36 Burst results for "Ottoman"

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:49 min | 13 hrs ago

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

"A decade ago, Turkey's Foreign Minister Audit of Attalou used to boast his country was on good terms with everyone police fantasia want. less confrontation, less tense attitude. Especially, in the region, he spoke at the Council on foreign, relations with the will of the principal. In. Two thousand three. Zero problems with our neighbors. And the made a huge progress. All, that now seems a distant memory Turkey is growing its international influence and not always with a light touch. The country has been backing Libya's government in its civil war. Last month. The Turkish Defence Minister landed in Libya to inspect his troops and opposition warlord warned them to get out or else. Turkey prompted an angry statement from Egypt last week by allegedly planning gas exploration and Egyptian waters. And yesterday Turkish officials railed against an American company for its dealings with ethnic Kurds in neighboring Syria. That Turkey believes to be terrorists. To some, all this adventurism is reminiscent of past chapter of the country's history when the Ottoman Empire ruled all of Syria and far beyond. Turkey, has been playing an especially prominent role in Syria since protests spread into a full blown civil war. Turkey has really become a meshed in Syria since the start of the our spring, the uprisings that took place in two thousand eleven across the Middle East it back. The Islamist. Movements that initially took to the streets and then took up arms. Nicholas Pelham is our Middle East correspondent. But as those fighters were false back towards its border, it's really stepped into try and protect its southern border, stop any more refugees coming into the country and to provide some sort of safe zone for the proteges, and it's also very nervous about the current state law that emotion the northeast of the country. It feels very threatened by the emergence of Kurdish power on the southern borders, and is it reasonable for Turkey to think that those Kurdish forces are really a threat historic? The have been links between the PK, the cuts down Workers Party, which has been waging a thirty five year a war for. Autonomy and separatism inside Turkey. Many of those fighters did flee sought refuge in Iraq and in Syria, and so Turkey is worried about what it sees very much kind of PKK influenced state emerging on its southern borders. So this year it's been launching pretty heavy attacks inside Iraq, it's been sending tanks across the border. It's established positions inside northern Iraq. It's been carrying out drone bombardments, such two hundred kilometers from its border in Saint, John More, Kurds all the way along its southern border inside Syria inside. Iraq see a new Turkish assault, which is pushing deep into their territory and not just unsettling. Kurdish aspirations for sovereignty in Iraq and Syria, and this is also unnerving Arab leaders as well. Who Turkey pushing deep into territory, which was part of the Turkish Republic predecessor. The Ottoman Empire, which ruled the Middle East centuries until its dissolution about a century ago, which is to say that Turkey is expanding its influence is doing this adventurism beyond Iraq and Syria all over the Middle East of the moment. There's a this year has seen the new intervention of the Turkish, Army. Libya. They came to the rescue of the besieged government of National Accord. In Tripoli, which has been fighting a civil war against a renegade general. Khalifa. After Turkish forces established at base on the borders of Tunisia, we're seeing it's frigates make a bid for control of looking coastline and even ward off French frigates. We're really seeing a substantive increase in Turkish. Power across the Middle East and it's not just happening in Liberia. It's happening in Gaza, which is an ally of Turkey. Turkish forces there have tried to help. Cut Break Its blockade by Saudi Arabia they're. A. Few hundred to a few thousand Turkish forces that are they're wasting more Turkish interested in Yemen civil war. We're seeing interest in a Sudanese port and actually Turkey's largest overseas basis in the point of Africa. So really this is a massive increase in Turkey spread across the middle, East and do you believe that the the the Ottoman history plays into that as a return to former glories? In some way? It's very much the in the rhetoric certainly saw Mr. Osman tropes at the at the height of the Arab spring wanted to appear to be the leader of the Muslim world. He was promoting his version of governance across the region hoping to clone the Turkish model across the Middle East. But since the collapse of Islamist movement since its as from power in Egypt and the retreat of many of its forces, he's really kind of played much more on Turkey's national interests. He's ally domestically with what had been his nationals opposition. He seems to be much more concerned on trying to maximize Turkey's economic claims in the. The Mediterranean this since much more about promoting Turkey's national interests than flying it systems colors. This is really an exercise in in hard power and trying to exploit the weakness of others, the retreat of Europe and America from the Middle East. The policies of many Arab governments, and try and push Turkey to fill what seems to be a vacuum of power across the Middle East, and so is that push to serve Turkey's national interests working is, is it benefiting from this from this expansionism? If you're trying to put together a balance sheet of profit balance sheet? Sheet Turkey has benefited from Khatri investment cutters, loans, and investments have helped prop up the Turkish lira. It may be that country's also hoping to fund part of its military costs in Libya Turkeys, keen to promote its companies when it comes to eventual reconstruction of war-torn Libya, which after all is energy rich state, and so long term, there may be benefits, his critics home highlight, the cost it's estimated that Turkish operations in Syria have cost anything up to about thirty billion dollars, and of course, there is a threat that you're going to see a major escalation. Escalation in the Middle East, which could embroil Turkey. It's not just Turkey is entering the middle, East enforce. It's also Russia. Many Arab states are trying to gain Russian support to push back Turkey, not just Syria Egypt the United Arab Emirates looking to Russian support in Libya, and Egypt is sending its tanks to the Libyan borders. The UN warned that the risk of a of a regional war focused on Libya and beyond that that risk was huge. So this is a massive gamble and it looks as if the stakes are going to be increasingly hyphen

Turkey Middle East Syria Libya Iraq Sheet Turkey Egypt Turkish Republic Principal Nicholas Pelham Workers Party Attalou Saudi Arabia John More Russia Tunisia UN Tripoli
Fresh update on "ottoman" discussed on Lexicon Valley

Lexicon Valley

01:04 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ottoman" discussed on Lexicon Valley

"The Ottoman Empire into the area where the language spoken would have been Persian and so somebody like Sultan Celine New Persian, he could speak Persian the way at. least a lot of us can speak French or Spanish, and so his Turkish was full of Persian, and then one might want to speak some person. He also would have spoken Arabic as the language of religion the language situation in the Ottoman Empire was fascinating and cannot be done justice to in one episode of anything but there was Persian and Persian trusting language in. That is just like English, it starts as this bristling Lee complicated in terms of endings and conjugation declines language very much like an early Indo European language very much like Latin and Greek old English and old person were of similar structure. Old Person was quote unquote worse in terms of how complicated it was but then the Persian empire took in a great many people. From a great many places who would've learned old Persian as adults and therefore would have broken it down the way we adults breakdown languages we learn after the age of about sixteen and so pretty quickly old person becomes a language that is actually as user friendly as English modern Persian as a language that gives you very few headaches in terms of having to memorize. Lists of congregational patterns et Cetera. It's refreshing as a can of mango flavored bubbly Seltzer. It's absolutely marvelous and also it shows you how things where down over the years words in old Persian tend to be just longer than words in modern Persian because of how these things go. So for example, you can see Old Persian written in the town of the Houston upon a rock face King Darius writing about his exploits and he describes himself as a Shafi A- as Shafi Ah. That's that long word. You know what that is now shah. So Sharia is now just shah that's what happens to words overtime in any case, person was another language of empire. You read about the moguls who ruled India and similar regions for a long time. That's a whole other story. Persian was what they ruled in toxic and Dari those are basically Persian those varieties of Persian language with a great deal of influence and spread even. Today, and it's part of the Indo Iranian sub family of Indo European and so person has relatives. We've probably mostly only heard of pasta these days because of various, very unpleasant things that have been going on there that relate to the United States over the past twenty years. But Pashto is one of these Indo Iranian languages and if German and Icelandic are the way Germanic quote unquote should be an English and Swedish and Dutch are extremely Streamlined Persian is the English Pasta. Is There Icelandic the closest to what old person used to be like? Then the Kerr's they speak Kurdish that's another one of these languages, and there's Baluchi which I only mentioned because in the Baluchistan area skeletons have been found of rhinoceroses that were the size of buildings. It's absolutely fascinating Paris seven theory. There's a whole book written about these things but I always think of these big rhinoceros anyway that Is The Persian story and you know I know it's a little tacky this sort of kitschy sense of you know what the Middle East used to be like but one more piece of Kismet on sorry because it really is musically a great piece of work. This is the overture to Kismet. Inglorious. Monitor phonic sound. This is arranged by the incredible Hershey K. in just a little. This is how Kismet starts a lot of you like this..

Ottoman Empire King Darius Shah Sultan Celine Shafi Ah LEE Seltzer Middle East United States Hershey K. India Kerr Baluchistan Houston Paris
Istanbul landmark Hagia Sophia reopens as mosque

WBBM Evening News

00:39 sec | Last week

Istanbul landmark Hagia Sophia reopens as mosque

"Takes on a new role in Istanbul. Today is an historic day for the Muslim world because the first Friday prayers in 86 years were taking place at the Iast Sofia site after Turkey converted back into a moss Sofia's of 1500 year old majestic structure. With Byzantine and Ottoman architecture built to be a cathedral, then turned into a mosque than a museum. The decision to convert I s Sofia back into a mosque was controversial to those who want Turkey to remain a centre for all religions. Pamela Fox CBS News of the Devotion of Dogs to

Moss Sofia Iast Sofia Sofia Turkey Byzantine And Ottoman Istanbul Pamela Fox Cbs News
Istanbul's Hagia Sophia Reopens as a Mosque

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | Last week

Istanbul's Hagia Sophia Reopens as a Mosque

"Ridge Ip IAB Erdogan attended the first Muslim prayers inside the iconic Aya Sofia in more than 80 years. Imperious Peter. Kenyan reports heir to one declared earlier this month at the former museum would reopen as a mosque overflow crabs filled the plaza outside the is Sofia. As the Muslim call to prayer rang out. Originally built in the sixth century is a Byzantine church was converted to a mosque after the Ottoman conquest in 14 53. Turkey's Western oriented leader Mustafa Kemal Ataturk made it a museum in the 19 thirties. Erdogan's decree declaring the uh Sofia mosque once again. Provoked international protests, including from the pope. Turkey has promised to preserve the Christian icons inside the S Sofia and it will retain its name, which refers to the Christian ST Sophia Peter. Kenyan NPR NEWS, Istanbul Less than

Aya Sofia Sofia Mosque Mustafa Kemal Ataturk S Sofia Christian St Sophia Peter Erdogan Turkey Peter Istanbul
Hagia Sophia: Pope 'pained' as Istanbul museum reverts to mosque

AP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

Hagia Sophia: Pope 'pained' as Istanbul museum reverts to mosque

"Says he's deeply pained over the decision by Turkey to change in the status of Hadiya Sapphire, originally an Istanbul Christian cathedral from a museum to a mosque. In a brief improvised remark. Francis, speaking from his studio window overlooking ST Peter's Square, noted that the Catholic Church marked Sunday as the international day of the sea. Then he said, Madam apart sample on the sea brings my thought Tio East amble. I'm thinking of saints afire, and I'm deeply pained, Francis said. No more. It was clearly referring to the move by Turkey to formally convert the monumental building back into a mosque. The colossal cathedral was turned into a mosque after the Ottomans conquered the city in 14 53 while the secular government in 1934 decided to make it a museum. I'm

