35 Burst results for "Oster"

Korda, 1998 Australian Open champ Petr's son, in 1st Slam QF

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Korda, 1998 Australian Open champ Petr's son, in 1st Slam QF

"22 year old Sebastian corder has reached his first major quarterfinal that after toughing at an Australian open 5 step win of the ten seater pole umbert a gadget finally securing a ten points to 7 in a super tie breaker. In X takes on the Russian Karen catch enough, fellow American Jessica bagula also reached the final 8 that after straight setting barbaric French akova. But the upsets continued, and the women's top seed Irish van tech and the 17 cocoa goth became the latest, both making fourth round exits, golf out hit by the Latvian, Yelena oster penco. I'm Graham agar's.

Sebastian Corder Jessica Bagula Yelena Oster Penco Golf Graham Agar
Holiday advice for home bartenders, plus 4 festive cocktails

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

Holiday advice for home bartenders, plus 4 festive cocktails

"London's top cocktail makers have some holiday tips, Salvatore calabrese, is called the Maestro behind the bar at velvet at London's 5 star Corinthia hotel. His holiday drink of choice is a truffle. Sazerac. Something that is warming is cozy, can wrap you up. Hopefully with a snow outside. Calibration says the glass is the star. It's the canvas of the drink, but the drink has to be special too. Which is really nice whisky to go with the cognac. Over at nomad London, Lyanna oster is serving a Scrooge sour. This is a cocktail very similar to a whisky sour, but with the addition of normally red wine. In this instance, we're going to use mold wine, so a little bit of Christmas spice for our Christmas time. Oster paints a peppermint bark swirl on the glass and sprinkle some crushed up candy cane on it. I'm Ed Donahue

Salvatore Calabrese Corinthia Hotel London Lyanna Oster Oster Ed Donahue
Salvatore Calabrese, Corinthia Hotel And London discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

Salvatore Calabrese, Corinthia Hotel And London discussed on AP News Radio

"London's top cocktail makers have some holiday tips, Salvatore calabrese, is called the Maestro behind the bar at velvet at London's 5 star Corinthia hotel. His holiday drink of choice is a truffle. Sazerac. Something that is warming is cozy, can wrap you up. Hopefully with a snow outside. Calibration says the glass is the star. It's the canvas of the drink, but the drink has to be special too. Which is really nice whisky to go with the cognac. Over at nomad London, Lyanna oster is serving a Scrooge sour. This is a cocktail very similar to a whisky sour, but with the addition of normally red wine. In this instance, we're going to use mold wine, so a little bit of Christmas spice for our Christmas time. Oster paints a peppermint bark swirl on the glass and sprinkle some crushed up candy cane on it. I'm Ed Donahue

Salvatore Calabrese Corinthia Hotel London Lyanna Oster Oster Ed Donahue
"oster" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"oster" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"Politically inconvenient truths known now and then were censored rather than refuted because they were true. None of this is to mention the staggering and horrific death tolls in developing countries that simply lack the consumable excess to withstand the economic insanity of shutting down vast swaths of production just in case. It is offensively stupid to suggest that the consequences of these tradeoffs were not known at the time. It can be immediately deduced prior to such disastrous experimentation, hence it was known and it was ignored. More politically inconvenient truths known now and then were censored rather than refuted because they were true. Masking has been less devastating than preemptive mass house arrest and coerced isolation, but has nevertheless affected children's psychosocial development in likely irreparable ways. It should be stated outright and not tiptoed around that the point of masking, given its clear ineffectiveness toward its alleged medical goal, is to dehumanize and to signal subservience. This is linked to the harm it does to children learning to speak into socialize, but has likely psychologically harmed adults in similar ways. Oster writes that, quote, the latest figures on learning loss are alarming, but in spring and summer of 2020, we had only glimmers of information. Again, this is false. We knew this at the time, but were socially destroyed for saying so. We were not remotely, quote, in the dark, except by the choices made by sensors. Of course, the economic and psychological harm of communist inspired pre emptive mass house arrest and coerced isolation has been embedded out exclusively on the poor, both within and between countries. The rich have had access to resources to overcome or avoid the psychological trauma of isolation, worklessness, or both simultaneously, or the political clout to feel comfortable flouting this cruelty. But furthermore, the rich are disproportionately exposed to the only economic assets that benefited from preemptive mass house arrest and coerced isolation. Be they in the form of equity in digitally native businesses or more indirectly given the nature of their remote amenable knowledge work.

Oster
"oster" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

08:01 min | 6 months ago

"oster" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"She is rather insistent on this point, a Brown university economist who specializes in health data, oster prefers to analyze numbers that help parents think through a decision. When there isn't any data, you can approach this and whatever way you want, including finding a parenting coach to counsel you on what to do, she says. But I'm not that parenting coach. Except, occasionally she is. A leading voice in the debate on reopening schools during the pandemic. Oster has lately veered into more conventional mommy blogger content. She bristles at that characterization and it's true she doesn't show off puzzlingly clean kids rooms or promote baby gear with discount links, and she hasn't left behind the data driven approach to parenting, laid out in her bestselling books expecting better, crib sheet, and the family firm. But she does seem to be trying to straddle both worlds. This spring her newsletter parents data, which she launched just before the pandemic, added a wins and woes section that celebrates readers whose kids slept through the night, and commiserates with those who lost the battle over screen time. Every week she fields questions from her 150,000 Instagram followers on topics ranging from vaccination, for which she can point to the data, to dealing with motion sickness, for which she can not. On the latter, she suggests keeping one of those big gulp cups from 7 11 in the car for less mass. I point out that this is technically advice. That's totally right, she says, laughing. I definitely mix data about this thing and thoughts from a fellow parent. When I try not to do is say, here is expertise on child car sick vomiting. I realize it's a subtle, subtle distinction. This isn't a pivot, she says, but it is a deliberate strategy. She wants to broaden her readership and teach a wider audience data literacy. How to tell a good study from a bad one, with relatable anecdotes on parenting, like the veggies you sneak into your kid's food, she says. And she's good at it. Her answers often filmed during her 6 a.m. run are short, and usually comforting. But oster, who was one of times 100 most influential people of 2022, doesn't deny that the past two plush years have been trying. She spent many of those months gathering data on COVID-19 in schools, which she wrote about in national news outlets are analysis suggested the benefits of in person education outweighed the risks. Some parents greeted her work as a godsend at a time of uncertainty. Others told her to stay in her lane and accused her of endangering children. She defends the work, citing her findings on how closures were perpetuating inequality. I felt bad about being yelled at, but I don't regret it. If the result was more kids got access to in person school at the cost of some people yelling at me on Twitter, that's okay. She and a fellow Brown professor are now planning a class on lessons from the pandemic. She reveals this with a sigh, anticipating the Twitter reaction. I'm quite excited about the class, she says, but I am sure there will be the regular kind of pushback that I get when doing anything with COVID. Oster has always sat somewhat uncomfortably between jobs. When she was a University of Chicago professor, she got pregnant and had the typical questions. Could she drink coffee? Which prenatal tests should she get? What were the risks? Doctors offered her restrictions without explanation. Oster, trained and studying public health and statistics, examined the studies and found that many were outdated, based on a small sample size, or otherwise flawed. Her resulting book aimed to empower pregnant people to make their own decisions. But oster says those efforts to democratize data analysis won her few fans in academia. She speculates that she did not receive tenure at the University of Chicago in part because she had spent time on a book meant for non academics rather than writing papers that would inevitably be read only by other economists. Still, as oster's kids got older, they're now 7 and 11, she kept researching child rearing queries and pursuing commercial writing. Her books were passed from parents to parent and climbed the bestseller list, a certain type of well educated mother now quotes oster like a gospel. Her prominence reached a new level in the pandemic, the U.S. government produced limited data on COVID-19's effects and schools, so oster led a team that began collecting publicly accessible data on schools in 42 states across the country. I think it is possible to say a decision needs to be made now. And one of the pieces of information that are feasible to get, she says, I worked hard to be transparent about the limitations of the data we collected on COVID in schools. I thought it was substantially better than any of the information that was out there while acknowledging that it was not perfect. After she faced criticism that her funding in part came from organizations that support charter schools or oppose unions, oster responded in her newsletter. Our sources of funding have no influence, full stop, the funding for this project has run through Brown, which has strict rules that would not allow funders to influence research findings. Her conclusions have since been bolstered by research conducted by the CDC. The European Union and other academics. The emotional critiques from COVID wary parents hit harder. I don't think of myself as someone who is unsympathetic to the fact that people are very afraid, she says. But I still think that having information is a way to move through some of that anxiety. It is this belief that data can be soothing that continues to set oster apart, even as she dabbles and winds and woes. It's what attracts readers who want information and discomforts them when they aren't sure what to do with it. Oster is found that despite her efforts to hedge, many parents still want definitive answers. And expecting better, she concludes, don't worry too much about sushi, with the caveat that lower quality sushi might carry bacteria. Yet a friend recently texted me the following about her pregnancy diet. You can eat sushi while pregnant, Emily oster says so. In a bid to make nuance more acceptable, oster harbors larger ambitions in the zone of data literacy. I would like to see us teach everybody in high school how to read and interpret data. She has spoken with organizations about ideas for better education on the subject, but she is reluctant to predict what she'll be doing in a few years. Given that her books have followed her children's stages of life, I ask if she might one day graduate out of this space. She smiles. There's always menopause. This episode was brought to you by mint mobile. Hate your phone bill? Yeah, most people do. Except mint mobile customers. They get premium wireless for just 15 bucks a month. With unlimited talk, text, and high-speed data on the nation's largest 5G network. What's the catch? There is none. Keep your phone, your number, and all your precious contacts. Including those you'd rather forget. To get your new plan for just 15 bucks a month, go to mint mobile dot com slash tech.

oster Oster COVID Brown university University of Chicago Twitter academia U.S. government Emily oster CDC European Union Brown
Will We Ever Get Justice for Enduring the Lockdowns?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 9 months ago

Will We Ever Get Justice for Enduring the Lockdowns?

"Ramona from North Carolina, Charlie, are we ever going to get justice? For what they did during the lockdowns. She has some pretty, let's say aggressive four letter words in there, some swear words. So I'm not going to continue that. So I'm just going to summarize her question like that. There's a new story out that pairs nicely with Ramona's question. Remote learning according to freebie dot com had an even worse effect on U.S. students education than was previously known. K through 12 students who attended school from home in the 2021 school year lost 50% of their typical math curriculum learning, according to a Harvard study. Quote Emily oster from Brown university said it's pretty clear that remote school was not good for learning. Oh, who would have possibly been able to predict this? Anthony Fauci and all these people, Deborah birx, the scarf woman, did so much damage to our country. Children are at a low risk of severe illness of death from COVID-19 in school transmissions is also extremely rare. Quote, in places where schools reopened that summer and fall, the spread of COVID was not noticeably worse than in places where schools remain closed. Schools also reopen in parts of Europe without seeming to spark outbreaks. This is intergenerational abuse. While grandparents were able to still go, golf outside and see their property values increase their grandkids had masks on being abused in schools. Now, I'm not blaming the grandparents. I'm not. But there were plenty of people that recept the generis and octogenarians that were perfectly fine with locking down the country. While their kids and their grandkids and grandkids in particular have been totally and completely and permanently damaged by the lockdown agenda.

