you have. It already powdered. If you're looking for the paprika that you cook with powdered yes okay. So it's a very unique technique to powder because One of the things that you have to be extremely careful with how you approach paprika once you grind paprika after all the time you spent with it to become dry and ready to grind. You have to do it very slowly makers as soon as you pick up speed you burn the paprika and that remains throughout its lifetime because once you come to cook it again you have to be very careful with a not to burn it because then you just have to start over again tour guides from budapest anna leonard and george farkas are filling in on the importance of peppery cup in the cuisine of hungary right now on travel with rick steves. Okay so when we're talking about this have rica and i think it goes back the days when spaces were really important. I mean spice was big money in the early days of training today today at that time and originally now why was spaces in general very important economically for people well. It was a very important product. It was expensive at that time. It was not so easy to fly from one continent to other a trip two months of making food more interesting or is it a matter of preserving food actually spicy i got to the highest study stock chrissy those who had the opportunity to get products from far far away and paprika also i was introduced for the highest stock resi in hungary after people realised it is not poisonous because i it was considered a supposin and when they discovered that it has healing effect. You know it here the colorado and screw after it they started to make its production but it was a rarity and it was very expensive so at first who is just for the very wealthy and then you learn it. It helped as medicine against scurvy and cholera. Yes but also medication. Very often is a privilege of the wealthier class. Not available for everybody. Some

Hungary George Farkas Columbus Budapest Rick Steves Cuffy Hologhan Bashar Mediterranean Sea Leonard Anna Christopher Sega George Spain Anna Leonard America Rica Chrissy
Who Was Vlad the Impaler

Your Brain on Facts

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Who Was Vlad the Impaler

"A time when I didn't know that Vlad. The Impaler was thought to be the inspiration for Bram Stoker's genre-defining vampire Dracula hop in your home school bus police box or phone booth with aerial antenna and let's go back to 15th century will lakia a region of modern-day Romania. That was then the southern Edge over to the province of Transylvania. Our flad was flat the third glad the second his father was given the nickname dracul by his fellow Crusade nights in the order of the Dragon. They were tasked with defeating the Ottoman Empire will lakia was sandwiched between the Ottomans and Christian Europe and so became the sight of constant bloody conflict without looking it up. I'm going to guess that the order of the Dragon failed since the Ottoman Empire was still standing in nineteen twenty-three. Dracul translated to dragon in Old Romanian. But the modern meeting is more like Devil add an a to the end to denote son of and you've got flat Dracula at age eleven flat and his seven-year-old brother Raju went with their father on a diplomatic Mission into the Ottoman Empire. How'd it go? Not too good. The three were taken hostage their captors told Vlad the second that he could be released if his two sons remained behind home since it was really their only option. He agreed the boys would be held prisoner for five years one account holds that they were tutored in The Art of War science and philosophy. Other accounts say that they were subjected to torture and brutal abuse by the time Vlad the second return to Allah Kiya. He was overthrown in a coup and he and his eldest son murdered shortly. Thereafter Vlad. The third was released with a taste for violence and a vendetta against the Ottomans to regain his family's power and make a name for himself. He threw a banquet for hundreds of members of rival families on the menu was wine meet sweetbreads and gruesome vicious murder off. The guests were stabbed not quite to death then impaled on large spikes. This would become vlad's signature move leading to his moniker Vlad the Impaler, but it wasn't the only arrow in his quiver. Facing an army three times the size of his he ordered his men to infiltrate their territory poison the wells and burn the crops. He also hired disease dead-end to go in and infect the enemy defeated combatants were often treated to disemboweling flaying Alive boiling and of course impalement. Basically, you turn your enemy into a kabob and let them die slowly and just as importantly conspicuously vlad's reputation spread leading to a mixing of Legend in fact like that. He wants took dinner in a veritable Forest of spikes. We do know that in June of 1462. He ordered 20,000 defeated Ottomans to be impaled. It's a scale that's hard to even imagine when the Ott's in Sultan mehmed II Came Upon the Carnage he and his men turned on their heels and fled back to Constantinople. You would think flawed was on the road to Victory but shortly thereafter. He was forced into Exile and imprisoned in Hungary. He took a stab no pun intended on regaining will lakia fifteen years later, but he and his troops were ambushed and killed according to a contemporary