Francis Turkey Istanbul Christian Cathedral Tio East Amble Hadiya Sapphire St Peter's Square Catholic Church Madam
Greece condemns Turkey's decision to convert Hagia Sophia into mosque

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 3 weeks ago

Greece condemns Turkey's decision to convert Hagia Sophia into mosque

"The top leaders of Greece are slamming. Decision to turn the highest Sophia Museum into a Mosque Is considered the greatest example of Byzantine Christian architecture in the World Joanna. Kakissis reports from Athens on Greece's response to Turkey's move. I guess a Fiat. which the Greeks Call I guess of? Yeah was built fifteen hundred years ago as an Orthodox Christian Cathedral Greek Prime Minister Kitty Echoes. Mitsotakis said turning this museum back into a mosque would damage Turkey's relations with Greece in the Western world. The Ottomans converted I. Associate to a mosque and fourteen fifty three when they conquered the. The Byzantine city of Constantinople and changed its name to Istanbul Mustafa Kemal Ataturk who founded modern Turkey, a secular nation ordered idea Sofia's conversion to a museum eighty five years ago for NPR news I'm Joanna Kakissis in

Greece Sophia Museum Turkey Istanbul Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Byzantine Christian Joanna Kakissis Orthodox Christian Cathedral Kitty Echoes Prime Minister Constantinople Athens Sofia NPR Mitsotakis
Pope 'deeply pained' over Turkey's move on Hagia Sophia

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Pope 'deeply pained' over Turkey's move on Hagia Sophia

"Pope Francis says he's deeply pained over the decision by Turkey the change of the status of hard yes the fire originally and he stumbled Christian cathedral from a museum to a mosque in a brief improvise remarks Francis speaking from his studio window overlooking St Peter's square noted that the Catholic Church month Sunday as the international day of the sea then he said it might have important poll on the C. brings my thought to ease stumble I'm thinking of since the fire and I'm deeply painful Francis said minimal but was clearly referring to the move by Turkey to fully convert the monumental building back into a mosque the colossal cathedral was turned into a mosque after the Ottomans conquered the city in fourteen fifty three well the secular government in nineteen thirty four decided to make it a museum I'm Charles the Ledesma

Pope Francis Turkey Christian Cathedral St Peter Charles The Ledesma Catholic Church
Turkish high court ruling paves way for Istanbul's 6th century Hagia Sophia museum to be re-converted into mosque

WBBM Morning News

00:20 sec | 3 weeks ago

Turkish high court ruling paves way for Istanbul's 6th century Hagia Sophia museum to be re-converted into mosque

"Now, in a highly controversial move, Turkey's president formally changed the status of Istanbul's iconic hired Sofia back into a mosque. After a ruling from the country's highest court. The World Heritage Site has been used as a museum for the last 80 years. It was originally built of the six centuries the cathedral before was conquered by the Ottoman Empire.

Ottoman Empire World Heritage Site Istanbul Sofia Turkey President Trump
Worry, haste, retail therapy: What have we bought and why?

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Worry, haste, retail therapy: What have we bought and why?

"The store closings that have gone along with the coronavirus have created a different kind of retail therapy some people have gone shopping bad during the pandemic online retail sales have surged as consumer spending fell rapidly wacky purchases range from rubber chickens to luxury items finance with refunds from a canceled events a man in Germany paid fifty cents a piece for squares of toilet paper others went for fancy espresso makers new furniture and shoes with no where to go one Indiana couple got to skip their last preschool payment due to the lockdown and purchased the counter their dreams the refund on their son's lunch program bought them a matching Ottoman I surely after

Germany Indiana
Exploring Hungary

Travel with Rick Steves

08:03 min | 4 months ago

Exploring Hungary

"Let's start out today's travel. With Rick Steves with a little old world charm in Hungary when travelling in Europe. You just have to include the great cities on your itinerary. Hungry elegant capital of Budapest is certainly impressive. But there's another side that you should explore as well and that's the country's smaller towns and cities historic Acre is an easy and popular sidetrip northeast of Budapest. It's been attracting travelers from Eastern Europe. As a place to catch your breath surrounded by the opulent architecture of Hungary to introduce us to the scene. And we're joined by Hungarian tour guides. Monica Poche and George. Farkas thank you. Did I get that right in Budapest? If you're looking for a little break you head up to egger very much. So yes how far away is it and what it would take about. Maybe an hour and ten minutes done in a highway and then on the secondary roads. And then you find yourself in gear Third Drain Connection. There is yes you will have to switch. That's one of the reasons why is not as cosmopolitan as it should be? Because when the train tracks were planned they didn't make a direct connection initially so That's a little bit of a of a downside of it but there's a great bus connection as well so Monica when you were growing up in Budapest. Did your family ever go to Edgar together? Yes actually not just with our family but I remember that During school trips during the communist era we were taken to Edgar Edgar was the seat of the archbishop pre so it has fantastic beautiful churches by the way would like to tell you during the communist era because of the nine hundred fifty six revolution aft-r in Hungary all of the churches are considered to be museums. Saw it ever also well capped? That's even during the communists. They are as squid children. We were taken to the Churches Museums. But not as living places of worship. The church survived physically. But it's a historic place Museum rather than a place of worship joining a community standard harmonised. Okay well it was very much controlled control. Why let's just turn around a little bit and say why Edgar would be the number one destination for Hungarians visit because it's part of the curriculum because that's where biggest victory happened. Hi this is Turkey Turkish time because they talk about. That was the last place to be taken in by the Turks of they go all the way thirteen. Nine thousand Turks are coming over and two thousand Gillian's actually locked themselves up. In the castle women children as early and they go and defeat the Turks. So that's the victory talk about. That's why all children are taken and they are taught. We don't talk about the fact that the send away the defeated Turks. A couple of months later turned around and came back into the town. But that's something we talk about. Obviously that's that's not really something won your battle fifteen fifty two so nearly five hundred years ago. The castle is still there and you can visit the Castle Castle. You even as a tourist. You get a sense. This is really important to the Hungarian much so very much. And my memory of Egor is a minaret and it must be the most northern minaret from the Ottoman Empire sticking up right there in the middle of this city yet. It's like a spaceship. There cannot send has no contracts they just sitting there is under go in a major restoration and so rather interesting Just recently they Reinstated the culpa. Praia a month later. They put it on their huge reconstruction was built for the the man who sings the calder calling. For prayer he actually climb up. The spirit is what about two hundred steps all the way to the top right and then he would get that acoustical benefit of being a top of everybody and to this day while they might not climb up there five times a day. Tourist can climb up there. Yes it's a tight little climb. Yes but it's a good view from there and also the reason it's important to mention because although Hungary was under the Turkish Ottoman invasion in a fifteenth century. They majorly converted existing buildings into minarets or they converted the Roman Catholic churches into mosques. They didn't be too many things. They've built these mirrors that we have. I think maybe two or three in our whole country for the minaret would just decorate a pre existing building that became a mosque. Is that what you're only by? They will buy. It's very rare to see anything from the Fifteenth Century Turkish Ottoman era. But that minaret is one of a kind of it. Gary Tour Guides. George Farkas said Monica Poche telling US why the town of Edgar Northern Hungary is one of the country's most popular getaways right now on travel with Rick. Steves something I remember from Edgar is. The market is just a wonderful market. George can you take us on a little walk? If you have some American friends with you and you want to introduce the culture. What would you find in the market at Egger? That gives us an insight into the salt of their Hungarian cuisine. And it's a great experience. Actually it's a a living market and you still see the ones that actually just went out in the morning and they went to see what's there to sell and they come onto their tunnel is stalls and then they sell day or individual small quantity backyard. I remember that it's like my little card table. And there's a hardscrabble old farmer husband and wife and they've got their turnips potatoes and they kind of looked like their produce very much so yeah so you can get that type of thing and then and then you continue on and then you start to see. The beautifully presented larger stalls with Grapes and Peaches and plums and veggies. And all that beautiful presented. The key is to have that relationship with the vendor. So you go and blink and then they know that they know us so you get the nice stuff From the front. I'm you know to really presentable one. And you're not regular year. You have to be aware you might not get what you see. Are you likely to find some of this famous Hungary and Moonshine for sale very much so Pelinka Pelinka because that's fundamentally something It's like GRAPPA? It's very legal. I would say it starts from eighty proof upwards and its shots That's how in the old days those that work out in the field started. They with just to get some energy my hunches. There's these flat little flasks. That people have definitely I I do have one with me. At that moment Hungarians would never leave the country without a Lilla flat flesh of Polanco. We also call it medicine if you have a heartache if you have a little bit of stomach problem because you're abrode no you are not taking. Bapti obese more something as but you immediately get delillo. Hungarian piling cars sanitizer society. Strong believe it or not but there are still destination centers in the country when you have some fruit trees in Hungary. Let's say plum or apricot or whatever you can take your own fruit to these destinations centers. You know it's bio and then Not filled with chemicals and then they make it for you. This bio moonshine exactly. There's actually a reconsidered approach today because In the old days when you went to house of Hungarian Oh you start to the dinner at the venue they will offer you pulling her and now modern culinary understanding. Is that if you offer Pelinka before the meal. You should be assured that the meal is not going to be good because what they say that if you have your Pelinka sort of so strong it kills your taste at your ability to ten. Then you don't taste the food so now pulling Kush should actually be digested. I suppose to Pera tiff. So if you are a host and you respect what you've cooked you want people to appreciate it you're not gonNA hide it by giving then you offered as before

Hungary Edgar Edgar Budapest George Farkas Rick Steves Monica Poche Turks Edgar Northern Hungary Fifteenth Century Turkish Otto Europe Eastern Europe Castle Castle Acre Churches Museums Egger Ottoman Empire Place Museum Pelinka Pelinka Pelinka Pera Tiff
Predicting the Decade and Distributing Conferences

