30 Burst results for "Oster"

Experts warn of impending Covid-19 disaster

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:45 sec | Last month

Experts warn of impending Covid-19 disaster

"Substantial increase in new covid nineteen cases. I'm joe chiro fox news. That's a prediction of dr michael. Oster home the director of the center for infectious disease research and policy at the university of minnesota. He sounded the alarm about a rise in variance on fox news sunday. I believe that In some ways almost a new pandemic the only good news about this is that the current value effective against this particular variant. Be one one seven But in a sense this is virus that is now Fifty to one hundred percent more transmissible or infectious than the previous viruses. White house chief. Medical adviser dr anthony found. She believes any new waves won't be as severe as the previous ones because of vaccinations.

Joe Chiro Dr Michael Center For Infectious Disease Oster Fox News University Of Minnesota Dr Anthony White House
House nears relief bill passage; Dems mull wage hike rescue

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 months ago

House nears relief bill passage; Dems mull wage hike rescue

"The house has approved the president's one point nine trillion dollar pandemic relief package along the straight party line vote sending it to the Senate it was a thin margin yes Sir two hundred nineteen that they start to ten on a bill that speaker Nancy Pelosi says will throttle forward the nation's effort to combat covert nineteen action nations in the arms of the American people money into the pockets children into the schools workers back into their jobs but Republicans like Pennsylvania's guy Russian Balder say only a fraction of the spending is devoted to the pandemic so what are the Democrats spending the rest of the money on crop pet projects of course and also pay Oster per progressive liberal special interest groups the house bill kept in a minimum wage hike proposal even though Senate rules say it has to be removed party leaders insist they will find a way to revive the fifteen dollar an hour proposal Jackie Quinn Washington

Nancy Pelosi Senate SIR Balder House Pennsylvania Jackie Quinn Washington
"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:11 min | 5 months ago

"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

"Don't know. I really have these. Like yeah i'll have these. There was like a sort of the other thing like this was at some point shortly before she came out. Amy schumer tweeted out my like instagram. Expecting better the pregnancy book and said that she really liked it. And then i got to be on her podcast. So go to the -partment and like you know. Meet her and record her podcast. Which was like totally weird. Like just like that was like really crazy. Experience was it was it as much fun as being on a contract. Though it was it was very similar. Her podcast has. It's a little more. Let's say it's like a little more r rated they come to. Little is just a little bit. I'm not going to share share with your listeners. That kind of game. They you know question game. They play on that. But let's just say it's not that similar. I guess not That's pretty fun did Did that generate any Ever gonna hate mail about like. Oh dear you encourage pregnant. Women eat sushi. Yeah definitely i mean. I i will say nothing. He tells the hate mail. I got when. I say that you should in schools face of covid but yes i do get some. I do get some hate mail about that kind of getting lot of hate me for the covert school. Absolutely yeah Let's how do you deal with that each does it really bothers me Yes it really bothers me. And i tried to just my my nine hundred was like do you have to look at it and i was like well. No not not really and she was like one introduced delete. It is very very wise person. She was like she thought that she was like. Do you have to look at that. She's like when people tweet me. You should not look at them. Yeah took me a long fine well to realize that you can block people on twitter. Who remains you. It's like you don't invite them into your house. Why would you let him downstream percent. Email like that. And tweet. I i try to just like delete in von. Yeah for you. My guest today has been emily oster. Emily thanks for being part of econ. Talk.

Amy schumer twitter emily oster Emily econ
"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

08:32 min | 5 months ago

"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

"Early on even around kids was just so uncertain that it was very very difficult to to think about how those choices would would go and it made me think a lot more about the ways in which we have to sometimes move forward to make choices even with with uncertainty and i think it's it's it's been a place where we have to make a lot of important decisions both personal decision and policy decisions it without being sure and i think that has led to a lot of decisions which feel cautious but i think when we may reflect on them later we may find that they were not as cautious as we thought they were. They were imprudent despite their seeming. I think the phrase is unknown unknowns. There's the known guns there's the there's the things we know about and we know a lot about him the things that we don't about what we know that we don't know them then they're the things don't know about that. We don't know something like that. But anyway i'm writing a book about decision making in in the role of date in that and how hard it is for our minds to consume data and one of the issues. I'm writing about his parenting And i make the argument that this really no data of the kind that we normally call data about what it's like to be a parent. There is information. You can read literature. You can watch movies. You can talk to your friends. You can watch your friends you can babysit but until you've had a baby Or become a parent it's It's it's uncharted territory at l. a. Paul talking about this During her book transformative experiences. Agnes callard talking about aspiration. And that's another way we deal with with this kind of uncertainty and threats. What your thoughts are on that. Your data person you're also parent If you've been surprised at what parenting you mentioned your your daughter. You're surprised at how parenting has changed in ways that no data or maybe the restated for you. That could help you understand that. No i mean. I think I am surprised by being a parent all the time and i am particularly kids. Get older. I am surprised. At how little. Like how little i am able to rely on data to and how how frequently i am surprised at just like what is like what is going on. You know what my kids are like the parts of parenting. That i find the most difficult and i am the most unhappy with what i'm doing. Are the parts where i am like imposing my own like stuff on my kids you know and and that's i find that really hard that like you sort of have some which is kind of may be on the things that you wish that you did and sort of trying to separate out like okay. I need to be supportive of the things my kids like and of course you know i'm gonna suggest things that i think would be good for them to do but like sort of. How do you learn to to recognize like my kids. Not exactly like me. And i can't like make make them excel at things or just make them do things or make them like things that i like I i find that really hard. This programs g. rated So but i'll just make a reference to philip larkin's poem it's called this. Be the verse. You can google it. You can read it. It's related to this. I urge listeners. To check that out Agnes speaking magnus callard. She wrote a very thoughtful piece recently about the challenges in our current culture which encouraged parents to let children become. Whoever they whatever's best for them and that appeals to me deeply now as older. I wish i thought more along those lines And been more. It's very hard. I think we naturally want our children to come out quote like us and i think we probably subconsciously children fixing things that our parents did incorrectly to us for that and that's the lurking palm And they also We have an actual urge to extend ourselves into the future through our children. And it's a beautiful thing in many ways. And i think there's this tension between the callard essay grappled with as between saying you know my children are not me. They have to find their own space their own love their own desires their own passions and at the same time a family is not just. Oh i raised you like a boarding house the luck by a good life you know. So it's it's kind of tricky. And and the times until about fifty years ago it was understood as agnes points out that parents were supposed to make their kids turn out like them. Religiously culturally behaviorally. And now it's like not just it's not just now. Maybe we should do that. That's wrong you have to let your kids find their. You're just blank. Slates explore the world. That's a that's not what all kids need dealers and not fan. I think it's i think it's there's a sort of piece of this which is like you know there are y- there's like helping sort of if you're there's helping your kid push through things that are hard to to because you know that they will they will like what comes out on the other end and i think that sometimes they'd be like well i should just like if they're not enjoying it they should. They should just quit. You know actually like a lot of things as an adult. You know you you like learn and you look back and say well. I'm really glad. I pushed through the hard parts of that because then it then there was like a lot of a lot of reward and i think we sometimes but then there's the piece where it's actually you don't have to push revie like some things you just don't. This is not for you and you know we shouldn't kind of make them And i also feel like there's Yeah they're just like a lot of ways in which In which there are a lot of really good ways in which we were kind of encouraging kids to be to sort of be who they are and not you know like i think back to like when people were left handed and then they made them with the right hand or you know like a lot of kids lick a lot of boys where like a lot addresses now and like people are like. That's the thing that's fine and that was a very different from. When i was a i was a kid even And you know which was a long time ago the dow on And so the you know those kind of things. That seems great. That seems like really good progress. And you know then then i think we also there's also a a piece where you kind of want to help them. Learn to to grow into adults that we wanna be raising adults And that doesn't always mean ju just doing whatever. Yeah no it's it's such an art and Tarred there's no No rules you know each ones different. It's really makes it tricky. So i got i only have to. I feel like. I'm already struggling to manage the two that's ever done when you get Three as a friend of mine said you're playing shorthanded. You've always crippled him. Having zone exactly you got somebody who's in the penalty box Let's close with a Must've been an interesting experience for you. I was watching a cooking show sometime over the summer with my family. And i said that's emily oster and you were on David chang's show. Now how did that come about. And why were you there. I assume right at some point. Somebody roads means like. Hey you know. I work for this like david. Chang's netflix show ugly delicious. Like you know. David's wife grace Is pregnant and you know like habit if we have you on and like you can like you know. Go eat sushi with her and you can like talk about what it's like to be pregnant and also like that. It's okay to eat sushi. Something i talk about in the book. I was like all right. Yeah so i like you know. Of course david. Chang is and and kids wife is very nice and i showed up at this like okay. Come to this fancy sushi restaurant at this time. And then you just like show up there. Then we ate the sushi anna. That was it and it was like a really weird..

Agnes callard magnus callard callard philip larkin revie Agnes Paul agnes google emily oster ju David chang Chang netflix david grace David
"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

06:43 min | 5 months ago

"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

"I hoped it would go away. It did go away. the recite help to go away. They want to go see my dentist to to look at it idea of going out and being in close proximity someone who is seeing other people. You know numerous times. A day didn't seem a refund but about a week and a half ago i went in and had my tooth poll which is by the way anyone listening at home i got. It's months and months and months ago. Just i'm i'm against it Try to keep your teeth. I'm a big fan of keeping my teeth so but I'm glad it's gone. It was not really pleasant. But i thank all the people in the office. My dad said to me. This is the least cova risk place in the world you know. He's got he's got a mask and then he's got a plastic face shield and he's you get your temperature taken when you walk in but the truth is you're not spitting in a cup for attest when you get there. They don't know who you've been seeing and where you've been and you could be very a semantic and still be troublesome but the truth is i'm in i'm violating all the things i try to to avoid you know i'm i'm i'm a foot and a half away from somebody for twenty minutes or half an hour so it's really unpleasant but he's doing that every day with every person who comes in there and i thanked him and i said it's really i really appreciate it and i think a lot of people in in the medical professions and dennis and others it all kinds of people up and down the line grocery stores and so on. Yes they'd like money. Yes they feel that that it's good for them to work. But i think also be like they're supposed to be there That's the feeling i get from my the doctors. I've seen in the last six months and the end the dennis and and all the people do it. You know it's sorta like it's again easy for me to say. My job involves sitting in my home recording podcasts. solitary things. But it's interesting to me that teachers who work with children do not either feel that obligation or we do not encourage them to fill gatien. Do you think that's a fair assessment of this issue. I think it's a. I think there are pieces. That are that are fair and then pieces where. It's more complicated. So you know when we asked. People have drawn this parallel with nurses and doctors. Said you know we'll look. We told like we require them to come to go to work during the pandemic and know 'cause that was there that was their job off by the way and some of them was yes it was a it was actually quite high risk but of course then people pointed out that you know they're provided with more with more than we were providing teachers with you know although it is a much higher risk environment to be in a medical office treating people with kobe than to be in a in a school But one of the. I mean one of the things i I think is going on in a lot of these cases. And i think we could learn something from the experience of this kind of medical space. Is that the the the sort of bring off the band. Aid of of going back is That is that step is hard. And i think it's really scary and actually when i talked to you know. One of my friends is e pediatric deduc. And she said you know she was on vacation with the pandemic star and then she had to come back in the end. She's the first few days. Were really scary because it was like i was just walking around all the time thinking like at any moment i get cold but of course at that point it was like really clear exactly what was going was going on but she said you know then kind of like i got used to it and we figured out the press procedures and we figured out new even though it looks a little different it was like was like okay and i think that wind schools have gone back. That many teachers have had that experience. I mean my kids are back in school and their teachers. The beginning were like. I don't know how is it going to be now. They're like it's like it's actually a great. They're you know it's great to be with the kids it's like you're experiencing like the good the good pieces of it But i do think we didn't you even putting aside the approach of individual teachers or of the of the unions We kind of haven't we didn't think about this as essential in a way that I think we we said okay. Grocery stores are essential but somehow we never said. Schools are essential. And that i think has shaped the discussion a lot. Turn up the band aid thing and then getting used to it. There's a little bit of an allusion there. I've noticed among some of my friends that i might algae is the guy he's given One hundred hundred and twenty one dollar bills and he's in a payment for something and he starts counting one two three four and after he gets forty six forty seven. He goes yeah. I don't know if it's right this far. It's probably right the rest of the way and he stops counting a lot of people. I feel like. I've said like well. I haven't gotten yet so i think i'm i'm saying it's not true. And they start you see them. Change their behavior endemic fatigue pandemic and they start doing riskier things. But i guess the other way to look at this. Let's put on our Our political economy has free market oriented friends site. This is this. This school problem is exactly what's wrong with the teachers unions. They don't want to go back and they they're protecting their their their employees other would say well. That's their job. That's exactly why we need. Unions is to protect them from this. I guess the other thing to think about is it does suggest that maybe we don't value our school so much. It's like i tell the joke. I've told us on contract before of the teachers talking to on the airplane about what she she was a math teacher. I said you know what's fourth grade like or sixth grade. Whatever it was at your school she said well. It's kind of a review year. I thought review year. I'd say fly guys strange low set of expectations. So maybe we just don't expect much from the school part of our lives and maybe we're gonna learn something from this. Maybe maybe we'll learn that it isn't so bad. Yeah i mean. I'm not sure i yeah i think we have not. We are not as a society pro. We do not prioritize schools in general and we certainly have not prioritize them prioritize them them here and the people. Keep saying well you know. Parents are out there expecting schools to be childcare and you know schools are not childcare. And you know. That's not a reasonable expectation. But of course like we've set up a society which is your childcare. It's it's the state required literally requires you to send your children to childcare. So it's a little bit funny to say that you know somehow families should be able to just like replace that with something else given that we've sort of set up the society with that in mind. So let's look at the bigger picture.

gatien dennis cova kobe fatigue
"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