Ramona Emily Oster Deborah Birx Covid Anthony Fauci Charlie North Carolina Brown University Harvard U.S. Europe Golf
"oster" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Your goal is to raise a kid who is not obese and has high test scores, it's not like you can definitely achieve that. But there's better data on how the ways that we parent contribute to those things. In some ways, I think that a lot of the writing in family firm, though, is speaking to people who have thought of those kinds of outcomes as the thing that they're trying to achieve and saying, wait a minute, actually, you might want to think a little bit more about whether those are really the reasons to do this, some of the things you want to do and so for me, the best example of that is the extracurricular discussion. And then I think a lot of people and I talk to some of them. Well, tell me things like, you know, I want my kids to do this extracurricular because that's the thing that I think, you know, I heard that that's what gets you Dartmouth. You know, like Dartmouth's looking for a horn players this year. And I think that the point of the extracurricular discussion when you dial into the data is actually, yeah, I store a curriculums are great. But they're great because they help kids have a better sense of belonging. And because they're an opportunity for social environment. It's different than the social environment that they have at school, and that can be really helpful and really scaffolding if kids are struggling. But you actually do not need to be a horn player for that. And if anything, it's probably really important that the thing you're doing is something you're good at and something you enjoy. And necessarily being good at. But it's something that you like. And so it's an argument for, in fact, thinking about extracurriculars as recreation as something that is a thing that you're doing for your kids, socio emotional health, more than that it's something that you're doing to make them achieve. And that's a really different frame that I think most people are coming into their extracurricular activities with. Was it hard for you to get into the mode of being someone who people look to for advice on these questions? They want to know what you think about a topic like that? The piece I find very uncomfortable is when people want to know what I do. So I am happy to tell people how I think about something. And I'm in some ways happy to give people advice. The question that people ask that I don't have an easy time engaging with is we'll just tell me what extracurriculars your kids do. Which it's like, I feel like the whole point of everything I do is like, no, actually, you shouldn't necessarily do the things that my kids do. That's literally the entire point. It's that part. I'm not good at engaging with that. But your kids do pop up in the books. I'm always interested when people write about family members or kids. Do you have a particular strategy around that in terms of how much you will reveal or not reveal where the lines there for you? So my husband is a much more private person. And he reads everything to sort of say, this is okay. Like he basically reads everything and decides what is reasonable about the kids. He's happy to have me to whatever I want about him. So I sort of try not to talk about things. I think my kids would not like me to talk about. And with the both crib sheet and family from I had my older kid read it herself or read the parts that she was in herself to get her approval. And what is her relationship to being in the books at this point? I think she doesn't care. I don't think my kids care at all of that. They're not engaged with this. The thing they like, the absolutely the best. My kids are really into audiobooks. They love listening to audiobooks. And so I recorded the new edition of expecting better and then I recorded a family firm. I did the recording. And so the thing the only time I've seen my son even remotely excited about this was when he got that on his audible. And then he came down and just played over and over the part where this is the family firm. And I'm the author, Emily oster. He was just calm down and play that over and over and over again in the kitchen. That's it. That sounds fun. Yeah, it was great. I want to talk a little bit more about the book. So there's kind of like rubric in the new book in the family firm that's like the four fs, parents who frame a problem, they should do fact finding, final decision and then follow up for F's. When you're writing this type of book, did you start with that premise? Like that premise exists in your life or you sat down and said, I need to organize what I'm going to say in this book. It's something in between those things. So this idea that there's a decision framework and it has a set of concrete steps of this type. That is inherent in how we run stuff in our household. I don't think that prior to this book, I would have said, it's not like we had this for fs, and we were going through the four apps and I just wrote down the forest. It was like we had a way of encountering the world, and then when I came to write it, I thought about how would I structure that so someone else could replicate it or could do a version of this and then that is sort of where the framework came from. So it's almost like I tried to generate a framework based on what we were already doing. I feel like the book would be in some sense like shelved with parental advice books about how to raise your children. But how much of the book is about how to raise your children versus how to relieve your own parental anxieties around raising your children. I think it's a lot of the second. In fact, I also think it's a lot of how to get along with your partner if you're partnering with somebody else. I mean, there's pieces that are like here are some stuff about how you could do things in here some advice about child raising, but it's much more a book about how to encounter these problems and how to work through them with somebody else than about here's how to do this or here's the right kind of parent to be. So in the book, in the, I guess, the conclusion or the closing might be the epilogue. I'm not sure what it is. You talk about how COVID hits while you're writing this book. Can you tell me how did that affect the book itself? Were you already too far along for it to kind of have an impact on the book? No. So the book, like a draft of it was done before COVID hit, thank goodness, otherwise it definitely wouldn't exist. But then the summer of 2020, I did a lot of revisions and the writing I am about COVID, particularly around some of the structured decision making stuff that I wrote at the beginning. You can sort of see how that overlaps with the book and I think they interacted a little bit with each other. So there's this sort of piece of it that's like that was kind of influenced by COVID particularly around. Which is how I talked about it. And had you already decided to start the newsletter? I started the news. The first issue of the newsletter is February 2020. There's like.

Dartmouth Emily oster
Kelly, lowly D-Backs rally past NL East-leading Braves 6-4

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Kelly, lowly D-Backs rally past NL East-leading Braves 6-4

"The Diamondbacks put together a five run seventh that allowed them to beat the Braves six to four Carson Kelly tied it with a three run Homer and Dalton Marshall added a go ahead double that ended at Landis four game winning streak Oster valley homered for the third straight game as the Braves took a three nothing lead off Madison Bumgarner with a three run third Dansby Swanson sacrifice fly boosted the lead to four one in the sixth the D. backs improve their National League worst record to forty nine and one oh four hours after announcing a one year contract extension for manager Torey Lovullo I'm Dave Ferrie

Carson Kelly Dalton Marshall Braves Oster Valley Diamondbacks Dansby Swanson Landis Homer Madison Bumgarner National League Torey Lovullo Dave Ferrie
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"Or everyone all right emily. Do you have just mere everyone i to here. It is when i get up in the morning and get ready. I put my pajamas back on before. I eat breakfast so i don't get food on myself and then changed my clothes later. Even though i have otherwise gotten completely ready that is not just you. You think not just me. I don't know because i do stuff like that. Like putting on the mike especially my bra put on my clothes that i'm to wear to leave the house or that i'm going to wear to. The studio is the very last thing i do like. I don't want for different reasons than you. It sounds like but. I just don't want one extra minute in actual close. Oh yeah us even is true. Like the hard pants Her cancer not are not so good. But yeah i think. I think i'm just always. Even though my kids are big night. I like i have like a holdover from when they were just like. Throw food at you Which actually is really still true. That i actually that's still happen. So maybe it like makes a lot of sense yes. There wasn't any time. When i was younger where i would put on my clothes and then put on makeup and do my hair and now right now it's like everything is done identical asset. Yes yeah yes that is not just you tony. What about you. Your clothes and shoes are on the second. You exit the shower right and then you do your hair or shave or whatever you do. Yep yeah so weird life because men who have like more comfortable clothes yes. Yeah like my i. We talked about this recently. My husband wears his jeans until he goes to bed. You take them off. I know soon as i get. Hold on like i get stuff off me whereas my lululemon pants same okay and then do you have a. Would you tell someone.

cancer tony
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"I think we have made this so sailing and it is scary like but but it also like give me half to at some point realized that there are other costs as well and when you get then you at least for some period of time you'll be like more protect against it right. Mary catherine also says i'm always curious about exactly how big a threat sids is when there aren't other risk factors involved and i've never really nailed it down. Those research. small for for served for without other risk factors are really really small. Really small like point. Oh six thousand point. Oh three in one thousand something like pretty looks very small. Okay let's take another super quick break and then come back with just me or everyone. I want to tell you guys about rossi's it's twenty twenty one and nobody has time for uncomfortable shoes. That's where rossi's comes in raf. These surveys thousands of customers. The number one word used to describe their shoes is comfy. Rossi's are amazing. They're made out of recycled water bottles. And when i heard that. I thought well i don't want crunchy shoes. But they are super soft and yet sturdy and also stylish and their machine washable. You can wear them. Hope you're sitting down because this is a big bold claim and it's true you can wear them straight out of the box without getting blisters. I don't think you could say that about any other shoe our dog walker kathleen whereas rossi's because they're the only shoe she can wear right out of the box and she's on her feet you guys. I think we've established that. I am someone who likes to not be on my feet but kathleen is an actual active person. So what i'm saying is rossi's work whether you're sedentary or whether you're walking all around town with dogs or without dogs. I picture like a high powered person on their way to an important meeting. Cutting a crisp silhouette in their off these. But i also picture someone who likes to sit around. That's me looking stylish. In her office there is an array of different silhouettes. I so i have the point. I also have the flat and just today. I made the decision..

rossi Mary catherine walker kathleen Rossi kathleen
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"We have a lot of evidence suggesting that returns Education are very are very are very large in in general doesn't necessarily mean college is going to be for everyone in like the idea that that kind of a college degrees is not worth. Anything is not really doesn't really supported whitney c. says what was her favourite class in school parentheses defined school. However you wish probably. I took this really amazing class in college on witchcraft which was like in my senior in college class on like on witchcraft. It was in the in the folklore and mythology department. The department that we had And and it it. I ended up writing a paper about witchcraft which was ended up getting publishing economics journal which is like a whole other thing but like it was a it was sort of like totally with an example of a time. When like i learned a lot of things that i wouldn't have otherwise no. I got to kind of combine. This one thing with this other. I liked so that was special. That's cool okay and then Question for. Mary katharine ham. Who is the one who introduced. Yeah you too. When i was pregnant with my first son. She recommended expecting better. And just one thing to see that. I want to call out from that book. I thought it was so fascinating. Your point about whether coffee is related to miscarriage. And that maybe it's that the women who don't lose their aversion to coffee don't have strong pregnant and that was really interesting. Okay so. Mary katharine ham. Says i'd love to hear about her experience with polarization and twitter. Mobs maybe advice. She's fought off at least two in the past year. I think both around kid related mask related. Kobe stuff but i know it takes a toll i really liked to incentivize so much more of her kind of thinking in online environments. Does she have any thoughts on how to do that. I think twitter has become just awful in the last. I mean like you know. there's a piece of it. That's very useful like it's a good place to get information. But the kind of discourse particularly around some of the cope itself has become so so polarized. And so it's not just -plore is angry. In a way that i think is really unproductive. And there's kind of so much personal kind of like personal animosity and i've struggled a little bit with with sort of how to fix that and also even the question of like how much engage. I have like other ways to to engage that. Are you no longer whereas easier to explain. what you what you you think and i think that is have i. Yeah like definitely have these moments like. Stop this like it's too. It's too much. And i worry it's not productive right so there's like there's a place for like legitimate sort of like discussion and disagreement about some of these facts that that's very very reasonable. The sort of you are trying to like kill other people. Part of this is not helpful. And i don't i don't i'm not sure where. The path forward is serving on worse than the last eighteen months. Kobe nineteen question. I know a ton of vaccinated people who have gotten coverted shum and i have heard my mother-in-law's friend works in an icu. And she said we need to change our thinking about this. It's not that we're trying..

