33 Burst results for "Osteoporosis"

Zombie cells central to the quest for active, vital old age

AP News Radio

01:03 min | Last month

Zombie cells central to the quest for active, vital old age

"Scientists are working toward an ancient goal staying healthy and active late in life The field of cellular senescence looks at how as we age our cells eventually stop dividing University of California scientist Leonard hayflick discovered the phenomenon by accident in 1960 After about 50 population doublings of the original cells I noticed that the cells stopped dividing It's a hot topic for research as scientists explore vaccines and drugs dubbed senolytics that might stop the accumulation of not quite dead cells which can trigger inflammation and are believed to lead to an array of conditions like dementia osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease Pairing a chemotherapy drug with a plant pigment showed promise in pilot studies of lung and kidney disease by the Mayo Clinic I've always thought that exercise is the best medicine there ever was invented 95 year old athlete and senior games medalist Richard solar returned to the track at age 50 and has his own prescription for a healthy old age Keep moving That's my motto I'm Jennifer King

Leonard Hayflick Dementia Osteoporosis University Of California Cardiovascular Disease Kidney Disease Mayo Clinic Richard Solar Lung Jennifer King
Major test of first possible Lyme vaccine in 20 years begins

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

Major test of first possible Lyme vaccine in 20 years begins

"Researchers are looking for thousands of volunteers in the U.S. and Europe to test the first potential vaccine against Lyme disease in 20 years Lyme disease is a growing tick-borne threat Pfizer's anneliese Anderson tells the AP they're working on a vaccine to protect both adults and kids as young as 5 We call it beer a 15 Robert to willer is an avid hunter in hiker He was the first in line when the study opened in central Pennsylvania And if I find a tick on me I don't know okay I'm good I don't have to worry about anything Doctor Allen Kevin's at the Altoona arthritis and osteoporosis center in Pennsylvania is looking for volunteers who spend lots of time in tick infested areas Not a single day goes by that someone either has a concern about Lyme disease could possibly have Lyme disease We live in an area where Lyme disease is endemic The Pfizer study will cover two tick seasons I'm Ed Donahue

Lyme Disease Anneliese Anderson Willer Allen Kevin Pfizer Altoona Arthritis And Osteopor Pennsylvania Europe U.S. Robert Ed Donahue
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"It's not something that we ask women have you gone through menopause yet. And it's important to know because it can help stratify who's at higher risk for bone density issues and the sooner we get involved the better. Because remember, after the age of 50, there is that natural age related bone loss. It doesn't have to be severe if we take action. But if we compound that with an early postmenopausal that deep steep drop off in bone density, if that happens early on, you're going to see somebody who may have to go on either medication or suffer the consequences of fractures. And what about certain conditions that really only occur in women and only occur after the age of 50? And I'm speaking about primary biliary cirrhosis. So this is a condition that really hits women versus men about ten times the amount and also it occurs in mid to late 50s. This is also when a woman's going through menopause. So it's like a perfect storm. And osteoporosis is very prevalent in people that have this deep and prolonged cholestasis. And what that means is this is the beautiful biliary tree that exists within the liver. And if this is obstructed, we can actually damage the liver. In addition to not being able to absorb our fat soluble nutrients like vitamins ADE, CoQ10, fact soluble important fatty acids like fish oil. So we have to make sure in those patients that they're getting the nutritional support that they need. And they do recommend in these patients if the nutritional and fat cyborg supplementation doesn't do the trick, they may have to go on bisphosphonates. So what about as we go through the timeline postmenopausal issues like breast cancer? This is when a lot of women, if they're going to get breast cancer, this first starts happening. And osteopenia and osteoporosis are well recognized side effects of aromatase therapy, which a lot of patients do go on. There are some other adjuvant therapies that will lead to increased bone loss and a higher fracture rate as well. And there's even a condition that call it actually cancer treatment induced bone loss. And that's how common that it happens because they've really suppressed the ovary. And without that estrogen, there's going to be bone loss. And when you compound that with chemotherapy and inflammation and radiation treatment, these women are at high risk for abundancy issues. And also when they're on aromatase inhibitors. So let's talk about now having thought about all the things we've gone through in the timeline. And all the imbalances that can occur. All the triggers and mediators, how do we organize that so we can remember it. And we're going to put it in that grows B mnemonic to hang on to it. We'll start with G, which is digestion absorption. And these are some of the conditions that are absolutely associated with loss of bone density and osteoporosis. And to be thinking about that, any of these conditions really affect the digestion absorption of critical nutrients that we need. Even things like small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, for example, which is known as sibo, or we talk about leaky gut, intestinal permeability. Those are also associated. Acute pancreatitis is a severe issue for a lot of patients. You probably heard a lot of the commercials about exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or EPI. That can also be associated with bone density loss. But an acute pancreatitis these patients have a higher risk of osteoporosis, particularly if they are women and particularly if they are in that postmenopausal age group. If they've had several episodes that increases their risk of osteoporosis more and more, this is a study that looked at children that had been screened for celiac. Now they didn't have symptoms of low bone density, but they analyzed these children with celiac compared to patients that didn't have celiac. And they found that celiac disease patients had reduced bone mineral density. They had less vitamin D, higher parathyroid hormone levels, parathyroid polls, the calcium out of the bones to keep the calcium levels stable throughout the body. And they also had increased systemic levels of different types of cytokines. And think of those as really inflammation, almost chemical inflammation within the body. What they did, though, is they took these children and put them on a gluten free diet and then reexamined them at a period of time later and found that those children later, once they were eliminated gluten, had no difference in bone metal density, vitamin D levels, parathyroid levels, and their cytokine levels were indistinguishable from the controls. So that's good news for those of us who may have gluten sensitivity or even celiac disease to eliminate gluten. Think of gluten as a sabotage saboteur abundance. What about the use of proton pump inhibitors? Now, these are medications that are passed out like candy in the medical world. And this is a study looking at young adults. These are adults that should not have bone density issues. When they place these young adults on proton pump inhibitors, they found that in children below the age of 18, there was a suggestion of lower bone density, but it wasn't quite significant. In children between the ages of young adults between the ages of 18 to 29, there was a significant increase in bone density and fracture rates on those who were on proton comp inhibitors. So let's look at Marsha. She's a case of a patient who saw a colleague of mine originally. And she was now liparis, postmenopausal woman who had had osteoporosis and did not want to go on bisphosphonates. She was very thin, very small frame. She was taking an NSAID

osteoporosis biliary cirrhosis breast cancer Acute pancreatitis celiac disease cancer liparis Marsha
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:49 min | 2 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"But first of all, you've got a bigger body, but the other thing about milk is to consider why how milk has evolved. I mean, milk, the purpose of milk is to help grazing animals on the plains of Africa, the infants that are at high risk of being eaten by the local carnivores grow rapidly so they can be strong enough and fast enough to be free of predation. So that's a very strong selective fitness factor. Evolutionary drive to get these baby ruminants, the gazelles and the other grazing animals to grow very quickly. So that's a good thing. Except if you're consuming these foods that stimulate growth in children, but in adults, these growth factors that may be stimulating biological systems that relate to cancer. And while the data are definitely not clear yet, there seems to be evidence of cancer of high levels of very consumption causing prostate cancer men, especially aggressive forms of prostate cancer and endometrial cancer, although interestingly milk intake may protect against colorectal cancer. And that may be an effect of the calcium. You know, the issue around growth, this very interesting, because there are 60 different naturally occurring hormones in milk, not including the ones that they pump into the cows or that they milk them all pregnant or that they give them for growth factors. So these are just naturally occurring. And the purpose of these is to grow a little baby calf into a big cow, very rapidly, like you said. So I think that might be good for infants, but it's probably not good for long-term long-term health. And it's worse now because of modern industrial farming. Because a hundred years ago, you'd send the cows out, they'd get pregnant. And you wouldn't be breast, you wouldn't be milking them during pregnancy, the baby cow would be born, would feed a little bit. And then you'd milk for a while until the next cycle. But now, in hyper accelerated hyper efficient industrial agriculture, cows are being milked throughout their pregnancy. And so those hormones that would be normally pregnant present in pregnancy, estrogens and progesterone and other hormones get dumped into milk. So the milk supply is even though milk normally has many growth promoting factors. It has even more so today. So that's something to bear in mind. And even if you're in an organic organic milk, it could still be the case where you're milking. Organic milk. Unless you're getting it from like a local farm that's using more traditional low intensity agricultural practices, organic milk is not going to be any different in that regard. So David, in terms of the recommendations, I'm going to sort of pressure a little bit on that because I think we have a government that's telling us we should be having three glass of milk a day, and then we can't have school lunches without milk. Do you think that's the right policy? Do you think it needs to be modified? What should we do? It's wrong. We came forth in our paper, at least in our opinion. Quite clearly, that there is no evidence basis for all adults eating three servings of dairy a day. Milk or milk equivalents. And we recommend zero to two. Which takes into account that milk and dairy products have been traditionally part of many cultures. They can be delicious, cheese, yogurt, and fermented dairy products actually look very good. They tend to be in epidemiological in the best epidemiological studies consistently popping up as among the most protective foods we eat. That may not have to do with the inherent dairy per se, but the fact that yogurt is one of the few naturally fermented foods that remain in our diet. Yeah. Hundred years ago, most cultures. Germany or France or a lot of what we would have eaten would have been fermented at least during the winter. Yeah, but now even the food that people think are like pickles aren't naturally fermented. They might be chemically treated to pickle them, whereas yogurt, especially if it's not sugar sweetened, is one of those traditional fermented products that may be beneficial to the gut microbiome and have other health. Yeah, that's important we just said, the sweeten ones. I mean, there's more sugar pounds in sugar sweetened yogurt, like fruit sweetened yogurt than per ounce of soda. So it's definitely not a health food when you add the sugar in. And I think that the question then comes. So we're not arguing to get rid of dairy products, but we just don't think that this super intense consumption. I mean, three servings a day, which is would make dairy products like among the most dominant source of calories for any single food, and many people's diets. We think there's no evidence basis for that. And for people who we don't think that there's going to be much harm from consuming one or two servings a day, but for people who are not consuming any dairy products and eating a high quality diet, they shouldn't feel badly about that choice. There's no reason to suddenly dump in a lot of dairy. You know, osteoporosis is really a common problem. And it's so we chatted about earlier, one of the challenges is if your bones get thin and weak and you fall and break a bone, particularly a hip as you get older, it's like getting a terminal cancer diagnosis in terms of your risk of death. So it's really quite shocking. I think 50% of people who get a hip fracture die within a year. So that's not great. So you really don't want to get osteoporosis. And historically, you know, we really didn't have a lot of it because most of us were out there working hard using our bodies and eating a very nutrient dense diet. And unfortunately, the dogma has been, that if you want to prevent osteoporosis, you have to drink a lot of milk and take a lot of calcium. Unfortunately, that's not true. And the got milk ads were taken off the air and out of magazines because the FCC are the Federal Trade Commission, which regulates truth in advertising, said there's no data you have to stop advertising.