Talking Machines

09:58 min | 6 months ago

Predicting the Decade and Distributing Conferences

"You are listening to talk machines. I'm Katherine Gorman Neal Learns and I know it's a little bit belated Neil but happy new year. Happy new decade if you believe decades does come from complexity about zero counting depending on. Whether you're a Fortran or C I. I don't know how do you and happy do you decorate. Yeah absolutely and try to see whichever exactly but you know however you counted. It's a nice. It's a nice artificially artificially imposed time to think about what this last unit of time has meant and what is next unit of time might hold so I would love to do the traditional navel-gazing commute period of time kickoff that journalists love to do which is thinking about what we might see in this next unit of time in this next decade. And you know Oh is informed by what we've seen in this last decade. I think that we've seen this kind of reflection right. Now is so important because I think we have seen humongous change not only early in the the research and what has been technically accomplished but the way that the practitioner community works and the implications of that four four things going forward. So what do you think. Neil if you had to choose one sort of hallmark of what you think signals what we can see in the future around how work gets done. I think there's lots of lots of crystal ball gazing about. What kind of work is going to get done? And that's very exciting. I Yeah I think the how that work is going to get done and how we talk about how that work gets done is going to have a huge impact on what problems picked up in solved so it is appropriate that we choose an arbitrary number based on number fingers we have only Chand for period of reflection it makes the universe make sense with tens right. Yeah Yeah I B as being an amazing decade in terms of adoption machine learning techniques. That's absolutely clear and I guess if I look back to twenty ten I don't think I would have full cost tool that. We would be where we are now a common who who says that the things happen slower than you expect in a period of years but a period of decades same false and that seems to play. He's he's something that I I was reading over the holidays. which is the printing press was being developed? The fourteen forty S in mind in Germany by Gutenberg and I think the prince his first Bible in fourteen fifty five by fifteen twenty Martin. Luther is banging things on church. Dole's saying saying he doesn't like the pope anymore and you've got a sensitive the beginning of the reformation of the church which I find extremely interesting vesting when you compare nineteen forties when people building computers in various parts in the world And I it it'll technology to two twenty twenty. It's the same seventy eight year period and first of all it makes me think. Wow actually things happen. Pretty fast with the printing impress and wild things in some sense happen pretty slowly with computers but one of the things that happened with I think the printing press some Some point was initially. It was a tool that was used by churches to print indulgence season. Bibles and things like that. And then it was used for descent and I guess one of the things we can we seen in communication is the increase in social media and it being used in that so really radically changing the way we're having conversations not necessarily all to the good. I think probably would say the same thing about the printing press but but it takes a while to assimilate how to to do these things I think. For example. You can see changes in the way. We're doing politics and that I think he's not he's not I don't I think when people are becoming popular major politicians are becoming popular on social media platforms. I don't think it's because they are sort of spend golly geniuses that know how to conduct population reputation. I just think that there's a coincidence between that politicians personality and way of communicating and things that well on these platforms and that's that's kind of interesting and I think Yet so there's some of that going on and I think we have hope we're going to get. We need to be able to use these tools to do better communication in science as well which I think is really interesting challenge. Yeah and I think that we've we've started to see that right. I don't I I don't know when I mean you know this. I don't know when archive opened up but like I certainly became aware of it And its impact within the last decade decade and then. I think that we've seen so so that to me. Sort of took the the model of or at least the timeline of publication location of academic papers especially for this community which seems to rely so heavily on archive to communicate this information that changed radically but also the journal structure in machine. Learning at least has never been what a traditional journal structure would be like. It's sort of relied at least from my point of view relied more heavily on the main the main flagship conferences. But but now even those main flagship conferences were seeing things like people putting their posters online heavy use of QR codes in posters to like communicate back to the paper. And then also this idea that I think naps is taken up That seemed to be growing in popularity. We saw the meet UPS last year. The idea around decentralisation allegation of these larger points and I think that that Willie roles in neatly and nicely to your idea around like the printing press was a tool for four the well-established to communicate. And then it became as the idea as the technology became democratized became used to express a wider variety including dissenting opinions. And so I wonder if as we see not only the communication but the community the practitioner community become decentralized and reach a wider population and include a larger number of voices if we're knocking to see a larger variety of research questions getting chosen particularly with response to the on the ground questions that people are facing geographically being wider. I don't know does that make sense. What do you think the so many things going on? I guess when people look back at this period you suspect then they they might just say Oh and then all hell broke loose a hun- because actually there's something else that went on win. The printing press was developed at a similar time. The Ottomans Monds I think the second sacked Constantinople and that actually cools A large number of written works to leave Constantinople things. Things have not been known in say Western. You're sorry very European perspective and that sort of gave material for the printing press to welcome and one of the things things that's going on when you talk about ideas and dissemination of ideas. He's also the ideas that came out so people then started re translating the Bible. But in this case it's very complex because when you mentioned archive I see that as an old combination of the old and the new. Because this genuinely if I speak to most people that finding sort of clarification blog posts all software perhaps the most useful thing and driving through their ideas but when it comes to their citations they will cite archive papers but not those blog posts all very often not the software despite the archive papers. It's not having gone through a sort of a more formal peer review process. I think Perot Tom Dietrich how to sort of check many of them to make sure they're on subject great service to the community see but they haven't gone through a sort of formal pair of you yet. Somehow they had artifact which is more tracing back to the the notion of what a written piece of work is and how it should appear as a paper which in some sense is also relatively modern notion. Only two hundred years old. But it's so important important an interesting the what you write this disruption. Going on there's also massive conservatism. In the way we expect to do things it's not like let's revisit everything we think about scientific if it communication and conferences and everything else because in some sense I would say. Many of conferences have become undermined by the status. We place on on getting a paper in that conference. Venue for conferring they have become a status symbol for getting your tenure or students are in a very difficult position because I think they feel. PhD students that they feel that unless they have a few Europe's papers papers or you IRA. I starts papers the they I see la so now now you have to start worrying. Which conferences have I missed an GonNa Win Fund and other really good conferences that I forgot to mention they feel the the pressure to produce these papers because they feel that probably the only mark of success that came up with the new? NFL meeting. which which I thought was a great innovation this Europe so there was a meeting for people that machine learning once? You're on the stand about the community a lot of questions around this and I think that there's a way what I'm slightly worried about. Is The misalignment between those contributing to understanding and those being credited for that contribution it almost seems like back. Once you've got this idea that someone's explained clearly in a blog post you. The archetype is to cite this paper that you've never really read. Don't really understand now now. Of course the idea maybe in that paper and so forth but it's really sucked too sophisticated ecosystem communication now and I think that that's opening up challenges which you see reflected in people talk about

Neil Europe Constantinople Katherine Gorman Neal Chand NFL Dole Luther Perot Tom Dietrich Germany Willie UPS Gutenberg Martin
Human Rights, Hate Speech And The First Amendment

Dave Ramsey

05:28 min | 9 months ago

Human Rights, Hate Speech And The First Amendment

"Happen okay so Richard singles as since World War two many nations have passed laws to curb the incitement of racial and religious hatred by the way have been successful new no they have not anti semitism in Europe is it back at near all time highs it really is terrible so those those laws no word seeking to curb hate speech and hate crimes I am been wildly successful which is why Jews are moving by the bundle over Israel well I started out as protections against the kind of anti semitic bigotry to give rise to the Holocaust we call them hate speech laws says Richard Stengel but there's no agreed upon definition of what hate speech actually is in general hate speech is speech that attacks insults people on the basis of race religion ethnic origin and sexual orientation I think it's time to consider the statutes he says that domestic terrorists were consumers of hate speech okay well you just said you can't define it but if somebody bad consumes it that means it's hate speech again I I ask willing to broadband Bernie Sanders on healthcare willing to do that this is speech doesn't pull the trigger but does anyone seriously doubt that hateful speech creates a climate where such acts are more likely no we all agree with that that's why we should use social mechanism to push people to be more civil overall but banning things via the government because a bad person could do bad things thinking bad things like good luck with that he says let the debate begin hate speech has a less violent but nearly as damaging impact in another way it diminishes tolerance it enables discrimination not noticed all these words are defined by Richard Stengel so corny to Richard single it's discrimination if I say the man is a man or woman is one presumably they'll be hate speech and should be banned by the government he says it isn't that by definition speech that undermines the value of the first amendment right what is a speech that he says isn't that by definition speech that undermines the values the first man that was designed to protect fairness and due process equality before the law but look what he's doing here he's saying there's some other values that are not first amendment values but the first member could undermine them so we need to get rid the first amendment the first man it was designed to protect fairness by saying we're allowed to speak and your process by saying that the government can't take away your stuff based on something you just say equality before the law what the law is equal in that we can all say stop and he's saying well free speech undermines those things and she just get rid of hate speech why shouldn't the state's experiment with their own version of hate speech statutes to penalize speech but deliberately insults people based on religion race ethnicity and sexual orientation well because the government shouldn't be in the business of determining your intense based on what you have to say about politics and the world that's why his worst where truth cannot drive allies must add new guard rails I like to see that standard okay cannot drive LS we're can't treat drive allies where can't it Dr allies where hasn't it where is it impossible for truth to drive out lies in all for protecting thought that we hate but not speech that insight Tate in other words he's not for protecting thought that he hates because all thought to be a good insight hate really awful stuff but this is this is the world that the left would like to see it's funny because the left is a divided mind about this Barack Obama actually was speaking to young people the other day and he and he actually ripped on them I'm cancel culture saying that all of this was over rocks this idea of purity and you're never compromised and you're always politically bulk and all that stuff that you should get over that quickly world the world is messy and there ambiguities like if I Twitter hashtag about how you didn't do something right or use the word wrong verb or then I can sit back and feel pretty good about myself because men you see how what I was I called you out that's not that's not activism that's not bring about change you know is very different from the modern Democratic Party by the way I think Barack Obama really believes that you down I have my doubts I have my doubts okay meanwhile in a piece of breaking news I just wanna point out the wild hypocrisy of the left when it comes to human rights remember that time ahead I'm I was supposed to be the human rights crusader right you want to boycott Israel very important boycott Israel well now she said she doesn't know what kind of running shoes on like a Turkey and on Tuesday she refused to back a resolution recognizing the slaughter of Armenians by Ottoman Turks during World War one is genocide she instead voted present she's a real hero for human rights she has really really worried that human rights violations unless they're human rights violations that take place in the house of an Islamic dictatorship whose policies she's largely backs she has a truly knowledge means of historical crimes against humanity must include both the heinous genocide in the twentieth century along with earlier mass slaughters like trans Atlantic slave trade and aid of American genocide so in other words she wants to do with a resolution condemning the Armenian genocide exactly what the Democratic Party did with her anti semitism by where they were like well sure she's an anti semite but let's just condemn all hate she's like I can't condemn the Armenian genocide only I need to also condemn America thank you cannot that is what about isn't of the highest order astonishing what about him in addition represented Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas and Paul Gosar there's on also voted it presents those four hundred five in favor eleven in opposition solid solid stuff from human rights campaigner L. and I'm already coming up speaking of utter stupidity the left is now

Richard Europe
Ilhan Omar responds to criticism for her 'present' vote on Armenian genocide resolution

Sports To The Max with Mike Max

00:22 sec | 9 months ago

Ilhan Omar responds to criticism for her 'present' vote on Armenian genocide resolution

"Converse woman L. Han Omar is facing criticism from Minnesota's Armenian community for not supporting a resolution recognizing the mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks as genocide the Minnesota Democrat was one of three lawmakers voting present when the house overwhelmingly approved it yesterday Omar says recognition of genocide shouldn't be used as a weapon in a political

L. Han Omar Minnesota
House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

All Things Considered

01:04 min | 9 months ago

House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

"Okay in the house also approved a second measure today aimed at rebuking Turkey that resolution recognizing the Armenian genocide why is that significant so will the economic sanctions could sting if signed into law there was this symbolic rebuke as well an overwhelming vote of four hundred five to eleven to recognize the Armenian genocide this is been a big priority of Armenian American advocacy groups and they've argued that that the United States needs to recognize the deaths of an estimated one point five million Armenians from nineteen fifty teen the nineteen twenty three they were systematically killed in the Ottoman Empire which is now modern day Turkey accomplishment Brad Sherman has been an advocate for this resolution for more than twenty years we should recognize that genocide again and again long ago but we didn't because we were told that we had a great alliance with Turkey previous administrations have prevented movement on this in part due to fierce opposition from the Turkish government but it's now called because so many in Congress feel like the relationship with Turkey has