Mary katharine ham whitney twitter Kobe
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"Have i been making things. Have i given him the idea that you always get exactly what you want when you want it like. I've i've been making things too simple and then yesterday when we were at the zoo they both had church rose and owen. The little one finished his and then wanted elliott's and was kind of going over like cookie cookie and starting to go over to elliott. And i was saying like no honey. That's your brothers. You already finished yours. That's your brothers. But i was thinking like should i let elliott Should i have let them workout. This cane enabled shero situation themselves. Yeah i mean. I agreed database to answer to that you know. I think the i will say the thing. I sort of struggled with with my kids particularly as they get older. It's much easier to ask my ten year old like why. Are you making such a big deal about this. You know like cancer just like let him have whatever is the thing like why are you you know like how could this be so important to you and i think that i have sort of pulled back a little bit on that with like it's one thing to say like life does not always deliver the things you want. I am not going to buy. You cannot have this desert. You can't have candy at two o'clock in the morning like you. Can't you know like some of the times like there is a no and there's a lot of value being consistent about the things you say no to but i think there's a difference between bat and like you need to as the older kid like sort of like there needs to be disappointment to sacrifice for your sibling. Right right so. I think that i think i would sort of separate those two things out and i think that like learning the lesson of like. You don't always get what you want a good one learning. It's like fine for your brother to take your colors right littler. That's not a lesson hitting the question is what is the lesson you wanna you want him to learn that framing the question which is one of four one of the apps. Yes thank you. Okay luke chastain says my questions. Should you prioritize saving for yourself so you don't become a burden on your kids and allow them to be free or should you prioritize saving for them so they can go.

elliott owen cancer luke chastain
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"Friend zone zoom parties a level. You can text me. And i'll text you back access to thursday show videos. This particular video will be on youtube. Youtube dot com slash out some resin But people can submit questions for my guests and we have some questions as you have an soon..

Youtube
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"It's not like that but it will definitely help you work through all sorts of things in your life. i'm again. I cannot cannot recommend it highly enough better. Help wants you to start living a happier life today. And it's more affordable than traditional off line therapy and financial aid is available visit better help dot com slash best friend. That's better h. E. l. p. and joined over two million people have taken charge of their mental health with the help of inexperience professional in fact so many people have been using better help that they are recruiting additional therapist. Fifty states special offer for alison rosen. Listeners get ten percent off your first month at better help dot com slash best friend again. That's better help. Dot com slash. Best friend i also want to tell you guys about purple. Doesn't it seem like the world against us from getting a good night's sleep this time of year..

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"About at ten. how how how. How do you do this. How do i go to bed at ten. Or how do i get five. Oh i mean. I don't know i really liked the mornings and you know we just like i don't know i like i just have a thing. Where we're we just go to bed at ten. I don't know. And then i really i kind of find that like getting up at five kinda of like kind of enough sleep for me to like you know basically be okay right you know like a level of adel tiredness any and i just. There's like so much value to me in in having that time in the morning. That's kind of my like my time space to us. In whatever way. I like my use it. Have you always been a morning person. Yes even as even as much younger person like people will be like. Why are you going to go out. And i feel like i'm like is this like eleven fifteen i. I don't think we're gonna get. Let's just go to bed. What were you like in college. Undergrad you know. Yeah like me.

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"But i right and then like how. Are you going to be as an adult. Yeah i pretty close to both my brothers including the one who like. I hated as a kid so which one is. Is that the dollar now. The youngest one. We actually pulled up all my mother for some reason saved all of our new year's resolutions from children's through the other we were like we're like altogether and we were like reading them and the youngest brother and i every year. Our resolutions are be nicer to the other one care. And it's like you know. Sometimes i'm like be nicer to john even though that stupid. Why did you dislike. Do you remember. I knew i don't actually have any particular memory of why this why this was actually very similar. Like i really like now. He's a wonderful person. I love his wife. I left his kids. I don't know. I have no idea what we're like five years apart. Navy this system. I'm so bossy like it was like just so. Are you possibly in your marriage. Probably but i think Yeah but i don't like. I don't think that's the way my husband would describing. What would he say leno. Actually i just i don. I wouldn't pick bossie. You know i. I am like in charge of a lot of things but i don't think that's i don't i don't think it comes across as bossy. But maybe he would say one of the things. I love about the family firm which. I haven't filled out the worksheet yet until where she now and also. I love that you mentioned that in third grade year teacher was like she just loves workbooks. I love him. But i love the idea of a family mission statement I actually wrote a personal mission statement for myself this year. Which is something that i had never thought to do. But i had a guest on the show michael buckley and he talked about having made one for himself and he read it and i was like. Oh that's that's amazing. And then i kinda filed it away and then one day i just wrote sort of a rough draft kind of thing and the the beginning of it is like i wanna live honestly and authentically and show people that it's okay to be human and then something came up on the show where there was an interaction i'd had with a guest that got a little bit awkward and i felt like it didn't reflect the best on me as an interviewer and i wondered if i cut it out. Tony knows i call. We mostly communicate by tax. But this was one of our phone calls because we we went back and forth. Tony felt we should keep it in because he thought it was an interesting exchange. And i just kept going back and forth. I could just take it out. And then as far as the listeners know it was like a super polished interview But then i looked at my little mission statement..

bossie leno michael buckley john Tony
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"What about research appealed to you is it. The is it the the process of finding information or like the actual accumulation of information. It is the moment when you know something that other people don't that's is actually not hard by june. That is an easy question at. I was reminded of it this morning. Because i was doing something. I'm doing some stuff about like some research about kobe. Not surprising and and some new data came in. And i had like a moment like a sort of twenty minutes to try to do it. And then there's like an. I and i sort of made a graph that i was interested in answer to like and it was sort of and then there's like that moment where like you knew something and nobody else and there's like there's just that's that's like so special and and that is that is the thing that that is just by infinite leaves bounce the best part and all the other parts where you're like you know trying to write it up and make tables and convince other people. All that stuff is like fine. I like parts of it but that moment is really special. Where do you go actually. i'm an okay. Let's say the the lay person. I want to be able to make decisions informed by data. But where would that person go to find. That information kind depends on what kind of decisions you want him. And let's say it's cove we'll cove it just turn to link it to something we're all dealing with. I have not necessarily felt like. I want to go to the data but i felt like i don't know what new i don't know what sources to trust like. I wish i could just go to like dr faustini's blogger. So i don't even know if he has one maybe he does. He have a subject newsletter. Yes dr fao. Chance of sang patriotic. Even patriots yeah so so. It's sort of two fold question. Where do you go when you're looking for data and then where does the layperson go. So i think there are some pieces of data where that's easier associate like. What is the case rate. What is it what a hospitalizations look like. I go to the new york times like there like there are some sources like that. The thing that i think is much harder is like. Let's say i wanted to know like something that is is sort of one. Step more complicated. Like how commoner breakthrough infections writing. Something about like how common breakthrough infections. How does natural immunity comparative vaccination immunity. I think part of what's hard. Is that actually figuring out. The answer to that requires reading many different pieces of of data. And so you know. I i like fao g i like you know bob wachner but i basically i'm looking for people who are sharing and some way research studies and then i'm going to the research studies and so that that's a little bit harder for like that's a harder thing to convey to layperson partly because sometimes when you go to this research ideas you're like oh my gosh. This research study is so bad and sometimes it's like okay. This is this is better so you know. I think there are a few people like. There's a guy named bob walker at ucsf who is like a like a very useful person to follow..

dr faustini dr fao kobe patriots bob wachner the new york times fao bob walker ucsf
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"At that. Yeah i i think maybe i had read that. There was concern earlier in the pandemic about that. But then i Did a little. Google and a lot of animals are at risk. And there's even an animal vaccine. It's doesn't have rene but it has the antigen and then i read the words spike protein. And then i was like okay. I'm done reading this. It just it just i was like this is going to require more concentration than i have right now in the middle of doing things i will go back and read it though but anyway speaking of things that require constant bat is a terrible segway. I just suspect our guest always has the ability to concentrate because tony. She has a phd from harvard economics. She's possibly the most decorated in high in high education. Guest we've ever had. She teaches to the professor at brown university. She's put out three books all of which have helped me immensely as a mom expecting better crib sheet and now her new one. The family firm. Which i'm holding up camera. Youtube dot com slash. Alison rosen. i it is and also. She has been very prolific during this pandemic and helped eased a lot of people. He's their mind. I think about the specific risks. Because w- this pandemic is constant risk-assessment. Please put your hands together for someone. I'm so delighted to bring onto the show. Emily oster.

harvard economics rene Google Alison rosen brown university tony Youtube Emily oster
"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"Hey everyone hi hello. Welcome to another episode of alice. Greg what are you doing here. Hey what do you mean what alison. Where'd you come from brag. I came from the world of childish. And i just wanna make sure that your listeners know that year just is wonderful. On the on the podcast. What if they don't have kids donate donate them a lot of our listeners. Actually tell us they don't have kids. We talk about sex. We talk about all sorts of dirty stuff but also parenting. Yeah so the checkout childish new episodes every wednesday wherever you listen to podcasts aspirin. Hey everyone hi hello. Welcome to another episode of alison. Rosen is your new best friend. I am very very very excited about today's guest and don't wanna keep her waiting long not my usual yam on and on and on while i pretend the guests in traffic even though really they're they're so just quickly. I just quickly want to check in with producer. Tony faxed and the bad boy of podcasting to find out how he's doing. Tony hello you just got back from a night away from playing a show. How are you doing yeah. I'm good feel a little worn out but in a good way. Yeah we just went out of town to palm springs for a night and then came back and played a show last night and that was super fun nice. I saw that some listeners. Where at the show. Yes some listeners. Were there came and said hello. Our friend renee culvert. Was there got to see her for a little bit. Yeah it was really fun and you play drums into bands back and you had been hiking in advance of that to try to like bill well in advance your tour that you're doing but how was your stamina. It was fine for the show. It's worthy motion city stuff that i'm concerned about because that's a lot more high energy. Just go go this. The don't stop stuff is is has some energy there but it's very silly and still will more laid back in the town. Land set that i played Literally and i don't mean this as an insult it's just a fact. Their stuff is very mellow. And i literally did not even sweat when i was playing with which is like i might be the first show ever played. I didn't have a drop of sweat. Yes so don't stop. Went live on instagram and streamed a little bit of the town land set and i had never heard them and i listened and i was like. Oh this is what matt gourley would play. I could just. I could sit back and relax in amid century..

alison Tony hello renee culvert alice Greg Rosen palm springs Tony matt gourley
"oster" Discussed on Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew

Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew

"Him ebay. Do think there is a sort of freedom almost in saying like. Hey there's a lot of good choices. And i think matt piece of crib sheet which was kind of like. Here's the evidence on this but you know hey actually in almost all of these situations there really are a lot of good choices and reasonable people could do different things and there's just a lot of freedom in that because that phase of parenting is so much of people telling you like well. That's how i did it like you better. You better get this piece of equipment or this you do it like this. Because that's what i did and you don't do that. You're i don't know your kid. It'll be a serial killer or whatever it is like your big fear. Oh yeah what is talking about you. Alluded to how. The effect of the book has kind of progress. But what is the effect that you want your books to have versus. Maybe what they have had in real life. I mean i. I think the the books to have or to make people feel more confident. I think one of the most one of the pieces of parenting. I find the most difficult is how much how anxious i am always about doing the right thing and i hope that the book help other people be less anxious in some ways or feel just feel that they made the choice correctly and a lot of the recognition for me in parenting a lot of loss of control the recognition of loss of control is realizing like i can't i can't control my kids do i can. I can't control the outcome of every choice. they make. i can control that. I made the choice in a way that made me that. Made me feel confident about it or as confident as i could. And that's kind of a lot of what. I'm i'm hoping people get out of the books I think sometimes people sometimes people get that. And then i think sometimes they get like more like thank you for the permission to like. Have a cup of coffee. that's okay too. That's part of it so in kripke. Some of the information you go over is how you know. Breastfeeding is not the end. All be all that. It's okay to have some coffee. it's probably okay but like be. You know to have some some wine. You can do things like sharing a room. You could swaddled but a lot of these. Things are like okay with breastfeeding. There's so much information where it's like. This is kinda. Make your kid five times for intelligent. And they're gonna go to harvard if you do this. And if you bottle feed. You're going to destroy their future and she. It is very interesting. How you're just like yeah there. There might be some benefits but at the end of the day it kind of stylistic and it's like you're it'll be okay regardless some is so good all of those first of all. Many of those things are way over overstated. Or just really. Don't show up in the data at all when you when you kinda do it right and then even the things where maybe it matters a little bit. The effects are small. So we're not there's basically nothing is is both reassuring and terrifying. There's nothing you can you can do. That's really going to matter that much. you know. None of these individual decisions are like the decision. That is gonna make your kid go to harvard or go winston gold medals or i i apparently my parents did not raise me and right. Oh that's funny. I i think we previously discussed. There's a piece of information. I was like a so worried when we were pregnant with drew about cash like i just need a load up on the information so i don't make any wrong decisions and Your book was incredibly encouraging expecting better. And that's why it's like my most recommended book for anyone pregnant and then also. There's this interview that i heard where you kind of come to realize that your job is apparent is just trying not to mess it up. Don't as long as you were like supportive and you're there for them and you know you you your intention. Probably like to love them. Then you'll be okay but just don't mess it up so and that means whatever i don't i don't know how. How do you mess up parenting. Emily i mean a lot of ways. You know a part of this part of the recognition. Is that like already taking it seriously like. That's that's kind of a huge amount of the of the battle and that you're loving your kid and being attentive and paying attention to them and wanting to do a good job. It's kind of like a lot of the the the thing and then all these individual things do. I reach them for twenty three minutes every day or fifteen minutes. So it's good to read your kids like do you know. Do you have to read for a set amount of time and if you do it extra time that's going to matter it's up like no you know. These things are all sort of a part of a bigger picture but by thinking about it. You're already kind of doing it. Yeah i think that's one of the most comforting things. Though about your data that you actually have compiled is. I read every book. I read every article and it was like okay when your child is eighteen months old. You're gonna have to start doing this. And if you don't then they're already eight months behind or if they don't have this exact many words that they're saying by sixteen point five months there they need to be with a speech therapist and i feel like there were just so many specifics where and nobody backed up. Why i.

kripke harvard ebay matt Emily
"oster" Discussed on Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew

Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Couple Things with Shawn and Andrew

"What's up everybody. Welcome back to couple things sean. Andrew podcast. all about couples they go through. Today is not quite about couples. It's definitely couple couples but it's definitely a different side of the couple things about parenting mostly. Yeah and we brought in our favorite. She's the only person that gave us sanity going into drew. Yes dr emily. Officer is a prolific author. One of my favorites and i found so much encouragement in her book. She's written three now. One is called expecting better all about the data driven approach to pregnancy second is called kripke the data driven approach to how to handle it. Newborn and the third is now the family firm which is coming out. August third and i love her style of writing what she does essentially study study so if the topic is breastfeeding she'll look at all the studies on breastfeeding and decide angle to decide every science all of it. Yeah and she'll say hey this is what all of the studies agr- agree. How do you say that. We're aggregated aggregated together. Say this is like the conclusion of conclusions right anyway and her inspiration for writing. This is not to psych you out and try to have this really ice cold Approach to parenting. It's more inspiration. It's actually the opposite end trying to call me down because intern. I learned first. Hand that when we got pregnant withdrew. People had such polarizing opinions and thoughts about how to do parenting how to make every decision. What whether to do something or not. It was always this right and wrong. And i don't wanna say she debunks all of it but she goes through every single decision in shows what the actual data proves. Which is it. Just don't think it's the best book you could read. Doc does a great job of making you feel confident as a apparent that you can do it and you're probably doing it well enough you know. She's a great sense of humor. I really enjoyed our conversation if you wanna to find out more about dr. Emily oster And what she's up to will link confirmation now blow as well as links to her book. The family firm without further do. Let's go and jump into this one with dr. emily oster. Dr emily oster. It's good to talk to you again. how are you. i'm good. how are you guys doing. We're grace excited to have gone. I don't know if you know this. We've only done one other solo interview doc and that was with another professor. Karl pilmer wrote He's written some really good books like yourself. Who's written amazing book. So you've written walk us through crib sheet expecting better and the family farm. My gosh okay. Talk us through. I feel like it's a progression of pregnancy newborns and now like elementary school years right. Yeah it is. Oh really started. Mapping my own journey so the first book came out. I wrote it while i was pregnant. A lot of a lot of the research. While i was pregnant with my first kid and then that came out when she was like two and then i waited. Have a second kid to write a second book. So i could make sure that you know i kind of got the important stuff and not all weird stuff out the first kid and so crunchy came out in two thousand nine hundred and then the family firm is about this next phase. I'm in now where the kids are in. School and a lot of life is decisions. You didn't necessarily expect logistics kind of how to shape your whole your whole life plus data about older kids so it's a little. It's a little journey. How do you describe your books as a whole like what are you write about. How do you write. I write about using data and decision making in parenting So i read a lot about how we interpret data in around questions in parenting and how we think about correlation versus causality and the limits of evidence. And what we can know and what we can't know. And then on top of that. I write about how we can use that data to make decisions. That work for our families recognizing that those are not always the same decisions for the same people and that the data is a big piece of it but not always the whole peace and i think part of what's happening sort of over the course of the books is it's become more about kind of using the data to inform your own choices and combined with your preferences and less about like okay. The dana says says this. So that's a little bit of a a journey as you parent. I have to say after enter. Did his first interview with you. We were pregnant with our daughter. It was that long ago. Yeah and i remember. He didn't stop talking about that interview for months. We were so terrified of having a newborn because so many people had so many very strong opinions of this is right and this is wrong and as a new parent especially like as a spouse to navigating that was terrifying and he would just sit down babe. You've no idea what she said. I feel so much better about just everything and we would run through all of it and it was just. Yeah it made. It made our life a lot. Easier to embarrass.

emily oster dr emily Dr emily oster kripke Karl pilmer sean Andrew drew Doc doc dana
Florida Governor DeSantis Calls out NIH for Not Studyinf Long-Term Effects of Children Masking

The Dan Bongino Show

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Florida Governor DeSantis Calls out NIH for Not Studyinf Long-Term Effects of Children Masking

"We had a whole year to watch how this is developed in Florida and throughout the United States and throughout the world, and I can tell you in Florida we had school districts that mandated it last year. Others that didn't same with private and charter and there was no statistical difference. In terms of the cases. There was a study done by Emily Oster Brown University looked at New York. Massachusetts in Florida. They found no correlation to force masking and differences in cases. But you also have a situation where a lot of parents have have come that come to me. They've come to the school boards and said This has been very difficult on their young kids to have to sit there for eight hours with this, it's not natural. It's never been studied what the effects of that are. You know, NIH has a $42 billion budget. They've not spent a single penny since Covid started studying. How these mitigations affect kids. Yeah, again again. I woke up this morning saying to myself. How is it that we live with about 100 Million people who identify as being Democrats or liberals that can be this dumb to subject their kids to this without having any idea what it's going to do to their Children? Long term? Listen, I'm asking a serious question to our liberal and Democrat friends out there of which I have none. I'm just saying, pretending I have liberal Democratic friends for just a moment, a very serious question. What kind of parent are you? You're not even interested. And that there may be significant long term downsides and deleterious effects from putting a piece of cloth over your kid's face for 40 hours a

Florida Emily Oster Covid Brown University Massachusetts United States NIH New York
YouTube Favors Biden Advisor Dr. Michael Osterholm, Suspends Sen. Rand Paul Over Same Commentary

The Dan Bongino Show

01:27 min | 1 year ago

YouTube Favors Biden Advisor Dr. Michael Osterholm, Suspends Sen. Rand Paul Over Same Commentary

"Is being suspended from YouTube for saying on YouTube that cloth masks are not effective at stopping coronavirus. He was suspended for that. No dissent is allowed anymore. YouTube are straight up hardcore communists. They're not soft Communist YouTube. Google Facebook, Twitter. They're not pretending anymore. They're not like, Hey, let's take a radars Put lipstick on this thing and kind of pretend we're not Communists. They are now hard core communists doing nothing different than communist totalitarian have done nothing. So Rand. Paul says that if these costs master of cloth master ineffective, you two bands him He is on rumble now because he believes in free speech, and so do we. And he's been putting his thoughts there and because we don't ban political speech like the losers that screw tube. But you know what's really incredible is Glenn Greenwald just pointed out of social on Social media. Excuse me. You know what stunning Joe Biden. CDC advisor Michael Lost to Osterholm. Excuse me, Covid advisor. Who was a doctor himself, well renowned researcher in this field, Oster home who again was Biden's Covid advisor, said the exact same thing to both PBS and CNN. But because he said it onto grotesquely liberal, radical leftist communist networks. And because he's attached himself to Joe Biden. Nothing happened to him at all.