prostate cancer cancer endometrial cancer colorectal cancer Africa David Germany terminal cancer France osteoporosis FCC Federal Trade Commission
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:27 min | 2 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"So decreasing those things, which is our process diet will cause you to be more acidic, exactly. And then the green leafy vegetables are very good and then things like sardines, which are great because they have natural sardines are one of my favorite foods because guess what? They got great protein. They have great omega threes and they have great calcium and it's highly absorbable calcium. So if you want to actually help your bones eat sardines. Yeah, herrings, sardines, mackerel, that's what I'm for lunch. I'm having canned mackerel with ones with the bones in them is getting better. Exactly. That's how a lot of the populations will live on islands would get their calcium they eat the fish bones. Yeah, yeah. So getting rid of things like alcohol, caffeine, excess salt, excess protein, too much sugar, obviously all the sodas, the junk food, the food added, that's so important. And then adding in all the foods that are going to build your bone, like the sardines or herring or mackerel, but also the greens. I mean, where do cows get their calcium from? Grass. Grass. So you can actually get more calcium more absorbable calcium from things like tahini, which is sesame seeds, sesame seeds. That's probably the highest source. Chia seeds have more calcium per serving than milk. And it's better absorbed. Plus omega threes and fiber. All the dark green leafy vegetables that you mentioned, the vitamin K is also in these green leafy vegetables. So you omega three fats are really important, which you can get those from the sardines and the fatty fish. So a lot of foods that are bone building foods. So we do need calcium. There's no question. Your bones are made primarily of calcium and phosphate. But how much calcium? And minimum requirement to be perfectly healthy bones probably at most a half of what has been traditionally viewed as necessary in the United States in the UK, their minimum calcium requirements are about a half of what they are here. And in some populations, like in South America, the adults do perfectly well getting even a third or a quarter of the amount of calcium, 300 milligrams a day. You mentioned that really important. That level of calcium can be obtained from so if you're going to get a gram or more day of calcium, milk is sort of the obvious source. But if you accept that we don't need that much, the 506 hundred milligrams a day or probably more than sufficient. Well, that's easily obtained from just a basic diet. A serving of kale is going to get you a third to a halfway there. She is serving of sardines. Nuts seeds. Chia seeds, tahini. Those are my favorite. I mean, one of the things you said that I just want to come back to, which is really important is this whole idea of calcium balance. And when you look at countries like Sweden that you wrote about in your paper, they have the highest intakes of calcium and the highest risk of fractures and countries like Indonesia and China have the lowest intakes of calcium and the lowest risk of fractures. So one of the things I remember when I was medical director Kenny ranch, I often talked about was osteoporosis and it was really clear that there are a lot of things in our culture that drove calcium loss. So it's not just about how much you take in. It's how much you pee out. So caffeine alcohol, sugar, phosphoric acid from sodas, too much meat, perhaps I don't know if that's true, but that's what it seemed to be the high protein acid load. All these things, stress, all these things cause bone loss. And if you mitigate those in other words, you cut those out of your diet or you reduce some and you deal with stress and you deal with the fact of how you're losing calcium that your net net may be better than if you're taking super high levels of calcium. And the other thing that's interesting to note is that cows get their calcium and have great bones. Where do they get it from? Grass. They're drinking milk. Three servings a day. For a little bit, and then they don't. And they're getting it from grass. So why not? So that's definitely green leafy vegetables are actually a very good source of calcium. You know, kale, a serving of kale has almost as much calcium as a serving of milk. And you get many fewer total calories that way. But let's go back to these ecological comparisons. Those are the comparisons where you look at different countries and see different risks. It's important to understand that those are limitations to those kinds of analyses. What they do convincingly tell us is that you can, it's possible to be human being, consume no milk. Relatively low levels of calcium and have low fracture risk. The problem with these studies is that they're very confounded. So when you look compared the Swede to the Filipino, you know, there's a big difference in height and height is a major risk factor for boning fraction. So ironically, it may be that milk consumption in adolescence in childhood and adolescence. Actually, increases risk for fractured adulthood. So how could that be? Yeah. We've talked about that you don't really put away a calcium bank in childhood. You don't get that benefit. But the one thing that is pretty clear that milk does in childhood is accelerate growth. It's not hugely it's not going to turn a. Horse racing jockey into a baseball player. But you get about an extra centimeter for every additional survey glass of milk a day. So maybe and this is a population average, but so maybe for comparing low and high consumers, you grow an extra inch. But on a population basis, that increased height is one of the major risk factors of having a fracture. Simply put the bigger they come the harder they fall. So I'm kind of screwed. I'm like 6 foot three. I would just advise you to go fall. Well, I mean, working on my core strength and muscle mass. And that also helps mitigate. But this is a big, you know, this is one of the first myths that drinking a lot of milk as a kid is going to reduce your risk of getting it fractured as adulthood. And if anything, it's the opposite. So these are the businesses, the basis for our recommendations, which is you need calcium prevent osteoporosis, and that's why our guidelines tell us to have three glasses of milk a day. Yeah, well, you do need calcium. You just don't need that much. And the amount that you need can be obtained from other sources. And so what about the idea of weight? Which again, it's not to say that milk is inherently bad or toxic. And we talked about one situation where it could be helpful. People with borderline nutritional status, but when they drink milk, they're drinking, you know, drinking a glass of milk and maybe you just have two cookies after school as a kid, instead of having the whole package without milk, or with fat free milk, which doesn't taste very good. And isn't very satiating. Yeah, I want to get into the fat free thing in a minute. I know it's your favorite topic, but I just want to sort of summarize here about the calcium story because what you're saying essentially is that all the data and there were over a hundred papers you reviewed, all the data really didn't point to a benefit of increased calcium and take through supplements or through dairy, and that there was potential risks as well. And then it wasn't just a benign intervention that there may be increased risks with increased calcium intake in different situations, whether it's cancer or whether it's from perhaps the high levels of calcium causing greater growth and fracture risk. We don't know, but it's not a slam dunk. So you think you think based on the current data that you reviewed in the New England Journal of Medicine, so you think that the government should change its dietary guidelines. Well, let me just say, so we talked about the tradeoffs. And milk is a one downside of extra growth. We talked about was fracture risk. But another downside of being tall is cancer risk being told you are the higher your risk of cancer. Maybe partly it's more, you're okay. You're taking good care of yourself.

Chia Kenny ranch osteoporosis South America Sweden Indonesia kale United States UK China baseball cancer New England Journal of Medicin
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:11 min | 2 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"They were in their young 30 years old, and they went up into outer space and guess what, in outer space, you float around. There's no stress on your bones. And when they came down on Planet Earth, they actually lost a significant amount of their bone loss, bone mass because they were not having sort of the body and it says, oh, you know, we don't need our bones. We're just going to jettison a balloon where jettisoned the bailiff. And you get rid of the bones that you don't need. So our bodies naturally will make stronger, better bones when we respond and use stress weight resistance exercise bands resistance machines, et cetera, is very, very important for maintaining good bone mass. Let's get back to the diagnosis part because you do a dexa scale. Let's see, you have low bone density. What do you look for next? Well, you look for things that doctors don't often check that we look at here. What do you think about? What are the most common things that maybe a traditional doctor might look at? And one of the tests that we might do that are quite different. Oh yeah, so some of the tests that we'll do is the, as I mentioned, the dexa scan, we will then do urinary bone resorption. So we can actually measure the collagen breakdown products like NTO peptides in the urine. Basically if you're peeing out your bones, exactly. When you lose your bones, you pee them out. That's exactly right. You can do that. Measuring the vitamin D level is very, very important. That's another vitamin D helps regulate calcium and calcium metabolism. Far more important than calcium. Way more important than calcium. And then the other thing that's also important is to realize is that you do not want to take too much calcium. And I actually tell my patients, I don't want you actually taking a calcium supplement. Most of the time. I want you getting it through your diet. Yes. Exactly. And if you do take it in a supplement form, you probably don't need and you don't want to go over, probably about 600, 500 to 600 milligrams. And there are studies showing that women who are taking higher doses over a thousand like 1200, 1500 milligrams, they actually get more calcification in their arteries, too. Yeah. Well, that's the calcium is the nature's band aid. So wherever there's inflammation, calcium goes. And so when you talk about hardening of the arteries, if somebody calcium buildup in the arteries is in plaque. So that's not good. So we look at vitamin D, we look at the bonus. We look at the bone resorption. We look at vitamin K vitamin K, vitamin K vitamin made in your gut, and if you don't have a good microbiome, that can be a problem. Exactly. Yeah, so there's actually two forms of vitamin K there's a vitamin K that you find in plants and the vitamin K that you make from gut bacteria. And vitamin K is traditionally thought of as a vitamin, which helps with clotting. But vitamin K actually has an effect on bone density. And it's very, very important to get adequate amounts of vitamin K so you can actually take low levels of vitamin K and that can help with clotting issues, but you need much higher levels of vitamin K to have a bone effect. Yeah. And we do the test here, which is a mouthful, but it's called under carboxylated osteocalcin. And it is a biomarker for a functional vitamin K deficiency. And this is a test I love to do in patients. Because people don't know about it. Doctors don't usually. Right now, there's only one lab that actually does it, but measuring that can tell you whether or not you have a functional vitamin K deficiency. And I oftentimes in most of the time, if I'm giving vitamin D, I will give vitamin K at the same time. Otherwise, you'll start getting calcium deposition in tissues that you don't want to. That's right. And then there are other conventional things that often get looked at like parathyroid hormone. Parathyroid hormone a tumor on your parathyroid gland, it causes more bone turnover if you have certain cancers, like blood cancers, but you can look at protein levels in the brain that look can be affecting bone health. And also, you know, people can get weird things like Cushing's or adrenal tumors or brain tumors that cause high steroid levels in the body. So there's a lot of things that we look at. Most of those don't turn out to be it's mostly the age related, just general sedentary life, bad lifestyle habit, osteoporosis. But we also look here at ultraviolet center and a lot of other things that give us clues about why you might have a problem. For example, we look at the gut because if you have leaky gut, you could drive inflammation that causes problems. If you have digestive issues and not absorbing minerals, if you're taking an acid blocker, you care about that. And also gluten is a huge cause of osteoporosis. Yeah. People don't realize that, if you have celiac, for sure, but even if you have low grade non celiac gluten sensitivity, definitely it causes leaky gut impairs absorption. So there's a lot of things we look at that may be different than what you see in a normal practice. Yeah, it's interesting. You mentioned that because one of the biggest risk factors is having celiac disease because gluten issues can affect mineralization and one of the, one of my take home things when I do with patients is I often ask them because I have a family of dentists is I also ask how many feelings do you have? Do you have any cavities? Do you have weak teeth? It's a very common thing. People say, well, my dentist said, I have weak enamel. Well, why do you have weak enamel? Well, guess what? Celiac disease is associated with enamel defects. So not only do you have weak enamel. You've got weak bones. So we do this work up and someone has osteoporosis and on a traditional doctor, what do they give them? Usually the bisphosphonates. Those are the things that cause maximum actonel, those kinds of things. And the interesting thing about them is they have a not so good risk benefit ratio. You can get significant side effects. You can actually necrosis of the jaw. They're not to be used in our risk free. They're not risk free. They're injectable drugs. They do them injectable now. And also, there's Forteo, which is like a parathyroid hormone. Like drug. And sometimes doctors even use drugs like avista, which blocks estrogen receptors. They're selective estrogen blockers. And of course, doctors use hormones like estrogen therapy, although that comes with certain risks. Absolutely. And even men testosterone therapy. So these are all therapeutic options out there, but we take a different approach in functional medicine. So what would be an approach that we would focus on with osteoporosis different? Where do you start with patients and how do you build up the treatment model for them? Well, the first thing I get people to do is to start using their bones, start using their muscles. So getting people to the gym, doing some resistance exercise, at least three days a week, where you're really stressing the bones is going to be the biggest thing. Optimizing the right strength training. And also body weight exercise. You just really need to push your bones. And at the same time, you're building the muscles, and then you're also helping with balance. So it's not so much that when you fall because everybody falls. But you want to have the muscles and the reflex time to be able to catch yourself so that you don't necessarily break something. That's right. So really important to have the muscle mass and the it's true. Yeah, core strengthening exercises are so important. People have just so low stability as they get older and they lose their balance and that's an important point. And then also optimizing vitamin D levels and we actually will do some genetics relate to that. And interestingly, there are some gene variations related to the vitamin D receptors. So people who have genetic variations of the vitamin D receptors need higher levels than quote unquote normal. So if you look at the range of normal vitamin D, a standard laboratory is about 30 to a hundred. And if you're at 32, your doctor will say, oh, you're fine, you have enough vitamin D. Well, guess what? If you have a problem with the polymorphisms related to the vitamin D receptor, you need to have that be on the higher end. You may need to be up to about 80 to a hundred in order to have that the beneficial effect. That's right. So we really focus on exercise and strength training. Focus on vitamin D levels. We also do a lot with diet, right? Because you want to eliminate the bone dissolving things in your life and your lifestyle and your diet and you want to add the bone building thing. So what are the bone dissolving things we want to help people get rid of and we talked about them a little bit, but yeah, well, excess amounts of protein and also if you have acidic urine, you can actually be more susceptible to more or less peeing out your bones.