Vlad Dracul Bram Stoker Transylvania Romania Raju Europe Sultan Mehmed Ii OTT Constantinople Hungary
Change, Loss and Timeless Love

Tara Brach

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Change, Loss and Timeless Love

"Nama stay and welcomed my friends. Really glad to have you with us. I was recently perusing two different articles. The first title was aging the secret to happiness and the second was WANNA be happier. All you have to do is get older. So same theme and they both draw on research that teams to confirm this correlation that the older we get the happier we are. Now I know that seems counter intuitive given the challenges we face that we. Lose, people we love and we lose our youth and our health and our memory. I saw cartoon this very old couple and they were both on rockers on the porch and he's responding to her. He says, now you want an open relationship. Of Billy Crystal, but it this way he said by the time, a man is a wise enough to watch his step. He's too old to go anywhere. Okay so there's this evidence that Carlos aging with happiness and the understanding that resonates for me is that through our our lifetime, we have the capacity to learn and adapt and spiritually evolve and. With the passing of time. There can be a growing acceptance of the inevitability. Of Change and loss. A growing acceptance. Of Change and loss. and. Walk. Clearly, this doesn't happen to everyone for those that do deepen in that acceptance. Nabil's living and appreciating the moments. And loving were fully. So the title of this talk, and the one that follows is change loss and timeless. Love. And the theme arises from a central teaching on the spiritual path and. That is that our capacity to live and love fully is totally intertwined with how we relate to change and loss. So. This'll be AH invitation for you to look in your own life at how you're relating to change and loss. It feels really relevant right now to explore this given, how many people around the globe are experiencing such rapid change and real loss due to global pandemic and Deepening social divides and climate change the devastation to this earth. And while it may feel like change a speeding up. impermanent. So what really makes us clutch? Is really the nature of all takes form. And we know it on the on the largest sweeps. If you think of the history of the Universe Big Bang and stardust forming and planet earth elements combining to create this amazing variety of life forms and then Homo sapiens evolving tools and art and science and war and slavery in plagues and collaboration innovation. The whole thing you know empires coming and going Greeks the Romans, the Ottoman. Empire Portuguese the British the American. You know rising to dominance and then passing we always think things are for good but it all passes and here we are. On the brink of destroying. Earth our home. Seeing species common species become extinct. galaxies. Of Stars collapsing into black holes, it's all in permanent. And then. We can sense it on the most minute level you know if right this moment. You take the time to perhaps closure is and bring your attention inward and hold still really still. You can sense that. The body everything inside a moving if you feel your hands is anything holding stelle. It might seem that way if you're very very tense but if you even begin to relax a little, you can sense the hands feet. In the face. The Heart Everything's moving. Nothing hold still there's this. Ever changing flow of sensations feelings. Sounds come and go. Your body's replacing sells millions per second. Within those cells nonstop motion.