Youtube Michael Lost Osterholm Covid Twitter Facebook Google Glenn Greenwald Paul Joe Biden CDC Oster Biden PBS CNN
"oster" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"oster" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"Was part period of time when everything was very very black and white and it felt like even discussing thinking about risks and actually calculating in thinking about why we're making different decisions was almost like frowned upon so i felt like your newsletter was one of the first places where i was like. Actually let's do some math and think about how are decisions in this context which is wildly different but headache compare to decisions. We've made at other times. Could you talk a little bit more about that. Visiting grandparents posed in kind of the thought process that went through gauging risk. And how you explain risk to people and maybe a little bit about the response. Sure so at that time. I think this was kind of we. Were coming out of these first stage of like everybody is like down. Everyone's in their house and starting to ask these questions about okay my kids daycare's reopening or you know now it's can. I see my parents in two months three months. Like can i see them or they're safe ways to do that big. You're exactly right that people had initially was sort of like there's totally black and white like don't do anything. Don't leave your. Don't leave your house but there became a point. Where at least people started thinking about not doing that and i think a lot of people felt very trapped in the question of how to think about this in the new world and so kind of what i tried to do was both give people a little data and give them a framework to think about that which started with the idea of just being very explicit. About what the question was that they were asking and in a sense of. Oh that is really obvious. I think that it was the piece that people it was a piece that was missing for a lot of people so telling people look what you wanna do is ask you know. Should i see my parents or not. But should i see my parents now or in two weeks or now or in six months or now or not until the vaccine. And i think that kind of idea that you really need to think about what. The alternatives are the concrete alternatives are. I think was already somewhat helpful because sometimes people say well you know what like. I'm actually it's not like i'm not willing to wait until there's a vaccine like i cannot imagine doing that and so then it totally changes how. I'm going to think about this choice. When i know no matter when i see them there's going to be some risk and so the question is then. How do we mitigate the rest counter we evaluate the size of the risks and then he spent a lot of time talking to people about. Okay what exactly. Can you do to make these risks smaller. What's the value of testing. What's the value of quarantine. How do we think about those. And then how big are they relative to some other risks that you undertake every day

emily oster emily Sarah Emily sarah laura josh alex tennis
Decision-Making in COVID Family Life with Professor Emily Oster

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Decision-Making in COVID Family Life with Professor Emily Oster

"Was part period of time when everything was very very black and white and it felt like even discussing thinking about risks and actually calculating in thinking about why we're making different decisions was almost like frowned upon so i felt like your newsletter was one of the first places where i was like. Actually let's do some math and think about how are decisions in this context which is wildly different but headache compare to decisions. We've made at other times. Could you talk a little bit more about that. Visiting grandparents posed in kind of the thought process that went through gauging risk. And how you explain risk to people and maybe a little bit about the response. Sure so at that time. I think this was kind of we. Were coming out of these first stage of like everybody is like down. Everyone's in their house and starting to ask these questions about okay my kids daycare's reopening or you know now it's can. I see my parents in two months three months. Like can i see them or they're safe ways to do that big. You're exactly right that people had initially was sort of like there's totally black and white like don't do anything. Don't leave your. Don't leave your house but there became a point. Where at least people started thinking about not doing that and i think a lot of people felt very trapped in the question of how to think about this in the new world and so kind of what i tried to do was both give people a little data and give them a framework to think about that which started with the idea of just being very explicit. About what the question was that they were asking and in a sense of. Oh that is really obvious. I think that it was the piece that people it was a piece that was missing for a lot of people so telling people look what you wanna do is ask you know. Should i see my parents or not. But should i see my parents now or in two weeks or now or in six months or now or not until the vaccine. And i think that kind of idea that you really need to think about what. The alternatives are the concrete alternatives are. I think was already somewhat helpful because sometimes people say well you know what like. I'm actually it's not like i'm not willing to wait until there's a vaccine like i cannot imagine doing that and so then it totally changes how. I'm going to think about this choice. When i know no matter when i see them there's going to be some risk and so the question is then. How do we mitigate the rest counter we evaluate the size of the risks and then he spent a lot of time talking to people about. Okay what exactly. Can you do to make these risks smaller. What's the value of testing. What's the value of quarantine. How do we think about those. And then how big are they relative to some other risks that you undertake every day

Headache
Experts warn of impending Covid-19 disaster

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Experts warn of impending Covid-19 disaster

"Substantial increase in new covid nineteen cases. I'm joe chiro fox news. That's a prediction of dr michael. Oster home the director of the center for infectious disease research and policy at the university of minnesota. He sounded the alarm about a rise in variance on fox news sunday. I believe that In some ways almost a new pandemic the only good news about this is that the current value effective against this particular variant. Be one one seven But in a sense this is virus that is now Fifty to one hundred percent more transmissible or infectious than the previous viruses. White house chief. Medical adviser dr anthony found. She believes any new waves won't be as severe as the previous ones because of vaccinations.

Joe Chiro Dr Michael Center For Infectious Disease Oster Fox News University Of Minnesota Dr Anthony White House
House nears relief bill passage; Dems mull wage hike rescue

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 years ago

House nears relief bill passage; Dems mull wage hike rescue

"The house has approved the president's one point nine trillion dollar pandemic relief package along the straight party line vote sending it to the Senate it was a thin margin yes Sir two hundred nineteen that they start to ten on a bill that speaker Nancy Pelosi says will throttle forward the nation's effort to combat covert nineteen action nations in the arms of the American people money into the pockets children into the schools workers back into their jobs but Republicans like Pennsylvania's guy Russian Balder say only a fraction of the spending is devoted to the pandemic so what are the Democrats spending the rest of the money on crop pet projects of course and also pay Oster per progressive liberal special interest groups the house bill kept in a minimum wage hike proposal even though Senate rules say it has to be removed party leaders insist they will find a way to revive the fifteen dollar an hour proposal Jackie Quinn Washington

Nancy Pelosi Senate SIR Balder House Pennsylvania Jackie Quinn Washington
U.S. shatters another record for daily cases as states threaten new lockdowns

Democracy Now! Audio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

U.S. shatters another record for daily cases as states threaten new lockdowns

"Says once again shattered its own world. Record for daily corona virus infections reporting a staggering one hundred sixty three thousand cases thursday. Nearly hundred people died of covid nineteen in just the last twenty four hours. Public health officials are warning of a humanitarian catastrophe as the virus continues to spread exponentially and hospitals are pushed beyond capacity california's. Become the second. Us state with more than a million confirmed infections joining texas in chicago. Mayor lori lightfoot has issued a thirty day stay at home advisory and will cap social gatherings at ten people in pennsylvania. prison officials are warning of a deadly. Full blown resurgence of corona virus. Seventeen incarcerated people have died of covid nineteen in pennsylvania during the pandemic six of them since mid october. Meanwhile one of president-elect biden's top corona virus advisors epidemiologists. Michael oster home has proposed that congress pass a relief package to allow. Us residents to remain at home for four to six week lockdown to flatten the curve of transmission. If we did that then we could lockdown for four to six weeks and if we did that we could drive the numbers down like they've done in asia like they did in new zealand australia and then we could really watch ourselves cruising into the vaccine availability in the first and second quarter of next year bringing back the economy long before that

Lori Lightfoot Pennsylvania Michael Oster California Chicago Texas Biden United States Congress Asia New Zealand Australia
Many states begin reopening as coronavirus cases continue to climb

Meet The Press

03:45 min | 2 years ago

Many states begin reopening as coronavirus cases continue to climb

"Administration distanced itself from a draft federal government report predicting an uptick in new coronavirus cases and three thousand deaths a day by June first and the president announced the White House task force was all we're now looking at a little bit of a different form before declaring it on again after public push back so we keeping the task force for that period of time and Mr trump is just missing the consensus of public health experts dead widespread testing is a necessary step to re opening businesses safely away by doing all of this testing we make ourselves look bad repeating his claim that the virus will disappear on its own I feel about vaccines like I feel about this this is going to go away without a vaccine the president's skepticism of public health guidance is now being echoed by many of the governors who support these models have been so wrong from day one those models keep changing so really it's not they're not very good because we did so much for testing we have more cases we were going to the hot spot and we were testing so of course are positive cases are going to increase you have to be warriors we we can't keep our country closed down for years we can't keep our economy shut down forever but sixty eight percent of Americans continue to say they are more concerned that state governments will lift restrictions too quickly then that they may take too long still with the unemployment rate now fourteen point seven percent pressure is growing and the president is accusing Democrats of slowing re opening to damage him politically they could only get because it offered me the longer it takes to a dark man the election the longer it takes to open up and joining me now into infectious disease experts Michael Oster home from the university of Minnesota and Columbia university's Jeffrey Shane gentleman welcome to meet the press and Dr so let me start with you simple question are we ready to reopen the economy well first of all let me just say that is when we say what we mean by opening the economy that's really unclear we have to we can't stay locked down for eighteen months but at the same time when you have cases increasing deaths increasing health care workers out adequate protective equipment and we're suddenly going back to what was once our normal lives that's not a safe place to be we can't do that and not expect to see a major increase in cases Jeffrey Sherman I have we squandered the eight weeks and locked down and that are or are we the rushing the re opening in that we don't have the testing and tracing program in place yet or we just squandered the eight weeks we have not used the eight weeks as well as we could have unfortunately it would have been benefited enormously from consistent messaging and concerted consolidated plan of attack for actually aggressively and proactively dealing with this virus at this point however we do have to pick ourselves up where we are and we need to start taking those measures we need to look at some of the countries that have been very successful in quashing this virus down I'm particularly point to Korea South Korea and Germany and maybe even New Zealand and Taiwan these are countries in particular when the cases of Germany and South Korea that had enormous outbreaks they flatten them the crush them down and they did this because they tested so aggressively and they use contact racing they were able to quarantine people who were becoming infectious before they actually spread to other people it's a very powerful measure it requires real investment but we already have models that show that it can work and once you've done that then you're in this position of strength where re opening the economy is not going to lead necessarily to the rebounding cases that I'm expecting given this patchwork response we have right now when the re openings taking place in some