osteoporosis blood cancers adrenal tumors brain tumors celiac disease Cushing cancers avista
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"So it's not just the calcium. It's the connective cartilage tissue that's in the center of the bones that makes it healthy. And that's also, this is a very simple thing to remember is one of the big things that increases a person's risk for osteoporosis is smoking. And I always tell my patients, you know, you ever see somebody who's a chronic smoker. What do they have? Wrinkles. They get more wrinkles. Right, smoking, up regulates matrix metalloprotease enzymes, which are break down collagen. And that's why patients who are smokers have higher risk for cardiovascular disease, higher risk for osteoporosis, because they're actually breaking down their connective tissue. Wow. Yeah. That's another reason to stop smoking. Exactly. Actually, it's funny 'cause if you have a woman who's a smoker, they oftentimes, they have one of the things I'll tell them as well, you don't want to have wrinkles. And they'll stop smoking because the vanity is that name is right. That's right. Well, you mentioned something I want to come back to, which is this whole idea of inflammation. And we've talked about all kinds of conditions on this podcast in the house call. And the truth is most chronic illnesses are related to inflammation, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, dementia, depression, autoimmune disease, obviously. But osteoporosis just seems a little bizarre to be related to inflammation. How does that work and how do we identify what the factors are that are causing the inflammation that leads to osteoporosis? And there are measures that you can do to check for sort of low grade inflammation, things like HS or high sensitivity, C reactive protein, gly a, looking at their diet. So an anti inflammatory diet helps to decrease inflammation. Looking at essential fatty acids are also important, looking at whether or not there's any silent gut inflammation when you do stool analysis, you can check for markers, which I call my CRPs of the gut, which is calprotectin. So if you have chronic gut low grade gut inflammation, that's going to potentially increase your risk for osteoporosis. If you have sort of low grade osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, which is more severe than osteoarthritis. It's more of a significant joint destructive inflammatory arthritis. Those are things which break down bone. Very, very slowly. It's like a slow leak. And our American diet is our standard American diet is a very inflammatory diet of processed food, sugars, refined oils, and lack of protective anti inflammatory foods. Which are the phytonutrients in plant foods. And so we get this incredibly upregulated immune system, which is why we're all suffering from COVID in America we've been over 11 million cases over a quarter million deaths today as this recording. And I think we're uniquely susceptible because we're so inflamed and osteoporosis is one of the victims of inflammation. Our bones are one of the victims. And it's from leaky gut, it's from our processed diet. It's from a lack of protective foods. So we really have an opportunity to really change that dynamic and shift the balance from bone breakdown to bone buildup. Exactly. Healthy, healthy bones. Yeah, and you know, how do we normally treat this with traditional medicine? What is the general approach in terms of diagnosis and treatment? Well, diagnosis as we mentioned is really with dexa scan and I always like to emphasize, especially as women tend to have osteoporosis more than men, but men can get osteoporosis. And there are certain medications that can do that. But I actually think that one of the ideal things to do is to actually get your bone density checked when you have no symptoms whatsoever. When you're at peak bone mass, which is around 30 to 35 years of age, you want to know what your bones are then. But your baseline is. Right, exactly. Because I can't tell you the number of times that I've seen a patient and they're a woman, especially a woman, they're entering into a metabolic Aspen. Have you had your bone density checked, test checked? No. Was it what you need to actually have that checked? And if you have one when you're at peak bone mass, which is around maybe 25 to 30 years old, and then you get one as you're entering menopause at the perimenopausal area, then you can see, okay, where are your bones going? Where are they going? You have two points. One data point doesn't show you much. Two data points show you a trend of eth is going up, going down, staying the same. Very, very important information. So make sure you get your bone density early and at intervals that are depending on what your bone density shows. If you're great at 30, you can probably wait until you're 50, but if you're menopause, you want to check more. And men get osteoporosis too. Absolutely. And then get us your problems. It's not exactly anybody can get it. And again, high levels of alcohol, high levels of caffeine. The PPIs which acid blockers acid blockers, big ones. That's the third leading most prescribed drug in the world, and it's an acid blocker, and if you take this for or reflux, you're going to get osteoporosis because you're inhibiting mineral absorption. Nexium all those drugs. Chronic steroid use is a big risk factor for osteoporosis, a huge one, and then, as I mentioned earlier, smoking. And then just sedentary lifestyle. If you're not stretching your bones, you're not putting stress on your bones. I remember when I was in my trainings that are losing, basically. These are losing, and there's actually an interesting thing. It's called wool slaw, which is that bone responds to stress. And I remember reading this article, looked at astronauts.

osteoporosis cardiovascular disease rheumatoid arthritis osteoarthritis COVID autoimmune disease dementia diabetes depression cancer America Aspen
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:03 min | 3 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"But the most rapid bone loss occurs during menopause. I mean, look at the steep decline. Look at that curve really fall off. And so what I find interesting is that in both men and women, as they age, their estrogen levels tend to drop off. And estrogen is so important for bone density. We just reviewed why. And so in both sexes, there is an age related decline in bone density. And that leads to increased bone resorption. In other words, increased activity of the osteoclasts, right? Because you don't have the estrogen and also impaired bone formation because you don't have the estrogen and protagonist to stimulate and to stimulate and recruit those osteoblasts, the bone builders. Now, this impact really hits women harder, especially during that menopause where that slope just drops off. Like it's off of a cliff. Think about what is recommended right now from the U.S. preventative services task force. Remember, they want to check your level of bone density at the age of 65. As you can see, that's really after most of the bone density has been already taken place. And at that point, it's not surprising that so many women have to go on medication because we really haven't caught them early enough, halfway. But when is the most common age for menopause? It turns out it's about 50 and a half, okay? So at 50 and a half, we're actually catching women right as they're starting to fall off that cliff. What if we checked their bone density earlier? And what if we started to take action to improve all the things that can improve gum density so that we don't necessarily eliminate all bone density loss. But we bring that curve back up. We sort of blunt the curve, if you will. And what if we as women and men as well? Really try to work hard to improve our bone density for the rest of our lifetime. Maybe there'll be a decreased slope of age related bone density loss. And with that, we might be able to maintain our bone density and not have to be placed on medications that have so many side effects. Well, that's been my goal. In conventional medicine, what they've taught us to do is to look for signs of this silent insidious disease and the sad thing that happens is once we see those signs and what we call that dorsal kyphosis, the dowager's haunt, here's a picture of a man who has it. And I know you've seen this also in women quite a bit, but both men and women can have it. At that point, there's already a lot of vertebral bone loss. In fact, another way of picking up on this silent disease is by looking at the loss of height loss of one and a half inches, raises the concern that there's already been some vertebral fractures. Other signs of osteoporosis could be tooth loss or more dental cavities or skeletal pain due to fractures or frequent fractures happening more often. But this is all really too late, isn't it? So what if.

U.S. preventative services tas osteoporosis
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

08:05 min | 8 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"Best health. You still need to be kind of guiding and directing that process. The second part of this is nourish. You need to restore the raw materials and nutrients that need for stronger healthier bones through diet through digestion through absorption. You need to make sure you have the right inputs to produce stronger outputs because you can't rebuild something that's not there, right? And that's going to happen on three layers. Are you taking in the right nutrients in the right amounts? Are you actually absorbing those nutrients? If you have digestive issues, those digestive issues can actually be a source of inflammation that contributes to bone breakdown in the body. And then are those nutrients actually making it to the cell level. And a lot of times people are just told, take your calcium, take your vitamin D but there are other nutrients that are important beyond just that. Magnesium. Magnesium is unbelievably important, not just for our bones, but for our overall health. One of the primary functions of magnesium is that we needed to make proteins in our body. So when you eat proteins in your diet, be it from animals, eggs, fish, dairy, beans, peas, brown rice, whatever, through the process of digestion. You break those proteins down. And once we absorb those amino acids, we can then rebuild them in our bodies into various proteins. But you need magnesium to do this. And just about everything in the body is a protein is made by proteins. Bones are 50% protein by volume. Another important nutrient that's often overlooked is vitamin K there are two types of vitamin K well, at least for the sake of this conversation. Let's just say K one and K two. K one can be converted to K two, but not efficiently. K two is what's most important for bone health. There are some major forms there's MK four. There's MK 7. But vitamin K two is going to aid in bone mineralization. And that's super important too. So it's more than just calcium and vitamin D and then the last part of this is I would say the last part of this process would be build. You need to build strength of body, strength of mind, strength of bone, you need to reduce your stress, improve your sleep, get an exercise plan in place. It's going to help you actually build bone strength and do those things in a way that's going to prevent fracture and injury and things like that. So that's the high level. And that's pretty much the same across the board for people, no matter how old you are. Yeah, it seems like great advice across the board like you said, even for kids starting at a young age, make sure they have those nutrients optimized, and they're getting a very diet. It seems like you've mentioned the absorption piece a couple of times. And I think that's a thing that is not talked about enough in modern society is not only is our diet nutrient depleted compared to what it was a couple generations ago. But we're likely not absorbing things nearly as well because of all of the other things that are inputs in our bodies and the chemicals we're exposed to. It also seems like there is a very direct connection here between bone loss and gut issues. So can you talk more about that and kind of what to be aware of related to gut health and if that can be part of the problem? Absolutely. Yes, major connection between gut health and bone health. So I'd always talk about a bucket earlier, but let's forget about the bucket for a second. Let's just say, you know, we're going to use a completely different metaphor. Think of our bodies and our bones as being like plants. In order to grow, they need nutrients and the right conditions, right? So most people focus so much on the nutrients, the salads, the smoothies, the supplements, that they fail to consider the soil. Our gut is like the soil. We absorb almost everything here. So when we take in food or supplements, we start to break them down into smaller pieces in our mouth. That food makes its way into our stomach where it's turned in the acidic mix to break it down even further. Then it makes its way to our small intestine. Our soil. And this is where our nutrients are broken down to their smallest form to be absorbed by us. The plants. But in order to absorb anything, we need roots in our soil, right? Our roots are called villi. These tiny little hair like projections cover our small intestine and are responsible for absorbing nutrients. They absorb the nutrients from the food you eat and then shuttle those nutrients into your bloodstream so they can travel to where they're eating the body. Whether that's for healing a cut in your hand, growing your hair or fingernails or rebuilding stronger bones. The job of our roots are villi is so important that the total surface area they use to absorb nutrients is the size of a football field. How amazing is that? But when we have poor digestion and our gut health is an optimal, we can't properly break down our food. And when we can't properly break down our food, nutrients won't be available. And if nutrients aren't available, the villi won't be able to absorb them. And the body won't have the raw materials and resources needed for stronger healthier bones. So where do we have to start? Well, we need to start with our nutrients making it to your soil. If you have bloating, belching, burping, excessive gas, even diarrhea after meals, or you feel like food just sits in your stomach and stagnates for a long time. There's a good chance you have low stomach acid. Age, stress, nutrient deficiencies, gut infections are all contributors. And surprisingly, you know one of the best indicators of low stomach acid is reflux, which is shocking, right? When people have reflux, what do they take for it? The same thing I took for a number of years, comes and proton pump inhibitors like prilosec privacy, NXIVM, map result. Like most people who take PPIs, I'm mistakenly thought I had too much stomach acid. And I ended up suppressing what little stomach acid I did have. The reason that's a problem is because we need stomach acid to properly break down and extract nutrients from our food. Like amino acids, the building blocks of protein. I mentioned earlier, a bones are 50% protein by volume. They need amino acids. Calcium is the primary mineral constituent of our bones. Low stomach acid reduces its absorption. Magnesium iron B 12, if you have low stomach acid, your soil will be starved with these nutrients and others. The next question about gut health, does your soil have the right balance of bugs? Other problems are going to rise. If your soil has the wrong balance of bugs, which dysbiosis, the presence of bad bugs, gut infections, or even good bugs in the wrong place, sibo, like small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. These bugs make up our microbiome. When this is out of balance, it's going to negatively affect your body's ability to absorb nutrients and it's going to contribute to leaky gut and systemic inflammation. Both of which are bad for your body and your bones. So again, how do you know if your bugs are not balanced? You might experience the bloating, the belching, the excessive gas, the heartburn, the constipation, diarrhea, even fatigue. Those can all be indicators. And then the last part of the digestive health picture, ties into one of the reasons why I developed that, you know, at a younger age is there are multiple conditions and diseases that affect your body's ability to absorb nutrients. So are your roots even working properly? Celiac disease is one of them. And it's a primary reason for my osteoporosis. How does that contribute to nutrient malabsorption bone mass when you ingest gluten, those villi, are roots become blunted to the point where they can't do their job. And so for me, my roots effectively became damaged. My body was starved with T bone healthy nutrients like calcium phosphorus and vitamin D those are usually absorbed a little higher up in the small intestine where that damage is more likely to occur. And this went on for years, had no idea calcium was being raped for my bones to serve other purposes. And there's a good chance that that can be a contributing factor in osteoporosis. So we need to make sure if you are still consuming gluten, you know, the TTG IgA is a great test to help with that. And then also the total serum IgA.