Billy Crystal Carlos Nabil
Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

Digiday Podcast

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

"Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I've Riley did today's senior correspondent based I've read the UK and it gives me great pleasure to welcome a fellow Brit to the show. This week Christopher Kenna is the CEO brand advance the UK based global diversity media. Network. Said welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. She is Chris So yeah, it's fair to say I to start kind of right at the beginning because I think it's fair to say that you didn't take maybe the most conventional well traveled route into the into the media industry. And I won't stick if our listeners a little flavor if I may of the years that led up to you founding your your current company. So I didn't know where we start kind of at the very beginning Many of our US listeners probably know where the olive man is but. But that's where you were born. Very, very small British island has relation of what like eighty thousand or something like that. Yeah. So let's start there. Yeah the Ottoman. From people on the other side of the potent if you look in. The UK map you've got the big and then you've got islands, which is small bit this a little island right in the middle of the big being. England Scotland Wales on the small bit be an island is a little dot in the middle never rarely shown on whether ups Whether symbol but. Yeah population about eighty, seven, seventy, eight, hundred, thousand. A blockade everyone. You know which Just as. It's off with a with. From the very get guy. I was destined Dabo. Trophies and certificates got a significant for that UH. I don't remember getting obviously I was born but. When could so skip I was in cash in. And when you come out of, can you get like a big thing achievements event? On pretty much anything, anybody's ever written about you open to that point of until you sixteen on the very first thing in now was this. From Jane. Critical Hospital From you spend a number of years in the in the British army. Is that right wherever you based? Yeah. So I was based out a Jimmy Fest So did my member basic training here in England in Boston bond went to blunt it, which is the army school of signals. To do sort of second phase training which is. I was a on communicate so to go. Out to use a radio not but you know what I mean and so I was destined for comes. So maybe not all is so far apart as you think. You. Know army to media we basically doing the same thing. So then yeah I was boasted out to Jimmy went out seventeen. Met My now ex way. My kid when I was seventeen. So. We start on the fatherhood on your after kits. Now they're both off German English they live at JEB new Madonna goes to union bellied son goes to high school and beautiful in Jimmy. Yet did tell us to of Iraq one tour of Afghan and what led you to leave the army. awhile I was involved in an ID so I've epilepsy now. Because of injury on so yeah I icon. Epilepsy in a rifle mix. Ni- I imagine. That's not good company. So and then media came calling for you. Well well, you came cooling for media well I. Don't know who, but but I think I'm good at this. I've lived sound a little arrogant now but I think definitely media needed needs people like me. You. Know just the background I don't mean specifically there's nothing particularly special about May. The I mean you don't people from my background's people that didn't you know two Family Income Kofi Union blind you don't we need diversity of vices. We need diversity of thought. So yeah, I think it needed me as much as I needed it. But no so I started off. Is So when Columbia Street back Manchester. I'd spend a lot of time to care and Blah Blah Blah. Back Manchester. On then. Yes. Fell into acting and presented done even. Go too much into that. 'cause it's a problem, a life of China Forget. But yeah, ended up doing presenting things like price drop TV. MTV completely is. Got My own show on sky which was puppies the most watched show on TV. What was that show? Cope the Chris Candido show. I was destined to be an office as well. Then, I made a production guy start up production company. Of. Factual shows such shows like queer three did drama series those on TV code the ends I wrote in direct produced directed quish. Couple of football documentaries champions one about. Munches to CEOS an official release DVD for Manchester, say did one class rages as well? Yeah a Sold the rights to a lot of the shows that came to London on that's how it got into. Sort of. Went into. Media An. Advertising. Agency wouldn't worked a DO DOT com. And partly, Connecticut now. But yeah.

UK British Army England Scotland Wales Manchester Chris Candido Christopher Kenna Jimmy United States British Island England Iraq MTV London Dabo Kofi Union Connecticut Boston Jane Official
"ottoman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"ottoman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Thankfully, the Ottoman Turks didn't just destroy all of them. But even now they're they're saying the religious authority in Turkey that While they will not destroy them is what they're saying would it is being used as a mosque. So any time I don't know how they're distinguishing if it's just during prayer, time or not. They are going to be covering those up. So there we go again, covering up once again, the conquering of Huggies Sofia. Well, it's a foot in the door, Jordan and look, all you have to do is look at the history of President Erdogan to know where this is going to lead. I mean, when President Erdogan first ran for prime minister at that point, Jordan as you know, he ran as a secular city ran, saying that he was going to preserve the secular state of Turkey. He has done anything but since taking power, hey, has tried to return it to a caliphate. We talked about that on yesterday's broadcast majority. Then he's also consolidated power unto himself. He's converted. Turkish system into a presidential system, which, of course, is very convenient giving that he did that, as he was stepping into the role of president so he's converted all of the power. He's coalesced all the power around himself while trying to move away from being a secular state. So look, he might say at this point that he's going to preserve the artifacts that that cut against different religious traditions. Jordan. All you have to do is look at the history of President Erdogan and how he acts on this, He says. One thing to get a foot in the door, But as soon as he has the power is soon as he has the ball in motion. He very quickly pivots to what has been his goal all along. And you don't have to guess on this Jordan. He wants to return Turkey to an Islamic state. He wants to return it to the seat of the caliphate on Look, we've had direct Direct dealings with President Erdogan and Turkey in his his new image when we dealt with Andrew Bronson and his imprisonment there, so look, people need to not be fooled by what President Erdogan is saying. Now we know where he's heading Jordan. You know, I also so I want you to go to a C l j dot org's. We need to take action here. I want you to listen. This is the Islamic Society of North America..