Jesus the Philosopher with Dr. Jonathan Pennington

Knowing Faith

09:09 min | 3 years ago

Jesus the Philosopher with Dr. Jonathan Pennington

"Here. We are and we are joined by Dr Jonathan Pinkston. Thank you for coming on the show. We're glad to have you. Hey I am absolutely thrilled. That's excellent so You are just wrapping up Sabbatical. You've just wrapped it up. That's right okay. And you're telling me before we jumped on Mike that Iran a bunch of fiction on Sabbatical. Yep Okay tell me what you were. Because I'm reading a bunch of fiction right now. Yeah well I always do. I often joke that I actually just professor to support my fiction in reading habits. Because I'm and I mostly listen to because that way I can just constantly listen to them when I'm sometimes walking driving doing dishes. London whatever So I listen veraciously. All kinds of things got some favorite authors like Ursula Gwynne and others but I just I just read Willa cather author. You know her. She was a famous nineteen twenty century. Her Book Called death comes for the archbishop. That was really good. I also read the entire David Foster oster wallace reader which is both fiction non fiction any Wallis. Some you know everything. Infinite Jest while infants all the way through that truth be told but all his essays everything it was fast essay that stands out to your hand. Yeah the one about the State Fair Illinois that was and and The one about television is a long essay about television. Its effect on people. Yeah so he wrote an essay on I think it's called collect. They've named a collection of essays this as well but both flash and not where he talks about tennis pros. Oh yeah that's right. That was man. It's incredible it was so he wrote that. I've never watched tennis in my life but after I read the essay I got on a bender with watching professional tennis. Yeah you don't you don't like sports. That actually have is that it is well. He's so ham fisted the rest of the very literally. Exactly I was GONNA say haven't reading David Foster ause because I've been watching football and I didn't you know what big game was on today. JV Edit tell somebody else's like is there a big game and they're like it was like who do you have today in college. Like is this the sports ball. Don't even Yeah Ursula. Gwen are you into science fiction too. I mean good science fiction. Science fiction is created equal. But I'm reading this collection of short stories by Ted. Yes absolute escalation escalation absolutely. No I just know cool. I like old school like okay. We'll Ted Chiang is amazing. I read the earlier collection and that the story and they're called the story of your life the basis for the movie movie arrival which is one of my all time favorite movies. Have we not talked about not using it got so. Hey it wasn't at Brad like several times and he did not get sick. Okay we'll start talking about cross fit or are you still there. Okay listen if you have not read Ted Cheese amazing. He's incredible okay. So that's Dr Pennington Worley. co-signing an endorsement. If you listen to this podcast broadcast hanging in there for you. We love to have you know. We're we're glad to have Dr. Go ahead please. Oh no no no no what is amazing about him and league win is the same way and you should care about this and you should try. Is that a think a lot. About the power of language in shaping our thinking An culture yeah and so both Lin Chang are constantly thinking about how we say things and the way we structure our society and how languages connected that. That's why that that movie arrival. Yeah did you ever see that. Yeah so it's not language it was about how I know amy. Yeah on that one whitaker's in it too right. The Guy Blackhawk as well as listening. I have a big crush on her. She reminds me of my childhood crush. Elizabeth Montgomery say an actual the person's name and that person would be listening going. Oh I never even knew that he was with again where he's an actual person. You might actually be witched. Oh Man who can forget are- even recording. This has been hot. No we are although I could talk to you about Hans Fictional the rest of the time that we have together. Dr Painting is a professor and author posture preacher. He's written a number of books. He has a friend to the TV institute. Big Friend Friend town this week and teaching It's been my favorite time of the year. It's the most wonderful time of the year so even when we started the training program one of the hopes was bringing in outside speakers Experts in their field but are also churchman. Church women people who who want to to do theology or new tests ultimate cities at the highest level in the academy but can also translate to the local church and we didn't know it was gonNA work five years ago But we brought you back five times so it's worked. It's pretty well and you know this. Our students have just really gravitated towards you. And I've also seen you Avenue now for seven eight years or so You've always been a wonderful the teacher and a good friend. But even as you've been preaching more your church just seeing God used that to shape you into a just a beautiful person into theologian into a real. You're a real person. You know what I mean by the air you're dealing with substantive issues but you're also living In a broken world that we're living in and you're able to speak speak in both of those worlds. Yeah so grateful for that well. It's the teaching works because of hungry people could be up there doing my stick and if people were hungry angry it wouldn't be the same. It's an interaction and so you guys have created something so beautiful here of hungry people who are seeking the Lord and trying to figure out their lives and and so it's annoying to come in and it's been fun part of that so you've been in town this weekend speaking about the gospel of Matthew. And would you say that has been where your focus has been the last number of years. It sounds like yeah so I had the great privilege of doing a PhD. In Matthew hasn't stopped since and I always when I think about Matthew I always think what he says in an esoteric way in chapter. Thirteen that The scribe train for the Kingdom of Heaven continues to bring out of his treasure house else. Things old and new and so we've been studying this book of Matthew for two thousand years and they're still. I've been studying for twenty years and every time I read it I see do things. They didn't see it especially everytime I preach from it one of the things that I've been amazed even though not write articles or books teach. It's when I go go to preach a passage that I come to understand it I think in its fullest way. What do you think that is I wanted to ask you about the the process of rediscovery? So somebody's many. Listen to this like okay. I'm on my Bible Reading Plan and I've done it faithfully the last twenty years. I'm coming up on a book of the Bible. I've Read Twenty Times Thirty Times Forty Times. What is some of that process of rediscovery for you as you walk the same path over and over again? How like where does that come from? Does it never feel like it's just old hat like well. Of course you know. This is what what he's doing here in the Greek and this matthew. This is a typical matthew. Move that he's making right here. Like what does rediscovery somebody no no but but what is But what does it look like. What rediscovery look like? Somebody's spending lots of time in one book of the Bible. Yeah I I think it is a it is a literary and theological Michael masterpiece and the reason. We're still reading it. Two thousand years later is obviously. It's in the Bible. We believe it's inspired. But it is a masterpiece. The reason it's still worth worth reading over and over and and a great piece of literature is one that you've reread. I just wanted to read once. And the more so structured and I always remind students that it by the time matthews written this thing down. He's been pondering and praying and preaching teaching and rearranging and editing for like thirty years. Probably by the time. He's this is is his magnum opus. This is as great piece. Just like we would read You know brothers Karamazov for something over and over and you'll see things in it even more. This is a masterpiece. Sure piece and you never get tired of it. I think the other thing and this is why things I so appreciate about all you guys. I'm thinking of Jan.. How much joy her books to her experience? As a teacher feature I think you'd probably affirm this that when you go to teach you go from passive learning to active learning and so that's what I think is amazing that I'm teaching teaching and preaching for Matthew. That's when I come to understand it more. I think you guys build things into the institude. Were there reversing say. Yeah I think so. I think a big part of the reason why I never gets boring is because I'm an active reader passive reader

Matthew Tennis Ursula Gwynne Professor David Foster Dr Jonathan Pinkston Ted Chiang London Iran Willa Cather Mike Lin Chang Elizabeth Montgomery Ted Cheese Illinois TED Dr Pennington Worley. Gwen Karamazov Brad
Stefan Krasowski on Visiting All 193 UN Countries

Counting Countries

11:46 min | 3 years ago

Stefan Krasowski on Visiting All 193 UN Countries

"Steffan Krzyzewski come from Minnesota in the US. I've I just recently gotten to one ninety three. UN countries which is why we're talking today. You bring me back for follow up. But I'm happy to be here I don't remember that comment but I'm glad to have you back and curious to hear a little bit of your final part of the journey and I just wanted overview a couple of different different things to remind the listener Remind us again. Why the love of travel was the catalyst what spurred your love for expiration in discovery like many many in my boat there? There's a collecting background. Where you you get interested in collecting different things and I did not travel much coach growing up? My parents not not active travelers so it was my high school junior year trip to China. We had started studying Chinese Back in fifth grade grade and went to China and traveled around and it was just eye-popping exciting thrilling and so as soon as I could I went to college and University of Pennsylvania Wharton School Philadelphia but spent semesters in Shanghai and Hong Kong and then moved to China right after graduating college. And the you've been in Hong Kong. I arranged at ride classes three days a week and just every every Wednesday night I would head the Shenzhen. See what buster overnight train rain was leaving in hop somewhere new and got addicted traveling in China going every province in in the country. And then step-by-step expanding out to the region and the wider world pulled out of curiosity. You didn't come from travel family. What's your family? Think of what you've done what you've accomplished in the travel world world totally supportive. Do they think you're a little crazy. What's going on when you get together for Thanksgiving? Oh I've got one wonderful parents sand and Brother who's a doctor and a scientist who's WHO's very different although we both Studied Chinese at the the same starting and he studied in China in highschool so my parents Prince of been extremely big about education that they work worked to put put us into the best schools that that we could get ourselves into an and get that environment and Mother reading to me every night Even when I developed an interest in books like James Bond or Tarzan in bucks as a as a first or second grader that would have pretty racy stuff she wouldn't our through and and Be Happy to expose me to to new ideas. A Matt so the circumstances weren't for for them to be traveling a huge amount growing up but they're always been very supportive and and As as both my brother and I got older than the I was living in China my parents did start traveling and in quite a quite a lot of times they visited me. TRAVELLED AROUND DOWN SO my father's a adult of million miler now so it's it's certainly not not anti travel in out of curiosity whose commander and his better yours or your brother. I should hope it's me because I still go back several times a year and actively do stuff with China and he hasn't significantly kept up with it since since going into medical school. I mean I know he did say at the time that Learning Anatomy class was pretty easy Z.. For him when when he had been studying Chinese characters for some time but when he was when he was at his best to you. As far beyond me reading classical Chinese the It's it's it's much more different than than say Latin. It was never a spoken language. The written Classical texts are incredibly hard. Pardon any was brilliant that I can. I can get through the first few sentences of the Dow ditching and and that which is which is hard enough but He was he was way beyond me as scholar. Could use to your brother in and Stephan. What was that inflection point? So you explain how you really were taking advantage of semesters abroad in Hong Kong China the region starting to explore like crazy. What was the moment when you decided to chase when ninety three? What was that light bulb moment? It was. It was somewhere around Azerbaijan Georgia Armenia trip that I took from China on one one of the holiday weeks that that China has an at that point I was had been to just about every country in Asia and and was loving it than in seeing the possibility awesome -bility of doing much more in learning learning about frequent flyer programs which was making some of these possible Places like the caucuses were connected to China. Southern routes in Chai from China and Could use my north west and then later when they became Delta Delta Miles on on these is trips so things that I thought were previously unattainable for time or cost reasons were suddenly feasible and and And I never I never had an interest to be a full time traveler even if I had unlimited resources for that I push myself very hard on trips. The I've I've taken several three week trips Only wash twice longer. Once a four week I think in the that was in Central and west Africa and a five week around the Pacific and I was so exhausted after three weeks of pushing myself that that is the the long term travel all thing wouldn't wouldn't fit for me and and professionally isn't isn't where my interest lies and and certainly not as it is where my marriage marriage would be taking me so the I like short intense trips. It but was there a day where you sat around and counted up the country's on the map happen you saw that you're at fifty or a hundred and then you read an article. What was that final? Push where you said okay. I've done this now. I can do that. There was more of a a different back back to that other by John. Looked at within. The cost was to get to Nakhichevan which is a separate part of other by John that on the Traveler Century Club list as a separate territory and it was it now? It's quite easy to visit in affordable all and more flights at that point it was it was looking that expensive and I decided I'm not going to get addicted to a crazy list like that and subsequently I've ended knocked divide and gotten addicted to that list but it was It wasn't it was it was Wasn't necessarily one day except perhaps perhaps when I got got to eat team more. So that was the last country in Asia that I hadn't been to and did say I went to to all this trouble to get east team or deal with Indonesian and flights which wonderful delightful country in many ways except traveling Logistically is Is One where a lot of things. Don't go to plan and and So once I got to East Timor as I'm going for the UN Stephan. You're last on counting countries actually November of twenty sixteen eighteen. And you're at one hundred eighty six countries at that point. But you didn't finish your you analyst until August of Twenty nineteen in for some travelers. That's a lifetime Some travelers as we know have done all one hundred ninety three during that same time period. So you took your time to finish off the last seven countries I want to focus on four of your final five two of them. I found pretty surprising in two. I didn't so your final countries was Italy. How did Italy early of all countries end up being one of your last countries? There were three that I was saving to the end of Italy Greece and Turkey and and Mainly not not so much animus. I'm really WANNA have a big party or something. It wasn't that it's it's I'm history is my favorite subject fascinated with ancient history. And all of those three are are are so special in central to to world history and world world civilizations that I wanted to to save them to really enjoy lavish in terms of time and and Destinations destinations trips to go. So that that was the original thinking and then What will get into why I got stuck on on a couple of others and so then finally I just? I just couldn't wait. These are wonderful places that I'll visit multiple times in my life but That that that roughly was the idea As well as the flip side is after seeing so many ancient Roman ruins in North Africa. That have this kind of thinking. Why should I go to Italy and see the crowds? But you know that's just that's just one of the ten thousand different things that are fantastic by deadly to to go see show as a history buff. You mentioned Italy Turkey Greece. What's a highlight for you? Visiting those countries by all of all of the above. I mean it's it's just incredible. How you You could pretty pick pick any point on the map and see multiple layers of of incredible history I mean what I. I walked off the plane Lina in Milan. I had booked the trip like a week before last minute and I can only get one one ticket to the last temptation Or the Last Supper or the last supper painting and and I had like an hour and fifteen minutes from touchdown in Milan Malpensa to to getting getting getting in the door picked up a rental car drove as far as I could into the city abandoned the car where other people were illegally. Ugly parks hopped on the subway and guide in and saw that and and So Italy I've really I've really just started. I've been a bit in the North's I've I've seen the Vatican again but I haven't properly visited row. I've been around Sicily different territories in. It's it's just pick your pick your time in history Greece more specifically the ancient In the ancient era I mean I just gets it gets incredible to. You're just driving down the road and you see the road sign Its Tab obeys in the ancient Also known as thieves. And now it's just a a scruffy scruffy town but just pull off the road and spend the night there because these names out of history are incredible and and the answer Turkey Turkey. I took a A road trip from von the famous Lake van in the Armenian Indian churches in the East and drove all the way across the country The the more or less southern route through the Kurdish areas than around the Jian coast and So many eras of history from the first Essentially I city of multi-level housing and that goes back back. Thousands of years all the way up to the modern times. I mean it's just I just couldn't i. I had take UNESCO sites off the list because there's only so many you you can see in a day it's It's incredible and Turkey actually. has this fantastic museum pass system where you can get the countrywide one or you can get one. That's for a week league or are some regional ones arrest Boland's and the prices are so low and every mega site in the countries included. It's it's not like many countries where the tour pass includes everything except the one really must see