diarrhea football systemic inflammation Celiac disease osteoporosis
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

07:58 min | 8 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"And imagine that bucket has a small hole in it with a very tiny leak and over time over years and years that water level gets lower and lower and lower. Until one day, you go get that bone density scan, you realize your water is low. You have osteopenia and osteoporosis. And you're shocked. I thought my bucket was full of water and usually the reasons are because either you have a bunch of health issues like I did and that's what led you to go get a dexa scan or you're on the opposite end of the spectrum. You work out. You think you're eating healthy, you're doing everything, right? You get a dexa scan is a check on the box. You find out you have osteoporosis. And either of those scenarios, you have this reaction of how do I fix this right now? And sometimes people make quick drastic decisions, including taking a bone drug, often influenced by our doctors to immediately plug the hole and fill our buckets back up with water. And we do this before identifying where the hole is, what caused it or if there was even a hole in the first place because your bucket may not have ever been full of water to begin with. So let's talk about the first one. Is there a hole in your bucket? Are you actively losing bone? A single bone density scan will not tell you that. And you need to know the answer to that before you make other decisions because something could be causing that loss could be multiple things. So the test we want to use here is called a serum CTX test or a CT load peptide test. This is a bone turnover marker test. And it's looking at the level of bone breakdown that's taking place in the body. It's measuring these collagen bone protein fragments if that level is elevated or really high. That can be an indicator of active bone loss. So that's one of the ways to tell in between dexa scans if you're still actively losing bone. Then the question becomes what caused the hole? And this is leading more into your question of what contributes or could have contributed to the bone loss in osteoporosis. And a lot of people don't know this, but there are multiple types of osteoporosis. There's primary osteoporosis, which is typically related to a decrease in estrogen and postmenopausal women. Estrogen has a protective effect on bone when estrogen levels decrease as they do during menopause. It's going to cause an increase in the activity level cells that break down bone. But then there's a whole nother cause of osteoporosis. That secondary osteoporosis. This is a category. I fell into. And this is where osteoporosis occurs as a result of, you know, behaviors, conditions, diseases, disorders, medications, variety of those different things. Most people who are unexpectedly diagnosed and their 30s or 40s from 50s and 60s, they have or had a secondary cost. And that's what that's what we have to go and explore and figure out. And then the last part is and this is important for kids to did you just not start with a full bucket? Did you just not achieve peak bone mass? Because what's important to keep in mind, if you are a diagnosed with osteoporosis, it does not automatically mean that you're actively losing bone. You may just not have built up enough bone in your younger years. Up to 90% of your bone mass is acquired by age 18. And it peaks by the time you turn 30. So by the time you turn 30, your bucket is about as full as it's going to be. So if when you're younger, you had an eating disorder, poor nutrition, low calcium and vitamin D intake. If you smoked or drank excessively, if you let a sedentary lifestyle or if you took certain medications, those all could have prevented you from achieving peak bone mass and starting with a full bucket. So many directions to go from there. I think the first being so as parents, what can we be aware of to make sure hopefully our kids do reach that full bone mass from an early age? What are the factors we want to be really careful about? Yeah, especially with young kids to get them active. Get them outdoors playing. Get them playing sports. Any of those activities when they're younger that are going to surprise their bones, we want to stop her bone density in the legs of soccer players is usually great because it's multi directional. They're changing direction really quick. They're the short intense bouts. And then they're off. So that's great. Resistance training is great. Getting them active and walking and moving, all fantastic. One thing I would say for kids too is sugar. We gotta pay attention to sugar. We don't want to have the consuming a lot of different sugar. Excessive sugar intake could exacerbate vitamin D deficiency, research have actually found that a high intake of fructose is going to increase the expression of an enzyme responsible for degrading vitamin D and that's also going to decrease the expression of an enzyme that helps synthesize vitamin D too. So it's going to reduce our internal absorption of calcium. It's going to increase our urinary excretion of calcium and magnesium. These are important minerals for our bones. So it's not just, you know, I know we hear all the time not to eat sugar and not to be given our kids a bunch of cookies and cakes and candies and all those things. But there's good reason for it too for the health of our skeleton. So those are some important things. Chemicals, paying attention to chemicals when we're younger to I would say, and I'm sure this is about the most common advice out there. And one of the easiest low hanging fruit that we can do is try to shift to consuming organic produce and things like that if possible. That way, we're not getting things like glyphosate. And some of the other some of the other damaging chemicals and things like that out there. We don't want to be consuming those things for our kids. And then even your personal care products to pay attention to the things that you're using there, I'll even just say, you know, when I first started saying that you had fluoride free toothpaste and things like that came out, we jumped on that immediately. Like in our House, we were using some other brands and things like that. But fluoride can actually not be the best thing long term for your gut health for your bone health, especially if your kids are swallowing that stuff. Long term instead of spinning out in the sink, probably not going to be the best thing there either. So those are a few things from kids perspective too, that I would consider incorporating. And then for adults as well, you said to age 30 is kind of when you're optimally going to hit your peak bone mass and ideally, that's when it's going to be really good for people who maybe get a dexa scan or start having some of these noticing some of these symptoms and find out their bone mass isn't ideal and maybe they're in their 30s or 40s. I would assume from hearing your story that that doesn't mean all is lost and it can't some of that damage can't be undone. But what does that process look like? If someone gets similar news or just finds out they maybe have some of these risk factors are kind of on that path. Yeah, absolutely. So number one, no, it does not mean you're permanently fragile. If you get a diagnosis of osteoporosis and this doesn't mean, you know, no matter what age you are, you can build bone strength in the age, it just becomes more challenging. The older you get and the more bone you lose, there are fewer cells involved in the process that process becomes less efficient. So we want people to want to be on the side of prevention and not reaction. So let's say you find this out your 30s, 40, 50, 60s, 70s, even. You're still going to follow the same process. The first step has to be, you have to identify and address all those cause issues of bone loss and bone damage. If there are things working against you actively, you have to address those things first. You've got to know what tests you need to order and get done. You have to know how to understand your results. You've got to be your own best advocate. And this is with any health condition, not just osteoporosis. You have to you can't just put all your faith into one single person and expect them to do everything for you and then make sure that that's going to get.

osteoporosis osteoporosis occurs soccer
"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