President Erdogan Jordan Turkey president Islamic Society of North Ameri Huggies Sofia prime minister Andrew Bronson
"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Dictators

"In fourteen forty. Two Blackwell was ousted by Hungarian affiliated. Rivals the rivals. Then Install Dracula's oldest son Miuccia as the new ruler of Oil Laikipia seeking to form an alliance against the Hungarians drop-goal fled to the east and tried to enlist the support of his other enemy. The Ottoman Sultan Murad. The Sultan agreed to help but his support came at a very steep price. In exchange. For Vlad Drexel's future loyalty. He demanded that DRAC will leave his two sons with Murad at the Ottoman court in Gallipoli in Modern Day Turkey essentially as his prisoners. Drac who'll had to choose between his power and his family. He chose power with his young sons. As collateral DRACO and the sultan combined forces and invaded Laikipia to reclaim the throne after a quick and decisive battle will laikipia once again belonged to La Draco. But his son. Vlad the impaler still belonged to the Ottomans though they were technically captives in the Ottoman court. The experience more closely resembled an elite boarding school than a prison.

Ottoman Sultan Murad Oil Laikipia Ottoman court Drac Vlad Drexel La Draco Blackwell Miuccia Gallipoli
"ottoman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:06 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on KGO 810

"Gene, Rogan's new book is the fall of the Ottoman. Meet. She is overwhelmed by the Russian and the French and the British throughout the first years of the war, and they hold fast to the German empire. And dig in over the scenes that are heartbreaking in Eugene's book have nothing to do with the great powers have to do with the village level. When I quote, Eugene say if one of the correspondence saying that the news of war came like, a thunderbolt Eugene what I sense from your reading of the diaries and the letters in the Ottoman empire is that they were not prepared for this and people would show up with the Ottoman empire flag, or they there would be someone calling out that they were to March. The watcher of the town would say, you're recruited and you go off to war, but it didn't fool the mothers. They all knew they had a sense of foreboding that this would come out badly. And it's as if the whole empire realized that these were the last. Days is that is that a fair reading of the diaries? They were not optimistic at I definitely John. And I think for the citizens of the Ottoman empire. Nineteen fourteen came as this sort of combination of their nightmares because it was war weary empire that you've already mentioned the since the young Turk revolution in nineteen thousand eight the automated already fought three wars, they fought against Italy over Libya in nineteen eleven and lost before it against a coalition of Balkan states in the first Baltimore nineteen twelve and lost. And then they got drawn into the third Balkan war. Second Balkan war. The third conflict. The arguments had to fight in nineteen thirteen in which they manage to score. No small victory in recovering some lost territory, including the city of Deir which it falls under the first Balkan war. But the country's economy was shattered. Its military had been completely depleted of arms and munitions and the economy the soldiers, the, you know, the the military nothing was ready to go to war again. And such a such a massive were evolving, all the great powers of Europe. I think they sense of dread that accompanied the coal to to the draft was still right across the empire by Kurds Turks, Arabs, Armenians Greeks, everyone who lived is in Auburn citizen and being called to serve underarms rewarding. You that the the empire stood very little chance of quitting. Gene is good to touch upon the British. The French calling on their empires. Their Moslems, the French call on the north African Berbers who dress as these as the men with large pantaloons who go off to war to die in Belgium, unappreciated at the time just a detail about Egypt. This is when the British empire, which has been a protectorate of the Jeff Sessions the KC since the late nineteenth century eighteen eighty two. They just take it over don't they, gene? They don't they don't they don't pretend it's legal. They an exit. He had very little choice job, and they looked at Egypt as an automobile territory in Egypt. Still in nineteen fourteen was formerly part of the Ottoman empire. For the moment, the Ottoman entered the war Britain's position would be either as a hostile power in Ottoman territory or else they had to separate Egypt from the Ottoman grip to to legitimate their presence there. It's one of those funny technicalities of war where the rules of war and the rules of empire came into conflict with each other. And the solution the British came up with and it was an awkward solution was to declare unilaterally Egypt independent of the Ottoman empire. Then that meant how would Egypt rule itself? How would you designate the the leader of this country and suddenly overnight became sultanas and that way trying to make Egypt on equal standing with the Ottoman empire. Big Muslim states ruled by sultan's, but this soul to that. Of course, was an ally of Britain, an ally Britain promised would not be called on to play an active role in the war big mistake. Because of course, Britain had debate that promised several times not just drawing on each material support for the war. But did you mentioned served actively in our two records? They served Arabia in jazz, and they served in labor gangs. Whatever. The sort of allied war effort took them from Gallipoli to Salonika quite to the western front now pieces of the empire to be attacked by the British and the Russians we'll start with the Russians in the Caucasus. Because at this point Anatolia was the easternmost part of the Ottoman empire. But it reached up into the caucuses and there's a river there called the our river. And that's where the first battle between this November between Russia and the undermanned third army, and what I take from your from the diaries here is that the Russians overwhelmed them, and they were very much thrown back. Did anybody get blamed for those losses? Eugene Julio opening conflicts between the Russians and the Turks. I think that the Russians had clear orders to try and create a buffer zone between their frontier an audit enforces. And so the occupying a stretch of of land the length of the Caucasus frontier about ten fifteen miles deep and the Ottomans had no way of holding the Russians back at this. Point they weren't prepared for war and that eastern front, and they were ruled back effectively by the Russians, but the general in command of the Russian seemed to get ahead