08:00 min | 5 months ago

"oster" Discussed on EconTalk

"Guest is economist. Emily oster of brown university. This is emily's fourth appearance on econ. Talk her last time. Here was april twenty nine to talk about her. Most recent book crib sheet data driven guide to parenting today. We're gonna talk about work that she has been doing on the pandemic particularly what we've learned about the vulnerability of school children and if we have time we'll also revisit. Some families work on pregnancy and parenting. Emily welcome back to econ talk. Thank you for having a always like to get to chat with you. So describe the nature of the data that you're even gathering Where is coming from. And what you've learned so far. Yeah so even gathering data on schools and the the approach that we're taking is to basically start with schools and school districts So we are. We would like to do. Some sort of ultimate goal is to do some tracking of kobe cases in schools that have how outbreaks or cases are affected by mitigation practices. But we realized to to do that. We kind of needed to to understand what the situation is at the school. I so what we do is we. We go out to districts or individual schools. We asked them to enroll and give us a bunch of information on how many kids they have in person. Are they opening in person. How many staff do they have And then are they masking and distancing at various distances and then Once we come back to them every other week and ask them how many kobes cases they have and the data then goes into a public dashboard which is identified not at this school or district level but at broader geographic levels. With the idea that people can you look at it. Get a general sense of what's going on. Get a sense of filtering a little bit by the things people are doing looking at different age groups As we get more data. I hope we'll be able to say some more things about kind of what looks like it's working. What's the details of the relationship between the communities. Brad and the and the schools spread but that's the basic structure of this data project. You say we. Who's we so we. I is me and then also a team from tracks which is a technology data survey company and a bunch of school related people assume particular. The association of school superintendents. The national one. And then like we've gotten help. From a bunch of the state associations the national association of principles elementary secondary principles. That's two different groups And then A bunch of private schools association so basically a bunch of people who school affiliations plus plus Kind of state aside. And is this a for profit venture. No oh my goodness. It is not a forefront adventure. This is like an ed. Basically entirely the moment basically almost entirely volunteer effort that has some funding now from soccer berg and and a few other foundations. Templeton's gold silver giving. So we've gotten we've gotten a little bit foundation funding but it is largely run in a in a volunteer way. And how many district students are you capturing right now so in the most recent poll of the in this sort of most recent two week period that we're looking at There about thirteen hundred schools About six seven hundred thousand in total enrolled students of whom about two hundred eighty thousand are in our in person about eighty thousand in person staff. So you know it's still relatively small. I think you know given that like there are fifty six million kids in school We do have reasonably good geographic coverage in that sense we'd have some data from every state and i think we will in the next period have much more because states have started doing a better job. Doing report outs of some of this information on their own. We can probably pull that in and that will increase our sample quite a lot. So i have no children in K. through twelve anymore Our friends who have children k. Through twelve typically. When i asked them how your kids doing they say oh. They spend forty five minutes a week in face to face and they're not allowed to learn anything they're just doing. I don't know what they're doing and they have to alternate. There's all this crazy stuff going to are there of those. How many kids did you say in this. Seven hundred eighty thousand seven hundred. Yes something like seven hundred and fifty thousand. I think in two hundred and eighty thousand. You said we're in person. Yeah or they in twenty four seven. I mean not twenty four seven but all every day i wish they have an offer that never be. So smart right are they. When you say there in person are they in person sometime. During the weaker fulltime it varies so about in our data about a coup. So something like like so. Those numbers are estimated in that number. Two hundred eight thousand estimated in-person daily attendance. So that's a sort of like so that's actually understating. The number of kids in because if if the school is like a hybrid you know to have people. Are there half the time that gets registered as like half the kids so So actually we're seeing you know. In our in the data i think about a quarter of the schools are just fully remote about a quarter of them are fulltime in person for everybody in the other fifty percent are some hybrid in which some kids are there and different at different times and is that sample to expand or you going to or is this kind of bit. No i think the sample will expand i mean. I think the next big kind of push on this is to try to get states to sort of more. Broadly partner with us to do this. So so there hasn't actually been that much so some are doing quite good report out other states are doing less out. we are planning to To work in something where districts that are enrolled can have basically their own district specific dashboard. Which would be presented to them where they could see what's going on with their schools. Nc some benchmarks opener hoping to fold that kind of service into this in the sense that then we'll help places and encourage them to be part of it so we're trying to grow. And when did it start before we get into about to get into the interesting stuff folks listening at home but gonna get these preliminaries otherwise we're dealing with. When did it start ox. So basically we started doing this august and we posted the first the first round of data which covers basically the first two weeks september Posted in kind of towards the end of september. And then we've done these biweekly polls were about to do about just next week. We'll pull the fourth round of biweekly data. And what have you found so far. So i think what we found. There's sort of a few a few things to highlight so the first thing the kind of headline thing is that we've talked about the risks seem to be relatively low so at least in the places that that we're seeing it's about we're seeing this. Most recent period about one point five cases per thousand kids per two week period About twice that in staff so higher rates and stuff than than students. That's actually although. Our sample is fairly selected. So i think it's a little tricky to sort of say. Okay that's the number mean. I would not say that's the number for everybody. It's actually pretty in line with a wad of other numbers that are kind of coming out in various in various ways so relatively limited risks but more than that risks. That really are in line with what's going on in the community and that's probably the most salient feature. Is that what we're seeing. Sort of looks like they're spread if they're spreading the community you get cases in schools. But we aren't seeing a lot of what looks like big outbreaks in the schools And and you know and we are seeing these rates scale with the community and that's true like so for example..

Emily oster association of school national association of princi brown university emily kobe Emily Templeton Brad soccer Nc
U.S. shatters another record for daily cases as states threaten new lockdowns

Democracy Now! Audio

01:37 min | 6 months ago

U.S. shatters another record for daily cases as states threaten new lockdowns

"Says once again shattered its own world. Record for daily corona virus infections reporting a staggering one hundred sixty three thousand cases thursday. Nearly hundred people died of covid nineteen in just the last twenty four hours. Public health officials are warning of a humanitarian catastrophe as the virus continues to spread exponentially and hospitals are pushed beyond capacity california's. Become the second. Us state with more than a million confirmed infections joining texas in chicago. Mayor lori lightfoot has issued a thirty day stay at home advisory and will cap social gatherings at ten people in pennsylvania. prison officials are warning of a deadly. Full blown resurgence of corona virus. Seventeen incarcerated people have died of covid nineteen in pennsylvania during the pandemic six of them since mid october. Meanwhile one of president-elect biden's top corona virus advisors epidemiologists. Michael oster home has proposed that congress pass a relief package to allow. Us residents to remain at home for four to six week lockdown to flatten the curve of transmission. If we did that then we could lockdown for four to six weeks and if we did that we could drive the numbers down like they've done in asia like they did in new zealand australia and then we could really watch ourselves cruising into the vaccine availability in the first and second quarter of next year bringing back the economy long before that

Lori Lightfoot Pennsylvania Michael Oster California Chicago Texas Biden United States Congress Asia New Zealand Australia
"oster" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:41 min | 8 months ago

"oster" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This point on Meghna Taco Bardy we are talking today with Emily oster she's a professor of economics at Brown University Co founder of the website covid explained. We'll talk about that in a second and currently she's working on a covid nineteen school response dashboard that's attempting to gather data on school reopenings around the country, and by the way if you're a school leader who Wish to participate in the dashboard we've got a link to how to do that at on point radio. Dot. Oregon, Emily's also author of the previous books expecting better and crib sheet. No Emily if I if I may I just want to it's very easy to say what could or should right with the federal response here but in terms of gathering data. About Cova and schools, I mean. It is a novel virus. It's this is a novel pandemic. for the world is any any country? Do this better in terms of having the right information or better quality information before re trying to reopen their schools? So I not really although I think some places did better in terms of collecting data as they were opening. So the UK came out. A few weeks ago with some data, they actually had some schools open in June. So I think that they kind of they lockdown they close schools then they reopened and so then they released some data before the fall reopening about what happened in the. In in the summer when they were open so I think that was an example where they actually like they, they had the data. They had some data to do some decision making I think many of these European countries have done. have done a bit better than than US although you know probably not still not perfect. Well just WANNA play a little bit of tape for you. This is from July where in the White House Press Secretary Kaley mcenaney was asked what president trump would say to parents who were having to juggle kids work and remote schooling and mckinney said that schools in the United States should reopen. And then she added this and the President has said unmistakably that he wants schools to open and I was just in the talking to him about that. When he says open, he means open and full kids being able to attend each and every day at their school are the science should not stand in the way of this and Dr. Scott. Outlets that I thought this was a good quote. Of course, we can do everyone else in the Western world are pure nations are doing it. We are the outlier here emily oster respond to that God. So first of all, I, just the idea like we shouldn't let the science stand in the way is sort of exactly the opposite. We should let the science guide us and I'm not. It's not that I'm necessarily think it's wrong to have some school reopens actually think that that we can do this. Well but the idea that somehow we should do it in spite of the science as opposed to with the sciences a little bit. A little bit crazy. I think it is true that many all these other places have opened more than we have I think it's also the case that our that our infection rates are very different and so you know we were talking about opening schools in some places in the south a month ago where the infection rates were very high, it was a very it's a very different virus situation than they were seeing when they were doing this in Italy or an or in Germany. Or basically anywhere else in Europe. So I think it's again this is part of the reason it's a little bit hard to learn from the European data about what we should do, what is the Safeway to do this right? Because the contacts are very different. So so to to that point, then in the in the data that you're trying to gather for the dashboard for the schools dashboard, how are you you and your group going to try to assure that the context is also part of the information? That people can glean from the dashboard. So I think we will. We Will I. Mean Shortest Answer is that I think the most important piece of context is community rates in that something that we can merge in. To the to the data. So we can let people cut the data a little bit by you know, are these places in areas with high medium low? Low infection rates and I think that's an important piece on I. Think the other really important piece of the of the context is age of kids. and. So actually some of these European countries tight traded with respect to age of kids opening for the youngest kids first, and then for older kids later, some of that has happened here too. We can. You know look again hopefully, look in the data, NC, elementary schools versus middle schools. Versus high schools. So I think those are the kinds of cuts entered of context that I think are probably most central to people's difficult decision making I'm just going to say that no matter how dismal the news gets will always take a moment to pause and congratulate someone on the brilliant use of a word and hearing you say tie traded in that context I made my day and now I want to figure out a way to get the word precipitate in there somehow but I exactly. Emily. Hang on here for just I can because obviously anything that has to do with cove in schools is of deep interest to our audience. So we have on point story Shammar with us who's been keeping up with the conversation on social media and Dori. WHAT DO PEOPLE WANNA know? Yeah there's so many people asking about so many different kinds of decisions that they have in. We'll get to some of those but I. we had some users on twitter asking about another kind of choice when it comes to school, which is parents making a decision to send their kids to private school who were at public school because those private schools are able to be in person and their local public school.

Emily oster US Meghna Taco Bardy Oregon Dot President professor of economics UK Cova twitter Europe Brown University Co founder Kaley mcenaney Dr. Scott Shammar White House Press Dori Italy
"oster" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Probably Science

"Yes, so here we go, it's. If it is greater than three solar masses. It becomes a black hole. Okay and neutral star has a massive above one point four semesters up to three soda, masses. and. Small it comes to white off. On a hanging becomes a white dolphin, the person but yeah. Like whole. Disney operated not with a name that. Explains its emotional state or medical degree. Or allergic reactions. by the way a lump of neutron star. If you had if you had a kid, sugarcubes size of a lump of neutron star, it would weigh as much as all of humanity. Emotionally all of humanity. Yeah, all of humanity. Even the of humanity. We don't even know about yet. Undiscovered basic. The people that live below your surface or in the in Marietta's very on his. Will the law. We, we should probably wrap this up. But Dan, where can on this find out more about you and things you do? Well Let's see I have a podcast of my own that I started up with well really my friend. Doug started it up and he asked me if I wanted to do it, and honestly in my kind of recovery. It was like this'll be nice distraction. It's ended up being a lot of fun. It's called a podcast, but evil It is a podcast dedicated to discussing villains of various types, so we've done fictional ones like Dracula, we've. We've done sort of classic mythic ones like Medusa. We've been real people like Al Capone and fun pop culture ones like Freddy Krueger every episode. We look at the different villain and sort of break them down It's called a podcast, but even find us on twitter at podcast, but evil i. what are the I? Love this idea because Sony movies that I think fail me because I don't believe the bad guys intentions like why would he want? What's your favorite like a motivation for someone to do bad and in a move? Oh, well, you know, it's interesting. We always talk about the alignment of a villain, the dungeons and dragons alignment. yeah from being a either a nerd or from the memes online so we're only interested in the evil side of the chart right so you got lawful, evil, neutral evil and chaotic evil, and so if you're lawful evil that means that you use the system. To do you're evil? You're doing it in in service of the system like Darth vader or Hitler, villains tend to be the guys who also make the rules when their lawful evil. There's neutral evil which is like you don't really care about any rules. You're just in it for yourself. Most like criminals like Al. Capone. Fall into that category. And then there's chaotic evil like the joker. Where is the reward? You're sadistic. Yes, seek out doing harm and you get off on it and a lot of times. Villains end up being some sort of combination thereof my favorite. It's hard to say my favorite motivation would be. I guess I tend to like the the masterminds. The Cobra Commander's unless losers of the world's. Guys dream big and fail. But you imagine I. Imagine like what is there like when someone in marvel movie wants to destroy the universe, or whatever then what do you do? What's fun about that after? Right. It's almost as they somewhere. No inside of them. They're not going to succeed. Passed that point, Yes really lose me, but that would be how you truly defeat going fine. Go. Yeah, go ahead now, creation. You have a summer house got to leave destroyed to go. Enjoy your time now like what's the what's actually interesting? Because we were just talking about the dictators and you know there's no real successful dictator. It never really ends well. You know it's not. They never retired, and you're like well I'm done dictating I'm just GonNa live off my successes, you know they always die either like an exile or at their own hand. Me Depends on how you define. You could make a case of Fidel, Castro. Being both a dictator unsuccessful. Maybe one of the more successful ones probably because he didn't achieve. The kind of cartoonist levels of of Villainy maybe that some people got to just did an episode on mean. Who apparently a chapter optics. Which I think is a line. Dictators unofficially don't. Br against the dictates hasbro coach. Well if we said that was cool, then we'd all do. It. Is it? It's cool. I'm no expert on Fidel Castro, but that would be my guess like. Another mistake that they make to is they tend to then eventually start spreading their aggression out of their own borders, and then that's when you know. Everyone says okay. You can't do it anymore. Sorry, you're threat so if you kind of restrict it to your own little country that you're adding up, you can really make last. Lessons to learn future dictators listening. And Small Small and then you're on twitter and a instagram and the like. Oh dictator. I can think of one on twitter. I'm on those things I'm not super social media active, but if you wanna find me on twitter, and and you know, be one of several, a handful of people who like my jokes I guess I'm at dern. because. I want to be sort of anonymous O. D. E. R.. R. Turner stor we'll do those you can find us. At probably science individually at Andy at Matt cushion probably besides Dot Com is the website we find links and also all donation. And patron links. We really appreciate everyone who helps us out. Those probably science I g mail. Dot Com is the email address. If you have any questions, comments, clarification stories, you would like us to cover. Dan thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me guys. There's a lot of fun. And this!.

twitter Fidel Castro Al Capone Dan Dot Com Disney Marietta Al hasbro Doug Commander Freddy Krueger Sony Darth vader R. Turner Andy instagram
"oster" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Probably Science