08:14 min | 8 months ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"As I got older, I realized there are a lot of kids going through that now. And that's kind of something that I want to be a mentor, somebody who can teach them the values. How can you be a good kind contributing member to society from a really young age? And eventually I'd love to get that to the point where these kids couldn't have an internship or something like that and a purpose driven organization like ours. That's beautiful. I think we definitely need more of that. And unfortunately, this is like you said something that affects a lot of kids and I think resources like that are going to be so helpful in the future. And I think that creates ripples as well. Like when you help a child at a young age, it creates ripples for future generations. And that's much the same reason I've always loved working with moms, because I feel like I can help moms, then that creates ripples for their kids and for generations beyond that as well. Absolutely. Well, I know that you're also an expert in all things bone health and it seems like this came from a place of personal experience for you as well. I've often heard from people in this podcast and myself as well, a lot of us get into the health and wellness world trying to solve our own problems. So I would love to start broad and hear the story of how you got started on this journey in the first place. Yeah, and part of that starts with my father's passing. You know, he passed away when he was 35 at a really young age. And my entire life, I had this fear that I was going to follow in his footsteps to an early grave. And not have the opportunity to watch my kids grow up and experience the joys of being a father. And when I was diagnosed with osteoporosis at 31, at a time when I still had all these other health issues to resolve, I thought my fate was destined to be the same. You know I had a young daughter, son in the way. I was devastated. And I remember the day the doctor sat down with me and confirmed that I had osteoporosis. And it wasn't just like a letter in the mail. Actually sat down with me. And her exact words were this is going to be an issue for you. Bone drugs and fracture were my future. And I walked out of that office afraid. And for the people who know me well, they know I'm typically not the most emotional person. But they're very few things that are going to strike fear in my heart, but that did. And when I got home that night, I was laying on the couch across my wife. My daughter was upstairs sleeping. And I looked up I saw my favorite picture of her on the wall. She was a little over one year old, wearing this cute polka dot dress, standing in front of a white picket fence, blond hair, blue eyes, innocent and sweet. And I just broke down crying. And I cried hard. It was the kind of cry that empties the sum of life's burdens. And after I was done, I looked over my wife and said, I just want to dance with my daughter on her wedding day. She needed her daddy. And I questioned whether I didn't even be allowed to be there for. And for those first couple of days and weeks, I was angry, upset, overwhelmed. I was scared. I had no idea where to start. I just wanted to know everything was going to be okay. And how I was going to figure out how to improve my health and my bones. And after a great deal of reading, research, working with doctors, consulting with people. My mindset started to shift. And once I got to the point where I started applying the things I had been learning was actually making improvements in my health and my bones. That's when I realized just how challenging it can be for the average person, mostly the average woman who's diagnosed with osteopenia and osteoporosis, normally not the young man, to figure out what they need to do to address bone loss, build bone strength and prevent fracture because the prescription for 90% of women who are diagnosed is calcium, vitamin D, walking and a bone drug. And that's woefully inadequate. It's really that reason why I started bone coach and bonko dot com. That probably had to be quite the shock for you to be 31, and like you said a guy, which is not the normal wrist demographic. And probably in very good health. I read that you were a marine before that. It wasn't from lack of movement. It wasn't from we're doing a lot of the things that should have potentially not put you at risk. So that had to be quite a shock to find out. And I'm curious at that age, how did you know that you had it and how would someone else who maybe has the early risk factors know that they might have it as well? Yeah, so for me, even though being a marine knowing how to work out, being physically active, all those kinds of things. I had that. And I had a foundation of weight lifting and things like that when I was younger. But at the same time, I had celiac disease. Malabsorption and nutrients for many, many years. A slew of digestive issues, low energy, poor sleep. You know, obviously probably was an absorbing my nutrients. There were just a lot of different things while I was in the marines. I smoked for 5 years. There was some drinking and things like that that took part during that time too. All of these things can contribute and work against us. And typically, you're not going to be getting a dexa scan of immigrant. We'll talk about those in a minute. When you're younger, but for me, because I had celiac disease, that's one of the things that we ended up pushing for. And we originally thought it was just going to be checking the box, but it turned out, found out we had osteoporosis. So that was kind of a complete shock for me at that time. Gotcha. That was the impetus for you like going in and getting tested at that point. Okay. Yeah, absolutely. And so I've been assuming those are all also than risk factors of someone already ask celiac disease or know they have some kind of gut just bioses that can be a potential risk factor for bone issues. They absolutely can. Yeah, absolutely can be risk factors for that. And in terms of like, I didn't even know when I was diagnosed what osteoporosis was. So osteoporosis literally means porous bone. It's characterized by either not enough bone formation, excessive bone loss or a combination of all. And an osteoporosis, you're both your bone density and your bone quality are reduced. And that's going to increase your risk of fracture. And I had just mentioned about density scans. So that's kind of the gold standard of finding out how you have osteoporosis is the dual energy x-ray absorption. It's a painless test, kind of like an x-ray, but very low levels of radiation. You lay down on a machine, the machine does a scan. It tells you your bone mineral density. The actual mineral content of your bone. And then it generates a score. And the score is called a T score. And a T score is telling you how much your bone mass differs from the bone mass of an average healthy 30 year old adult. So a score of zero means your bone density is equal to the norm for a healthy young adult. Score plus one minus one considered normal and healthy. But a T score of negative one and between negative one and negative 2.5, that indicates you have low bone mass, oftentimes called osteopenia, which is like a precursor to osteoporosis. And then a T score of negative 2.5 or lower indicates you have osteoporosis. The greater that negative number is so negative 2.5, negative 2.6 negative 2.7. The more severe the osteoporosis, most women are getting these scans done by the time they're in their 50s and 60s as a check in the box. Their doctors are going to order them. But that's too late in my opinion. If you haven't had one yet. And you're in your 30s. You're 40s. You're 50s. Go get one. It's a good idea to get a baseline. And we don't want to avoid doing something too. Just because the answer may not be something we don't want to hear. You can't address something also until you're aware of it. So that's a really important note that I like to make is let's be on the side of prevention, get a baseline, and that way we don't necessarily just react later on in life. Yeah, that's a great point. I remember finding out when I first found out I had Hashimoto's and it was in some ways a relief because at least then I knew and I could start addressing it. And you're right, I don't think a lot of people think to get that. I haven't ever gotten a dexa scan and I'm in my 30s. But it makes sense and I know there's a lot of other information that can come from that as well. So it seems like a great baseline test. I'm guessing it's multi factorial, but what do we think causes osteopenia or osteoporosis? Great question. And I try to I try to get people to think about imagining their body is like imagine you have a bucket of water, okay? The bucket represents your body. The water within the bucket represents your bone mineral density, the measure of how much phone you have..

osteoporosis celiac disease osteopenia marines Hashimoto
Dr. Cindy Geyer Explains Seasonal Allergies

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Cindy Geyer Explains Seasonal Allergies

"Welcome cindy get to be here is always so tell tell us. What is this problem with allergies. We're having this country. How prevalent is it. What are the symptoms of most people get a white causes it and and how does traditional medicine typically deal with this problem will allergies have been around for a long time so it's not a new problem it's when your immune system makes antibodies usually called aegean antibodies to something that you're breathing enter exposed to the environment like a dust allergy or a pollen allergy grass allergy and. When that happens these mast cells. That contain histamine dumped. Histamine calls all symptoms that we recognize as allergy symptoms congestion. Sneezing itchy nose. Itchy eyes watery eyes sometimes using tightness in the chest stick it can contribute to asthma and one of the things that sort of gets overlooked is just how exhausted people who have acted allergies concealing relate Just loma Fatigue so those are the classic symptoms. Even though it's not new the prevalence is unfortunately increasing There were people nowadays with allergies actual allergies than there were fifty years ago hundred years ago and we can talk about some of the reasons why that happens in typically. We're going to treat it or in traditional medicine retreat with identifying the allergen trying to remove it treating the symptoms with antihistamines may nasal. Steroids may be an inhaler for your lungs or trying. Desensitization shots were draws to try to down regulate that response and and what we see often is is for this resignation. That oh i've got allergies is just i got anything i can do about it so like e or i had to take these nasal sprays and the truth is most of the allergy medicine. They're pretty benign but the steroids. The steroids are not and they're often used pretty aggressively. Flo nase and name names the next. His hailed steroids. That may reduce symptoms. But then 'cause osteoporosis. In 'cause you know other immune suppressing issues and now people really suffer from these problems and and the question why are we so overreactive to things. That are just part of our normal environment. I mean that's a question asking allergies something. Humans get well. Guess what not necessarily when you look at populations indigenous cultures and you look at even kids who grew up in american

Allergy Grass Allergy Allergy Symptoms Congestion Sneezing Itchy Nose Cindy Asthma Flo Nase Osteoporosis
Why you need more (not less) phytic acid in your diet

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

03:26 min | 1 year ago

Why you need more (not less) phytic acid in your diet

"Fighting acid has gotten a lot of bad press lately. And it's true that this compound which is found in legumes nuts seeds and whole grains can bind to minerals and reduce their absorption. But there is a lot more to the fight acid story fighting acid or fight. It is a natural compound found in the seeds or the kernels of plants. Young plants need phosphorous order to develop their roots and when seeds are planted in soil or even just soaked in water. The fighting acid breaks down and releases phosphorus to support the sprouting plant. But if we eat those seeds instead of planting them we may end up absorbing calcium iron copper and zinc from the foods that we eat at the same meal and that's because fighting acid does have a tendency to bind to certain minerals and block their absorption from the small intestine. And this is why gas it is sometimes referred to as an anti nuclear plant. It reduces the amount of nutrients that we absorb from foods. Dry beans nuts seeds and cereal grains like wheat barley oats and rice all contain fighting acid. As a rule beans nuts are higher infighting acid that cereal grains and the fighting acid is concentrated in the seed hall or in the case of grains the brand. If you remove the hull you also remove more of the fighting. Acid to white. Rice for example is much lower invited acid then brown rice soaking beans nuts and grains in water for twelve to twenty-four hours or simply cooking them breaks down most of the fighting acid and you know mineral deficiencies due to fight. Acid intake are generally not a concern in developed nations nonetheless. A lot of health conscious people soak or out all their nuts and grains or avoid them altogether in an effort to reduce their intake of fighting acid and increase their absorption of minerals. Not only this probably completely unnecessary but those folks could actually be missing out on important benefits. It turns out that fighting acid is an important nutrient in its own right and it may help to protect you from a number of serious diseases as i said. Fighting gasset from foods can block the absorption of calcium from the digestive tract. So you might expect that eating foods high in fighting acid would weaken your bones but people who eat lots of beans and grains do not have a higher risk of osteoporosis. If anything higher consumption of these phytate rich foods is linked with stronger bones women who have the most fight aids circulating through their bodies actually have less bone loss and fewer fractures over time so far from increasing your risk a fight rich diet may actually help protect against osteoperosis. Now how is this even possible. Well for one thing. It appears that when your diet is in fight aids your body adjusts by decreasing the amount of calcium the gets excreted in the urine in other words. Your body conserves calcium to make up for reduced absorption from foods fight against it also appears to block the formation of do lasts which are specialized cells that break down bone tissue and this by the way is exactly how osteoporosis drugs like fosamax work

Rice Aids Osteoporosis
"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

". I'm Cassie Wenas. . I've been a registered and licensed stay Titian for twenty two years and of those twenty two years I've been teaching nutrition classes and Co hosting this dishing up nutrition program for about the past fourteen to fifteen years. . I am telling you this certainly not to make myself feel old. . But to let you know that I have quite a bit of experience to share and I feel really fortunate to be able to be here this morning to help all of you listening better understand the connection between what you eat and how you feel. . And today my co host Teresa and I will be discussing subject that I know a lot about and if we're being honest I know a lot about this topic more by destiny certainly not by choice we're going to be talking about the myriad of health problems that gluten grains cause for a lot of people as many of our listeners know I know a lot about this topic not only because of how gluten has negatively affected my health but what? ? Really drives, , my passion on this topic stems from the fact that both of my kids have a condition called seal EAC and if you're not familiar with this autoimmune condition in a nutshell, , it's when your body has a severe reaction to gluten and actually causes your body to begin attacking itself. . It's kind of like the immune system goes haywire, , and if you swallow even just a tiny speck of gluten, , your immune system I begins attacking your own small intestine. . So. . Now you know a little bit about our topic for the day next, , I'd like to ask a few questions just to get everybody connecting the dots as we delve further into what we call the dark side of gluten. . So question number one, , do you or a close family member have lupus. . Do you or a close family member have rheumatoid arthritis or do you have a thyroid condition like? ? Disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. . Do you have Raynaud's if you're not familiar with rain odds, , I can explain from personal experience. . Raynaud's is when the blood vessels in your hands and your feet. . Constrict when you get cold and they constrict beyond what's Normal When the weather or the air is cold or it can happen because of stress as well, , and then your fingers or your toes might turn white and you get sort of a burning pain not fun. . Or is your Autoimmune Disease Scleroderma or type one diabetes. . Do you or a loved one have chronic acid reflux or do you have osteoporosis if you can say, , yes to any of these questions you're in for a super informative show today theresa and I WanNa help you make the connection between eating gluten grains namely the the Ri- The barley and most oats and your health problems. . And as I just mentioned, , my co host today is Theresa. . I WanNa tell you a little bit more about her Theresa Wagner like me is a registered and licensed AIA Titian she to teaches many of our nutrition classes she of course, Co , host this radio program. . She's a mom of young kids and she counsels clients several days a week either by zoom or phone appointments because of Covid, , nineteen were offering all of our nutritional counseling either by video or phone appointments. . Yes. . That's right and we are staying busy with those phone appointments and zoom appointments but as it relates to our topic today, , cassie. . Mentioned earlier that your kids CEAC. . Disease. . It made me think were you shocked at the many hidden sources of gluten when you started? ? Living a gluten free life all those years ago I really was shocked I had been a Dietitian for many years at that point by the time our family got diagnosed. . So I knew gluten was inbred. . I. . Knew it was in anything made with wheat flour but I had no idea of the more hidden sources of gluten in our American food supply just to give you a couple. . Of examples. . Gluten is in some brands of Deli meat. . It's in a lot of summer sausage and beef stick brands. . It's in some ice creams for heaven's sakes and even in some medicines, not , only that but when you have, , CEAC, , you have to be careful about personal care items to you need to be sure you're buying gluten free shampoo gluten free toothpaste, , gluten-free Lotion, , and gluten-free makeup. . Yeah. . It's so crazy to me that gluten is an ingredient in so many every day nonfood products. . It reminds me of a client who had ongoing migraine headaches. . We have limit. . You know we had gone through elimination where we Eliminated. . The dietary sources of what we thought causing the Migraines and we went through lifestyle habits that we thought could possibly be causing the migraines when we finally looked at her personal care products and switched to a shampoo without added gluten. . Her migraines they disappeared.