of himself, and perhaps felt that he could achieve greater glory by pushing deeper into Auburn territory, and has was to prove the case with other ambitious generals over extending your troops. And making for volatile supply lines often resulted in embarrassing defeats. And so he got overextended and the Ottomans when they finally reached a point of high concentration we're able to roll the Russians back and the Russians were forced to go back to the lines at the buffer zone date. I hope to create around Korean in this eastern Caucasus region and in so doing I think said ambitions at work among the audience that if they could actually contain in Russian thrust drive them back perhaps because applies the Russians and try and make an launch a campaign into Russian territory to achieve a great victory. The British declared war on the. Ottomans November fifth nineteen fourteen and at this point Britain lounges secret plans lot using the army in India to attack both Bosra that's at the head of the Gulf. This is the same territory and the Persian Gulf that we're fighting over and worrying about today, the oil fields that were at that time attached to pipeline and refinery in what is now Iran Persia, but that was the British oil companies controlling that they needed it for their Oilers. What the first of the dreadnought fleet that didn't use coal at used oil. So the British attack very effectively against Bosra, and they create the state of Kuwait there in correspondence, the Arab tribes. Have they shown which way they're going to go here early in the war Eugene be Arabs knew they had no fight in the European conflict. But he could see that the way the conflict would play out would definitely influence the balance of power in Europe. And so they're not for instinct was to sit on the fence. See who would prevail try to keep their options open and ensure that however the war went to the Europeans the results would be to their advantage. And no one played the game better than the founder of the modern kingdom of Saudi Arabia who was being pressed by the Ottomans to support their warford by the British to preserve a benign neutrality towards the allies as part of the kind of British late that the British empire created out of the Persian Gulf. And in the end, it was to no one except his own people and manage to conclude an agreement with the British that gave him a monthly stipend managed to persuade the Ottomans of his non hostility and used every resource that came his way from for the British to continue his conquests that Arabia targeting particular, his old rival the Rashidi clad in Ohio. So the are basically, you know, not to be caught up in Europe's conflicts slightly and look for. Every opportunity to advance their own interests, the Gulf of Aden, which is now under active patrol here at the opening the bomb all Mandevu the opening of the Red Sea at this time was a concern for the British as well, they used my note says sixty nine th Punjabis they use the Indian army to secure the Aden protectorate, and they had to deal with forts that could fire it's a pretty wide area. I believe it's not narrow like the Dardanelles. But I took a made a note here Eugene that they targeted the Shiite Zedi which of the exact same forces. That are now participating in the civil war of Yemen. It's one hundred years later, and nothing has changed about the the switching of sides in Yemen. Well, nothing has changed in westerners misreading of the politics of Yemen and mistaking friends, and foes and taking actions that could could the end prove more harmful to western interests. And they. Anticipate that was certainly the case when the British decided despite Turkish gums at the entrance to the boundaries Monday streets into the Red Sea. They were operating under the assumption that by extending artillery, then to reinforce a fortress. They held near the the straits that they could stop the Turks from threatening the movement of British shipping into the Red Sea up to Suez canal into the Mediterranean world of very important water communication line for the British empire to contribute to the war effort of the western front, but. In the end what they did by attacking an automatic position in in south Yemen was to take neutral powers like the. Yeah. Is eighty ruler to refer and make him side with the autumn is because he saw the British encroaching on his territory without permission undertaking all-star lax, and so he is lauded with the Ottomans instead and was later to be devil. The British in the Aden carbonate by laying siege to the colony and enforcing the British back into a desperate situation where they suddenly had to take much needed troops from to reinforce their position in Aden to keep sort of Ottoman Arab coalition from overwhelming the besieged town. So yes, another example of a kind of imperial overstretch and westerners misreading the politics of the Arab world a note here because we're a catastrophe of Gallipoli, the ANZAC the Australian and New Zealand contingents, leave Australia, and they are parked in Egypt, and they parade into the heart of a Cairo to impress everyone. I note that they park. Them there because they didn't quite know what they're gonna do with them. Eventually they're going to send them to Gallipoli. But from my reading of what you're reporting here, gene. It looks like the imperial troops destabilized, Egypt that the Egyptians regretted siding with the British is that correct? The British team even before war broke out in nineteen fourteen that they were dealing with a growing nationalist movement in Egypt and a growing dissatisfaction with British occupation that had been in place since eighteen eighty two so one of the territory's, I think Britain was most concerned about after the Ottoman Soltan declared you had with Egypt would the Sunni Muslims of Egypt make common cause with the Ottoman Turks and rise up against. The British as occupiers of Egypt. So one spruce strategic imperative win the deployment of the Australia. New Zealand troops was not just take advantage of a stopover in Egypt to give them basic training for military service. But also to have a large mass of troops and the British dominions who could really impress the people of Tyrone Alexandria of the strength of the British position. So that hotheaded nationalist wouldn't fi on a kind of revolt or applying against the British at the instigation of the ultimate. And so they really do deployed the ANZAC troops in a deliberate way making the March right through the heart of Cairo press on the natives just how big the military presence one hundred years later, the same anxiety same heart of Cairo the fall of the Ottoman suppressant book, but it's a history of the great war in the middle. Least Eugene Rogan is the author when we come.