Turkey United States Brad Sherman Turkish Government Congress Twenty Years
House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

All Things Considered

01:48 min | 9 months ago

House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

"Okay in the house also approved a second measure today aimed at rebuking Turkey that resolution recognizing the Armenian genocide why is that significant so will the economic sanctions could sting if signed into law there was this symbolic rebuke as well an overwhelming vote of four hundred five to eleven to recognize the Armenian genocide this is been a big priority of Armenian American advocacy groups and they've argued that that the United States needs to recognize the deaths of an estimated one point five million Armenians from nineteen eighteen to nineteen twenty three they were systematically killed in the Ottoman Empire which is now modern day Turkey accomplishment Brad Sherman has been an advocate for this resolution for more than twenty years we should recognize that genocide again and again long ago but we didn't because we were told that we had a great alliance with Turkey previous administrations have prevented movement on this in part due to fierce opposition from the Turkish government but it's now called because so many in Congress feel like the relationship with Turkey has degraded are either these measures gonna go anywhere in the Senate you know that's an interesting question it faces a skeptical Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader McConnell essentially gets to decide whether gets a vote a congressman McCall he's the top Republican on the house foreign affairs committee he says he's been in constant communication with the White House and his counterparts in the Senate he's confident they can come to an agreement they'll go through the Senate and I I I feel very strongly the president will sign it the president has actually lifted sanctions on Turkey as part of the administration's efforts to broker a cease fire in Syria so it will be a heavy lift to convince the president to sign and the White House hasn't weighed in on this houseboat but the Senate will get a classified briefing to more about serious so we'll be hearing more about it soon no

Turkey United States Brad Sherman Turkish Government Congress Senate Mitch Mcconnell Mccall White House President Trump Syria Congressman Twenty Years
House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

All Things Considered

01:48 min | 9 months ago

House Passes Resolution Recognizing Armenian Genocide

"Okay in the house also approved a second measure today aimed at rebuking Turkey that resolution recognizing the Armenian genocide why is that significant so will the economic sanctions could sting if signed into law there was this symbolic rebuke as well an overwhelming vote of four hundred five to eleven to recognize the Armenian genocide this is been a big priority of Armenian American advocacy groups and they've argued that that the United States needs to recognize the deaths of an estimated one point five million Armenians from nineteen teen the nineteen twenty three they were systematically killed in the Ottoman Empire which is now modern day Turkey accomplishment Brad Sherman has been an advocate for this resolution for more than twenty years we should recognize that genocide again and again long ago but we didn't because we were told that we had a great alliance with Turkey previous administrations have prevented movement on this in part due to fierce opposition from the Turkish government but it's now called because so many in Congress feel like the relationship with Turkey has degraded are either these measures gonna go anywhere in the Senate you know that's an interesting question it faces a skeptical Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader McConnell essentially gets to decide whether gets a vote a congressman McCall he's the top Republican on the house foreign affairs committee he says he's been in constant communication with the White House and his counterparts in the Senate he's confident they can come to an agreement they'll go through the Senate and then I I I feel very strongly the president will sign it the president has actually lifted sanctions on Turkey as part of the administration's efforts to broker a cease fire in Syria so it will be a heavy lift to convince the president to sign and the White House hasn't weighed in on this how to vote but the Senate will get a classified briefing to more about serious so we'll be hearing more about it soon

Turkey United States Brad Sherman Turkish Government Congress Senate Mitch Mcconnell Mccall White House President Trump Syria Congressman Twenty Years
US to step aside for Turkish assault on Kurds in Syria

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:19 min | 10 months ago

US to step aside for Turkish assault on Kurds in Syria

"On Sunday night the White House announced that US President Donald Trump had spoken to Turkish President Richard Type Erred One and agreed that you had forces operating in northern Syria would stand aside in the event of Turkey's long threatened invasion of the area we've been in Syria for many years serious to be a short-term hip just short term hit we were supposed to be in and out that was many many years ago northern Syria is probably not a helpful way of thinking about the region concerned though is geographically the north of Syria it is practically Kurdish the area of Syria along the border with lucky has been controlled for some while by Syrian Kurdish militia called the white p g the white PG have been a key ally of the US led coalition Fighting Islamic state Turkey however considers the Y. p. g. terrorists allies of the PK eighty largely Turkey based Kurdish group who have battled Turkey for decades Turkey also wants to repatriate the two million Syrian refugees is currently hosting to the territory the wipe e. g. hold trump now seems with little consultation with anybody but other wan to have wait to in one Syrian Kurdish official by NBC News said the Americans of traitors they have abandoned us to a Turkish massacre if the why PG and Kurds in general thought their heroin in helping to tackle Islamic state would be some guarantee of American support in future they were reckoning without two things one obviously is the impulsiveness of Donald Trump who has learned what little he understands of the Middle East from Fox News which is worse than not knowing anything at ooh the other is a long history almost an ingrained habit of abandonment off the Kurds by those who profess to admire and respect them and promise to see Turku they fought with us they follow us they died with us they died we lost tens of thousands of Kurds died fighting isis they died for us and with us and for themselves but they're great people trump claims that he has not betrayed the Kurds among a series of bowl hinged and mentored tweets on the subject he has exclaimed that Inouye have we abandoned the Kurds who are special people and wonderful fighters codes will have ample reason for thinking that this is about half right the molten history of selling the cuts out dates back to the nineteen not when the Kurds hoped the dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire would at last permit them a state of their own the nineteen twenty treaty of several promised one in fact however western powers decided they cared less about this than they did about keeping the new Turkish Republic on board and the fledgling Kurdistan was quiet were encouraged by the West when there was a government in Baghdad that the West found disagreeable and ignored when there was an Iraqi rule of the West felt it could deal with in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s the west shrugged as Saddam Hussein waged a campaign of genocide against the Kurds including the use of chemical weapons in the early nineteen nineties following Gulf War One the Kurds were enjoined by President George H W Bush to rise against Saddam when they did a little help was forthcoming and the West continued to arm Turkey as it's brutal war with the PKK continued and when the United States removed Saddam in two thousand three Iraq's Kurds who had eventually being protected to some extent by a US imposed no-fly zone were the section of Iraq who did as it was hoped all Iraq would do embraced the opportunity and built a more or less functional and Western Friendly Society and there is indeed an argument that the West has no better friends or more reliable allies in the entire Middle East than the stateless Kurds as regards wine trump has done this varies the eternal Tara Khel response why does trump do anything assorted conspiracy theories are in play pertaining to trump's property interests in Istanbul his eternal Royat please Russian President Vladimir Putin for some reason and so forth but there is a simpler and likely explanation trump is now firmly in reelection mode he probably understands that he's best chance of getting a second term is to go to the people buoyed by a healthy economy and unburdened by American military involvement in countries his base couldn't point to on a map. It's hard luck for the Kurds of course but then it usually his

White House
On This Day in History: Austria-Hungary Annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina

This Day in History Class

04:06 min | 10 months ago

On This Day in History: Austria-Hungary Annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina

"Today was October nineteen o eight Austria Hungary informed the Ottoman Empire of his annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina this announcement set off what's known as the Bosnian crisis a period of conflict between Austria Hungary and the Ottoman Empire under the eighteen seventy eight treaty of Berlin Austria Hungary gained the right to occupy and administer the Ottoman Empire's provinces of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Sandjak of Novi Pazar but Austria Hungary always had its sights set on permanent possession of the provinces Bosnia and Herzegovina were widely sought after but Austria Hungary a lot of work into developing infrastructure mines factories agriculture and schools in Bosnia and Herzegovina at the same time ethnic and the end religious conflict grew within Bosnia and Herzegovina and groups in the two provinces displayed nationalist ambitions the young Turk Revolution broke out in the Ottoman Empire in Nineteen eight and restored the Ottoman Constitution Appear Seventy six and revived the Ottoman Parliament Vienna. I was afraid that the new authorities in the government of the Ottoman Empire would try to restore Ottoman political power in Bosnia and Herzegovina as a WPRO Russia Serbia for control over the Sandjak of Novi Pazar and Bosnia and Herzegovina Russia itself was stabilized after defeat in the Russo Japanese war foreign minister of Austria Hungary alloys graph flex up on Arendal saw an opportunity for Austria Hungary to assert his dominance in the Balkans Austria Hungary's ambassador to Russia Leopold Graf Ferstl set up a meeting between Aaron Paul and the Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Petrovich. It is both skis in September nineteen eight at Bouchon Arabia. What actually happened at the meeting is up for debate as no minutes of a meeting where release it is both ski. It says that Russia would not object to the annexation and an exchange Austria Hungary would not object to open the Bosphorus and Dardanelles Straits two Russian warships is Boesky insisted on an international conference before the annexation took place but on October six the day after Bulgaria declared its independence from the Ottoman Empire Emperor Franz Joseph. I of Austria announced that it was annexed Bosnia and Herzegovina the withdrawal of the austro-hungarian Armie from a Sandjak of Novi Pazar was also announced but is Boesky was not expecting the annexation to happen so soon he said that Aaron Thaw Paul did not tell him the date of annexation and that he did not know Austria Hungary planned on executing it before the matter was settled with other political power opposition to the annexation erupted in Europe Russia and the Balkans France Britain and Italy protested the annexation Pan Slavic nationalists nationalist throughout Europe. Were unhappy with announcement. Serbia insisted that Austria Hungary seed part of the Jack of Novi Pazar to them and Dan is Volsky supported them but Austria Hungary backed by Germany threatened to invade Serbia at the end of the Bosnian crisis ACIS Austria Hungary seemed to have come out on top after a boycott of austro-hungarian goods caused commercial losses Austria Hungary ended up paying an indemnity to the Ottomans and alienating many from Australian policy but the Ottoman Empire recognized the annexation which Russia and Serbia accepted opted in March of nineteen o nine the next month the treaty Berlin was amended to accept the annexation the nation's managed to avoid the war but tense relations between Austria Hungary Russia and Serbia after the latter two faced such mutilation remained and contributed due to the outbreak of World War One and nineteen fourteen.