"Is that I? I really do believe that everybody at some point in their life experiences pain or or other strange symptoms as a result of stress essentially, and you know it works itself out, and you move on, and you don't really think about it. Maybe you blame like You know an injury. You had like a month ago or something like. Why would it hurt a month later? But you just do that, so it makes sense to you. What can happen is it can kind of get stuck in a self reinforcing loop? What drives pain really is fear of symptoms, a lot of the time or other stresses in your life and what can happen, is it kind of gets stuck and your brain is actually driving these sensations. It's all downstream. It's coming from your brain and has nothing to do with what's there anymore? There may have been an injury at some point, so it can actually just be on this this loop in really the trick is breaking that cycle. If, it's moving around your body. That's a pretty great indicator that it's not structural. You know right right so right now, or are you paying free organic? Paid. Better place when the journey started. Though well I'm in a I'm in process. You know this has been a long journey for me I'm certainly doing a lot better I wouldn't have been doing this podcast just a few months ago. To be perfectly honest with you one of the things, and really this is one of the biggest mind Fox of the whole process is you don't really gauge your progress. By symptom reduction I know that sounds a little insane. You do get symptom relief. You do get these windows and you do sort of in the. If you take a large enough sample of your of your life, you see like I am doing so much better. But because it's not physical in nature, it can go up and down it can flare up. You can feel good one moment terrible the next and then good again. You know what I mean so. It's like you're letting the symptoms. Be The indicator. You're sort of letting the terrorists win. You're leading this. That's actually not a good indicator of how you're doing. Dominate how you're feeling, and it kind of keeps you trapped in the cycle, and you end up having to fight millions of years of evolution. And feel pain without fear. Pain wants you to be in fear. That's the whole point of it. To warn you, and so you learned to like be in pain and kind of goes away, and that ultimately kind of cycles it out so I'm not done. You're getting me definitely when I'm in the middle of something, but I am a believer, and it's taken me a long time to get to the point where I was even willing to accept it. You know I went down a lot of medical pads. That did not help so. Those any surgery for anything or You know I I've had I've had some take a few pieces out of me. And stuff nothing too drastic, but but there are people back pain and stuff like that. They get like fusion all these things. I would just say like if you don't have something that's life threatening. If you've ruled out life threatening stuff I really encourage people to go down this path initially before you start. Doing more drastic things, you can still recover even with that. Honestly, there's no reason that surgery should prevent you from being able to recover, but it's a lot to go through. I I did that last year disconnected me after like twenty nine hundred was the worst of. Years I mean twenty is giving it a run for its money, but yeah, yeah, well, this is really interesting. If you don't mind me and appropriate that a little bit, so you had some back pain, yeah, and it was really unique in that it was started I think two years earlier. I started to feel some toes. Go numb and I thought it was something to do with shoes I was wearing, but that was probably the first that the disc was bulging on that nerve and then. I was like a week long period where I started to hurt it, and it was hurting. Let that week, and then at the end of that week I bend over to pick up a piece of paper to quickly and I felt the the splash I felt like this very clear thing had just broken. And that would have been that disk rupturing and the sort. Sort of Jelly doughnut situation that Jealous Gordie out, and then pushing instantly on that in incessantly on that sciatic nerve, so then it was just march until August of last year was just constant pain of varying degrees, and then you know trying every. Few days before I actually it I went to a chiropractor for the first time ever which I've never done, and I will never again. That might have hastened the. Rupture of that, but. I have a friend. WHO's a WHO's a? Good neurosurgeon it back in Michigan or friend of the family, and he was saying only five percent of cases of disk. Related problems require surgery. It like well I couldn't be in that five right and then you know. Seeing the Brian, just having no. Improvement in my situation eventually talked to a surgeon and had it. It was good. The recovery hasn't been great either, but it's definitely auto interesting to me. I'm sorry this is fascinating. This is textbook case kind of the stuff that I've run into. I mean back pain. MRI's all of this stuff I mean I. don't really you know if you're doing well or you're satisfied with how you're doing? Then my policy is still like. Shut up and be like that so good. Myself he's. Doing. Better excuse me. If it were just paying than it might be a different conversation, but the reason the surgeon agreed to do it was the combination of pain, numbness and weakness, so it's pushing on the nerve that also powered that leg, so I was limping also for that whole time left leg was just I? Do I could do I could lift up my right foot on the to-. Fifty Times but left what I can do it like. Twice. So that. Wasn't going to I..

Fox Gordie Michigan Brian
"oster" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Probably Science

"Here from welcome to Science Cassian. Would and yeah, we thanks for bearing with the curious tech issues from last week we had. We had some things going on. We jumped between a couple of different software options. We finally found one sort of work, but we all sounded a bit robotic and Andy. Sounded bizarrely butch. By the way if that happens again I'm putting this on you for not being attuned enough to what I. Normally sound like to point it out as it's happening. Me Listening to your voice almost a decade now. What did I guess that's how Andy Sounds like? The desert has changed me. Ask. Most also to be fair. You were talking to other people who also know your voice. That's why I'm worried that maybe sometimes even they don't. Something behind the scenes happens, and it's not the version that everyone's hearing I don't know. If. You're tuning in time where you didn't hear. Last week's episode Andy was pitched down by about I. Don't know often active. Sure active maybe. Enough that it was strange enough that it was like a little witness protection. And these now living out to the desert, and his his exact whereabouts are unknown. By the way I have a Tony Update my neighbor Tony, but we should we should bring. Yeah, let let's bring guests in August is himself an experienced podcast and also a comedian improviser writer sketch performer, a former mad TV calls member from a boom Chicago. Treatment is Dan Asta Hey, guys. Expertise Hey. Dan I mentioned Chicago just because I cross policy them a bunch of times back in the day. And then you guys a everywhere now like just the tendrils of that one. SMALLISH AMSTERDAM-BASED IMPROV group. A like stretch all the way through TV, these days and yeah, I always like to say like attended boom Chicago which has famous alumni like Jordan Peele and And Dan Oster. But yeah, there's been a lot of amazing people that have passed through there for sure yeah. Set Maya's friend of the show. LEARN PLANS IS A. Is the boom part sort of a A fulltime American words. But I think when they were creating the theater back in the late nineties, they just for trying to come up with something that sounded dynamic, and they were from Chicago, so they were like boom Chicago. The funny thing is a bom in Dutch means tree. By this time. They would have hoped. Yes. You do Edinburgh with them because that was the first time. Will the second time encountered. The my Rachel was works as a as a waitress, and so I, went to visit her when I was nineteen something she was. She was there and that was when Seth Meyers and his brother stood in the group. Oh cool You might have been we. Now when they were in the group, but I will say that. I did do a Gig at the Edinburgh Festival not long after I arrived in two thousand five and I, I was very young was a long time ago, and I feel like I was still very tired. And I think I napped through most of the Edinburgh. That's if anyone's wondering. How cool I am I went to like the Premier Arts Festival in Europe and slept through most of it its. If any consolation, I went to the Alhambra one of the greatest Architecture design in the world and I slept in the park okay great. It was. End of a long Spanish road trip and I just missed it. My friends went inside and I just went I'm going to sleep this one ounce. Yeah, well. I, think that's just self care and that's healthy. That's. Where is the humber again? I don't know much about that at. The name of more venues in America than a more think of it as that are aimed for it than the actual thing. We the! Thinking around Seville but I could be wrong so I. Think like. Park or something because there's an Alhambra in California right, it's not. Yeah? Festival. It looks like a good place to visit. It's the UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is and I. I have driven there and I am was familiar with the inside of it as you off. Online. is in the south of Spain. So. If you ever find yourself in the south of Spain, I recommend going inside relevant. Just napping in your friend. Simon parents fit. I don't know I think the car parks in Spain are lovely. They I it was. It was very nice. It was very nice day now. But yeah, I probably. Hey, Dan You before we get into the science stuff, so Andy Has A. Andy has moved out at least temporarily possibly permanently to the desert and has a neighbor. And we're about to get an update thing. Come Oh. Yes, I live next door to self proclaimed Ninja who says that he he trains the nearby military from the twenty nine palms base, just east of us. And he lives with eleven dogs, and Tom Clancy's widow who is paid to take care of this is his history. Yes, Nancy clancy. Oh. Now I feel about it even lifted up. Because obviously, it was bullshit. Pius shows you Tom. Clancy never married a woman Nancy because you wouldn't do that. and. So but I have met hers. She does exist and then he asked me to pay some bills for him and. He doesn't have a credit card, so you brought over cash and the bill. The bill was in the name Nancy clancy. So there is some truth kernels of truth to these stories. You also claims he's killed two people with their own. Both at the same time, or is it possible that he's just wearing a wig I? I hate to admit this to listeners, but like here in San Benito. County things are getting more lax I. They don't have a car I gave them a ride. To a credit union yesterday. We all wore masks Nancy, who is in her eighties and nearly deaf sat in the backseat while Tony Talk. Door and she didn't respond because she can't hear him the strangest dynamic. But. He's. Right now he's. He's thinking about moving to Utah. This is going to move to Utah and the next month or two, and he sent me the link to this compound. That's like the seven thousand square foot. Thing is going to turn it into a UFC. Fighting and training compound I just got all these. It's like talking to a fourteen year old. WHO's just sketched his dream house in his book? Shouldn't you? I worry about like getting a bank account and and hard with which to pay your bills. Bring over stacks of cash to me and.

A. Andy Nancy clancy Spain Edinburgh Chicago Dan I Alhambra Tony Talk boom Chicago Tom Clancy Dan Asta Utah Seth Meyers Edinburgh Festival UFC Rachel Dan Oster Seville Europe
Many states begin reopening as coronavirus cases continue to climb

Meet The Press

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Many states begin reopening as coronavirus cases continue to climb

"Administration distanced itself from a draft federal government report predicting an uptick in new coronavirus cases and three thousand deaths a day by June first and the president announced the White House task force was all we're now looking at a little bit of a different form before declaring it on again after public push back so we keeping the task force for that period of time and Mr trump is just missing the consensus of public health experts dead widespread testing is a necessary step to re opening businesses safely away by doing all of this testing we make ourselves look bad repeating his claim that the virus will disappear on its own I feel about vaccines like I feel about this this is going to go away without a vaccine the president's skepticism of public health guidance is now being echoed by many of the governors who support these models have been so wrong from day one those models keep changing so really it's not they're not very good because we did so much for testing we have more cases we were going to the hot spot and we were testing so of course are positive cases are going to increase you have to be warriors we we can't keep our country closed down for years we can't keep our economy shut down forever but sixty eight percent of Americans continue to say they are more concerned that state governments will lift restrictions too quickly then that they may take too long still with the unemployment rate now fourteen point seven percent pressure is growing and the president is accusing Democrats of slowing re opening to damage him politically they could only get because it offered me the longer it takes to a dark man the election the longer it takes to open up and joining me now into infectious disease experts Michael Oster home from the university of Minnesota and Columbia university's Jeffrey Shane gentleman welcome to meet the press and Dr so let me start with you simple question are we ready to reopen the economy well first of all let me just say that is when we say what we mean by opening the economy that's really unclear we have to we can't stay locked down for eighteen months but at the same time when you have cases increasing deaths increasing health care workers out adequate protective equipment and we're suddenly going back to what was once our normal lives that's not a safe place to be we can't do that and not expect to see a major increase in cases Jeffrey Sherman I have we squandered the eight weeks and locked down and that are or are we the rushing the re opening in that we don't have the testing and tracing program in place yet or we just squandered the eight weeks we have not used the eight weeks as well as we could have unfortunately it would have been benefited enormously from consistent messaging and concerted consolidated plan of attack for actually aggressively and proactively dealing with this virus at this point however we do have to pick ourselves up where we are and we need to start taking those measures we need to look at some of the countries that have been very successful in quashing this virus down I'm particularly point to Korea South Korea and Germany and maybe even New Zealand and Taiwan these are countries in particular when the cases of Germany and South Korea that had enormous outbreaks they flatten them the crush them down and they did this because they tested so aggressively and they use contact racing they were able to quarantine people who were becoming infectious before they actually spread to other people it's a very powerful measure it requires real investment but we already have models that show that it can work and once you've done that then you're in this position of strength where re opening the economy is not going to lead necessarily to the rebounding cases that I'm expecting given this patchwork response we have right now when the re openings taking place in some