Raynaud Autoimmune Disease Teresa thyroiditis Disease Hashimoto
The Gluten Connection to Osteoporosis and Autoimmune Diseases

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:55 min | 2 years ago

The Gluten Connection to Osteoporosis and Autoimmune Diseases

"I'm Cassie Wenas. I've been a registered and licensed stay Titian for twenty two years and of those twenty two years I've been teaching nutrition classes and Co hosting this dishing up nutrition program for about the past fourteen to fifteen years. I am telling you this certainly not to make myself feel old. But to let you know that I have quite a bit of experience to share and I feel really fortunate to be able to be here this morning to help all of you listening better understand the connection between what you eat and how you feel. And today my co host Teresa and I will be discussing subject that I know a lot about and if we're being honest I know a lot about this topic more by destiny certainly not by choice we're going to be talking about the myriad of health problems that gluten grains cause for a lot of people as many of our listeners know I know a lot about this topic not only because of how gluten has negatively affected my health but what? Really drives, my passion on this topic stems from the fact that both of my kids have a condition called seal EAC and if you're not familiar with this autoimmune condition in a nutshell, it's when your body has a severe reaction to gluten and actually causes your body to begin attacking itself. It's kind of like the immune system goes haywire, and if you swallow even just a tiny speck of gluten, your immune system I begins attacking your own small intestine. So. Now you know a little bit about our topic for the day next, I'd like to ask a few questions just to get everybody connecting the dots as we delve further into what we call the dark side of gluten. So question number one, do you or a close family member have lupus. Do you or a close family member have rheumatoid arthritis or do you have a thyroid condition like? Disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Do you have Raynaud's if you're not familiar with rain odds, I can explain from personal experience. Raynaud's is when the blood vessels in your hands and your feet. Constrict when you get cold and they constrict beyond what's Normal When the weather or the air is cold or it can happen because of stress as well, and then your fingers or your toes might turn white and you get sort of a burning pain not fun. Or is your Autoimmune Disease Scleroderma or type one diabetes. Do you or a loved one have chronic acid reflux or do you have osteoporosis if you can say, yes to any of these questions you're in for a super informative show today theresa and I WanNa help you make the connection between eating gluten grains namely the the Ri- The barley and most oats and your health problems. And as I just mentioned, my co host today is Theresa. I WanNa tell you a little bit more about her Theresa Wagner like me is a registered and licensed AIA Titian she to teaches many of our nutrition classes she of course, Co host this radio program. She's a mom of young kids and she counsels clients several days a week either by zoom or phone appointments because of Covid, nineteen were offering all of our nutritional counseling either by video or phone appointments. Yes. That's right and we are staying busy with those phone appointments and zoom appointments but as it relates to our topic today, cassie. Mentioned earlier that your kids CEAC. Disease. It made me think were you shocked at the many hidden sources of gluten when you started? Living a gluten free life all those years ago I really was shocked I had been a Dietitian for many years at that point by the time our family got diagnosed. So I knew gluten was inbred. I. Knew it was in anything made with wheat flour but I had no idea of the more hidden sources of gluten in our American food supply just to give you a couple. Of examples. Gluten is in some brands of Deli meat. It's in a lot of summer sausage and beef stick brands. It's in some ice creams for heaven's sakes and even in some medicines, not only that but when you have, CEAC, you have to be careful about personal care items to you need to be sure you're buying gluten free shampoo gluten free toothpaste, gluten-free Lotion, and gluten-free makeup. Yeah. It's so crazy to me that gluten is an ingredient in so many every day nonfood products. It reminds me of a client who had ongoing migraine headaches. We have limit. You know we had gone through elimination where we Eliminated. The dietary sources of what we thought causing the Migraines and we went through lifestyle habits that we thought could possibly be causing the migraines when we finally looked at her personal care products and switched to a shampoo without added gluten. Her migraines they disappeared.

Theresa Wagner Migraines Cassie Wenas Disease Autoimmune Disease Raynaud Aia Titian Teresa Thyroiditis Hashimoto Theresa
Warning signs of a vitamin B12 deficiency

WIOD Programming

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Warning signs of a vitamin B12 deficiency

"Let's kind of start at the top, Dr Pincus and talk a little bit about what are some of the warning signs that you may be deficient in vitamin D. Okay, well, part of it is how you feel in one of the things Chris is being tired for no apparent reason. Okay. But on the reverse side of that I've seen that of lack of vitamin D sex here sleeps OK, Another big sign is that your bones ache. Now There's a lot of people listening who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis, which is Winning of the bone, but again a vitamin D deficiency. A big one is muscle weakness. So you try to get up from a couch. You get in and out of a car and you're finding it more and more difficult, and that's leading to the high high prevalence of people falling and injuring themselves. Another one of you tend to get more called especially upper respiratory problems. Okay, problems with blood pressure, cardiovascular problems, digestive problems, And if you're a diabetic, there's all kinds of Say it about being deficient in vitamin D and the list goes on and on. It is a huge problem.

Vitamin D Deficiency Dr Pincus Muscle Weakness Osteoporosis Chris
"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"The Peace Corps can mean the difference between being told you have a disease or not A. T. Scores determined by taking this decks bone scan, which is highly reliable to start with. Some experts even call it a scam test. But nevertheless. Women are told they absolutely need a decks escape after a certain age so you can know how your bones are doing. And says they normal decks guarantees score is based on what did I tell you the bone density of aloe the woman a thirty year old woman. You're practically guaranteed. Your real results will get you diagnosed with osteoporosis. So what are the scientific studies that backed up this t score? There had to be very precise watch, right? Well, not exactly. In nineteen, ninety two at a conference involving the International Osteoporosis Foundation, and again the WHO it took place in Rome. The two groups gathered to figure out how a number below which doctors. Say a woman. Has Osteoporosis. No one however had any idea what should a. Remember. They're judging this thirty year old. The question was how far below should they go? It was been told that one of the attendees just got up and drew a line anyone on the other side that lie. was asked your practice to your prosise. Somewhere along the line after billions of dollars of jobs were sold. Women. Got Wise All the side effects of these drugs. And sales began to drop phosa Maxim pro-lifer example cut up your risk of fracturing your femur remember that long bone and your and your thigh. and. Should be the strongest bone in your body. And that US you. Your jaw they were realized that more and more women were developing that. And more and more women were suffering from disabling joint and And remember, we did tell tell you that you can get micro cracks in your bones, making them more prone to break because they don't heal. So. Now along comes the American College of Physicians..

osteoporosis International Osteoporosis Fou Peace Corps US American College of Physicians Rome
"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

08:39 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"Because as we've talked about this a few minutes ago, ultimately, it increases the risk the breaks. Even, as the mineral density improves because it stops the bones from repairing tiny bits of micro damage that occur from everyday wear and tear. That was acknowledged in two thousand eighteen. The cat got out of the bag. But did anything saying come of all this the doctor stop prescribing this drug. Now. It was recommended. They continue to serve prescribing drugs like I max in spite of that bone rattling risk. So they also calcium magnesium vitamin D and case don't work and sure some of the studies out there don't prove that they do work but that's because they were rigged designed to fail. They just tested one or two ingredients on their own and not the group. Okay so This story was in relation to what we just talked about. The, the strength of the bones and how. There's no pencil strength they're more like less than would when you take these drugs. And drugs come always with A. Less of side effects. What on these. Bone building drugs. Was Standard Practice To have a holiday from them. Bonita I Max re-classed. After being on them for three to five years. Patients were typically told to take a vacation from them for a year or more. But since that molly was being taken from big forms pocket, it was an all hands on deck effort to scare women. Away from doing exactly what they're supposed to scare them into staying on these. By Bennie drugs nonstop. When women take a break from these medications, they may end up stopping them all together. And they don't want that. So, before you consider starting any of these drugs. Better, think about that a number of years ago doctors I floated the idea of taking your holiday from these heavy duty osteoporosis drugs it made perfect sense after all the longer you take them the greater, the chance of suffering serious side effects. Do you know you can get Osteo necrosis of the jaw. Is called O N J. You know you can get sudden unusual breaks in your fi bone called the femur, the longest strongest bone in your body. So where's where's? What's Big Pharma telling you now? They're telling doctors to tell their patients are taking a vacation from these drugs. These bone drugs, it's like setting out on the titanic there's a disaster in in the future. Doctor who proposed this Dr Nancy lanes she spent. A recent rheumatology. Warning. The. Doctors. That patient just can't walk away from these drugs like parolee and so forth without being at a big risk. Dr. Lane is a consultant for pearly drugmaker Amgen as well for Abbott Advisor. She says that the solution to any patient who wants to ditch a drug such as proletariat is just switched to another kind of osteoperosis process medication. Like estrogen which happened made by Pfizer or biphosphonate. But. Researchers from Loyola University cautioned about the risks involving taking a sabbatical from the biphosphonate jokes. They claim that fifteen percent of patients with proceeds will suffer are bone fracture during this holiday. But what important fact? That they said was that every single one of these doctor had to admit. You know what that was. You know what fact they had to admit even though they told you not to take a holiday all of these drugs come along with awful side effects if you continue to take. This jaw fracture. Oh, J. for is. That's a horrible condition. Your bone cells die off and leave openings in your jaw downhill. You know if you're going start one of these jobs, you know you're advise have any dental work completed before you start them. Because having dental work while you're on, them can accelerate this necrosis of your jaw. But the biggest myth of all is that. You're asked to accept those risks in order to keep your bones strong as we age. Again. Most, doctors will not tell you about vitamin D supplements vitamin K two supplements. Gentlemen. If, you're going to take a vacation come on down to Florida. Let it be at the beach, not I vacation from these dangerous drugs. You'RE GONNA. Get off them. Be Make it a permanent vacation. Now how about these scans? Well. I put together some notes about losing bowman mass you know. This is a billion dollar industry. These drugs for for. US prosise. And when did you get hooked on them? It's really hard to get out. So you're probably familiar with your credit score. But how about your t score? So, your credit score determines how you can finance the purchase right like a car or a house. The Peace Corps can mean the difference between being told you have a disease or not A. T. Scores determined by taking this decks bone scan, which is highly reliable to start with. Some experts even call it a scam test. But Nevertheless Women are told they absolutely need a decks escape after a certain age so you can know how your bones are doing. And says a normal decks can Score is based on what did I tell you the bone density of how the woman a thirty year old woman. You're practically guaranteed. Your real results will get you diagnosed with osteoporosis. So. What are the scientific studies that backed up this score? There had to be very precise watch, right? Well, not exactly. In Nineteen Ninety two at a conference involving the International, Osteoporosis Foundation and again the WHO it took place in Rome. The two groups gathered to figure out how a number below which doctors. Say. Woman. Has Osteoporosis. No one however had any idea what it should a. Remember they're judging this thirty year old? The question was how far below should they go? It was been told that one of the attendees just just got up.

osteoporosis bone fracture Osteoporosis Foundation Pfizer Loyola University US Dr Nancy molly Peace Corps Florida Amgen Rome Dr. Lane consultant Abbott Advisor
"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"That we need to heal. So you could supplement with carnitine. Collagen vitamin say or just one vitamin C.. So that's the thought today. And a lot of this putting this work together was Melissa the thank you for that. So. That's we WANNA to start the program off with that and then. I have a lot of notes today that I wanna just. Bring to your attention especially with start off with a WHO. Actually the world health. Organization. are ones that gave us the definitions osteoporosis. And Osteoporosis. And believe it or not. They were are bitch rarely conceived by this organization and then projected upon millions of women's bodies. To convince them that they had a drill treatable symptomless disease. This osteopor-. In nineteen, ninety, two and osteoporosis one, thousand, nine, hundred four were formally identified as skeletal diseases by the WHO. As bone mineral densities one through two point five standard deviations respectively below the peak biomass mass of the average adult Caucasian male as measured by. The scans called Deca the exit or the. Like the gold standard it is but this this test is inept. We'll get into that. But there an agenda behind this definition and these guys that does not have anything to do with health. And the standard deviation is simply a calculated. Quantity. To to to see how much you deviate from a group, the group as a whole. And who day pick as the average? A young adult female approximately thirty years of age when you have your peak bone mass. In your in Your Life Cycle. Then, you have to ask yourself, why would an eighty year olds bones be defined as abnormal if they are less dense than a thirty year Urals. So, what did they really find some things here? Is the aging process been redefined as disease and at target women. Much, as other diagnoses target women like hormone replacement therapy, and so forth treaty menopause..