Berlin Austria Hungary Ottoman Empire Herzegovina Austria Hungary Novi Pazar Austria Acis Austria Hungary Exchange Austria Hungary Bosnia Balkans Austria Ottoman Empire Emperor Franz J Ottoman Parliament Vienna Herzegovina Russia Wpro Russia Serbia Aaron Thaw Paul Russia Leopold Graf Ferstl Serbia Russia SKI
Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

BrainStuff

06:21 min | 10 months ago

Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

"At IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with us on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems. IBM A. B. M. Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren bogle Bam here although these days wearing shoes with high heels mostly coated feminine the original Wears High High heels were men so what's the history here when where and why did people I begin wearing shoes with elevated heels we spoke by email email with Elizabeth Mohawk senior curator Toronto's Batta Shoe Museum who says she has yet to unravel this mystery. The exact origin of high heels remains needs to be discovered. What's clear however is it. High heels. Were not a European invention heeled footwear only emerged in western Europe around the turn of the seventeenth century but had been warn for hundreds of years prior throughout Western Asia Similar Hawk said evidence for early Western Asian heels as far back as Tenth Century Persia suggests a strong relationship to horseback riding and may have been connected to the innovation of the stirrup the store profoundly changed horseback riding and in particular made military campaigns on horseback more effective as as an enabled riders to steady themselves in dramatically improved the effectiveness of weapons such as the Lance and Bowen Aero. He'll seems to have been a further development of this technology as it allowed the wearer to hook his feet in the stirrups better angering him to his steed eventually heeled footwear for men spread to Europe likely three political networks works and trade but the exact evolution is complicated so why did heels only become of interest to Europeans around the beginning of the sixteen hundreds civil heck said the answer lies and things it's complex European world exploration and the destablizing the textile trade to the rise of Persia under the reign shot a bus the first from fifteen eighty the eight to sixteen twenty nine and both Persian and European concerns about the increasingly powerful Ottoman Empire in particular it was the power of Shah boasts the First Mountain Military Terry who wore heeled footwear that may have made heels appealing I to European men and ultimately to women as the he'll entered into upper class men's fashion and there was a concurrent trend in women's fashion to adopt certain aspects of men's attire some hawks said that the women who played with this trend were often quote the butt of ridicule the end there numerous offenses included their adoption of men's military inspired fashion including broadbrimmed hats ornamented with plumes doublets carrying weapons and wearing heels in the heels that both men and women wore in the early years of the seventeenth century were very low but they would rise for both sexes as the century progressed the the majority of powerful and privileged men wore heels through the seventeenth century and into the early eighteenth century in France during the reign of Louis the fourteenth from sixteen forty three to seventeen in fifteen wearing red high heels was a principal signifier of political privilege limited to the king and his courtiers beyond France red heels for men were at first associated associated with French sophistication but by the end of the seventeenth century they were increasingly seen as effeminate especially in England similar. Hawk said fueled. Oh by nascent enlightenment thinking and increasing nationalisms men's dress began to undergo a radical transformation at the end of the seventeenth century. It was in the early eighteenth century that men abandoned abandoned the he'll to women's fashions and the he'll became a signifier femininity. Those shifts included a heightened division between men's and women's tire as as well as March differences between French English men's dress some will hawk said since the Seventeenth Century Western culture has shown extreme sensitivity to men in heels especially if it's deemed that the heels are being used to increase height she notes that this negative view only increased Darwinian ideas of survival of the fittest became came translated into racist and sexist notions of natural male physical and mental superiority but heels for man made a brief comeback in the middle of the twentieth any of century SIMILAC explained the he'll began rising in men's fashion in the nineteen sixties and in the early nineteen seventies reached unprecedented heights in direct response. I feel wheel to the burgeoning women's movement the heels and men's fashion however we're not borrowed from the female wardrobe they were block and high like Louie the fourteenth and were touted as a way increasing one stature masculinity and confidence in no way did they reference the Longstanding Feminine High and Thin Heal these days however however heels on men can be construed to emphasize a lack of height rather than compensating for it which means quote that heels on men function like a bad to pay they reveal insecurity and that in our current culture is deemed unappealing iconic footwear designer Christian Lubaton concurred to a news publication a man and heals. That's a prosthesis but I sympathize. The men need help but a man and heals is ridiculous clearly. Mr Lubaton doesn't watch the cowboy channel those BRONC and bull riders look pretty good or as someone hack puts it cowboys continue to own their heels and wear them with confidence today's episode certain Kerry Tatra and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works ruinous and lots of other topics our home planet has networks dot com in or podcast. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Hello I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo the two most important musicians of the twentieth twentieth century podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by Jerry Goose did and in Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah bowling but the new song featuring original lyrics by Bob Dylan listened to bear in a banner on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast.

IBM Hawk Iheartradio Europe Christian Lubaton France Lauren Bogle Bam Persia Batta Shoe Museum Dennis Quaid Shah Bob Dylan T-Bone Burnett Senior Curator First Mountain Military A. B. M. Toronto Elizabeth Mohawk Bowen Aero England
"ottoman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"ottoman" Discussed on KGO 810

"Gene, Rogan's new book is the fall of the Ottoman. Meet. She is overwhelmed by the Russian and the French and the British throughout the first years of the war, and they hold fast to the German empire. And dig in over the scenes that are heartbreaking in Eugene's book have nothing to do with the great powers have to do with the village level. When I quote, Eugene say if one of the correspondence saying that the news of war came like, a thunderbolt Eugene what I sense from your reading of the diaries and the letters in the Ottoman empire is that they were not prepared for this and people would show up with the Ottoman empire flag, or they there would be someone calling out that they were to March. The watcher of the town would say, you're recruited and you go off to war, but it didn't fool the mothers. They all knew they had a sense of foreboding that this would come out badly. And it's as if the whole empire realized that these were the last. Days is that is that a fair reading of the diaries? They were not optimistic at I definitely John. And I think for the citizens of the Ottoman empire. Nineteen fourteen came as this sort of combination of their nightmares because it was war weary empire that you've already mentioned the since the young Turk revolution in nineteen thousand eight the automated already fought three wars, they fought against Italy over Libya in nineteen eleven and lost before it against a coalition of Balkan states in the first Baltimore nineteen twelve and lost. And then they got drawn into the third Balkan war. Second Balkan war. The third conflict. The arguments had to fight in nineteen thirteen in which they manage to score. No small victory in recovering some lost territory, including the city of Deir which it falls under the first Balkan war. But the country's economy was shattered. Its military had been completely depleted of arms and munitions and the economy the soldiers, the, you know, the the military nothing was ready to go to war again. And such a such a massive were evolving, all the great powers of Europe. I think they sense of dread that accompanied the coal to to the draft was still right across the empire by Kurds Turks, Arabs, Armenians Greeks, everyone who lived is in Auburn citizen and being called to serve underarms rewarding. You that the the empire stood very little chance of quitting. Gene is good to touch upon the British. The French calling on their empires. Their Moslems, the French call on the north African Berbers who dress as these as the men with large pantaloons who go off to war to die in Belgium, unappreciated at the time just a detail about Egypt. This is when the British empire, which has been a protectorate of the Jeff Sessions the KC since the late nineteenth century eighteen eighty two. They just take it over don't they, gene? They don't they don't they don't pretend it's legal. They an exit. He had very little choice job, and they looked at Egypt as an automobile territory in Egypt. Still in nineteen fourteen was formerly part of the Ottoman empire. For the moment, the Ottoman entered the war Britain's position would be either as a hostile power in Ottoman territory or else they had to separate Egypt from the Ottoman grip to to legitimate their presence there. It's one of those funny technicalities of war where the rules of war and the rules of empire came into conflict with each other. And the solution the British came up with and it was an awkward solution was to declare unilaterally Egypt independent of the Ottoman empire. Then that meant how would Egypt rule itself? How would you designate the the leader of this country and suddenly overnight became sultanas and that way trying to make Egypt on equal standing with the Ottoman empire. Big Muslim states ruled by sultan's, but this soul to that. Of course, was an ally of Britain, an ally Britain promised would not be called on to play an active role in the war big mistake. Because of course, Britain had debate that promised several times not just drawing on each material support for the war. But did you mentioned served actively in our two records? They served Arabia in jazz, and they served in labor gangs. Whatever. The sort of allied war effort took them from Gallipoli to Salonika quite to the western front now pieces of the empire to be attacked by the British and the Russians we'll start with the Russians in the Caucasus. Because at this point Anatolia was the easternmost part of the Ottoman empire. But it reached up into the caucuses and there's a river there called the our river. And that's where the first battle between this November between Russia and the undermanned third army, and what I take from your from the diaries here is that the Russians overwhelmed them, and they were very much thrown back. Did anybody get blamed for those losses? Eugene Julio opening conflicts between the Russians and the Turks. I think that the Russians had clear orders to try and create a buffer zone between their frontier an audit enforces. And so the occupying a stretch of of land the length of the Caucasus frontier about ten fifteen miles deep and the Ottomans had no way of holding the Russians back at this. Point they weren't prepared for war and that eastern front, and they were ruled back effectively by the Russians, but the general in command of the Russian seemed to get ahead of himself, and perhaps felt that he could achieve greater glory by pushing deeper into Auburn territory, and has was to prove the case with other ambitious generals over extending your troops. And making for volatile supply lines often resulted in embarrassing defeats. And so he got overextended and the Ottomans when they finally reached a point of high concentration we're able to roll the Russians back and the Russians were forced to go back to the lines at the buffer zone date. I hope to create around Korean in this eastern Caucasus region and in so doing I think said ambitions at work among the audience that if they could actually contain in Russian thrust drive them back perhaps because applies the Russians and try and make an launch a campaign into Russian territory to achieve a great victory. The British declared war on the. Ottomans November fifth nineteen fourteen and at this point Britain lounges secret plans lot using the army in India to attack both Bosra that's at the head of the Gulf. This is the same territory and the Persian Gulf that we're fighting over and worrying about today, the oil fields that were at that time attached to pipeline and refinery in what is now Iran Persia, but that was the British oil companies controlling that they needed it for their Oilers. What the first of the dreadnought fleet that didn't use coal at used oil. So the British attack very effectively against Bosra, and they create the state of Kuwait there in correspondence, the Arab tribes. Have they shown which way they're going to go here early in the war Eugene be Arabs knew they had no fight in the European conflict. But he could see that the way the conflict would play out would definitely influence the balance of power in Europe. And so they're not for instinct was to sit on the fence. See who would prevail try to keep their options open and ensure that however the war went to the Europeans the results would be to their advantage. And no one played the game better than the founder of the modern kingdom of Saudi Arabia who was being pressed by the Ottomans to support their warford by the British to preserve a benign neutrality towards the allies as part of the kind of British late that the British empire created out of the Persian Gulf. And in the end, it was to no one except his own people and manage to conclude an agreement with the British that gave him a monthly stipend managed to persuade the Ottomans of his non hostility and used every resource that came his way from for the British to continue his conquests that Arabia targeting particular, his old rival the Rashidi clad in Ohio. So the are basically, you know, not to be caught up in Europe's conflicts slightly and look for. Every opportunity to advance their own interests, the Gulf of Aden, which is now under active patrol here at the opening the bomb all Mandevu the opening of the Red Sea at this time was a concern for the British as well, they used my note says sixty nine th Punjabis they use the Indian army to secure the Aden protectorate, and they had to deal with forts that could fire it's a pretty wide area. I believe it's not narrow like the Dardanelles. But I took a made a note here Eugene that they targeted the Shiite Zedi which of the exact same forces. That are now participating in the civil war of Yemen. It's one hundred years later, and nothing has changed about the the switching of sides in Yemen. Well, nothing has changed in westerners misreading of the politics of Yemen and mistaking friends, and foes and taking actions that could could the end prove more harmful to western interests. And they. Anticipate that was certainly the case when the British decided despite Turkish gums at the entrance to the boundaries Monday streets into the Red Sea. They were operating under the assumption that by extending artillery, then to reinforce a fortress. They held near the the straits that they could stop the Turks from threatening the movement of British shipping into the Red Sea up to Suez canal into the Mediterranean world of very important water communication line for the British empire to contribute to the war effort of the western front, but. In the end what they did by attacking an automatic position in in south Yemen was to take neutral powers like the. Yeah. Is eighty ruler to refer and make him side with the autumn is because he saw the British encroaching on his territory without permission undertaking all-star lax, and so he is lauded with the Ottomans instead and was later to be devil. The British in the Aden carbonate by laying siege to the colony and enforcing the British back into a desperate situation where they suddenly had to take much needed troops from to reinforce their position in Aden to keep sort of Ottoman Arab coalition from overwhelming the besieged town. So yes, another example of a kind of imperial overstretch and westerners misreading the politics of the Arab world a note here because we're a catastrophe of Gallipoli, the ANZAC the Australian and New Zealand contingents, leave Australia, and they are parked in Egypt, and they parade into the heart of a Cairo to impress everyone. I note that they park. Them there because they didn't quite know what they're gonna do with them. Eventually they're going to send them to Gallipoli. But from my reading of what you're reporting here, gene. It looks like the imperial troops destabilized, Egypt that the Egyptians regretted siding with the British is that correct? The British team even before war broke out in nineteen fourteen that they were dealing with a growing nationalist movement in Egypt and a growing dissatisfaction with British occupation that had been in place since eighteen eighty two so one of the territory's, I think Britain was most concerned about after the Ottoman Soltan declared you had with Egypt would the Sunni Muslims of Egypt make common cause with the Ottoman Turks and rise up against. The British as occupiers of Egypt. So one spruce strategic imperative win the deployment of the Australia. New Zealand troops was not just take advantage of a stopover in Egypt to give them basic training for military service. But also to have a large mass of troops and the British dominions who could really impress the people of Tyrone Alexandria of the strength of the British position. So that hotheaded nationalist wouldn't fi on a kind of revolt or applying against the British at the instigation of the ultimate. And so they really do deployed the ANZAC troops in a deliberate way making the March right through the heart of Cairo press on the natives just how big the military presence one hundred years later, the same anxiety same heart of Cairo the fall of the Ottoman suppressant book, but it's a history of the great war in the middle. Least Eugene Rogan is the author when we come.