Jesus the Philosopher with Dr. Jonathan Pennington

Knowing Faith

09:09 min | 1 year ago

Jesus the Philosopher with Dr. Jonathan Pennington

"Here. We are and we are joined by Dr Jonathan Pinkston. Thank you for coming on the show. We're glad to have you. Hey I am absolutely thrilled. That's excellent so You are just wrapping up Sabbatical. You've just wrapped it up. That's right okay. And you're telling me before we jumped on Mike that Iran a bunch of fiction on Sabbatical. Yep Okay tell me what you were. Because I'm reading a bunch of fiction right now. Yeah well I always do. I often joke that I actually just professor to support my fiction in reading habits. Because I'm and I mostly listen to because that way I can just constantly listen to them when I'm sometimes walking driving doing dishes. London whatever So I listen veraciously. All kinds of things got some favorite authors like Ursula Gwynne and others but I just I just read Willa cather author. You know her. She was a famous nineteen twenty century. Her Book Called death comes for the archbishop. That was really good. I also read the entire David Foster oster wallace reader which is both fiction non fiction any Wallis. Some you know everything. Infinite Jest while infants all the way through that truth be told but all his essays everything it was fast essay that stands out to your hand. Yeah the one about the State Fair Illinois that was and and The one about television is a long essay about television. Its effect on people. Yeah so he wrote an essay on I think it's called collect. They've named a collection of essays this as well but both flash and not where he talks about tennis pros. Oh yeah that's right. That was man. It's incredible it was so he wrote that. I've never watched tennis in my life but after I read the essay I got on a bender with watching professional tennis. Yeah you don't you don't like sports. That actually have is that it is well. He's so ham fisted the rest of the very literally. Exactly I was GONNA say haven't reading David Foster ause because I've been watching football and I didn't you know what big game was on today. JV Edit tell somebody else's like is there a big game and they're like it was like who do you have today in college. Like is this the sports ball. Don't even Yeah Ursula. Gwen are you into science fiction too. I mean good science fiction. Science fiction is created equal. But I'm reading this collection of short stories by Ted. Yes absolute escalation escalation absolutely. No I just know cool. I like old school like okay. We'll Ted Chiang is amazing. I read the earlier collection and that the story and they're called the story of your life the basis for the movie movie arrival which is one of my all time favorite movies. Have we not talked about not using it got so. Hey it wasn't at Brad like several times and he did not get sick. Okay we'll start talking about cross fit or are you still there. Okay listen if you have not read Ted Cheese amazing. He's incredible okay. So that's Dr Pennington Worley. co-signing an endorsement. If you listen to this podcast broadcast hanging in there for you. We love to have you know. We're we're glad to have Dr. Go ahead please. Oh no no no no what is amazing about him and league win is the same way and you should care about this and you should try. Is that a think a lot. About the power of language in shaping our thinking An culture yeah and so both Lin Chang are constantly thinking about how we say things and the way we structure our society and how languages connected that. That's why that that movie arrival. Yeah did you ever see that. Yeah so it's not language it was about how I know amy. Yeah on that one whitaker's in it too right. The Guy Blackhawk as well as listening. I have a big crush on her. She reminds me of my childhood crush. Elizabeth Montgomery say an actual the person's name and that person would be listening going. Oh I never even knew that he was with again where he's an actual person. You might actually be witched. Oh Man who can forget are- even recording. This has been hot. No we are although I could talk to you about Hans Fictional the rest of the time that we have together. Dr Painting is a professor and author posture preacher. He's written a number of books. He has a friend to the TV institute. Big Friend Friend town this week and teaching It's been my favorite time of the year. It's the most wonderful time of the year so even when we started the training program one of the hopes was bringing in outside speakers Experts in their field but are also churchman. Church women people who who want to to do theology or new tests ultimate cities at the highest level in the academy but can also translate to the local church and we didn't know it was gonNA work five years ago But we brought you back five times so it's worked. It's pretty well and you know this. Our students have just really gravitated towards you. And I've also seen you Avenue now for seven eight years or so You've always been a wonderful the teacher and a good friend. But even as you've been preaching more your church just seeing God used that to shape you into a just a beautiful person into theologian into a real. You're a real person. You know what I mean by the air you're dealing with substantive issues but you're also living In a broken world that we're living in and you're able to speak speak in both of those worlds. Yeah so grateful for that well. It's the teaching works because of hungry people could be up there doing my stick and if people were hungry angry it wouldn't be the same. It's an interaction and so you guys have created something so beautiful here of hungry people who are seeking the Lord and trying to figure out their lives and and so it's annoying to come in and it's been fun part of that so you've been in town this weekend speaking about the gospel of Matthew. And would you say that has been where your focus has been the last number of years. It sounds like yeah so I had the great privilege of doing a PhD. In Matthew hasn't stopped since and I always when I think about Matthew I always think what he says in an esoteric way in chapter. Thirteen that The scribe train for the Kingdom of Heaven continues to bring out of his treasure house else. Things old and new and so we've been studying this book of Matthew for two thousand years and they're still. I've been studying for twenty years and every time I read it I see do things. They didn't see it especially everytime I preach from it one of the things that I've been amazed even though not write articles or books teach. It's when I go go to preach a passage that I come to understand it I think in its fullest way. What do you think that is I wanted to ask you about the the process of rediscovery? So somebody's many. Listen to this like okay. I'm on my Bible Reading Plan and I've done it faithfully the last twenty years. I'm coming up on a book of the Bible. I've Read Twenty Times Thirty Times Forty Times. What is some of that process of rediscovery for you as you walk the same path over and over again? How like where does that come from? Does it never feel like it's just old hat like well. Of course you know. This is what what he's doing here in the Greek and this matthew. This is a typical matthew. Move that he's making right here. Like what does rediscovery somebody no no but but what is But what does it look like. What rediscovery look like? Somebody's spending lots of time in one book of the Bible. Yeah I I think it is a it is a literary and theological Michael masterpiece and the reason. We're still reading it. Two thousand years later is obviously. It's in the Bible. We believe it's inspired. But it is a masterpiece. The reason it's still worth worth reading over and over and and a great piece of literature is one that you've reread. I just wanted to read once. And the more so structured and I always remind students that it by the time matthews written this thing down. He's been pondering and praying and preaching teaching and rearranging and editing for like thirty years. Probably by the time. He's this is is his magnum opus. This is as great piece. Just like we would read You know brothers Karamazov for something over and over and you'll see things in it even more. This is a masterpiece. Sure piece and you never get tired of it. I think the other thing and this is why things I so appreciate about all you guys. I'm thinking of Jan.. How much joy her books to her experience? As a teacher feature I think you'd probably affirm this that when you go to teach you go from passive learning to active learning and so that's what I think is amazing that I'm teaching teaching and preaching for Matthew. That's when I come to understand it more. I think you guys build things into the institude. Were there reversing say. Yeah I think so. I think a big part of the reason why I never gets boring is because I'm an active reader passive reader

Matthew Tennis Ursula Gwynne Professor David Foster Dr Jonathan Pinkston Ted Chiang London Iran Willa Cather Mike Lin Chang Elizabeth Montgomery Ted Cheese Illinois TED Dr Pennington Worley. Gwen Karamazov Brad
"oster" Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Counting Countries

"What's what's next on Wjr just behind this mountain. I think it's not in both on H.. Is has has to be very curious so bearing in mind that will also very independent persons. WHO doesn't want to stand in the way a of each other streams of course I supported in the best way I can because he supports me in what I want to do? I travel alone as well and takes care of the kids. Lets me do anything I want to do. So that's I think that's how we keep each other happy for so many years you're not holding holding each other back up supporting crazy dreams each one case so. That is a very symbiotic relationship. And when when I think of your country count that you're at one hundred nineteen. What is your goal so I mean your husband? Your partner is accomplished. The one ninety three three is that your goal is wall or do you have a different travel. I don't really want to a need to go to Because I've seen lead how much work it takes. It is racing would just to get visas permission. Maybe a hundred and fifty would be very nice for me. I'm only forty three so I think I have a lot of used to traveling. I really hope so. So one hundred fifty would be my next gold and I've let Ajay travel extensively every winter for months so he could reach his gold. And I'm hoping that the next yes. We can go on winter holidays together. Not just in some of up to two ties twice speaking of partnership in support. Describe what that's like as a families that challenging is easy so for it sounds like for many years. Jacob is shared with me. You guys do a really big summer holiday with the family. But Jacob also leaves typically for a four week Solo trip in the winter so so Charlotte. What's that like as a family where your partner is disappearing for a month every winter? Normally a joke that it's a much much. She within the couple's therapy. I think it's quite nice to get a break from each other. The Kiss Ninety a a great conversation with Stephan in Jacob congrats guys awesome to see you completing the quest also big things to Charlotte for offering her perspective effective is well to hear the complete interview with Charlotte and also many other bonus interviews. I'd encourage you to become a patron lake. Ted Names Stephen Rothwell Ryan Gasden Adam Hickman Steph fro to join them good peach dot com to support counting countries and it also big. Thanks for our efforts of our guest announcer today visa. If you are interested in seeing lemurs think of going to Madagascar in August of twenty twenty. I'm running a group trip there. Reach out to me with any questions and remember Untamed borders the sponsor of counting countries. They are a specialist in countries that country free counters want to visit like so Sudan Afghanistan Pakistan while I want to wish everyone a great healthy happy and safe a fear of travel on twenty twenty. I WanNa think all of you for support and listening to counting countries. I do appreciate it. I look back at my twenty nineteen with a lot of thankfulness for a safe in incredibly amazing interesting year of travel on my personal personal quest. I'm making steady progress. I visited my fortieth country in November Afghanistan fascinating trip with untamed borders orders. You can check out my blog. Global GAZ DOT COM from my best photos of Twenty nineteen my year in review in tons of other great imposed on Afghanistan Pakistan. Lose Becca Stan and much more until next time save travels and keep keep on counting countries. You have been listening to counting countries. The only podcast to bring you the stories. He's from the dedicated few who've spent their lives on the singular quest of traveling to every country in the world. Our theme music is demeanor. Dance Britain performed and provided by Mundi. Get their entire discography at Mundi. World DOT COM IMMU in the world. UH DOT COM and keep up with rick and his own personal. TRAVEL QUESTS AT GLOBAL GAS DOT COM.

Charlotte twenty twenty partner Jacob Becca Stan Pakistan Wjr Ajay Madagascar Stephen Rothwell Ryan Gasden A Afghanistan rick Britain Stephan Ted Names
"oster" Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

09:31 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Counting Countries

"That was Yemen So things of more recent times. It's a bit easier to get to Yemen whether it's the mainland or even Sakata Tra But previously it was at one point extremely challenging and I think you were trying to visit during that more challenging time period. Describe your visit in how you're able to manage it. Yeah so they've even the tragedy of the the. The fighting Indian in Yemen is a sadly ongoing for that that period from two thousand sixteen through this year was Particularly intense is fighting. And I know some very resourceful travelers found ways to do a bit of a day trip from the border from Oman. or or even a few would be able to With different connections get journalistic visas in and and get in the day trip from Oman. I had I had no problem with did. I just didn't want to go to that amount of time and expense to have such a short visit to a country that that by everything I've heard from travelers. I've seen I've read is is a world jammed to to see an NBA explorer so I didn't take a real interest in that and It was only until the early months of this year. That a mainland Yemen became feasible for for some on on a bit more extensive itineraries. I've not yet been to the mainland but I did go to Sokoto Tra in In April that that transits through say you in but I didn't have a proper trip through mainland Yemen where I did spend as a week on Sokoto island which that island has been peaceful throughout the throughout the fighting It's had different forces on on the island but it's a very different culture. They don't own guns. There's no guns on the island. There's there's no dogs because their their livestock is free range and there's no chickens gins Because they said they hate chickens but they love eggs so when I was looking the trip the biggest warning they gave me was. We don't have many eggs right now and then I learned take care about the eggs. It was they were marooned waiting for eggs in the end suffering and tremendous way for several years but late late uh in two thousand eighteen weekly flights from Cairo resumed And then I was able to get a seat in in early April to go and spend a week on this this this incredible island in the beaches are some of the best in the world. That if they were to be developed every Major resort in the world would be desperately clawing to get get space It's a windy place much of the year. But the flora and fauna the dragon's blood trees are the most iconic is is an incredible place Fantastic food so I did my time until I can have a a really good visit and did have that that fantastic week on Sikora in just to provide some context so at one point over the last couple of years I mean there were multiple attempts by individuals who are trying to Five from Salau Allowuah Oman. To CICADA does fight simply Were not feasible which did not take off. which did not make it too so cadre? I think you're referring to now now a flight that is on Cairo air which is going on at the state airline and so they've got what three eight hundred twenty one's now one one new into older so the the prior attempts at charters and I was involved in booking or almost booking several ones by charter flights or ferries the these were ones that that consistently got hung up because the the Saudis were controlling the airspace. And there would be maybe a permit or maybe not or the permit will be issued and then taken away. It was very challenging for Operators seeking to do this and it was Extremely challenging for for perfect on the island. It's a fascinating thing that many of the islanders their families they have sons that are serving serving in the army that is one of the forces that sort of allied with the Saudis and that's fighting in their mainland So it's it's an incredibly credibly complicated thing and and there have been charters going in and out of Ui for families certain medical but but yeah it was really cut off on Mike flight out was a a lady whose from teargas Dan a doctor who has served in Sokoto for many years and She could not go back and visit at her family's see her husband encouraged and for several years and she was finally able to go out and visit him on the flight that I was leaving from excellent. And what about the logistic. So how did you plan the tripper. Who did you plan the trip through? What provider were you working with? There's a number of providers that They all it's a small place that and certainly it was. It was not a mainstream destination but it was a big for eco-tourism Before it was even on New York Times where to go places lists this Before the fighting broke out. So there are. There are several operators out there Sokoto. eco-tours is is the oldest There's there's there's several local ones Lupine you a trekkers Several so I I was with the. UA trekkers Which partnered on the ground with a ASCOTT ECO tours? And they were the first ones that were really aggressive at getting people in and took it and had a great experience Many many visitors it ends up being a somewhat similar program unless unless you have very specific activities of most of the nights are camping out In in very basic conditions around the island and actually I wanted to. I wanted to be in the hotel more nights. I'm not I'm I'm not Not Averse to to rough sleeping conditions. But it's it's a it's an intense climate in and I I liked having a a little bit of a commute for the islanders. That's a huge drive to say it's too far to go back to the capital for the hotel at night. But that's like a forty five minute drive in so they were willing to work work with me on on what I did and I really enjoyed being at its. It's the only hotel so various government officials were there. The environment minister was there meeting with UN the people on Phnom Tourism Development. So I liked being at that. The one expat hotel just just because it is the only hotel and and and seeing the the those type of people so I did it a little bit differently than the typical Five or even every night camping trip that that many of the guests are interested in. Tell me a little bit about the group. You're on a group wooded the other travelers like Earth Day with type people Well the one is a A A friend from travelers century club. That is Chinese national that that's based out of Washington. DC works with the World Bank and she's a fantastic antastic traveler. We had met on Messing Elena a few years before I wanna one was a veterinarian from UAE From Southern Africa originally and then our group was supposed to have Audrey Walsworth who you've interviewed on the program before the first woman to to go to every country in the world and she had been do Yemen but never Sokoto Tra and she was all booked in in. We were excited than Tom. uh-huh she flies out of Kansas City and Atlanta. Her plane goes mechanical for about eight hours and she gets rerouted Atlanta to different places is in Europe GETS INTO CAIRO or we're having them hold the plane. Hold the plane. They did hold the plane almost an hour. And this is a once weekly flight. Totally sold out Cairo airport has multiple terminals. And in this case coming in on connecting the many others there's no way to transit within the terminals So she had to go through terminal three immigration. Get on a taxi. Drive all the way over to Terminal One and she got there. It does minutes minutes after so she missed out for that we were. We were devastated about that. She turned around talk about a frequent flyer program expert. She she got dealt at a flyer back. Refund the miles re booker for a cheaper price. Two weeks later and she was back in Socotra she did did get there a couple of weeks later. God bless her. I'm hoping to travel with her At some point and a future but but even that experience I mean what an incredible bowl role model and and doing it decades before Certainly I started traveling and I believe that was an important visit for her. I think was that had her last. T. C. C.. Travelers Century Club location. That she needed to visit in she had previously completed the TCC as it then was and so she has. She's lifetime status within the club for having completed though as with them. Her personal goal is To them each time every two ears.