Osteoporosis Melissa carnitine
"osteoporosis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You with osteoporosis alternatives to osteoporosis, drug therapies back and keep your bones. Healthy and prevent bone fractures. And that's a very common thing with retirees. As we age, we lose a lot of the nutrients in our bones and your bones become brittle and estimated 54 million Americans have some sort of osteoporosis, low bone mass. With mostly it's with postmenopausal women and the women outnumber the men 2 to 1, but both experience fractures and when that happens, you're gonna have a lower quality of life. However common Osteoporotic drugs may cause adverse side effects. It seems like every every medication, you know, you see the commercials on TV, right? We take this secures that, But it gives you 10. Other things you know, may kill you, too. It's like that. It's like the The cost was the hand cleaner that kills 99.99% of the germs but its own kill that one that kills you right? But anyway, a lot of these osteoporotic drugs had very serious side effects, including more risk of atrial fibrillation. Which is another common condition. Retirees. Older people have fevers, muscular, skeletal swelling and fatigue. However, Fortunately, there are alternative approaches to these drugs, and the strategies are essential to increase your bone health and prevent Fractures. Number one on the list is exercise as it should be US.

osteoporosis US Osteoporotic
"osteoporosis" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Many of these women should make monthly appointments with a dietician or nutritionist is simply learned. To practice eating enough food to support strong, healthy bones, and that can be terrifying is eating enough food and you've been someone who's trying to possibly lose weight. Well, we have to look at other things like digestive health yet because if you're someone who experiences heartburn, stomach upset diarrhea if you're having digestive problems You may not be absorbing the nutrients that you need to make those building blocks for good bone. Great point. So we've got we've got to get that figured out their certain medications. That were placed on that can compromise our bone health and Even you know, the over exercising is a good point. I wanted to bring up. I have a friend. It's very clean. Always been a marathon runner eats very well. It started fracturing small little fractures and feet in her feet, ankles and so just little hairline fractures. That would cause pain. And so she went in. Had a Dexter scan and sure enough, has osteoporosis. So the reason for that is when we exercise for long periods of time. There's just not enough resource is from what we ate to supply our muscles in our body to sustain that activity. Because in order for the muscles to fire we need certain minerals and so A body being efficient mechanism that it is will pull those minerals from the bone. For that sustained, long term exercised, so exercise is important. We do want that bone and building exercise? Ah, weightlifting, yoga X walking all excellent forms of exercise. Because that bone and that muscle are really a unit and when we trigger the muscle To Bree build our to strengthen The bone responds by saying, Hey, I better shore up and be strong for this muscle activity, so they're a unit. And so we also I want to be site specific. So if someone has osteoporosis and their hips they need to do maybe some squats or things that help with our hip. Strength, So it's all over. We want to be lifting for our arms way. Want to be walking.

osteoporosis
"osteoporosis" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on KTRH

"You have osteoporosis of the soul once again the model one moment to the M. S. M. Singh take three of those twice a day or two three times a day for total six today and that's going to help you get rid of the tonight us coming and going in the examination go away very quickly the dry cough is usually could be called COPD and is caused by squeezing of that of ten trailer of the vagus nerve massive processes girl and then also for the I want to take vitamin D. three three those twice today as two thousand month for the plaque in the arteries you're going to get rid of fried foods and processed meats and oil that's gonna help you heal but I also wanted to take a two miles a month to the older daily classic telegram to grind them up and take him an apple sauce or something like that take three twice today the two thousand month and they will support healthy blood pressure but also healthy blood flow through blocked arteries your heart your kidneys and and you have to have a pressure yeah that's why I take those lessons yep okay so and so this is going to deal with it in force for the weight loss I want to get the A. S. A. P. dropper full under your tongue thirty minutes for each meal and you'll lose a half pound two pounds a day and then you know give a Georgian big time a call every couple weeks and when either pharmacists better myself you know we can kind of review how everything is going to do you should be a great testimony for George's and followers thanks say indefinitely follow up with us if you can't dock yeah are you going to be at the health show in Chicago absolutely it's in October I believe right okay I I will see you there my friend featured speaker will have a booth and so forth and yeah we have lots to do and I can't thank you enough for all the great things you do to help save people in the world well it's important I want my listeners to be around next up let's go to Gary and I had a whole welcome to the program high gear Dr Wallich okay saw you in person many many years ago for about thirty years ago and after that call and I was selling a product at that point okay and your car will have that much I'm awfully good memory I had a big mole on the side of my face up just a little bigger and you said that I have that they come up but anyway my problem here is one that you are probably uniquely suited for I contracted probably some kind of a STD from a dog I got a free dog and the reason they're free dog was that the lady was a breeder and owner of the dog was kept in a panel time so the stock was very very starved for affection and I learned later on the dog would come in with me right in the face and isn't you know and so he transferred whatever had to me and I didn't even know it she but while you're here never heard of that yeah well finally it got so bad that it basically was telling me and I've been living with it and here is a bummer in a hearing on the radio talking this certainly want to do this but what what what really happens is if the if all the regular doctors they almost all but laughed in my face when I want her to tell him about the dog transfer from from animal to human and this dog had.

osteoporosis M. S. M. Singh
Jameela Jamil Has an Ambitious Goal: To Feel Things

The Hilarious World of Depression

09:16 min | 2 years ago

Jameela Jamil Has an Ambitious Goal: To Feel Things

"It's the hilarious world of depression. I'm John Mel on this episode person who has become famous in America rather quickly as a Sitcom star and an outspoken activist. The Sitcom has ended but the activism. Who It's just getting started. Hello my name is Jamila Djamil and I am at the Hilarious Weld Off. Depression and And what do you do for a living? I'm an actor and activist at a pain in the US. Three job titles multifaceted. Jamila Djamil was a TV and radio host or presenter in England for several years. Welcome to fish. Wrap up with me. I am here to deliver onto you all of the latest chart news and gossip in less time than it takes to make a couple of so last Sunday Cigna American audiences. I got to know her playing honey. Djamil the name-dropping high-society Londoner on the NBC. Moral Philosophy Sitcom the good place. But we've been through a lot swell you. I haven't been this upsets. My good friend Taylor was rude. Yep Stage in Konya was defending my best friend. Say Jamila grew up in London. Her parents emigrated from Pakistan and India says. Her family had a lot of mental health problems. Schizophrenia OCD bipolar depression suicidal. Ibm for Jamila. There was anxiety. There was depression and coming to grips with a lot of trauma. I wouldn't say who within my entire giant family unit because South Asian families huge. But there was an abusive background. Came From and A lot of bullying at home and at school That happened to us. Because we were Pakistani and My Dad is I think. Technically Indian We were South Asians living in a very racist time in Britain such as very tense existence to grow up in where people constantly hounding you with racial slurs calling you a monkey and not wanting to sit next to you at school and just a general night Great doesn't doesn't so no it was really bad. I'm amazed I made it out of my. I've made it our of my twenties even but I've had like a full nervous breakdown gone completely just totally lost it looking back on it now. It was pretty bleak. She had big time mental health issues but she says South Asian immigrant. Culture didn't talk about that kind of thing and neither did British culture. What was being talked about? Was the necessity for girls to be ridiculously skinny. And Jamila Developed Anorexia so I think is a combination the fact that I was growing up in the nineties and so- Heroin Chic could time the adults using non ironically. Where you to? In order to be beautiful you had to emulate the look of someone who does not eat and only Consumes heroin is also look a famine? That people were trying to achieve which is fucking insane considering that famine was and is still occurring in this world and millions and millions of people are suffering and dying from it and how much those people would love to be able to eat something Having their own physiques considered chic in this Bizarre and shallow industry. I was seeing people in my own country. Flights Pakistan and see 'em like skill lethal people on the side of the street begging for food. And then I would come here and see people starving themselves deliberately to emulate that look in order to fit into runway closed just so tiny so the look was just everywhere you were supposed to have jutting out hipbones and believe me. It was a badge of owner. It wasn't something that you hid. There was a long queue outside the girls along line outside the girl's bathroom. Everyone throwing up at lunch one. After the other. The other there was a girl. Easter bring her weighing scales in school and e on them. I remember without giving an interview saying she eats nude in order to stop us from overindulging. In Your Kate Moss talking about nothing tastes as good as thin. Feels well tacos. Pizza cake was their decision that you remember making A. I need to start eating way less. I need to start. Was that a conscious thing or do they just emerge suddenly it was a very very conscious scarring moment of my maths teacher wanting to teach us about graphs and pie charts and she weighed all of us to collect all of our weights as data to show a chart. The dumbest thing you've ever heard how I was. Eleven I was one of the tools guarding was the second oldest girl in the year and I was choppy. Because you gotta get like why toget- toll and also I was just. That was just my build at the time I was loving the curry and I had no self conscious about my body whatsoever. I loved having a tummy. I didn't know about thighs very innocent child. I wasn't remotely interested in the way that I look and That moment changed everything because I was the happiest girl in the class. I was ridiculed by the entire year I came home. My family founded shocking upsetting. I was the happiest girl year and I was immediately encouraged to diet and so I started my first I about eleven and it was. I was dieting. The way an eleven year old were diet which is with no understanding of any nutrition. I was living on somewhere between like two hundred three hundred calories. A day sometimes lasts which is insane because I was very tall and even by the time I hit five ten in my early teens. I was still consuming sometimes. Want two hundred calories a day a belly move passing out all the time didn't did stop menstruating and thought that I was winning. It never struck you as something wrong with us. No everyone was doing it. Everyone was doing everyone who's taking laxatives. Everyone's drinking teas that. I now rally against so hard There was slimfast cans all over our school. I want you know fell over. One on the steps steps passed out a tiny like fake chocolate bars instead of meals. It was just people were afraid of carbs and Pasta and everyone was on the Atkins Diet. So everyone's smell like metal and also it was just disgusting. It's terrible time and we were all on it so it didn't even feel like something. You really hit ego also at the time because of Hollywood there was this fucking Brag that I think kind of still exists of women pretending they eat so much just unnaturally thin. What a dumb witted Brag finding other mental illness conditions emerging with the eating disorder or. Were you just two out of even notice a depression or an anxiety? I wasn't even out of it. I was high on it like I was just sort of I was I was such a devoted anorexic and I was so it's so time consuming beyond our exit. The amount of time you spend learning new tricks trying new tricks hiding your food all of the all of the things that you have to do with so consuming. The I didn't even know that I had any kind of mental illness. I didn't think I had anorexia. I didn't think there was no. I didn't think there was anything wrong with me. The only thing I thought was wrong with me that I wasn't enough I was never thin enough. Do you understand what Anorexia was and just think it was something other people had. Yeah I used to be jealous. I thought Anorexia could only come in the form of of someone who weighs like three or four stone forty two to fifty six pounds and I would be envious if those people for being able to achieve that. I really didn't get it. But that's the problem is if you give this misinformation children. We don't have the whole picture. We do we also have this like youthful arrogance to us where we think our health will last forever. Our lives will go on forever will never be Will never face the side effects in. No one knows about osteoporosis. Kidney damage or liver damage all the IBS. All the different things that happened to people who mess around with their health my thyroid. My drains. Everything is exhausted. I mean I even now sorry twenty years after I started sobbing myself. That's what I was gonna ask because so often people think of it as. Oh anorexia is when you're not eating enough but it is a mental thing that even if you people can have anorexia yeah and and even if you find better eating habits later on the reasoning the processing of the idea of food is still always there. So many of told our weaponized food in our minds. So we're taught that like food. Is You know if you have a parent who beats you and then feel bad about it and then gives you a meal afterwards. You start to associate that meal with love or if your parents are. You're not supposed to eat then. Food becomes rebellion and food. Become self harm so we can. We can give food all these kind of different personalities and I think a lot of people lot more people realized then they realize even during the the guilt associated food and the coding and the words that we use around food of clean eating dirty foods. This is just this shame Sort of slipped in an envelope within all of these ways of discussing this thing that we need to give our body nutrition so it can function food fuel and I didn't know that until I hit thirty