Egypt Britain Eugene Europe Yemen Eugene Rogan Gene Persian Gulf Ottoman Soltan Caucasus Aden Red Sea Cairo Australia Gulf of Aden Auburn New Zealand Eugene Julio Belgium
"ottoman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The cold water kind of breaking the ice as he walks forward. His feet solidly on the ground like never getting into deep and then Mike breaks the ice and kind of worshippers towards him probably about fifteen feet from each other. And I just kept lunging lunging, and I got a couple of feet more. And all of a sudden, my I feel my my feet touch the bottom. It was at that moment. Like, oh my God. Ottoman freezing. I'm gonna get outta here. This student's name is Jason coats still in regular touch today. Ever a decade later their time makes a lot about that night in the canal when he nearly died. Do you think you made the wrong calculation and the wrong choice? Trying to save your dog. I made the wrong calculation when I took her leash off. Along the frozen canal. I know, but the real choice that endangered your life was to decide to go rescue her in retrospect, do you think that was just around choice? I should not have tried to rescue her. No. I don't think I made the wrong choice because. Wow. Life without her. The next ten years wouldn't have been a life worth living. No come on. Really? I mean, that's an -serily you almost die. You're just lucky that somebody was passing by Anton matter. The dog was everything to me. And you're married now. Like like when you've told your wife this story does she agree with that assessment? Do you think that like you should have gone in like is this an example of like something about your judgment? Oh. And other examples of bad judgment. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Definitely. My wife says senior drama, okay? Send your drama take it easy. And so, yeah, I think I lead with my I definitely lead with my heart. Show. We have stories like this one of people in difficult situations. Trying basically to scramble the way up onto the ice and having to invent how to do it trying one thing after another. That kind of battle brings out who you really are WBZ Chicago is this American life. I'm glass, stay with us. Glenn new sheriffs in town. So the house of representatives,.