Yemen Cairo islanders Oman Sokoto Tra Sokoto island NBA Atlanta Sikora New York Times Oman. Sokoto Salau Allowuah Oman UN ASCOTT ECO Washington Century Club T. C. C Sokoto. eco-tours
Stefan Krasowski on Visiting All 193 UN Countries

Counting Countries

11:46 min | 1 year ago

Stefan Krasowski on Visiting All 193 UN Countries

"Steffan Krzyzewski come from Minnesota in the US. I've I just recently gotten to one ninety three. UN countries which is why we're talking today. You bring me back for follow up. But I'm happy to be here I don't remember that comment but I'm glad to have you back and curious to hear a little bit of your final part of the journey and I just wanted overview a couple of different different things to remind the listener Remind us again. Why the love of travel was the catalyst what spurred your love for expiration in discovery like many many in my boat there? There's a collecting background. Where you you get interested in collecting different things and I did not travel much coach growing up? My parents not not active travelers so it was my high school junior year trip to China. We had started studying Chinese Back in fifth grade grade and went to China and traveled around and it was just eye-popping exciting thrilling and so as soon as I could I went to college and University of Pennsylvania Wharton School Philadelphia but spent semesters in Shanghai and Hong Kong and then moved to China right after graduating college. And the you've been in Hong Kong. I arranged at ride classes three days a week and just every every Wednesday night I would head the Shenzhen. See what buster overnight train rain was leaving in hop somewhere new and got addicted traveling in China going every province in in the country. And then step-by-step expanding out to the region and the wider world pulled out of curiosity. You didn't come from travel family. What's your family? Think of what you've done what you've accomplished in the travel world world totally supportive. Do they think you're a little crazy. What's going on when you get together for Thanksgiving? Oh I've got one wonderful parents sand and Brother who's a doctor and a scientist who's WHO's very different although we both Studied Chinese at the the same starting and he studied in China in highschool so my parents Prince of been extremely big about education that they work worked to put put us into the best schools that that we could get ourselves into an and get that environment and Mother reading to me every night Even when I developed an interest in books like James Bond or Tarzan in bucks as a as a first or second grader that would have pretty racy stuff she wouldn't our through and and Be Happy to expose me to to new ideas. A Matt so the circumstances weren't for for them to be traveling a huge amount growing up but they're always been very supportive and and As as both my brother and I got older than the I was living in China my parents did start traveling and in quite a quite a lot of times they visited me. TRAVELLED AROUND DOWN SO my father's a adult of million miler now so it's it's certainly not not anti travel in out of curiosity whose commander and his better yours or your brother. I should hope it's me because I still go back several times a year and actively do stuff with China and he hasn't significantly kept up with it since since going into medical school. I mean I know he did say at the time that Learning Anatomy class was pretty easy Z.. For him when when he had been studying Chinese characters for some time but when he was when he was at his best to you. As far beyond me reading classical Chinese the It's it's it's much more different than than say Latin. It was never a spoken language. The written Classical texts are incredibly hard. Pardon any was brilliant that I can. I can get through the first few sentences of the Dow ditching and and that which is which is hard enough but He was he was way beyond me as scholar. Could use to your brother in and Stephan. What was that inflection point? So you explain how you really were taking advantage of semesters abroad in Hong Kong China the region starting to explore like crazy. What was the moment when you decided to chase when ninety three? What was that light bulb moment? It was. It was somewhere around Azerbaijan Georgia Armenia trip that I took from China on one one of the holiday weeks that that China has an at that point I was had been to just about every country in Asia and and was loving it than in seeing the possibility awesome -bility of doing much more in learning learning about frequent flyer programs which was making some of these possible Places like the caucuses were connected to China. Southern routes in Chai from China and Could use my north west and then later when they became Delta Delta Miles on on these is trips so things that I thought were previously unattainable for time or cost reasons were suddenly feasible and and And I never I never had an interest to be a full time traveler even if I had unlimited resources for that I push myself very hard on trips. The I've I've taken several three week trips Only wash twice longer. Once a four week I think in the that was in Central and west Africa and a five week around the Pacific and I was so exhausted after three weeks of pushing myself that that is the the long term travel all thing wouldn't wouldn't fit for me and and professionally isn't isn't where my interest lies and and certainly not as it is where my marriage marriage would be taking me so the I like short intense trips. It but was there a day where you sat around and counted up the country's on the map happen you saw that you're at fifty or a hundred and then you read an article. What was that final? Push where you said okay. I've done this now. I can do that. There was more of a a different back back to that other by John. Looked at within. The cost was to get to Nakhichevan which is a separate part of other by John that on the Traveler Century Club list as a separate territory and it was it now? It's quite easy to visit in affordable all and more flights at that point it was it was looking that expensive and I decided I'm not going to get addicted to a crazy list like that and subsequently I've ended knocked divide and gotten addicted to that list but it was It wasn't it was it was Wasn't necessarily one day except perhaps perhaps when I got got to eat team more. So that was the last country in Asia that I hadn't been to and did say I went to to all this trouble to get east team or deal with Indonesian and flights which wonderful delightful country in many ways except traveling Logistically is Is One where a lot of things. Don't go to plan and and So once I got to East Timor as I'm going for the UN Stephan. You're last on counting countries actually November of twenty sixteen eighteen. And you're at one hundred eighty six countries at that point. But you didn't finish your you analyst until August of Twenty nineteen in for some travelers. That's a lifetime Some travelers as we know have done all one hundred ninety three during that same time period. So you took your time to finish off the last seven countries I want to focus on four of your final five two of them. I found pretty surprising in two. I didn't so your final countries was Italy. How did Italy early of all countries end up being one of your last countries? There were three that I was saving to the end of Italy Greece and Turkey and and Mainly not not so much animus. I'm really WANNA have a big party or something. It wasn't that it's it's I'm history is my favorite subject fascinated with ancient history. And all of those three are are are so special in central to to world history and world world civilizations that I wanted to to save them to really enjoy lavish in terms of time and and Destinations destinations trips to go. So that that was the original thinking and then What will get into why I got stuck on on a couple of others and so then finally I just? I just couldn't wait. These are wonderful places that I'll visit multiple times in my life but That that that roughly was the idea As well as the flip side is after seeing so many ancient Roman ruins in North Africa. That have this kind of thinking. Why should I go to Italy and see the crowds? But you know that's just that's just one of the ten thousand different things that are fantastic by deadly to to go see show as a history buff. You mentioned Italy Turkey Greece. What's a highlight for you? Visiting those countries by all of all of the above. I mean it's it's just incredible. How you You could pretty pick pick any point on the map and see multiple layers of of incredible history I mean what I. I walked off the plane Lina in Milan. I had booked the trip like a week before last minute and I can only get one one ticket to the last temptation Or the Last Supper or the last supper painting and and I had like an hour and fifteen minutes from touchdown in Milan Malpensa to to getting getting getting in the door picked up a rental car drove as far as I could into the city abandoned the car where other people were illegally. Ugly parks hopped on the subway and guide in and saw that and and So Italy I've really I've really just started. I've been a bit in the North's I've I've seen the Vatican again but I haven't properly visited row. I've been around Sicily different territories in. It's it's just pick your pick your time in history Greece more specifically the ancient In the ancient era I mean I just gets it gets incredible to. You're just driving down the road and you see the road sign Its Tab obeys in the ancient Also known as thieves. And now it's just a a scruffy scruffy town but just pull off the road and spend the night there because these names out of history are incredible and and the answer Turkey Turkey. I took a A road trip from von the famous Lake van in the Armenian Indian churches in the East and drove all the way across the country The the more or less southern route through the Kurdish areas than around the Jian coast and So many eras of history from the first Essentially I city of multi-level housing and that goes back back. Thousands of years all the way up to the modern times. I mean it's just I just couldn't i. I had take UNESCO sites off the list because there's only so many you you can see in a day it's It's incredible and Turkey actually. has this fantastic museum pass system where you can get the countrywide one or you can get one. That's for a week league or are some regional ones arrest Boland's and the prices are so low and every mega site in the countries included. It's it's not like many countries where the tour pass includes everything except the one really must see

China Italy UN Turkey Asia Hong Kong China Hong Kong Minnesota Steffan Krzyzewski United States Shenzhen Greece Italy Turkey Greece Sicily East Timor Lake Van Stephan Italy Greece
Martini celebrates the festive season with a limited-edition Negroni chocolate collection created by Paul A. Young

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:23 min | 1 year ago

Martini celebrates the festive season with a limited-edition Negroni chocolate collection created by Paul A. Young

"The beloved Italian Coktail Negroni is one hundred years old this year and the Shuki pull a young has been asked by Martini to concoct brand new chocolate to mark the occasion. Well Uncles Ben. Ryland sat down with Paula. littler Elliot to talk about the creative and practical processes of marrying chocolate with such such a famous drink. Plus they enjoyed a little bit of tasting along the way I have the great privilege of being approached by fantastic brands And a half to love the brand and all I have to love the product that the brand of created and for me it has to be natural. Ashby pure and ask interesting. And I've known the Martini brand for for decades. I remember adverts in the nineteen eighties with a particular on roller skates. trae Martini and the any time any place. Any were to have a Martini so so it was. It was always a happy memory for me. So when they approach and said we've got these new reserve special and brought on Rubino for Moose my East pricked up because I'm not a beer drinker. Call volume alcohol drinker. Let one night champagne and spirits. But I like Negroni old-fashioned says bitter sweet flavors because you can have them over ice on their own stop blending them and for me. Obviously I have to blend into the chocolate. So the challenge for me was taking the two commutes on brought her which is a a number color and the Rabin which is this ruby color from youth and taste them dilute pair them with chocolate. Let's try and find a combination that celebrates negroni because the centenary celebration of Negroni without the chocolate distorting the flavors and characters in the botanical in the two Moose but also the vermouth are very complex. And they've got that distinct bitter sweetness to they can easily distort the chocolate as well so it was actually an opportunity for me to work with them on getting that balance. Absolutely right Let's take quite a long time. We always think about the delicacies Kasese that can go with a glass of wine for example. What it it's fairly common knowledge that certain foods should go with a glass of wine? Don't sit down to a lovely gloss of red wine and then and and then tuck into a box of chips not good idea that we often don't think about that same sort of methodology when it comes to pairing something something we chocolate. How do you know what goes well with chocolate? It's a really good question in two parts to it. When I when I first started in chocolate a quite few years I would be guilty? If you've ever analyzing and I think it it's the way some people take chocolate which is if you're doing it professionally or academically you do have to have a process of pinpointing and finding all of us delicate compounds flavors and tastes to the point where you're deciding whether this chocolate is fine. Quality with beans have been fermented well of picked well or and so on and so you really digging in Bolt for me when it comes down to it. I have to take it back to base level when I smell it smell texture to like the taste from beginning middle and end and Roy after the after taste does it work with ingredients and now you get people who will say what wine and chocolate hard to pair. I find it very easy to pair. That's because I've tasted a lot of chocolate and a lot of wine and I can think about those flavors starting out and you taste piece of chocolate. How would you know which one to pick their hundreds if not thousands of them on the shelf to boy Oy? It's really difficult and all I say is by and tastes and eat what you like. Try It if you think it doesn't work. You're probably right because you own your tongue on your taste spots. And if it pairs well great. An I have always with all my tastings and events set to people if you prefer eating or milk white or dark chocolate with a cup of tea fantastic few think it works for you. It probably does but when it comes down to do you like if you do great no matter what anybody else says because you a half to want to eat again and again and again I'm almost runner of the cadbury cream egg at with the woman dipping hurt chips into a cream egg. Yeah well salty and sweet is massive business. The chocolate industry tree lady is not as crazy as she looked. She has no But I I do have a box of beautiful chocolates in front of me and you just pulled me a gloss of the move which was very kind of you for this time of day. A little SIP exactly Tell me tell me first. What vermouth measuring? This has gone brought us. This is the amber colored very light fresh smell wise. I've got fruit and it has to me sympathy botanical. Medicinal that's not meant to be a negative Tiv- term. I remember as a child having buttercup Syrup as a medicine and Dundee Line serapis kind of things those botanical can pass over very successfully into a Moose yes and drinks and this has that element of bitter sweet to it which if you think about bittersweet flavor dark chocolate is bittersweet already got a really good foundation and having having having a taste It's light on the tongue but the aftertaste is really really long It's beautiful sweet as well. But not over not overpowering only switch cleverly made it very sweet not overly sweet at the beginning and then this kind of botanical bitter dryness comes in the end and the chocolate made with it is the blue and gold marbled finish which represents the best colors on the buttocks. It's a beautiful bottle. Ferry Italian design obviously and sticking with Martini brand absolutely. I think if you are familiar with the Martini a line of Vermouth e you probably would be impressed by this particular RESERVA SPATULA pull. Educate me on how I should be eating the chocolates with the truth. We've had a drink of Mussa. Still got the flavor. There have a bite of one of the chocolates list. It's the blue and gold when it has a very soft center of white chocolate. We've got some Bombay Sapphire Gin. We've the VERMOUTH in there. Got Some Madagascans chocolate. which is thought delicate fruity chocolate? And very little else the predominant ingredient in that is the vermouth because I wanted that flavor to to last on the tongue. And it's it's a gorgeous balance. The dark chocolate is just bitter sweet enough like the vermouth. Once you've had the first bite and it's melted and swallowed. I have a bit more. Vermouth just passed me. A A glass of Rabin now I suppose that means that well to be polite I would have to try some of this. You would have to try that one as well this array of full of flavor for me I get kind of a smell of time leaves and herb Leary is very very very smooth. A little a bit Rich in feeling flavor and that's represented in the chocolate as well. We've got that lovely Madagascar chocolate again. But they could nash the filling inside. I just heavier more full needs a bit more impact. Bit more strength to it. So it doesn't get lost in the Renault so now that we've had some of the redeem we should be tasting some of the chocolate or I'd have made the chocolates a half dome a very smooth surface and a dark chocolate can inside Very very different indeed this one. Yeah very dock inside and a much more pungent hit it take. It took a long time to find the right chocolates to work with the to the most because Kosta so complex for example. If you choose orange which I love chocolate and orange you instantly got. I honestly know which chocolate to put with it to get that nostalgic fail. I love chocolate orange. What this it was? Try again try again try again. It's absolutely fantastic. The opportunity to have something that is quite unusual all to work with both familiar. It's funny how I haven't had either the Vermouth to start with but the familiarity and some of the botanical in. I don't know where that's from. I'm from my many years past of tasting and eating but there is something in them and all my team who tried to. There's something in recognized but I don't know what it is. I think a lot of people might say I've I've never had vermouth on its own. I've had a Martini Shaken oster Martini or I've had it as a mix of had it in an aground. Have I had it with chocolate would would I tried it if it wasn't in the chocolate maybe not so my job and my responsibility is just to inspire people to try something different. Because that's what I've had the opportunity. It's due to create the chocolates. I think you've done very well. Thank you so much. That was really

Trae Martini Negroni Rabin Italian Coktail Negroni Rubino Ashby Kasese Ryland Cadbury Paula. Littler Elliot Bombay Sapphire Gin ROY Dundee Line Madagascar Herb Leary Mussa Kosta Nash One Hundred Years Milk
Fantasy, Meet Reality: A Running Back Breaks Out, Then Disappears

NFL Live

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Fantasy, Meet Reality: A Running Back Breaks Out, Then Disappears