China Italy UN Turkey Asia Hong Kong China Hong Kong Minnesota Steffan Krzyzewski United States Shenzhen Greece Italy Turkey Greece Sicily East Timor Lake Van Stephan Italy Greece
Martini celebrates the festive season with a limited-edition Negroni chocolate collection created by Paul A. Young

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:23 min | 3 years ago

Martini celebrates the festive season with a limited-edition Negroni chocolate collection created by Paul A. Young

"The beloved Italian Coktail Negroni is one hundred years old this year and the Shuki pull a young has been asked by Martini to concoct brand new chocolate to mark the occasion. Well Uncles Ben. Ryland sat down with Paula. littler Elliot to talk about the creative and practical processes of marrying chocolate with such such a famous drink. Plus they enjoyed a little bit of tasting along the way I have the great privilege of being approached by fantastic brands And a half to love the brand and all I have to love the product that the brand of created and for me it has to be natural. Ashby pure and ask interesting. And I've known the Martini brand for for decades. I remember adverts in the nineteen eighties with a particular on roller skates. trae Martini and the any time any place. Any were to have a Martini so so it was. It was always a happy memory for me. So when they approach and said we've got these new reserve special and brought on Rubino for Moose my East pricked up because I'm not a beer drinker. Call volume alcohol drinker. Let one night champagne and spirits. But I like Negroni old-fashioned says bitter sweet flavors because you can have them over ice on their own stop blending them and for me. Obviously I have to blend into the chocolate. So the challenge for me was taking the two commutes on brought her which is a a number color and the Rabin which is this ruby color from youth and taste them dilute pair them with chocolate. Let's try and find a combination that celebrates negroni because the centenary celebration of Negroni without the chocolate distorting the flavors and characters in the botanical in the two Moose but also the vermouth are very complex. And they've got that distinct bitter sweetness to they can easily distort the chocolate as well so it was actually an opportunity for me to work with them on getting that balance. Absolutely right Let's take quite a long time. We always think about the delicacies Kasese that can go with a glass of wine for example. What it it's fairly common knowledge that certain foods should go with a glass of wine? Don't sit down to a lovely gloss of red wine and then and and then tuck into a box of chips not good idea that we often don't think about that same sort of methodology when it comes to pairing something something we chocolate. How do you know what goes well with chocolate? It's a really good question in two parts to it. When I when I first started in chocolate a quite few years I would be guilty? If you've ever analyzing and I think it it's the way some people take chocolate which is if you're doing it professionally or academically you do have to have a process of pinpointing and finding all of us delicate compounds flavors and tastes to the point where you're deciding whether this chocolate is fine. Quality with beans have been fermented well of picked well or and so on and so you really digging in Bolt for me when it comes down to it. I have to take it back to base level when I smell it smell texture to like the taste from beginning middle and end and Roy after the after taste does it work with ingredients and now you get people who will say what wine and chocolate hard to pair. I find it very easy to pair. That's because I've tasted a lot of chocolate and a lot of wine and I can think about those flavors starting out and you taste piece of chocolate. How would you know which one to pick their hundreds if not thousands of them on the shelf to boy Oy? It's really difficult and all I say is by and tastes and eat what you like. Try It if you think it doesn't work. You're probably right because you own your tongue on your taste spots. And if it pairs well great. An I have always with all my tastings and events set to people if you prefer eating or milk white or dark chocolate with a cup of tea fantastic few think it works for you. It probably does but when it comes down to do you like if you do great no matter what anybody else says because you a half to want to eat again and again and again I'm almost runner of the cadbury cream egg at with the woman dipping hurt chips into a cream egg. Yeah well salty and sweet is massive business. The chocolate industry tree lady is not as crazy as she looked. She has no But I I do have a box of beautiful chocolates in front of me and you just pulled me a gloss of the move which was very kind of you for this time of day. A little SIP exactly Tell me tell me first. What vermouth measuring? This has gone brought us. This is the amber colored very light fresh smell wise. I've got fruit and it has to me sympathy botanical. Medicinal that's not meant to be a negative Tiv- term. I remember as a child having buttercup Syrup as a medicine and Dundee Line serapis kind of things those botanical can pass over very successfully into a Moose yes and drinks and this has that element of bitter sweet to it which if you think about bittersweet flavor dark chocolate is bittersweet already got a really good foundation and having having having a taste It's light on the tongue but the aftertaste is really really long It's beautiful sweet as well. But not over not overpowering only switch cleverly made it very sweet not overly sweet at the beginning and then this kind of botanical bitter dryness comes in the end and the chocolate made with it is the blue and gold marbled finish which represents the best colors on the buttocks. It's a beautiful bottle. Ferry Italian design obviously and sticking with Martini brand absolutely. I think if you are familiar with the Martini a line of Vermouth e you probably would be impressed by this particular RESERVA SPATULA pull. Educate me on how I should be eating the chocolates with the truth. We've had a drink of Mussa. Still got the flavor. There have a bite of one of the chocolates list. It's the blue and gold when it has a very soft center of white chocolate. We've got some Bombay Sapphire Gin. We've the VERMOUTH in there. Got Some Madagascans chocolate. which is thought delicate fruity chocolate? And very little else the predominant ingredient in that is the vermouth because I wanted that flavor to to last on the tongue. And it's it's a gorgeous balance. The dark chocolate is just bitter sweet enough like the vermouth. Once you've had the first bite and it's melted and swallowed. I have a bit more. Vermouth just passed me. A A glass of Rabin now I suppose that means that well to be polite I would have to try some of this. You would have to try that one as well this array of full of flavor for me I get kind of a smell of time leaves and herb Leary is very very very smooth. A little a bit Rich in feeling flavor and that's represented in the chocolate as well. We've got that lovely Madagascar chocolate again. But they could nash the filling inside. I just heavier more full needs a bit more impact. Bit more strength to it. So it doesn't get lost in the Renault so now that we've had some of the redeem we should be tasting some of the chocolate or I'd have made the chocolates a half dome a very smooth surface and a dark chocolate can inside Very very different indeed this one. Yeah very dock inside and a much more pungent hit it take. It took a long time to find the right chocolates to work with the to the most because Kosta so complex for example. If you choose orange which I love chocolate and orange you instantly got. I honestly know which chocolate to put with it to get that nostalgic fail. I love chocolate orange. What this it was? Try again try again try again. It's absolutely fantastic. The opportunity to have something that is quite unusual all to work with both familiar. It's funny how I haven't had either the Vermouth to start with but the familiarity and some of the botanical in. I don't know where that's from. I'm from my many years past of tasting and eating but there is something in them and all my team who tried to. There's something in recognized but I don't know what it is. I think a lot of people might say I've I've never had vermouth on its own. I've had a Martini Shaken oster Martini or I've had it as a mix of had it in an aground. Have I had it with chocolate would would I tried it if it wasn't in the chocolate maybe not so my job and my responsibility is just to inspire people to try something different. Because that's what I've had the opportunity. It's due to create the chocolates. I think you've done very well. Thank you so much. That was really

Trae Martini Negroni Rabin Italian Coktail Negroni Rubino Ashby Kasese Ryland Cadbury Paula. Littler Elliot Bombay Sapphire Gin ROY Dundee Line Madagascar Herb Leary Mussa Kosta Nash One Hundred Years Milk
Fantasy, Meet Reality: A Running Back Breaks Out, Then Disappears

NFL Live

04:58 min | 3 years ago

Fantasy, Meet Reality: A Running Back Breaks Out, Then Disappears

"Liz Merrill is a senior writer for ESPN. So we're doing a package on one one hit wonders. And he editors thought who'd be better to sort of headline this but Jonas Gray story it's been about five five years. Since his breakout game. It was November sixteenth. Two thousand fourteen. What happened on that day? New England would've gone through one of those September's which everyone in Britain them off. You know they've lost that Miami in the opening game and then they went to Kansas City and just got clobbered and then to patriots form. They rattled off five wins. And they're back to their dominating cells. Broody leads US Patriots into town to the Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday night. Football how Michael Smith game was a Sunday night football game and it was a highly anticipated anticipated game because it was a rematch of that year's divisional round game tonight. It's Andrew Lock Against Tom. Brady get your calculators out. There should be really default to rescue teams. Both come off by weeks. There's a cave named Jewish graves is making star back to the ground. This this is Jonas Gray Gray to the thirty yard line. You know. It's amazing what nobody knew was except for people in very inner struggles of New England And he actually had a really impressive training camp and Bella check had told him. You know you're so close to making the roster oster but they didn't activate them until mid October when Steven Ridley towards ACL this guy he wasn't uh-huh regular starter at Notre Dame. He was on the practice squad until three weeks ago. So his mom and his brother drove about three hundred miles from mm-hmm where they lived outside of Detroit. The Game Jonas at the time was living in a one bedroom apartment and this modest area outside of Boston Austin on the very bare bones and the only tickets. He could really sport. His family. Were in the nosebleed seats. They're ZEHR watching the game. There's all this anticipation there's nerve block white with Michelle. Give the gray runs. Between Guard and center white. He pushes to the end zone. Owed go to spray has a touchdown patriots. He's scores his first touchdown and his mom is like okay. I'll clap. I'm I'm pretty exciting. This is so awesome. So she's Kinda cool about it in cash and then you know he's course again and then we. He scores his third touchdown. I get the great lowers the coders running. It was more a touchdown his she drops to a knee in like complete. You know amazement and just so older well that you know for kids. It's finally getting a chance. And then Jonas Gray Mix Histories Iowa thing for two hundred one yards and four touchdowns give give the pig right. He runs a lot he for the Patriots. Schoolyard can't stop. Stop it so Jonas Gray erupts. He has this once in a lifetime. Performance how does he react. After the game he'd reaction was pretty wide. I I mean I think that's one of the things that made the story so endearing it because he was just like holy cow. Here's Glock like celebrating Alabama with me. Here's Tom Brady headbutting. Me All the stuff that you see in the movies really you know the thing you know. act like he's been there I mean and he did act like you've been there but inside he was completely awash. You know in all of the surprise and the joy and there was sort of that moment where from Michelle Foia talks to him. They had the traditional interview with the Star of the game. Let's turn to John Ray. Yeah Guy who didn't hear his name before you're going to be hearing it a lot. We heard it many times tonight and he's doing nervous. I mean there's a guy who graduated with a degree in English and he did stand up comedy already in college. So you know. She knew his way around the microphone but she didn't know what he's GonNa say touchdowns the first four of your NFL career on at this stage had explain this performance. I'm just blessed. Blessed beyond belief we put together a great game plan. They hammered in all week. She watched this for so long. Keep Watch Tom Brady. And GRONK and company and Julia Nettleton on TV. It was just one of those things where you just couldn't believe all this is happening. Someone one of those guys men are probably go home tonight and get back. I'll probably just lay in bed. Look up in the ceiling. Just just astonished man. What's going on? Aw Right in a great story man. God's helping