Egypt Britain Eugene Europe Yemen Eugene Rogan Gene Persian Gulf Ottoman Soltan Caucasus Aden Red Sea Cairo Australia Gulf of Aden Auburn New Zealand Eugene Julio Belgium
"ottoman" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"This ends four centuries of Ottoman Turkish empire control December fifteen nineteen seventeen Soviet Russia signs an armistice with Germany with Russia departure from the eastern front forty four German divisions. Now become available to be redeployed to the western front in time for Luton door spring offensive March third March third nine hundred eighteen breast Lidove it's Soviet Russia. Signed a tree with Germany, formerly ending his participation in the war. Harsh terms imposed by the Germans forced the Russians to yield a quarter of their prewar territory and over half of Russia's industries to the Germans March twenty first Germany's all out gamble for victory begins upon the launch of the first of a series of successive spring offensives on the western front the Saint Michel offensive named after Germany's patron Saint begins after a five hour six thousand gun artillery bombardment as sixty five divisions from the German second seventeenth eighteenth. Armies attacked the British third and fifth armies along a sixty. Mile front in the psalm at first it seems destined to succeed as the thinly stretched British fifth. Army's quickly overrunning wrecked using affective storm trooper tactics. The Germans recaptured all of the ground. They lost nine hundred sixteen during the battle disarm and press forward. However during the two week offensive the British third army manages to hold itself together, and prevents the Germans from taking heiress and key objectives of the offensive April. First nineteen eighteen British Royal Air force is founded upon the merging of the Royal flying corps and Royal Navy service. And by now, the British Abbas aviation industry has become the world leader. So no, April Fools. They really did that April twenty first Germany's red baron Manfred. Von.

Germany Soviet Russia British third army Russia Royal flying corps Ottoman Turkish Luton baron Manfred Royal Navy Army four centuries five hour two week
"ottoman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

09:31 min | 1 year ago

"ottoman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Is the John Batchelor show. Constantinople the Ottoman empire. We see it in American history right away with the US moldy, what was Tripoli in the marine him. What was Commodore Prebble and the constitution and Stephen Decatur that was about the challenge to parts of the Ottoman empire that time at Tripoli or along the north African post coast, but that is part of the reach of the Sultan in Constantinople at the end of the first war that autumn and empire long history of contact with American with America's navy. I mentioned the shores of Tripoli, but I learned from a wonderful new sweeping book about a small piece of Constantinople where the US navy was a critical observer of the chaos of the end of the Ottoman empire. America's Black Sea fleet by Robert shank that Commodore David porter called on the sublime part in Constantinople in the eighteen thirties. And in the eighteen sixties David Farragut was there in the eighteen ninety s Americans observed the contest between the. The Armenians Christians and the Ottoman empire. Some pointing to the massacres that continued into the twentieth century and the American ambassador Henry Morgan thought to Turkey during the first war left eye book, which he he was their thirteen to sixteen in which five chapters are devoted to his observations of the sufferings of the Armenians throughout the Ottoman empire. What we now call Turkey. However, I begin this story with the author by asking about why it is that the US navy following the end of the first war following the verse I treaty following the break-up of the Ottoman empire. Why the US navy dispatched destroyers and navy personnel to Constantinople why because we had not been at war with Turkey. So what are we doing there? Robert, Bob, a very good evening to you. Thank you very much. Your book is extremely carefully written and very politically astute for this period after. The first war. Why did the navy go there? What was the reason given to dispatch although all those sailors good evening to you. Good evening. Good to talk to you. Listen, we we were sending ships to support American interests and Americans who might have been endanger in a deeply in in Anatolia or Asia. Minor the continental Turkey is we call it today. And also because America have been so gripped by what was called has become called the army Nghien genocide the terrible stories of what had happened to the Armenians during the nineteen fifteen nineteen sixteen as reported on by ambassador Morton thought and others. And so they America started the near east relief campaign to help all the survivors of the genocide in deeply in in Armenia, and in many other places of of continental the Turkey and also, of course, Americans had some business interests. Overseas in in the region. And then, of course, missionaries had been in in Turkey from the congregational church before something like almost one hundred years. The US navy has dispatched though, we're not at war with Turkey. And we're not really sharing the spoils of the division of the of the Ottoman empire. The French and the British are extremely prominent we sail into Constantinople, and you paint the picture vividly. This is nineteen twenty twenty one that the remains of Gallipoli and the and the first war are everywhere with wreck ships with possible minds floating around with evidence of pirate havens on the on the shoreline. So this is not a restored Constantinople. Does the navy regarded as a good posting or is this a punishment posting what's the opinion of the sailors large? It depends not they're not always the same. But it was of course, a very romantic very, very. Fabled place. There were a great monuments on the headgear Sophia and many many great mosques on Sunday skyline. There were stories of of historic stories reaching back to Alexander, the great and the and before that the the with the Bosphorus strait and gone into Greece. And so all of that. And then as things that came around. All that. More and more of what the the the shitty was like began coming back story speaking come coming back to the states. And so it was a very very attractive thing for many, sailors. We need to meet the commander of the American flotilla the American ships. His name is Admiral Bristol, and you describe him. He's fifty years old his wife is Helen he described him as as a combination of amiable and stubborn was he regarded as a good commander by the the men in the in the destroyers cruisers. They were they were pretty much point. He was a very strong commander. And so they were on his side by large course, they knew nothing of the circumstances. They were going into and he more and more dominated their points of view. He was an old football player from the Napa since he was awfully awfully awfully genial. But you could assume an aggressive scowl what he wanted to an all did. Yes. You you. You have a wonderful photograph in your book of the Admiral scowling, I I guess he wasn't friendly to cameras, and he was a power that is not on. We don't have anything comparable today. Bob as I read it. He was more powerful than the ambassador and his word was law for not only the navy, but reporting back to Washington, it was that the nature of the navy in those days if you were an Admiral on scene you were God. Well, he was the in fact today facto ambassador, the other solos there were much sport it to impose this wheel up on them. Then they would have been America had not had since the war, although they didn't declare war on Turkey. But he was on scene. And so, and he talked to everybody there and learned everything, and so he was able to tell Washington his point of view and his point of view on more or less dominated in Washington is what was going on there. He was very knowledgeable. I am. Destroyers went throughout the black CHEN and so on and so he was very knowledgeable and all all that he came across right? They made regular calls. And so they were there was no internet. There were no satellites that were no airplanes following in this area. So a navy destroyer making calls in the Black Sea in the GM. That was fresh information. One other information to the Admiral. Yes, one in and then he cables Washington. One other major significant figure is Kamal Mustafa who is he in nineteen nineteen nineteen twenty when the Admiral arise. Well, he writes in nineteen nineteen and canal is the is not long after he gets there canal is set into by the allies into into conduct from Constantinople to continental Turkey to help solve some things the allies wanted to, but he had a different idea. And he starts a revolution. He begins to get people around him. And he begins in the far east of Turkey to to get all the Turks instead of the the Ottoman empire. The old Ottoman empire is falling and begins more and more to subsume all the governmental functions in deep continental Turkey. And he's a challenge to the Sultan. Does bristol. Bristol does Admiral Bristol have an opinion Bristol becomes very positive. Very favorable towards him. If he sees Canales the turkeys, George Washington very early on. He gets this opinion also realizes how powerful he is likely to be and Americans have been there American commissions have visited and the show him one of the generals who American general took exploratory journal says of back and who met the canal says this is no cheap political adventurer. He really does want to make of Turkey a nation in the in the I guess you'd have to say in the place of the old crumbling Ottoman empire. The book is America's Black Sea fleet. Robert shank, the US navy amidst war and revolution nineteen thousand nine hundred nineteen Twenty-three you can you you see the Turkish revolution. Well, the Admiral and the and the American contingent about to get overwhelmed by the Russian revolution to the north of the Black Sea. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Balance of nature's.