"Liz Merrill is a senior writer for ESPN. So we're doing a package on one one hit wonders. And he editors thought who'd be better to sort of headline this but Jonas Gray story it's been about five five years. Since his breakout game. It was November sixteenth. Two thousand fourteen. What happened on that day? New England would've gone through one of those September's which everyone in Britain them off. You know they've lost that Miami in the opening game and then they went to Kansas City and just got clobbered and then to patriots form. They rattled off five wins. And they're back to their dominating cells. Broody leads US Patriots into town to the Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday night. Football how Michael Smith game was a Sunday night football game and it was a highly anticipated anticipated game because it was a rematch of that year's divisional round game tonight. It's Andrew Lock Against Tom. Brady get your calculators out. There should be really default to rescue teams. Both come off by weeks. There's a cave named Jewish graves is making star back to the ground. This this is Jonas Gray Gray to the thirty yard line. You know. It's amazing what nobody knew was except for people in very inner struggles of New England And he actually had a really impressive training camp and Bella check had told him. You know you're so close to making the roster oster but they didn't activate them until mid October when Steven Ridley towards ACL this guy he wasn't uh-huh regular starter at Notre Dame. He was on the practice squad until three weeks ago. So his mom and his brother drove about three hundred miles from mm-hmm where they lived outside of Detroit. The Game Jonas at the time was living in a one bedroom apartment and this modest area outside of Boston Austin on the very bare bones and the only tickets. He could really sport. His family. Were in the nosebleed seats. They're ZEHR watching the game. There's all this anticipation there's nerve block white with Michelle. Give the gray runs. Between Guard and center white. He pushes to the end zone. Owed go to spray has a touchdown patriots. He's scores his first touchdown and his mom is like okay. I'll clap. I'm I'm pretty exciting. This is so awesome. So she's Kinda cool about it in cash and then you know he's course again and then we. He scores his third touchdown. I get the great lowers the coders running. It was more a touchdown his she drops to a knee in like complete. You know amazement and just so older well that you know for kids. It's finally getting a chance. And then Jonas Gray Mix Histories Iowa thing for two hundred one yards and four touchdowns give give the pig right. He runs a lot he for the Patriots. Schoolyard can't stop. Stop it so Jonas Gray erupts. He has this once in a lifetime. Performance how does he react. After the game he'd reaction was pretty wide. I I mean I think that's one of the things that made the story so endearing it because he was just like holy cow. Here's Glock like celebrating Alabama with me. Here's Tom Brady headbutting. Me All the stuff that you see in the movies really you know the thing you know. act like he's been there I mean and he did act like you've been there but inside he was completely awash. You know in all of the surprise and the joy and there was sort of that moment where from Michelle Foia talks to him. They had the traditional interview with the Star of the game. Let's turn to John Ray. Yeah Guy who didn't hear his name before you're going to be hearing it a lot. We heard it many times tonight and he's doing nervous. I mean there's a guy who graduated with a degree in English and he did stand up comedy already in college. So you know. She knew his way around the microphone but she didn't know what he's GonNa say touchdowns the first four of your NFL career on at this stage had explain this performance. I'm just blessed. Blessed beyond belief we put together a great game plan. They hammered in all week. She watched this for so long. Keep Watch Tom Brady. And GRONK and company and Julia Nettleton on TV. It was just one of those things where you just couldn't believe all this is happening. Someone one of those guys men are probably go home tonight and get back. I'll probably just lay in bed. Look up in the ceiling. Just just astonished man. What's going on? Aw Right in a great story man. God's helping

Jonas Gray Patriots Michelle Foia Jonas Gray Gray Tom Brady New England Andrew Lock Liz Merrill Football Andrew Luck Espn Britain Notre Dame Writer Indianapolis Colts Boston Detroit John Ray Miami Oster
This star moving at hyperdrive-speeds was spat out from our black hole

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

09:56 min | 1 year ago

This star moving at hyperdrive-speeds was spat out from our black hole

"Of the ticket a style that's being flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy Alexey at a record breaking speed of six million kilometers per hour by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre a report in the monthly notices the Roll Economical Society claims. The unfortunate star was sent on its course through gravitational dads with secretaries ace tax more than five million years ago the style which is now some twenty nine thousand light years from Earth is traveling some ten times faster the most stars in the Milky Way including the son in fact. It's moving so fast. I believe the Milky Way in about one hundred million years never to return one of the study's authors emeritus professor Gary that cost us from the Australian National University. Says is the stars encounter with a black hole occurred at a time when humans were first learning to Walk Upright. He says in astronomical terms star will be leaving galaxy fairly sued and will likely travel through the emptiness of intergalactic space for eternity the Milky Way central supermassive black hole secretaries a star has some four four point three million times the mass of our Sun. It's located some twenty six thousand light years away in the direction of the Constellation secretaries authors discovered discovered this hapless style while using the three point nine meter anglo-australian telescope at the siding Spring Observatory to search for the shorted remains of small galaxies orbiting. The Milky Way is part of the southern Stella Stream Spectroscopy survey follow up observations within made with the A and US two point three minute telescope confirming the stars. Extreme speed did the customer and colleagues then trace the Star's journey back to its point of origin in the Galactic Center. It's this must have originally been in a binary system with a companion star and this system ventured too close to the black hole secretaries ace ta which then captured one of the Stars Too Close Orbit or sling shutting the other one out of the system custom and very high speed. DACOSTA says it's great to be able to confirm thirty or prediction. That stars really can be flying out of a galaxy by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. I'm part of it. The national team that is using the anglo-australian telescope to get philosophies and abundances for stars in stellar streams the stuff streams Remnants of small galaxies have been ripped apart as they fall into is advertised on potential and by studying them we can learn about the distribution of doc mattering our galaxy for example but for every field. We don't necessarily have a complete set of targets for the thought so we used the other spare fathers to look at potentially other stars of interest and we found this stuff. That's has a velocity moving away from us as over a thousand cuomo specific and that was very unexpected and exciting discovery. Picked your interest in other words very much so Particularly the stars brought enough that the European Guy Satellite Commissioner a very accurate promotion. The motion in the plight of the sky is distinct from emotional life on us when we combine that with the observed. A lot of thoughts. Lusty you can trace Ashley Orbit back in time. And the orbit. Effect Exactly intersects with the center of the Galaxy. So we're very sure that this does being flung long out of the standard of the galaxy matches a prediction for a long time. Now that's been massive. Black Holes will blackouts. Generally I guess under the right circumstances weren't gobble Lapa Adventures too close but will in fact fling it out. That's right. There was a piper written first by Jack Hills in not an idea actually before four the Central Collin Galaxy was really well established in which he predicted it. If a binary star got too close to the central by call one of the stars would be absorbed in towards the blackhall. The other one would get a lot of energy be flung out of the center of the Galaxy and bicycling escape from galaxy completely. And that's what we're saying here. This really is the the first time that we've been definitively established that this high-velocity star doesn't affect have its origin at the center of the Galaxy. What do you know about this star? Well we know that it's Relatively young it's about two and a half times the mess of some. It's likely to be quite rich in chemical elements because the Santa Pod Aug- Aleksey is where the overall about this is about effective two times higher than it is in the local neighborhood so it's caught rich but With a massive about two and a half times orange the lofty that is traveling at its guide to escape from the Galaxy and hit off into it elected spice which is a very empty place. What does one cool is star in integrated space? I know if we have a planet outside our solar system. It's a rogue planet but what what is it aerobic style. I guess you'd call. It is a collective star. The the volume of spice outside of galaxies is very very empty. So you know you have a very small population of stars walk. These escaped from galaxies and and They'd be very hard to find. It's not the first high-speed contended that has been detected that appears to be living galaxy. Isn't no that's right nine for some Almost addicted I guess that there are these high-velocity stars that appear to be skyping galaxy in fraction of which appear to be coming from the center of the Galaxy. But this is the very first one where we've got precise enough to seminar of the top of the star to absolutely verify that it's coming from the center of the Galaxy hasn't been given head log number yet or a name. It has the rather prosaic name S. five because as five is the Stream survey project we're involved with And then it's it should be s one high-velocity star number one. I guess with the expectation that we might find more to me about the survey that you guys have been doing. This is really exciting. Isn't it looking at. The shredded remains a small galaxies opening the Milky Way. That's right It's actually a very good example of international collaboration. There's a team in the US that uses what's called the doc energy like camera on the former telescope in Chile. But let's you image lodge areas in the sky and they've infect done quite deep suv. I of the Southern Hemisphere Scott and in that imaging serve I I discovered of order a dozen of these streams where we believe these a AH small galaxies. That have been disrupted but you need to take spectroscopy of the stock is to get the philosophies in the abundances and the anglo-australian telescope with its two degree field spectograph spectograph lets you observe up to four hundred dollars at a time and that is a unique facility in terms of its field of view. A numbers fathers in the astronomical world so the US imaging imaging people have collaborated with star stone of his experts in fava spectroscopy to measure that. He's sort of these streams and You know serendipity can sometimes what can you fight or wait. Found this This particular stop by studying these still streams. This must be telling you a lot about the origins of the Milky Way Galaxy itself and how it's grown over Giga Giga us. Yes you're exactly right The the standard Theory of how the Milky Way is come into existence as had lots of galaxies Small galaxies full in get disrupted and then contribute. This does to the highlands of the disk of the galaxy in that process. We can try and map out. What the distribution of mass in our galaxy is by understanding the orbits of these streams in the galaxy get disrupted some of the stars get energy energy and move ahead than some of the stars lose energy in full behind? That's probably the other way around And so you. The whole thing gets strung out as a string of beat effectively and by studying the motions of streams we can actually see things like the influence of the lodge measuring like cloud as it comes by our galaxy. It's extra gravity. It disturbs the orbits of streams. and Are we seeing a lot of stuff from secretaries to office will run the other side that well it's been gobbled up. Now's well isn't it. That's that's right. I mean. The Sagittarius Stream was the first example of this Process with off. Galaxies falling in and being disrupted I guess it's Probably twenty. He's ago I guess it was in twenty five years since it was discovered and that is the archetypal example. The core of the galaxy is near the center of a Galaxy Galaxy. There's a stream of stars advice that goes across the hall. Scott now Sagittarius is was originally much more massive system than the small systems. That are just being disrupted the streams of West studying but it does just show that this process goes on Sagittarius. What in fact its own set of costs that guide to be added to the Hanover? The galaxy wants to sides of terrorists. System is completely disrupted with globular clusters. Can you tell the difference between a glove class. Sta and the center of a shredded galaxy. See that's very good question There are a few Gobert. COST IS GONNA cost is have constant abundance of elements it's like on and calcium Others but there are a few classes like a Centauri which is readily visible in the summer sky where there was a big range inch in the chemical elements like Nelson on from star to star. And it's certainly been suggested that Those cover costs as well. You see a heavy element abundance range by well obtained the former nucleus off galaxies. Pain disrupted our listeners are way normally globular cluster. oster is a tight ball of thousands if not millions of stars which originally formed together at the same time in the same molecular gas and dust cloud but when you see globular clusters crossed with stars of very different MILICIA's very different compositions. That's the telltale sign you're talking about. Exactly yes yes. In fact we have an example inside serious various the The there's a classical m fifty four which is a very luminous go cost which is right at the center secretaries and in fact does have a Ryan the elephants. So that's almost smoking guns or the Saudi.

United States Central Collin Galaxy Galactic Center Spring Observatory Stella Stream Australian National University Galactic Centre Roll Economical Society Dacosta Cuomo Gary Professor Lapa Adventures Commissioner Pain Jack Hills
Sondland detailed 'quid pro quo' in amended testimony filed this week, transcript shows

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Sondland detailed 'quid pro quo' in amended testimony filed this week, transcript shows

"Oster sunland testimony came with a remarkable addendum. That just yesterday. He changed his story on one of the main questions. At the heart of this he came in and told you. Just tell if I've got this right as far as I can tell. He came in and told you a couple of weeks ago basically. Yeah there was a quid pro quo in terms of there being a White House meeting for the new Ukrainian president that he wasn't going to get that unless they pursued these investigations. I didn't really know. What the investigations were? But yeah. That was the quid pro quo when it comes to military aid no I would never be involved in that now. He's admitting yes. There was was a quid pro quo for military aid and yes he was involved in it and he said that after ambassador Taylor's Opening statement was released ambassador. Taylor said that ambassador Sunland told him everything's on the table. It's not only the meeting at the White House. It's also the military assistance in in Rachel. If all the president did was asked the president of Ukraine to to investigate his political opponent that would be an abuse of power but he did much worse he leveraged the White House meeting in three hundred and ninety one million dollars in taxpayer dollars and I have a different take though ambassador. Sure sunland where people are really beating them up for his original statement and that's really for prosecutors to determine what that means but investigations. It's often times the case that people will want to do the right thing and tell the truth and I think it's important that if other witnesses have not been truthful to us or not come in. Because they've they've been told to not do that. We should give them the space to do the right thing especially before These public hearings. Let me ask you something. That's kind of a part hypothetical about that. When I was looking at ambassador Sunland testimony today? Particularly this revision. He still insists that he has no idea why the military aid was withheld have held or who did it at the same time. Your Committee also released the seventy five pages of text messages in which we see ambassador. sunlen being directly really informed by Bill Taylor that was holding up the military aid per the president. And so he still telling you as of today in his revised statement statement. I don't know who did it. With withholding military aid. We can see him respond in real time on his phone to being told that the president was doing that he responds to that. By saying I'm all over it as as if all work on it so if it turns out that these witnesses are lying to you even if they're not trying to but they are lying to you should they expect that there will be some consequences offenses that for them not just in terms of how it plays for the President's defense I'm sure a Department of Justice that actually cares about what happened here. Not Bill Bars Department of Justice will look at the truthfulness of witnesses but again this early in the investigation. I do think it's common you see. People evolve oftentimes people. There's just some facts that witnesses is will even if they know it they'll have a close hold on it. Fortunately here ambassador Solomon's not the only one that proves that there was knowledge that the security assistance was being withheld. We have other witnesses witnesses that no that was going on. We've heard that in public statements and we can prove that in other west

Ambassador Taylor President Trump Sunland Oster Sunland Ambassador Solomon White House Department Of Justice Rachel Ukraine Ninety One Million Dollars
Predators Sign Captain Roman Josi to Eight-Year Contract

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Predators Sign Captain Roman Josi to Eight-Year Contract