Jonas Gray Patriots Michelle Foia Jonas Gray Gray Tom Brady New England Andrew Lock Liz Merrill Football Andrew Luck Espn Britain Notre Dame Writer Indianapolis Colts Boston Detroit John Ray Miami Oster
This star moving at hyperdrive-speeds was spat out from our black hole

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

09:56 min | 3 years ago

This star moving at hyperdrive-speeds was spat out from our black hole

"Of the ticket a style that's being flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy Alexey at a record breaking speed of six million kilometers per hour by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre a report in the monthly notices the Roll Economical Society claims. The unfortunate star was sent on its course through gravitational dads with secretaries ace tax more than five million years ago the style which is now some twenty nine thousand light years from Earth is traveling some ten times faster the most stars in the Milky Way including the son in fact. It's moving so fast. I believe the Milky Way in about one hundred million years never to return one of the study's authors emeritus professor Gary that cost us from the Australian National University. Says is the stars encounter with a black hole occurred at a time when humans were first learning to Walk Upright. He says in astronomical terms star will be leaving galaxy fairly sued and will likely travel through the emptiness of intergalactic space for eternity the Milky Way central supermassive black hole secretaries a star has some four four point three million times the mass of our Sun. It's located some twenty six thousand light years away in the direction of the Constellation secretaries authors discovered discovered this hapless style while using the three point nine meter anglo-australian telescope at the siding Spring Observatory to search for the shorted remains of small galaxies orbiting. The Milky Way is part of the southern Stella Stream Spectroscopy survey follow up observations within made with the A and US two point three minute telescope confirming the stars. Extreme speed did the customer and colleagues then trace the Star's journey back to its point of origin in the Galactic Center. It's this must have originally been in a binary system with a companion star and this system ventured too close to the black hole secretaries ace ta which then captured one of the Stars Too Close Orbit or sling shutting the other one out of the system custom and very high speed. DACOSTA says it's great to be able to confirm thirty or prediction. That stars really can be flying out of a galaxy by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. I'm part of it. The national team that is using the anglo-australian telescope to get philosophies and abundances for stars in stellar streams the stuff streams Remnants of small galaxies have been ripped apart as they fall into is advertised on potential and by studying them we can learn about the distribution of doc mattering our galaxy for example but for every field. We don't necessarily have a complete set of targets for the thought so we used the other spare fathers to look at potentially other stars of interest and we found this stuff. That's has a velocity moving away from us as over a thousand cuomo specific and that was very unexpected and exciting discovery. Picked your interest in other words very much so Particularly the stars brought enough that the European Guy Satellite Commissioner a very accurate promotion. The motion in the plight of the sky is distinct from emotional life on us when we combine that with the observed. A lot of thoughts. Lusty you can trace Ashley Orbit back in time. And the orbit. Effect Exactly intersects with the center of the Galaxy. So we're very sure that this does being flung long out of the standard of the galaxy matches a prediction for a long time. Now that's been massive. Black Holes will blackouts. Generally I guess under the right circumstances weren't gobble Lapa Adventures too close but will in fact fling it out. That's right. There was a piper written first by Jack Hills in not an idea actually before four the Central Collin Galaxy was really well established in which he predicted it. If a binary star got too close to the central by call one of the stars would be absorbed in towards the blackhall. The other one would get a lot of energy be flung out of the center of the Galaxy and bicycling escape from galaxy completely. And that's what we're saying here. This really is the the first time that we've been definitively established that this high-velocity star doesn't affect have its origin at the center of the Galaxy. What do you know about this star? Well we know that it's Relatively young it's about two and a half times the mess of some. It's likely to be quite rich in chemical elements because the Santa Pod Aug- Aleksey is where the overall about this is about effective two times higher than it is in the local neighborhood so it's caught rich but With a massive about two and a half times orange the lofty that is traveling at its guide to escape from the Galaxy and hit off into it elected spice which is a very empty place. What does one cool is star in integrated space? I know if we have a planet outside our solar system. It's a rogue planet but what what is it aerobic style. I guess you'd call. It is a collective star. The the volume of spice outside of galaxies is very very empty. So you know you have a very small population of stars walk. These escaped from galaxies and and They'd be very hard to find. It's not the first high-speed contended that has been detected that appears to be living galaxy. Isn't no that's right nine for some Almost addicted I guess that there are these high-velocity stars that appear to be skyping galaxy in fraction of which appear to be coming from the center of the Galaxy. But this is the very first one where we've got precise enough to seminar of the top of the star to absolutely verify that it's coming from the center of the Galaxy hasn't been given head log number yet or a name. It has the rather prosaic name S. five because as five is the Stream survey project we're involved with And then it's it should be s one high-velocity star number one. I guess with the expectation that we might find more to me about the survey that you guys have been doing. This is really exciting. Isn't it looking at. The shredded remains a small galaxies opening the Milky Way. That's right It's actually a very good example of international collaboration. There's a team in the US that uses what's called the doc energy like camera on the former telescope in Chile. But let's you image lodge areas in the sky and they've infect done quite deep suv. I of the Southern Hemisphere Scott and in that imaging serve I I discovered of order a dozen of these streams where we believe these a AH small galaxies. That have been disrupted but you need to take spectroscopy of the stock is to get the philosophies in the abundances and the anglo-australian telescope with its two degree field spectograph spectograph lets you observe up to four hundred dollars at a time and that is a unique facility in terms of its field of view. A numbers fathers in the astronomical world so the US imaging imaging people have collaborated with star stone of his experts in fava spectroscopy to measure that. He's sort of these streams and You know serendipity can sometimes what can you fight or wait. Found this This particular stop by studying these still streams. This must be telling you a lot about the origins of the Milky Way Galaxy itself and how it's grown over Giga Giga us. Yes you're exactly right The the standard Theory of how the Milky Way is come into existence as had lots of galaxies Small galaxies full in get disrupted and then contribute. This does to the highlands of the disk of the galaxy in that process. We can try and map out. What the distribution of mass in our galaxy is by understanding the orbits of these streams in the galaxy get disrupted some of the stars get energy energy and move ahead than some of the stars lose energy in full behind? That's probably the other way around And so you. The whole thing gets strung out as a string of beat effectively and by studying the motions of streams we can actually see things like the influence of the lodge measuring like cloud as it comes by our galaxy. It's extra gravity. It disturbs the orbits of streams. and Are we seeing a lot of stuff from secretaries to office will run the other side that well it's been gobbled up. Now's well isn't it. That's that's right. I mean. The Sagittarius Stream was the first example of this Process with off. Galaxies falling in and being disrupted I guess it's Probably twenty. He's ago I guess it was in twenty five years since it was discovered and that is the archetypal example. The core of the galaxy is near the center of a Galaxy Galaxy. There's a stream of stars advice that goes across the hall. Scott now Sagittarius is was originally much more massive system than the small systems. That are just being disrupted the streams of West studying but it does just show that this process goes on Sagittarius. What in fact its own set of costs that guide to be added to the Hanover? The galaxy wants to sides of terrorists. System is completely disrupted with globular clusters. Can you tell the difference between a glove class. Sta and the center of a shredded galaxy. See that's very good question There are a few Gobert. COST IS GONNA cost is have constant abundance of elements it's like on and calcium Others but there are a few classes like a Centauri which is readily visible in the summer sky where there was a big range inch in the chemical elements like Nelson on from star to star. And it's certainly been suggested that Those cover costs as well. You see a heavy element abundance range by well obtained the former nucleus off galaxies. Pain disrupted our listeners are way normally globular cluster. oster is a tight ball of thousands if not millions of stars which originally formed together at the same time in the same molecular gas and dust cloud but when you see globular clusters crossed with stars of very different MILICIA's very different compositions. That's the telltale sign you're talking about. Exactly yes yes. In fact we have an example inside serious various the The there's a classical m fifty four which is a very luminous go cost which is right at the center secretaries and in fact does have a Ryan the elephants. So that's almost smoking guns or the Saudi.

United States Central Collin Galaxy Galactic Center Spring Observatory Stella Stream Australian National University Galactic Centre Roll Economical Society Dacosta Cuomo Gary Professor Lapa Adventures Commissioner Pain Jack Hills
Sondland detailed 'quid pro quo' in amended testimony filed this week, transcript shows

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:55 min | 3 years ago

Sondland detailed 'quid pro quo' in amended testimony filed this week, transcript shows

"Oster sunland testimony came with a remarkable addendum. That just yesterday. He changed his story on one of the main questions. At the heart of this he came in and told you. Just tell if I've got this right as far as I can tell. He came in and told you a couple of weeks ago basically. Yeah there was a quid pro quo in terms of there being a White House meeting for the new Ukrainian president that he wasn't going to get that unless they pursued these investigations. I didn't really know. What the investigations were? But yeah. That was the quid pro quo when it comes to military aid no I would never be involved in that now. He's admitting yes. There was was a quid pro quo for military aid and yes he was involved in it and he said that after ambassador Taylor's Opening statement was released ambassador. Taylor said that ambassador Sunland told him everything's on the table. It's not only the meeting at the White House. It's also the military assistance in in Rachel. If all the president did was asked the president of Ukraine to to investigate his political opponent that would be an abuse of power but he did much worse he leveraged the White House meeting in three hundred and ninety one million dollars in taxpayer dollars and I have a different take though ambassador. Sure sunland where people are really beating them up for his original statement and that's really for prosecutors to determine what that means but investigations. It's often times the case that people will want to do the right thing and tell the truth and I think it's important that if other witnesses have not been truthful to us or not come in. Because they've they've been told to not do that. We should give them the space to do the right thing especially before These public hearings. Let me ask you something. That's kind of a part hypothetical about that. When I was looking at ambassador Sunland testimony today? Particularly this revision. He still insists that he has no idea why the military aid was withheld have held or who did it at the same time. Your Committee also released the seventy five pages of text messages in which we see ambassador. sunlen being directly really informed by Bill Taylor that was holding up the military aid per the president. And so he still telling you as of today in his revised statement statement. I don't know who did it. With withholding military aid. We can see him respond in real time on his phone to being told that the president was doing that he responds to that. By saying I'm all over it as as if all work on it so if it turns out that these witnesses are lying to you even if they're not trying to but they are lying to you should they expect that there will be some consequences offenses that for them not just in terms of how it plays for the President's defense I'm sure a Department of Justice that actually cares about what happened here. Not Bill Bars Department of Justice will look at the truthfulness of witnesses but again this early in the investigation. I do think it's common you see. People evolve oftentimes people. There's just some facts that witnesses is will even if they know it they'll have a close hold on it. Fortunately here ambassador Solomon's not the only one that proves that there was knowledge that the security assistance was being withheld. We have other witnesses witnesses that no that was going on. We've heard that in public statements and we can prove that in other west

Ambassador Taylor President Trump Sunland Oster Sunland Ambassador Solomon White House Department Of Justice Rachel Ukraine Ninety One Million Dollars