Jason coats WBZ Chicago Mike Glenn Anton fifteen feet ten years
"ottoman" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

Under the Skin with Russell Brand

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

"And we'll bring you backward and forward, and, you know, show, you basic theses like, they make you think that because you're a minority that means that you're behind, and that's the history of the world tells us that that's not true, you know, in the Ottoman empire. The Greeks owned the banks I was a Turkish empire the Greek zone, the banks and we're doing the best in that economy. So he just goes through world history. And just shows you pretty much all of the fallacies and all of the emotional arguments that are made and basically tells you if you want to get ahead in life and start from nothing you have to abandon. These arguments is emotional. Arguments and understand the facts, and how it is that you can start behind and get ahead. And that's what I chose to do. For the sofa colitis that may have a truth to them when practiced on the level of the individual. But when translate to social scale become more complex and breakdown deal assure socialism, because it's it's utopian because it takes about individualism itself. Because like what what what when I feel kinda says you you'll powerful person you're driven if come from nothing, and if in your life, and it feels to me at least to suggest this to direct accept this. Actually, if you think you might be half directly say stuff like well, if I can do this you should do it right now. But that kind of for me. Didn't is to deny your unique abilities, and you'll unique qualities even having drive in the willingness to work hard is in self an endowment is why don't say you can do what I've done right. I don't say that that you're gonna follow everything that I've done. I actually hope that my kids never have to live through the or see the things that I had to see growing up. Why would I want? I don't think he should. I mean, just I don't want my children to go. See their ankles in prison or to struggle financially not to be able to afford to go on a school trip. I don't think that that's a necessary thing for you to understand how to become successful. But what I do demand. Is that people abandoned victim and tally? Right. I think that that is has become a cancer in our society to mentality about this. Yeah. Give me give us some background on it. 'cause some people won't know what you mean. It's just the oppression Olympics. It'll everybody wants to say I deserve more because I'm more pressure than you. Okay. Well, you you might say I might say that I'm more pressing you because. I'm black right? And and you're white so instantly. I'm more press than I deserve more. My voice should be louder. And then we say, okay. Well, you're a man, I'm a I'm a woman so instantly. I deserve even more because I'm a woman, you're a male and women are more press, which is totally ally. And I should have my voice heard louder, and then you keep going gay straight. And they've created all of these little these little pockets, and you have to figure out who is the most oppressed person. I guess it would be a disabled black female gay person with probably be the most. If you want to win the oppression Olympics. That's it and everyone should fawn over you and everything you say should count and should matter. And it's it's absolute crap. The victim mentality is what stopping most people from getting from point eight point being you mean, but if I imagine a like a guy disabled, and if you are disabled, what was that the black female female if I'm magin that person. I don't like I'm sure there's even within that category. I'm sure there's lots of lots and lots of variety, but. When I think of the most powerful people in the world, and the people who have the most influence, not many of them are guy. Disabled black females. So I feel well, I'm not a by the way, I kind of just so, you know, where we're starting from our feel like the difference between MSNBC and bright ball and Trump and a Bama is so small as to be irrelevant right from my political standpoint..