"It's ESPN and ice but yes for ESPN talks about hockey I'm grateful NHL Writer I'm Emily Kaplan National Nhl reporter indeed you are so today the big finally get some actual hockey news talk about other than like injuries and stuff the Nashville predators call the press conference today like everybody be at the arena like eleven thirty 'cause we got a lot of things to talk about Oh what could it be could it be everybody knew immediately was the Roman you'll see extension eight years the Max nine point zero five nine for number fifty nine on the for this contract making Roman Yo see the third highest paid defensemen via the CAP heading into next season behind only Eric Carlson Andrew he is twenty nine currently will be turning thirty on June first of next year so emily we think of this contract firstly after talk about this trend this is the NHL trend. I feel of the last eighteen months when you sign a new contract it has to have some owed to your Jersey number in it and it's just ridiculous to me it's too cutesy it doesn't make any sense I don't know if the players leaving money on the table I'm not the team is like besides looking cute and a press release what is the purpose I will say this as well kind of a beat trend when you consider that Wayne Gretzky's numbers retired or all around the league and no one can ninety nine ninety nine it'd be the number I would use if you're going to pull the contract mullarkey that's for sure but I look I think that Roman Yosi over the last couple of years I've been one of the most consistent and best defencemen in the League he's a guy that we should be talking about enormous conversations probably over the next two to three years that's what level is at the most shocking part about it to me is the no movement clause because that is something that David Poile infamously does not give out here and Piranha or the only guys on the roster who have it and you mentioned his age he's about to turn thirty of this brings him to what thirty nine years old we're at a time where hey the blackhawks are playing the predators tonight on Tuesday recording this and we're talking about thirty four year old Brent seabrook halfway through his contract with a new movement clause that is looking pretty bad and getting scrapped for the second straight day and I don't think that Romeo who's on that same exact trajectory but we see why these things do become troublesome down the road right so doughty's contract was thirteen point eight four percent of the cap when he signed it trying to or Carlson's contract when he signed his this past summer accounted for fourteen point four seven percent of the cap and then Romeo Issues contract is eleven point one you percent of the cavs so greg numbers you get the sense that that's often couch come on what am I I always I always I was wave past math in high school I went in the back of the book copy down every a answer every lake odd-numbered question had the answer and then just a bunch of nonsense on top of it and hope that was right and if I was right like my goal was like a seventy five just get me through it did what I could so get degrees get the feeling that this this salary this is for the contract probably settles in around this much it's down from where the Romans camp was looking for they wanna like nine five it probably settles in around here because partially because of the trade protection that's that's a hell of a caveat from Poi- like you said and and because of it you know this this number on the open market is over ten I think for a defense of his of his vision Ilk we've been talking a lot about Albatross lately insofar as him being a Ufa and you know these kinds of guys don't become available when you look at a team like for apple like the Vegas Golden Knights like we've talked about for the things Golden Knights are loaded up front they've got a goalie they don't have a foundational defensive another Blue Line there's don't Roman he's one expert says one both these guys could have been available summer now one of them's off the market and you've got to pay for that so yes the term is frightening because like you said Brent seabrook cautionary tale right absolutely frightening term on this I will note that according to cap friendly the the contract is structured with all a bunch of signing bonus money in the first four years so all the way until twenty four when he'll be turning like thirty four right so that's just a little note little caveat no signing bonus money for the last four years and you know just there are ways to get around things but for the moment eight years over nine million dollars for one of the best defense in the League and the predators obviously if you look at the ages on that oster the next four years of very important

NHL Eric Carlson Andrew Espn Emily Kaplan Hockey Nashville Reporter Writer Four Years Eight Years Nine Million Dollars Eight Four Percent Four Seven Percent Thirty Nine Years Thirty Four Year Eighteen Months Three Years
Text Message from Boeing Employes in 2016 Reveals Awareness of Deadly Problems in 737 Planes

Airplane Geeks Podcast

07:24 min | 1 year ago

Text Message from Boeing Employes in 2016 Reveals Awareness of Deadly Problems in 737 Planes

"I item comes from the Washington Post this text messages show Boeing Employees New in two thousand sixteen of problems that turned deadly on these seven three seven Max there's a number of good articles on this John oster Our has one from the air current that's new document and seven three seven Max investigation point is to chaos and pressure in M s development so the continuing saga in two thousand sixteen there were some text messages from Boeing's at the time chief technical pilot for the seven three seven writing to another technical pilot and he said that the canoeing characteristics augmentation system the M CASS was engaging quote itself like crazy and he called the problem agreed Gis Soho these kinds of well seemingly damning e mails text messages and so forth I don't know Max I find these kind of difficult to interpret at times because it's it's kind of hard to tell it taken out of context and and also you know one employee will write to another employee in ways that they wouldn't if they knew that these we're going to be published in the wall Ashington Post to the New York Times yes and I think the thing that really makes this a little bit more damning as that he continued his tex-mex Pigeon said so I basically lied to the regulators parentheses unknowingly and I guess the reply was something along the lines of it wasn't ally no one told us that was the case I don't quite understand the second part of that the yes I think probably Boeing has their legal department has probably come out said no more text messaging stop stop you know we're obviously seeing that in other places in the news or text messages are now becoming you know quoted and so on and I think a lot of people just think hey it's a private conversation nobody but us are on this and it's like no folks that is stored sadly it is available for discovery and when the lawyer start looking for it they're gonNA fight it and I think they're just it's like social media you know tell folks kids don't publish stuff it's got to be the same thing it's like when you're texting make sure you texts very carefully that's right that's right many corporations actually have training on good email and now texting etiquette if you will or best practices in one of the things is it they'll tell you is don't say anything or put anything down on paper or write anything that you wouldn't want to see in the front page of the newspaper because one day that's exactly where it may turn up and it's not that you're being trained to cover something up it's just you need to think before you make statements that you figure will be kept private another aspect of this recent revelation he is that apparently Boeing knew about these but only just recently provided the to the FAA so they're a little bit displeased with Boeing for having waited waiting so long for these one of the article says that yes in a letter to Boeing's chief executive Dennis Muilenburg that the F. A. A. Administrator said I expect your explanation immediately so the phase not too happy with Boeing on this particular development. Well and the the you know the interesting thing is that they say that the tone was set early in the messages when the same gentleman texted I'm locked in my hotel room with an ice cold grey goose and I think we can assume he's not talking about a bird because I'll probably fire off a few inappropriate emails before I call it a night yeah no kidding and the person he was is a texting with said something about had he accomplished anything in the flight simulator quote or what is the normal chaos there in another one message was I'd ask for a job in sales just get paid to drink with customers and lie about how awesome our airplanes are like oh my gosh it's just not the stuff that you want to see in the front page of the newspaper no and it may just be horsing around I mean some of it not not all of it but it sure looks bad now apparently C. O. Dennis Muilenburg is meeting with directors and senior electives has we record this basically in San Antonio for a regularly scheduled board meeting in that's going to occur over the course of a couple of days here and I I don't know what we'll learn from that or what result from that we'll see if anything but that's but that's coming up but Muhlenberg is also scheduled to appear before Congress the House transportation infrastructure Berkshire Committee on October thirtieth so that's coming up in and there's also a Senate hearing that may take place on the twenty ninth or it may take place after the House hearing on the thirtieth this is all coming from anonymous sources people didn't want to commit to this because it's not really can firmed but this is what the reports are so that'll be another very interesting event you can bet the Congress people will have some very pointed questions for me Lemberg at those those hearings well I think the seven three seven Max story is the gift that just keeps on giving I mean if you're funny comedians would be using this every night on the news it's not funny it's really Kinda Sad I think points to a lot of you know kind of breakdowns at many points in the process certainly within Boeing and perhaps to some extent within the the FAA end. I really am optimistic that we're all going to be better for this I think the people said Oh well people want to fly the seven three seven Max well of course they will this'll be the safest plane in the sky time people get through this recertification process so you could make an argument that that's the only plan you should fly Sir certification is completely because presumably those planes will never ever crash again because they've been going over with a fine tooth comb so I think this is a a sad chapter in a long story with Boeing and hopefully they'll move on quickly to a new happier at chapter and continue with a long term success always had I hope so and of course the longer it goes on in the morning expensive gets there's a Bloomberg article that says that these delays and getting this plane into service of cost Boeing least get this eight point four billion dollars so I obviously as time goes on the cost keeps going up

Boeing Washington Post C. O. Dennis Muilenburg San Antonio FAA Bloomberg Congress Muhlenberg Berkshire Committee Senate Four Billion Dollars One Day
"oster" Discussed on Tales From Helheim

Tales From Helheim

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Tales From Helheim

"Okay so I start off with this is true anyway oster by saying

oster
"oster" Discussed on Amy Schumer Presents: 3 Girls, 1 Keith

Amy Schumer Presents: 3 Girls, 1 Keith

14:29 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Amy Schumer Presents: 3 Girls, 1 Keith

"Discovery Park Mgm. The newest resort and the center of the Las Vegas Strip enjoy powerhouse artists like lady Gaga and Bruno Mars in the intimacy of Park Theatre and indulgent Luke Samuel Better than the or if I'm going to have smoke salmon like I might as well do cocaine because razor August and so and so then I started doing a lot of research since actually any negative consequences and I and I want to do it like why is that you're stopping living breathing human being but y'all tech when you're pregnant no because I didn't have to I four yeah bill at Applebee's you make the women's split it is carrying your child so anyway anyway her twice no it's early in the podcast so basically look at I look at data so I look at like studies which compare the AP's of kids whose MOMS drink like a little bit to kids whose MOMS don't drink at all in Mosul from Europe actually it's very hard to do in the US because people lie because social sanctions are are kind of severe and also the the US actually has sort of different drinking behavior where a lot of people don't drink at all in some people got yeah and so it's sort of hard to when you start talking about people are drinking during pregnancy they're much more likely to be drinking wikileaks to this sort of social like occasional like a half a glass of wine three times a week is like more common in European data and when you look there and you say let's compare kids whose MOMS drank a little ticket touts moms didn't drink at all like the outcomes are like the same if anything actually deuce MOMS drink a little bit tend to do better blue selection that's true I think I mean obviously oh I think I think it's because they're used to people you give them an inch and they take them Lyles Rincon they're being cautious but people said that mean dodgers that explicitly like I don't WanNa say it's okay to happen one but like because I think people have three but I think that's that's a little bit of a tricky line because if you tell people like absolutely never have any and then they have a little or they're like well you know I might as well just have like a lot of it because like I like whatever it lets you it was the the fear really excessive there's a there's this Alcohol Syndrome which is sort of a constellation of physical and mental complications I think at this there's this sort of intermediate which is basically about differences in Iq okay so hang said what I was saying well were you saying if you if you wanted right and a Lotta Times going to if you WANNA drink that bad you on more than likely my data shows me uh-huh drink more than one you know more than what you should drink an award that's what I'm really useless for the next twenty minutes in this season we're trying to mealy R Kelly care no I mean I think there is this sort of like luke fetishism thing around pregnancy where like you want you want to have what is best for your baby and I think the people sort of two there's a market in advice the more rules there are people are searching for rules too so it's like oh I can ten more roles than ten more annoying things you can't do or whatever and I think there's also becomes this thing that's like here's all this stuff I'm giving up for maybe like I you know it's my full you know gonna like do all this stuff we're going to show that I'm going to be a good mom is like by following like a lot of what kind of mother you are through instagram right Ah we'll keep you philosophy that everybody should have a backup kid can you tell us about the kids hiding in a cupboard right can't have just one kid well cases if you only have one kid then that kid gets a you know he's bad I just do the right thing you can have a kid does so it's like four months and then also thirteen more okay well I think we should pounded or pass Oh yeah do you wanna pound or do you want.

Discovery Park Mgm lady Gaga Las Vegas Strip Luke Samuel Bruno Mars Park Theatre cocaine twenty minutes four months
"oster" Discussed on Amy Schumer Presents: 3 Girls, 1 Keith

Amy Schumer Presents: 3 Girls, 1 Keith

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Amy Schumer Presents: 3 Girls, 1 Keith

"Okay sure your podcast I tried really hard this morning so that's where I'm coming from Oh I know oh you give me a break kief on and you feel bad for me I'm having a really tough state been yelling at a lot of people lately no I have not been yelling I yelled at two people yesterday were texting during Colin Quinn's show they deserve that up to sit in in an audience of any sort of a live show and text can I ask maybe concerts questions about this sure were they sitting right in front of you not directly from me but in front of the people in front of me so were they like really in your view yeah watching the show yeah or did you seek this out James Question listen as soon as Collins had put your phones way Amy Detective Nope jumped into not simply action I wish there were at my friend and watch his amazing show and then these too dumb twice let's can you still sage what are you can say twice bosses on the list it's on the there were just texting and that's so rude and someone who did a Broadway show and I would stop my own show and yell at this stage was anybody ever there when I yelled one percents like sucking on a scotch or something and you stop to lecture the middle of the bullet wasn't when you open a whether it's so quiet and show and someone like leave you know who loves workers because of his generation opens every little crease in aware there's you on some keep keep keep up I wanted to watch the show was really I mean like you're being honest me that it was just this drive too I wanna watch the show or was there an opportunity to rectify tiny justice I don't know what you're insinuating Kevin Was it fun to yell in their dumb faces to get off their phones sure sure and what did you say because that's the best part off your phone police offers some off your off your phones take an Texan Anything taking pictures of Colin which was which they were texting the pictures I saw the people all around them were upset too it wasn't just my ask anyway the one that said something do something dot org type bitch UH anyway it's hot in here and I am a everyone knows there's no bra happening today wherever can't wear brown you're pregnant is what I read it's a law it's the law speaking of the laws of pregnancy yes we have an incredibly esteemed guests this is our second Harvard grabbed that we've had on this podcast which is size me no not Harvard Day Camp we've Dr the emily oster on professor thank you so much for doing this thank you for having me I'm very excited you don't regret it already no not yet okay cool still time she is an economist and she after Harvard what you've taught at brown I teach him around now okay the way that I discovered emily was I am in the third trimester of a hellish pregnancy even privileged I'm having a very hard time and the best man that was bridget singing it's no picnic for anybody else either one thousand I'm Dick Anyway I was recommended her book expecting better this book really changed my pregnancy for me and has been just shining light on the truth and debunking the myths and just it's a fact based look pregnancy with the information that we have and I'm just so grateful professor emily oster everybody thank you can you tell us what as you great this book sure so I got pregnant that's basically I'm so sorry yeah and actually have much nicer than you and you know I think I had this experience like a lot of women who are like us have which is like I'm used to being in control like control a lot what do you mean weird and then then it was like all of a sudden it was like there was not controlling and there were a lot of a lot of judgment and a lot of rules and I didn't like that equally with the medical stuff I kind of got into like okay well you're telling me to do this but like Cup like why you like I think when I went to Mike my first pre visit like ten weeks or something like on the way out they like ran out for me and they were like oh by the way like here's this piece of paper with all the things you shouldn't do okay and two pages as you know and it's like all of these things and they're they're not ranked it's like don't smoke or do cocaine also know Salmon's okay like but surely like pretty close to the the stuff that do my job because even though I'm communist and not a doctor is people have pointed out what economists do you know like the Fed the Fed is at a bar is a bar I don't know the Fed what's the Fed Keith the Fed is who always argues with right now that does that limiting factor look how quick. Emily knew that Keith was full of US economists education and new no position yourself perfectly because she's slightly pivoted to everyone off to Italy as a as a smart economist would that Eh Communists and ninety four to ninety eight you were what in ecommerce through ninety nine thousand four hundred ninety eight economists yes ninety eight day wall what my day like I can tell you right now okay so you teach everybody wow okay great now what I predict this is my prediction there will be a recession in twenty twenty okay anyway take time can you just tell us what the Fed is it also you're the second Harvard Grad who trashed Keith within an inch of his life we know so the federal guys that monetary policy so like the guys who decide what the interest rates should be so they tell you what okay so that's like one kind of economics and hi actually do a different kind of economics it was probably not a good segue into what we got the trash we of course is very important but you know basically economic study of human behavior so we try to understand why people behave the way that they do and so most of my like academic work is about trying to use data who understand why people make healthy choices the way that they do so like why don't people eat more vegetables why don't they exercise more I can answer those right now study looked at my research people don't like to do that stuff anyway so most of my job involves using using data to try to to think about relationships you have like meetings and stuff a lot of meaning many meetings three meetings so I think what everyone is most interested in and I would guess like pregnant women they're like immediately like can I drink I've had a couple of glasses of wine since I've been pregnant but it doesn't taste the same it doesn't the toy no this baby's not mine but I'll comes up all the time spent a lot of time on on that and basically saying can you know you shouldn't have a lot lot as bad but having Can you say what a lot is to bridget because actually needs I don't know what if your hands simple bottle of wine glasses now what if it's read it like one in one small glass day in the second melon flavored mad dog were asking for a friend everybody says oh my parents or my mom smoked and drank when she was you know so what's the difference so a lot of the kinds of bad things could happen are not something that would always happen yeah and so you were looking at like probabilities of bad things and it is true for sure that kids whose MOMS drink a lot I do have a hard time early in ties scan my attention span isn't good and I do sometimes the bed could be because my mother drank good water station does she drank scotch like maybe that's that could've been it I have a problem with I'm GonNa tell you what the problem is desk keys beef that people wanNA drink that bad that the Assis Quechuan not drink phenomenon the the attitude that I think is very frustrating because he's like well of course if this is like good for my for my baby like if this is important from a baby of course it would be fine not to do this but if it if it doesn't have.