Turkey navy Constantinople America Black Sea John Batchelor Robert shank Admiral Bristol US Tripoli Washington commander David Farragut Bob bristol Commodore Prebble Stephen Decatur Henry Morgan Commodore David porter
"ottoman" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"You have to recognize that Islam by its nature is fundamentally incompatible with traditional western notion of how to live. What stood out to you about this interview? Todd, that's good stuff air the benefit of hindsight. We look back at history and that's one of the great things history is supposed to be able to do. It's supposed to be able to help us not to make the same stakes twice. So we we, we can see we can connect the dots. Why did the revolutionary war alternately happen? We can see what led up to the civil war World War Two. When I asked Robert Spencer about you know, how far away are we realistically from caliphate he didn't put a time on it, but he said a fundamental aspect of what it would take for the Calvin to happen is happening right now that fall of Europe that is pretty chilling. Does it take? Does that take the rest of our lifetime? Does it happen? And after we're gone, Steve, is it perhaps happening much much sooner than that? He doesn't know, but one way or the other, he says, it is happening as we speak. That is. Remarkable to behold because there's no buffer. I mean, the history of Islam tilts towards the caliph it and at times rival are warring Calif. It's like what happened after Muhammad's death? For example, this where we get the the traditions of Sooners and she is from is which of these caliphates we're going to, you know, pick up the mantle from Muhammed following his passing. So I mean the history of Islam tilts towards the caliph it with the Ottoman empire being the most obvious example. So why haven't we seen this in our day and age because western civilization has provided the buffer towards that happening. Has made it very difficult for because the goal of a caliph it and the way you would assert yours is the caliphat to consolidate behind is you have the means and the opportunity to impose a Jimmy. If there's not had Jimmy guess would you don't have a caliph it right? So Dida Jimmy to have a caliphate or Calvin half gem? Yes. All right. So if you're a bit player on the world stage, you can go out into the street and scream caliphate Calvin caliphate caliphate all you want. You're not rallying people to your. This is what ISIS tried to do this. This is what ISIS was trying to do. They were trying to wreak so much havoc essentially, conquer Iraq and Syria with the point of saying, we've defeated the west Iraq is a proxy state of the United States, the great Satan. We've, we've, we've deposed Assad who the west, who the west is at times called vile and necessary depending on which leader and which era we got rid of Assad. We got rid of the we. We have taken over the US proxy state of Iraq. We're the caliphat. We're the winners jump on our bandwagon. That's the sensually the history of his law. Well, if you have a powerful western buffer. Very difficult for consolidation around a caliphat because they can't acquire a Gemini. But if the west is going to unilaterally disarm in front of radical Islam. And multicultural themselves out of civilization. This is what Roberts talking about, right? Jimmy suddenly becomes possible. Right? Yeah, there's there's nobody to stop them. And again, he didn't wanna be grandiose and putting in a number on it. But his clear implication was that it could be much much sooner than anybody thinks. Well, great conversation was Robert Spencer enjoyed having him here with us today on the Thursday on the day show let us know what you think about what we think Stephen dais dot com is the Email address. You can like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter at Steve dais show last name, spell DAC. And if you have time today, click like where subscribe there on I tunes or Stitcher. The more of you do that. The more that helps other people to find as well. So many of you already have. Thank you. We greatly appreciate it back at it again tomorrow until then John three seventeen. This is Steve day..

Dida Jimmy Robert Spencer Calvin Iraq Steve Muhammad Steve day Assad ISIS Todd Steve dais Calif United States Europe Facebook Sooners Twitter Gemini
"ottoman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The remaking of the map of europe now the remaking of the levant this is the ottoman empire one hundred years before it fell apart at the first war napoleon is marching with thirteen thousand of his soldiers on damascus where he's heard there's a turkish army gathering he follows the course that alexander followed i in reverse up the coastal route to java which he besieges and he's onto akra the english no that he's out there and they mean to counter him did they see napoleon at the time as a special commander or today think this was a prank from the directory and not name his him as the enemy andrew near the very much worried about him as an individual because of course the italian campaign of proves that he was quite extraordinary general than say actually they went out of their way to try to count the letters backwards and forwards between the paleo and his and these offices and frowns and when they did capture them on many occasions they published an insult to the huge embarrassment of the various offices including the who pretty uniformly said how much they aged egypt we make note of the fact that while he was in cairo he i was told we believe of josephine's infidelity with if ally charles and he is genuinely laid low but that she does that to them all the time i got i got used to the fact that he was living inside of a novel of his head and both of them were always threatening to kill themselves after a while it just became like love poems andrew yes i think that they was that high raymond form love love discussion i mean they it was when he discovered about hip elite show that of course he took home the first is he's twenty to mister c's pauline away who was the wife of one of his officers and and that was that was actually that was more comic operetta pauline herself you tell the story of how she wind up a wound up to be after she passed from general to general he handed her off of being very wealthy with brazilian timber wearing pants smoking a pipe and living till ninety one i would say that she had the better of all of them i think she had the loss law frankie yes you obviously had a hell of a life i'd love to read autobiography we're marching bloodily towards the showdown and opera this is where the english commodore smith arise with two chips to make sure that napoleon is not successful this is a gun battle because sieges in those days where how much cannon and yet again i am i notes andrew always i wonder whether napoleon is in a dream he reads books he takes a library with him to cairo he's always studying what the greats have thought or made of these events and so while he's caesar and alexander in cairo now he stands on the same hillside where a richard the third besieged is that correct was he was eventually richard richard the i was he thinking richard as as low as he supervised the siege totally he was always thinking about history i mean he he was when he crossed the sinai of course he was writing about movies and trying to work out when these various things he was a man who's ultimately suffused with history it occurs to me when i read your story of napoleon that he wishes that he'd wrote the biography that you're writing trophy because he's studying history to come up with a character for you to follow it through the letters as he's studying history mir's within mirrors now the battle dhaka is bloody minded one point this is the age of napoleon bonaparte and mozart and everyone on stage all the time commodore smith challenges napoleon to a one to one duel to settle acro and napoleon's response is striking how does he turn him down he says that he wouldn't mind having do with the greatest british general up until that point he but unfortunately moore whose dad nashville he wasn't gang to fight and he said he wasn't gains have a deal against a single english royal navy commodore there is a battle that takes place away from aqua at the time fought by a subordinate to napoleon but eventually napoleon arrives just at the last moment this is the battle of mount tabor where they face off what would have been the army from damascus and defeat it and didn't make a do of the fact that he was.

europe one hundred years
"ottoman" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Kc since the late nineteenth century eighteen eighty two they just take it over don't they g they don't they don't they don't pretend it's legal they an exit he had very little choice job they looked at egypt as an ottoman territory and egypt still in nineteen fourteen was formerly part of the ottoman empire from the moment the ottomans entered the war britain's position would be either as a hostile power in ottoman territory or else they had to separate egypt from the ottoman grip to to legitimate their presence there it's it's one of those funny technicalities of war where the rules of and the rules of empire came into conflict with each other and the solution the british came up with and it was an awkward solution was to declare unilaterally egypt independent of the ottoman empire then that meant how would egypt hewlett self how would you designate the the leader of this country and headed suddenly overnight became so tons and that way trying to make egypt on an equal standing with the ottoman empire big muslim states ruled by sultan's but this sultan of course was an ally of britain an an ally britain promised would not be called on to play an active role in the war big mistake because of course britain had to break that promise several times not just drawing on egypt for material support for the war but egypt xinmin served actively in artillery corps they served lawrence of arabia in in the jazz and they served in labor gangs wherever the sort of allied war effort took them from gallipoli to salonika why to the western front now pieces of the empire to be attacked by the british and the russians will start with the russians in the caucasus because at this point on a totally was the easternmost part of the ottoman empire but it reached up into the caucuses and there's a river there called the our river and that's where the.

egypt britain sultan lawrence arabia salonika egypt hewlett
"ottoman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The ottomans in a way which meant common action would be unthinkable there's a railroad that the germans have held out and there in fact constructing at a berlin baghdad railroad it's a fantastic construction it's underway they've reached baghdad by a piece of it is in at the time of the outbreak of the war so the germans offer a much more than just mobile artillery and a lot of senior officers to lead the turkish army they offer practical engineering help and a deal of what what you'd have to say is empire support because they're aware of the russian threat i how ever learned from you eugene that the french empire the british empire and to a great extent the russian empire although the russians had also attacked were already imagining cutting up the ottoman empire before the war they didn't they didn't need the sick man to fail they in fact you write that the british coveted mesopotamia which is exactly what they picked off at the treaty british eventually i mean one hundred years ago today the british french and russians concluded the first of their wartime partition plans for the ottoman empire and that was really set off by plans to invade the dardanelles that famous battle of gallipoli right and russian fears that if the british and french did seize istanbul they better stake their claim in advance real estate risk losing one of their great historic objectives in audubon territory so they've got the british and french to concede that in the event that at attack on the streets were success the allies did seize istanbul constantinople that that territory would be ceded to russia and the french said we do so on condition we get syria they were quick as a flash to stake their claims in ottoman territory they knew exactly what they wanted but in march nineteen fifteen britons still hadn't really worked out precisely what did of ottoman territory they wanted and so in the constantinople agreement of march nineteen fifteen the first of these wartime partition plans the british actually said we don't know we want now but we reserve.

baghdad turkish army istanbul constantinople syria berlin just mobile eugene russia one hundred years
"ottoman" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello welcome back my name is dr christopher jerry and this is great big history podcast today we do imperialism from eighteen fifty two 1914 i e when white people conquered the world by 1914 europeans owned eighty five percent of the globe which means basically you had the ottoman empire in the middle east china south america in the united states and mexico not owned by europeans your views on everything else so causes cause of imperialism why do white people get on boats and unlike exploration the 1500s or colonialism in the sixteen seventeen hundreds when they went and lived in places why do they now just going conquer places end sucks things out of it while the number one reason his industrialization industralization requires a massive amount of resources minerals and markets and its people to sell stuff too and it needs resources that europeans don't have so industrialization required a way of getting at this stuff two european competition so why would i conquer the congo because i want the stuff in the congo i want the rubber i went to the copper i want the iron but i don't want any other europeans to have it either so i wanna close off my empire to other people now we are going to live in a world of free trade which makes all of this nonsense um people people said about the iraq war all we have we should conquer iraq and then we'll take the oil in fact that was one of the arguments the oil will pay for the war will just take the oil um down trump i believe said that as well we should just taken the oil we should stayed and taken the oil um.

united states congo free trade iraq dr christopher jerry middle east south america mexico eighty five percent
"ottoman" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello welcome back my name is dr christopher jerry this is great big history podcast and this episode where do the ottoman turks or we're going to do port one of the ottoman turks at least the rise of the ottoman turks and why this successful so on our map the ottoman empire will dominate the middle east parts of north africa parts of southeastern europe a and do so from roughly the twelve hundreds after the mongols come through uh they take needed little ramp up time until basically 1919 fifteen so before we get the ottoman turks we have to start with the situation turks cedric turks ran the turks the turks mean a language group i mean what happened in the early middle ages is oil leak classical age is in central europe not central europe central asia from the ukraine all the way to mongolia to china turkish speaking people one they defeated deep persianspeaking peoples and this is a lot of the and no create what becomes a lot of the stands you know turkmenistan obviously um and what happened is one of those groups one of those turkishspeaking groups entered into the middle east probably as mercenaries for the a bassett's that's a history one on one thing and then went into the took over much of the middle east they they went is kind of like the matrix or like terminator they started as soldiers and they went wait a minute we're more powerful in the people working for why we listening to them and so they started beat up the arabs and then they entered into uh asia minor.