Olympics MSNBC Trump Bama
"ottoman" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"This ends four centuries of Ottoman Turkish empire control December fifteen nineteen seventeen Soviet Russia signs an armistice with Germany with Russia departure from the eastern front forty four German divisions. Now become available to be redeployed to the western front in time for Luton door spring offensive March third March third nine hundred eighteen breast Lidove it's Soviet Russia. Signed a tree with Germany, formerly ending his participation in the war. Harsh terms imposed by the Germans forced the Russians to yield a quarter of their prewar territory and over half of Russia's industries to the Germans March twenty first Germany's all out gamble for victory begins upon the launch of the first of a series of successive spring offensives on the western front the Saint Michel offensive named after Germany's patron Saint begins after a five hour six thousand gun artillery bombardment as sixty five divisions from the German second seventeenth eighteenth. Armies attacked the British third and fifth armies along a sixty. Mile front in the psalm at first it seems destined to succeed as the thinly stretched British fifth. Army's quickly overrunning wrecked using affective storm trooper tactics. The Germans recaptured all of the ground. They lost nine hundred sixteen during the battle disarm and press forward. However during the two week offensive the British third army manages to hold itself together, and prevents the Germans from taking heiress and key objectives of the offensive April. First nineteen eighteen British Royal Air force is founded upon the merging of the Royal flying corps and Royal Navy service. And by now, the British Abbas aviation industry has become the world leader. So no, April Fools. They really did that April twenty first Germany's red baron Manfred. Von.

Germany Soviet Russia British third army Russia Royal flying corps Ottoman Turkish Luton baron Manfred Royal Navy Army four centuries five hour two week
"ottoman" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"So the big news is they got an ottoman from ashley furniture no more issues without front those or yup at everything's probably for everything's fine judy doesn't carry more ryan now apparently doesn't care anymore and and the details are mom that even in the spirit of forgiveness even lydia has made up of shannon so look things are looking up yes and she's tried to tell her who hates who in the group of women now and it's easy you know it's like basically kelley and the moms like oh they all hater well maybe i'll sprinkle some ferry test on kelly inches like kmt policto so in lydia vicky and kelly you're talking about q dubs which is just another excuse to to show shannon thrown a played again arson or say up back yes or actually my other again another favor par favor quote of mine get out of my fucking table this seed was so funny because disney sent it was at disney that movie whoever made the elti movie sent some guy over who's like what he's not a clown he's the guy who seat you at the movies but he call those guys and usher alluvia sir clown and he's trying so hard at the case for major show the kids watching him and they play crickets as if syria and with open mouse there are like when you're going to start singing yeah no i'm not i'm not usher i'm just an usher uh who the the kelly's mom was for something to vicky which i wish we could have heard and jazz for a europe remember that lydia is like what's up i'm so enthusiastic oh i'm so glad i was there you don't waste teague i played a food like men who had to that who does that and kelly think jab member she's like to thank them i played bush avid agar embassy because y'all was mine and are of a surprise it vicky was like oh you know it's funny dea today i stood south on i stood salsa on on a my boyfriend and then they will just short another clip of shannon throwing her plate just because why not.

judy shannon kelley arson disney syria kelly teague ryan kmt lydia vicky europe