Emily US Keith Italy ninety eight day ten weeks
Man Behind the Camera

Bon Appetit Foodcast

11:40 min | 1 year ago

Man Behind the Camera

"All right so this is your second time with the pot getting our concern Osama veteran okay known at the table. No crunchy snacks crunchy snacks. No no shaking of the coffee ice loud. There are months where like weeks will go by. We're I'm like how am I literally. Don't know where your I will not have seen you for two weeks. Yeah that is basically the story of my life. Sometimes I don't even know where I am. I'll wake up hotel. Mike Oh yeah no. I'm in Appleton Wisconsin. Oh No oh now I'm in San Antonio Texas. Yeah I mean we talk about a few issues in your job in general but in our travel issue that came on May so you you shot almost the entire feature will yeah does may two thousand nineteen you were in Beirut with Andy Burgundy tracked and then you I'm just flip through the pages then you were in Taipei with Suli and also burgundy and Andy any wanted to tag on everything so that was a big photo portfolio of yours your shot in Allison Rome in spring break menu story that was just in New York yeah that was here in the building the buildings that was as basic recipe story and then you shot photos for our red sauce America package which brought you. Where did you go for this one? Oh man that was a lot. I think that was six cities L. A. L. A. Philly New Orleans. Oh my God. Where did I go? I mean you literally can't remember yeah I it was like four to five cities. I guess my first question is I think a lot of fans of yours. WanNa know like how do you end up as a staff dog for at a food magazine like whenever someone asked me about this is I'm the worst possible personnel asked because it's purely luck and circumstance stance and my only goal and still the only like hey just don't get fired and spend closing up on your six and I still get asked to come back every day and there were definitely moments early on we're Alex pollick grocer artificial photo department critic Blake. I'M GONNA kill Lau a huge mistake so you start off as an intern turn years ago yeah. That's my freshman year of college. I just wanted to do something with my life and not just go home for the summer to California and you know Oh bummer and my parents house so I wanted to find an internship and I've always had a fascination with the magazine world apply too much internships. Nobody got got back to me in like a week. Before summer started. I saw a posting for esquire magazine to be a fashion closet intern. Oh and I was like that sounds cool. That sounds way out of my reach. I am hugely under qualified for that but I'M GONNA shoot my shot and Michael Steph. who was the fashion assistant at the time got back to me? He's like when can you come in based on what oh it. Did you have background. It was the most underqualified letter ever. It was basically hey. Here's my resume. I was a lifeguard in high school. I was a high school tutor and I intern at the State House in Massachusetts in politics nothing related to magazines but I really love menswear and here's like my favorite menswear blogs and here's my favorite brands brand's. I like fashion. I can work hard and he got back to me. Can I just say that. I am a lot of times when I talked to young people who are just out of college in their writing you you know letters to inquire about a job and they read like they're written by a law firm. I'm always like learning be yourself. Be passionate sort of expose yourself so to speak but that's what's GonNa grab some somebody's attention one hundred. I think the way I showed her. The letter wasn't like the formerly hi my name's dogs home. Hey My name's Alex. I'm really excited about this. I know him not meant for this Gig but I will do whatever it takes gap and so forth and they took a chance on me and that kind of was my segue into the New York City magazine publishing world and it turns out having square on your resume. Just opens opens up a lot of doors but it was great. It was just my eighteen years old. I didn't get paid but I got to see how magazines work I've got to be on fashion shoots Justin Timberlake Lake and Ryan Gosling and wow poll like hold fourteen thousand dollar jackets and look it Nick Sullivan whose whose the editor in chief at the time Grainger David David David grange just like talk shop and like this is amazing. This is legendary and that made me really WANNA stick with it yeah very recall okay so internship at esquire. How then does that lead you to be a so after that? I was convinced that I wanted to stay in publishing. Look fashion. menswear ended up at Nylon guys Juku for a little bit complex four pins so I was very very much in that circuit as an intern just doing minimal intern work but after a couple of years I was just like this is not really what's my angle here. I don't WANNA be stylus. I don't WanNa be a fashion writer. The idea of being a photographer and fashion was just you know. I didn't even sit down. That's not going to happen so after this is my third yes approaching my third year of college. I A Internet a bunch of or apply uh-huh bunch of other internships again. Nobody got back to me. Despite actually this I'm being off and having a lot of magazines in Monroe oster I applied to like yeah a a couple of mags won't be noted but they're they're. They're okay. They just get back. I mean I saw a posting for bone apetite photo internship and I was like I know nothing nothing about food. I like pictures. I took photo classes in high school and college. So how active a photographer were you at this point. It's like I'm not active. I don't know I took a lot of fissures in high school. I had my own flicker account. I you were you were you were definitely interested. We're sitting at least and I took pictures of the school paper and stuff like that. I I was a you know an avid hobbyist as major so do you did you come in an interview like what God you the job ultimately so I went in again. It's always like a last minute. Call in showed up from Boston and I met with Jake. Ramoser are former photo assistant and he he gave me a talk. Hey so turn yeah. It looks like you've worked a lot of magazines. you have zero photo experience and you have zero food experience so you're pretty underqualified but honestly the only person here that's interviewed. That's worked at large publications so we're GonNa go with you. So that was basically it was it was Bazeley. Hey you're you've worked at reputable places so we'll hire yeah. I do think that's interesting interesting career wise like over the years. I've worked at James Beard Foundation in Time Out New York and the food's severe than G. Q. Got more fashion thing that came back to food. I was a sports writer in college like it is you can move around and I think one thing that editors employers look for is that you do have experience in in a particular field and that you know how to get stuff done that you know under you understand what the industry requires but within that sort of industry you can shoot food. You can shoot you know people. You can do all these things. You don't have to be in one lane. One hundred percent I think at the time I was taking some classes and I was also I was studying NPR print journalism at the time and I remember talking about that with Jake and he was like Oh. This is a plus because you kind of understand writing thing and photography on some level so we'll run with this so he didn't internship summer internship a year or so later. We ended up hiring you as a foot assistant no so I did this summer internship and I was like this is way better than working fashion. Everyone's so much nicer yeah yeah. It was a great time and I was like in order for me to WANNA stay in this world I can see I need to shift from fashion to food media so then I went back to Boston awesome for my senior year and as as I left Alex pollock the photodetectors times like hey we love your great. Just reach out when you're when you're graduating we can like. Maybe you keep you keep you happy. Come back so I would always send emails and I say hey just graduated like three months three or four months. I would love to come talk about a photo editor assistant role. Did you in the interim year. Were you working on shooting things. Decrease your portfolio to share with Alex to say hey I just want. I've been shooting a lot. Take a look at my stuff. Yes so thankfully because of my time I she went over to Boston magazine for my senior of college and I ended up being digital intern which basically means I was just doing every anything and everything for the website correct the king yeah yeah I remember being so proud and like twenty years old on my I've got years of intern experience. I haven't been paid for any of them but you we know I've seen some stuff like that really was my my pride enjoy worked a lot of places and they harden managed digital intern and they also gave me bill do photo take pictures and do have my own bylines socially once a lot of times when you get your foot in the door somewhere are the the brand or the magazine wherever they need people to do stuff go. You can go okay but we'll trust you. There's something trustworthy about you. Then people are all right. Go give this a shot. You'd have a DVD will keep doing it. I must really thankful that it was a web internship versus print because obviously no one's GonNa give any Interna print byline whereas it's much lower risk to teachers hey make something for lab and if it's really good we'll Polish and if not we won't publish in no one will ever or care about low budget so it was just gave me a lot more freedom and they knew that I worked at the food magazine before okay so you know how to take pictures of food. You were photo intern turn. I'm like yeah I guess I mean I. I saw Marcus Nelson. Do you like an overhead shot of something by a window so I can do that. How hard can it be yeah so I mean I I? I did it and they would. It was really cool. I mean they sent me there. Okay so we'll just have you do restaurants so they would send me like once a week in shoot for four restaurants a week and just shoot it for their website so who was giving you guidance about photos style at that point what kind of shots they wanted from the restaurants. It's nobody else really. They just assumed you knew what you were doing. The funny thing is I applied to Boston magazine to be a photo inter. I WANNA continue that path that track of being working for requirements it's but they they didn't want but then the digital department got back to me. I didn't really have communication with the magazine so it was just kind of me and our digital editor who just send me. I was like Oh this. Let's get this close enough to bone advocate and some overhead shots off light and like keep doing this and I would just bike around Boston Jason and go to a bunch of restaurants that are digital restaurant editor Chris Hughes covered and yeah it was it was really good training. It's really good training. I looking back it was really great just being able to go in and practice and shoot restaurants for relatively low risk and have that be an internship set eh great base so then I shot all these restaurants and as shooting what's in all this stuff to Alex pollick. I'm like hey portfolio.

Intern Boston Boston Magazine Food Magazine Mike Oh Alex Editor Esquire Magazine San Antonio Texas Writer Andy Burgundy Jake Osama Appleton Wisconsin New York California New York City Magazine Alex Pollick Beirut James Beard Foundation
"oster" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"oster" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

"Oster like serious successful at a dream i do not think of in that light there's something about him i think i think the the charisma the the uniqueness of the different things he's doing the fact that he's still quite young and evolving and how much fans have taken to an anonymous just sort of like a sort of a cornball sort of you know comedy act i feel like he's perceived in a different way so i i'm i'm i'm more bullish on him than a lot of people that have sort of carved the sort of unique niche in in in an xt and the match i expect this going to be really good i mean i saw it on on a house show and it was it was tremendous match got over really well so i'm expecting their both guys are going to get over pretty well and in this one nobody has disgusted si dream interesting right now ricochet and you're just kind of hanging on his every word it is it's in in the ring it's not like that so it's i don't think the fans would embrace this act even if it was really good and convincing and believable if he wasn't delivering in the rank but he's certainly exceeded expectations in that regard so far too so i'm really looking forward to seeing the next step for both guys and ricochets just that that normal every man that that i think every top tier over roster should have so that it doesn't just there's something to contrast the other personalities up against and he's playing that role well is just a prideful athlete whose works hard and seems nice but tough so all right.

Oster
"oster" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

Reasonable Doubt

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"oster" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

"You know little ferguson momentum behind it they will investigate rhine right and so i won't be able to the euro the video that way by will after the oster was acquitted i think hit a cord um amongst the public can it's awful laney said it baz lady said awful that people had to see the video and the officer had to be acquitted before anybody was offended by this whole thing i mean we we were like those guys yelling in the wilderness uh ththe trees falling zones nobody i mean people you people just eat just couldn't mind i'm a guy who generally can get some kind of scrutiny years shed some light on something i couldn't get traction on that case to saved my life i felt like a simple i'm a dickhead but my feeling is cnn and on the the the usual suspects don't cover it a because it's not a wide officer shooting a black man but b because it's a a white officer shooting a white man i think it's not a coin toss i think they specifically aren't interested because it flies in the face of their narrative they've created a narrative the news is no longer about the news it's we have started down a path and were walking with purpose and anything that doesn't speed us along down the current path we're on we're gonna either ignore or we're going to tamp down or or whatever whatever be so this story it not only is an an innocent black teen male being executed it's a white guy being executed and it's screws up their overall narrative and.

rhine oster laney officer ferguson cnn
"oster" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"oster" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Problem is a very convene sionist constitutional point from the founding fathers while i i still believe him i think he that the democrats gene uh uh a power bound for backing away from the whole trump thing they want trump to be there they need the bad guy they need the one motivator for their voters now i teach room when because then what if for trump right bagged we're with the left be in terms of motivated voters gget getting them to the polls on it's trump hatred it really oster said what issue was there uh uh worse at one tell me one issue that is driving democrats right now no uh nobody asked that question she will issue that has driven uh right now nobody can tell you know gene it uh is it sanctuary cities is that they is it the kgb all guns dan no the poll showed that isn't the uh the the case because they believe in the separatist racism of black lives matter and they wish to separate the races by black lives matter has been promoting in many arenas no no gene gene is it because they're out there promoting top a trade let's for the jazz is it because they need leave that if you're a boy and say you're a a girl that you truly are a girl now phnom going through all the big issues of the year so what is it it's they hate trump when you go to the the the polls you look to when you vote you'll look to what bring about change now i think that what a chinese now is trump eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye how do you maximise the.

oster
"oster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"oster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I change because i didn't wanna you know because you were still dealing drugs those groups were also no not even a ages meeting this book is is me tell him oster is not like a to allow stores assad i want to involve nobody no medical at lahti peopling talked to him a years or no would their door right now so i kinda like changed the names just you know to protect the from whatever they guy just 'cause i'm share master i don't wanna share you know would they got ghana do you think some of their was surprised by how well you've done cents up i think so i don't will run with it a big croona more but i'm sure they're they're like shot bit you know i've got big ziga later on as you started to get more buzz in the music industry a number of record labels try to sign new uh who's todd moskowitz moscow some this marta may in the industry maybe thirteen fourteen years going with as his real name this is ruin and we just grew to have a uh a good friendship and business partners for i'd last to you but you were kind of suspicious of him when you first met him i didn't know anything about business in in the way that he was so a you know aggressive an open in front data id scare me oh so but you're relations ed he also was offer you the world yes wish care i can i can i never had those type of conflict of all you believe in you that much yeah i didn't eu know to me i felt like what is he gin out it is like wow he you know be so into a light did but he was he he was 100 percent jane when a'sincere i just saw i didn't understand it and so the relationship has grown you've company drift it's one of my close friends you've made seventy two mixed tapes today to sit easy to make quick saves over studio album to be honest is easy for me to recall it music dekalb county naturally.

oster ghana todd moskowitz dekalb county assad lahti peopling eu thirteen fourteen years 100 percent