cedric turks asia ukraine mongolia dr christopher jerry africa europe turkmenistan
"ottoman" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on WWL

"Ottoman insectary unmih's offering a unique twist on king cakes this year that story from wwl matt doyle in case stuffed in covered with crickets are being baker visitors at the end sectarian offering a nutritious take on a guilty pleasure curator of animal programs zach lemon says as a bug connoisseur he knows a good critter cake when he sees one today i've been eating bug 1997 so very give very very good limon says the cakes are being big from scratch where the bugs in mind which setting it up where one and making cake and adding cricket a w bacon them fresh this sunday for the king cake festival in champion swear i mad doyle almost a dozen carnival parades are scheduled in across the area this weekend but they'll have to deal with the weather mardi gras guide publisher arthur hearty says they probably don't have an alternate plan on the rain dates doubt it will recruit your crowder preclude commits were regretting upward cream toko reoperate greer recuperate friday so he thinks it's gone or no for ford parades in slidell crew of builds bowed parade poseidon slide galleons and personal use the adultery entered crude to vote and the crew delusions for raids will likely tight to the french quarter saturday night rain or not but the crew of little rascals the children's freight a notary may be be threatened just a little sunday morning were hoping it will dry out if you need to know more go to our website at wwl dot com this morning drug coverage brought to you.

matt doyle limon arthur hearty crowder zach lemon publisher slidell
"ottoman" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"Yeah yeah oh okay with that as mine oh my god i so we have like this really nice window looking out of our apartment in and it has a lip on it that's like a good eight or nine inches uh from the window like sticking out and your permit has this to you in your cat always goes on to john doe so i always thought when we moved in i'm like oh irwin's going to go on that thing a look out the window it's so interesting out there and she never did and i was just thinking i guess she doesn't care about the outside but i have come to the rules eishin that i think she doesn't believe the window is there uh scared that she's gonna fall so i put this when you call one of those things that goes with a charity put your feet upon ottoman yacht ottoman i just put the autumn in there and i put her favorite stupor blanket that she's just basically turned into nothing but cat hair at this point on in an now she to sit there all day instead of the window that it's our favorite spot we install that cap it thing in the window you saw that oh yeah he's life is at one of the ones that sticks to the window or is it something that is attached in a different way it like uh i guess sticks in a has like a kind of arm that goes down so at like a props it up on the wall on the inside so it does get proctor yeah ilker did have to like screw it into two places all year i went on amazon and i typed in cat window bed and i always saw were these weird beds that you used the suction cup things to stick him the wind i don't trust i know i don't trust the has an all right.

irwin ottoman yacht ottoman ilker amazon john doe nine inches
"ottoman" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on WJR 760

"Old notion of the ottoman empire observe the report of the house foreign affairs committee back on the 20s what was once the land of milk and honey has become through met misrule and oppression a devastated in sparsely settled land so when the turks controlled the socalled west bank they destroyed it when the jordanians controlled jerusalem they destroyed it it's quite evident that the house committee blamed the turks the dysfunction and oppression and view the creation of the jewish state not just as a biblical fulfillment in a place of refuge for persecuted european jews but is the only means of preserving democratic rights for everyone when hear more this is interesting christians jews muslims whoever congressman frank apple they republican new jersey spoke on the floor noted that for over two thousand years no other nation or people claimed the land is their homeland despite the prevailing isolationist sentiment among the politicians during that era they unanimously and passionately spoke of the need to recognize palestine as the land of the jews for the purposes of justice liberty and humanity and you can read the entire tired congressional record if you wish during consideration of the resolution on the house floor on june thirty represented a wall of chandler republican new york delivered a lengthy in riveting speech summing up the purpose and background of the revolution a resolution and i might add these are all gentiles these are all christians his speech makes it clear that the intent was to always have one state controlled by jews and that it was universally understood the jewish government will be better for all sides in terms of democratic values and that a few g hottest agitators for seeking to undermine the agreement sound familiar he predicted that jerusalem would be the seat of the jewish government his words were quite prophetic an ominous chandler directly address the smattering of the arabs living the area here's what he said about that the the arab shall be permitted to remain in palestine and a jewish government and domination with their civil and religious rights guaranteed to them through the.

turks frank apple palestine new york jerusalem the house congressman chandler two thousand years milk
"ottoman" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"So in other words trespassing would be okay is okay uh uh uh that we just now i just ignore that's via just let it go archaic law nate the police chief of ottoman sankoh kgb is facing a point from a city commissioner and question city council battle over her department's assistance in an immigration violated operation by fehb pence the result of the deportation proceedings against a west oakland resident at issue is whether chief an patrick made false statements and whether the department's involvement violated oakland sanctuary city ordinance that bars police officers from cooperating with ice at the request of ho obscene kgb agreed to send two police officers and two mark cars to provide traffic enforcement traffic enforcement agents conducted what they said was a human trafficking investigation at the home of a guatemalan bagged why federal agents detained two brothers indicated in proceedings began against one that no criminal charges have been filed contradicting a claim kirk patrick may later made an meaning that the city police officers provided aid to an immigration operation it only soul civil not criminal consequences they were looking human trafficking shall say what amazon city council person says that is out of bounds for the department to offer traffic support whenever you hear someone who is running for public office in wants a sanctuary city and says all i'll prosecute all criminals tim killer he threw member this story because if he provides traffic support he may be called out on it right watch trafficking we'd rather protect people who are here illegally then protect people were victimized by human trafficking in the city vocal that's where we obstacle relations back in one minute michelle on bush m finally gives him baghdad what will tell on the six show continues 447 right now from the northeast heights to the south valley from the west side of these mountains you'd hospitals and clinics yunam comprehensive cancer center name health.

police chief commissioner human trafficking michelle baghdad oakland oakland sanctuary kirk patrick amazon one minute
"ottoman" Discussed on The Jim Jefferies Show Podcast

The Jim Jefferies Show Podcast

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on The Jim Jefferies Show Podcast

"Leave their blinkers on air the ottoman empire and utter recovery is our bank bailout czar boot bird flu is your auto's are was any good need the iowa equi g would you cited czar this is atlanta's irony that another has said the hearing would you say if you are as i view you cited in your name i am the drug impaired dunked die guards dr jim jefferies yes desire said today i want is darn i want is for that are here yeah well i think so like the drug czar is officially the director of drug control policy or something like that he has an official title so i don't know what all the if the asia cup where he would that because because that is it's of it is a big problem biologically so it's i guess they they appointed one person to deal with that prodi lease at a fulltime job was he take care about the fish the asian carbs are we go back there quickly aging is john gross in it's from two thousand ten that the president barack obama do i get the vote for him and now he's just he's an appointee by so barack obama i i'm surprised that on abroad trump do you wanna drained right exactly the asian carbs are apparently there's a war czar weapons are a weather is asians are at sound at is very sciencefiction yet it's it's the program manager officer office of whether as asian and intergovernmental that does sound like a conspiracy theory right there and that's ever come and is there a good ties are that'd be hard to say no there's a terrorism czar and a shippings are a science are.

bird flu director barack obama iowa atlanta dr jim jefferies official asia john gross president program manager officer
"ottoman" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on WJR 760

"While in the middle east their their vows that neighborhood one more subject i would like to bring up and that is the kurds the kurds are muslims and they've align themselves with the united states and there are democratic people they have a civilized society they're the largest ethnic minority without a country they're repeatedly brutalised by one regime after another whether turkey or syria or iraq where iran i support the kurds and i support their vote in support of an iraqi kurdistan these are a good people there's roughly forty million kurt in iran iraq syria turkey after the ottoman empire fell and they were the victims of a secret agreement between the french and the british in 1960 they were left out while they requiring up the middle east the kurds were left out the kurds supported us in iraq against saddam hussein the kurds supported us and they're still supporting us in fighting isis in the middle east they are warriors they want their liberty they want their liberty and they are a role liable and have been for decades a reliable ally of the united states our country under our secretary of state tillerson and he's not the only one has admonished the.

united states turkey syria iran kurdistan kurt iraq saddam hussein middle east secretary of state
"ottoman" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Thanks for listening to the ataman dr drew show on podcast one have you heard podcast one as a whole bunch of awesome new shelves filled with big names there waiting for you on our brand new amazing afrikaansspeaking chain turkish norman lear talking to any bowler julia louis drivers and charles barkley geffen playhouse unscripted with brian grant josh gad soon neil patrick harris night so see we allows white heather who rose world fleet against remote podcasts would leave michelle nelly furtado l gang and more on every bionic rocho deatrich energized and if you like what happens in the ring got gusty boston christiana hotel and and a whole bunch more download our whatever kind you apathy for yourself go to the app store or google play or gelded now and i guess want account recorded live at corolla one studios with adam korowa and boardcertified physician at addiction medicine specialist dr drew pinski you're listening to the ottoman dr drew's show the get it on got to get it on a judge regular mandate get it on thanks for tuning in extra tone the friend love all that about you right reuss gave redoing teeth going on man source of you cut your your you hit i may observer observed that the rodriguez you seem positive who right industry pushing pushing your favorite you're not pushing past bad attitude you're pushing just on top of a good attitude that's good which is good right yeah well i writer morocco already pushing press that i am finishing reema today ou year in the families been help it up big time uh so they've pullouts the tools and.

norman lear josh gad boston christiana hotel app store corolla one adam korowa reuss rodriguez morocco julia louis charles barkley brian neil patrick harris michelle google writer
"ottoman" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"ottoman" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Thanks for listening to the ataman dr drew show on podcast one have you heard podcast one as a whole bunch of awesome new shelves filled with big names there waiting for you on our brand new amazing afrikaansspeaking changed her fish norman lear talking to any bowler julia louis drivers and charles barkley geffen playhouse unscripted with brian grant josh gad soon neil patrick harris nice so see we allows white heather who rose world played against remotely podcasts would leave michelle nelly furtado l gang and more blasts every bionic rocho deatrich and regina and if you like what happens in the ring we gusty boston christiana hotel sudden and a whole bunch more or download our whatever kind euafrica secret yourself go to the app store or google play or gelded now and i guess juan account recorded live at corolla one studios with adam korowa in boardcertified physician at addiction medicine specialist dr drew pinski you're listening to the ottoman dr drew's show the get it on got to get on a transmit again on mandate get it on thanks for tuning in thanks for telling a friend dupree shape which you do how you doing good good i was thinking about a few things uh trigger calls i i got like rushed to remind difficult soon that i'll get through this all right let's start with dominic thirty seven san francisco dominic guy going on man hey um my mom is coming out for a month to help out with my and uh i know you guys have some interesting stories are thought maybe you could tell me what to question a lot to say about memo could listen indiana she's the best let's see hands hard working in a mom or work ethic is what carried her young it wasn't book smarts in the effort.

josh gad app store corolla one adam korowa dominic guy norman lear julia louis charles barkley brian neil patrick harris michelle regina boston christiana hotel google juan san francisco