Jamila Djamil Anorexia Depression Pakistan United States Heroin Konya John Mel America Kate Moss IBM England NBC Taylor Britain Toget- Toll Osteoporosis Overindulging London
A Mediterranean diet can help to promote healthy ageing in older people

Made in America

01:37 min | 2 years ago

A Mediterranean diet can help to promote healthy ageing in older people

"This study links the Mediterranean diet too a lot of health benefits frankly in older people can cry has been saying this for a long time here in good day health this new study sort of underscores that the Mediterranean diet has some notable health benefits especially as I say again for the elderly healthier aging reduced frailty things like that what happened was this the group of people put the study together watch to the good health of more than six hundred Europeans between sixty nine and seventy nine years of age side is put more than half of them on a special diet was modeled after the Mediterranean diet adept especially for the for the elderly according to the Mayo Clinic the diet mostly consists of whole grains fruits veggies beans nuts herbs in olive oil fish and other seafood eaten weekly red meat not included in the diet really eggs and poultry eaten in moderation researchers say the group that aids the modified Mediterranean diet saw more growth among beneficial bacteria that are associated with better memory and better brain function participants with osteoporosis also saw less bone loss and those with blood pressure issues on proven there as so the Mediterranean diet named by US news and World Report the best diet three years in a row based on health experts input so what's the old expression a word to the wise is sufficient if you're looking to age well and you're like the eat follow the Mediterranean

Mayo Clinic Bone Loss Mediterranean United States
"osteoporosis" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

Beyond Your Wildest Genes

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"osteoporosis" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

"Do Three four last six. Hello WD tribe. Here's a quick peek. At our supplement product in book of the month for January. Yes I say. January twenty twenty at the end of the podcast l.. Spend a few minutes going into further detail so we encourage you to listen to the end. The supplement of the month for January twenty twenty is bone health plus simply said we we have not found a more complete bone health formula on the market period. The ten percent discount code for the month is lower case. B O any H. e. a. l.. Not a bone help. The product of the month for January is one calorie zero sugar forty nutrients Kito vegan Paleo non. Gmo Energy bits. Twenty percent off four ever using the code. BYU WG and that's upper or lower case. The book of the month for January is stopped doing that S. S. H. T. and self sabotage and demand your life back by Gary. John Bishop keep in mind all the links discount codes special offers for the product supplement impact. Will we listen to the show tonight. Tunes Post on Social Media and on our website and weekly newsletter at www dot beyond your wildest jeans dot com at the listen down tap. Thanks for listening everybody. It's Dr Mike and to know two thirds of your Byu WG team this week. We are your podcast guests with a highlighted look at one of our premium supplements bone health. Plus we know you're going to listen. Listen to the end of course but just in case we want to give you a heads up to ten percent. Discount Code for the month of January twenty twenty and that is bone own B o n e health H. E. A. L. T. H.. And that is case sensitive all lower case exactly exactly so you may be wondering why create this formula well as chiropractors all three of us in functional medicine Docs for collective fifty five plus years. Our patients share with us their bone density tests nearly on a daily basis and we can attest firsthand a number of people. Oh more so women who have Osteo Pina or osteoporosis. Seeing patients with collapse vertebrae and X ray because of bone structure weakness happens often. And it's an incredibly painful situation. Something you want to avoid at all costs this is the why for us formulating and creating this supplement so we want to go over some of the ingredients. And what makes our product stand. Out First thing is calcium calcium hydroxy appetite it's an elemental form of calcium and has additional components that helps support bone remodeling. There's calcium citrate this. This is more than twice bioavailable as more commonly used and cheap cheaper calcium carbonate so calcium. citrate it is also better absorbed by older people who often have less stomach acid magnesium which plays critical role in bone formation nation and helps with calcium absorption. There's Silica and Cilla silk. Acids that are useful for strengthening hair nail cartilage bone and teeth and it increases calcium..

545 - Is Red Meat Killing Us or Making Us Stronger?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:28 min | 3 years ago

545 - Is Red Meat Killing Us or Making Us Stronger?

"For the last two weeks the nutrition world has been consumed by a rancorous debate triggered by the publication of a highly controversial and hotly can tested paper in the annals of internal medicine an international team of researchers undertook what they're pitching as the largest and most rigorous analysis date of the effects of red meat consumption on human health according to their analysis the evidence that current consumption is causing harm or that reduced using our consumption of red meat would lower risks is too weak and uncertain to justify the recommendation that people should eat less red meat this as you might imagine has provoked a massive counter protest from the experts and institutions that have been counseling us to eat less red meat as they have been telling any media outlet that will listen the evidence linking red meat consumption to harm is overwhelming and unambiguous and to suggest otherwise they say is not just an attack on public health but also on the public's trust in nutrition science and research at its heart this demint is really about methodology how we gather data how we analyze it and how that gets translated into recommendations nutrition research is notoriously challenging and expensive to conduct and interpret it can take a really long time off in decades for our food choices the twins late into health outcomes the amount of calcium you get in your teens for example directly affects your risk of osteoporosis but not for another seventy years a change in diet may raise or lower your risk of colon cancer but it might take fifteen to twenty years for that to be revealed and then there's the fact that we don't all respond the same way to the same diets due to genetic and EPA genetic factors in order to detect any signal in all that noise you have to study lots of people for a long period of time and as a result most human dietary studies involve free living subjects and they rely on people's ability to be call as well as their willingness to report. Chris is Louie what and how much the eight over the last twenty four hours or thirty days or twelve months it's not a perfect way to collect data there are also a ridiculous number variables we eat three or four or more times a day we may eat dozens of different foods over the course of a typical week and hundreds of different foods over the of course of typical year we eat those foods prepared and dozens of different ways and thousands of different combinations other variables include sleep stress actively levels exposure to environmental pathogens all of which generally change over time so how do we capture or control for all of that and then when it comes time to map all of that dietary information onto our health outcomes well which of the thousands of different markers measures signs symptoms and states of health are we monitoring and how do we compare and combine the results of one study with another that chose sleep different set of things to measure suffice it to say that human nutrition research does not lend itself to tidy data sets and airtight conclusions there's a lot of interpretation required in fact it's possible to make the data say pretty much anything you want them to and the fact is that researchers have biases which influence how they interpret the data all of us including researchers tend to look for evidence to confirm what we already believe is true and reasons to discount evidence that undermines our beliefs if your family has been raising beef cattle for rations or you've made your career advocating for a high protein diet or you just love steak you're probably going to be predisposed to believe leave evidence showing that red meat is helpful if you grew up believing that eating animals is morally wrong or you've stake your career or your reputation superiority of plant based diets or you sell lentils for a living you're more likely to see the flaws in that same

Annals Of Internal Medicine Osteoporosis EPA Demint Chris Louie Twenty Four Hours Seventy Years Twelve Months Twenty Years Thirty Days Two Weeks
Chemical in soaps, hand sanitizers tied to osteoporosis

Bill Handel

03:43 min | 3 years ago

Chemical in soaps, hand sanitizers tied to osteoporosis

"And that is 'cause medics in toothpastes also can come even toys even clothing the risk of osteoporosis so i guess the bottom line is here never put on makeup never brush your teeth don't play with toys and certainly walk around naked and then you have a less chance of getting osteoporosis what what is this about it doesn't stop does it every study says it's good it's bad it's going to kill you it's not going to kill you what is going on with this all right so there's a chemical that the f._d._a. band from all these different hand sanitizers called trick with san it's a really affective agent for killing bacteria we use it in the hospital as far as our anti-bacterial soaps to make sure that you know our hands are clean in between patients but it got popular where it was in all these antibacterial soaps everywhere and so suddenly it was the number one soaps that were selling and it was it's basically everywhere you went you were being exposed to trick with san it works very well but it it we the concern was does it have effects as it gets absorbed into your body and it turns out it's in a lot of different things like cosmetics and toothpaste and other places there were studies already that showed that triplets dan does reduce the calcium content of bone in animals and reduces calcium and sells so this is the kind of the first time we're seeing that it shows a association i remember we always talk about how association does not right 'cause but there is an association between exposure to trickle stay on and lower calcium in your bones so there seems to be a relationship there's something to be aware of but overall the bigger picture is to be aware that we're we're basically like immersed in this chemical soup of all this modern stuff that we're exposed to and just to be a just an awareness of trying to reduce that whenever you can right and we're talking about also this chemical enhance sanitizers right All right. So. i guess the bottom line here is the more you sanitize your hands more you use the more you're gonna look like quasimodo the hunchback there's probably no reason for the average person at home to buy this antibacterial soap you should just get regular soap and water and wash your hands with rope and water and it's just as effective that's what i was going to ask you and that is doesn't soap kill bacteria and isn't the antibacterial agent here really is simply it's a marketing ploy because soap does just as well if it does well i think so washes bacteria all and it goes down the drain whether it kills it or not i you know i don't think it necessarily kills all back till especially some of the more serious bacterial agents but it washes it off all right actually this stuff actually kills the bacteria and so that's another concern as people were getting worried that it may be that we may get resistant bacteria to trick with him which we haven't really seen much of i there are some resistant bacteria but we haven't seen much of that it's just an effective agent but the problem is that you don't want to be drinking it and bathing in it and and completely absorbing it into your body so when you're at the e._r. it's and i've gone to my doctor and what he does simply wash his hands not true some of them on the wall do that sanitizer business do you outside of the us sanitizers you have antibacterial soap at home No, I just have regular soap at home. you but you but you do use the sanitizer in the car yes i do so we use the trick an containing soap in the hospital but we don't use it you know outside of the

Osteoporosis United States
Small tissue chips in space a big leap forward for research

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:01 min | 4 years ago

Small tissue chips in space a big leap forward for research

"I work the National Center for advancing. Translational sciences is spearheading. We've partnered with cases, which is the center for advancement of science in space, and we have got together to send these tissue chips to as you say, the international space station, and we could not be more excited. Her number of reasons microgravity has an incredibly disruption will affect on the human body in ways that we don't necessarily fully understand. And I know that you've had the five part series from the human research program talking about the different risks in space. And and so a lot of those risks in space could actually potentially be modeled on tissue chips. So that's the first thing is that these tissue chips could give really important information about disease pathology understanding of microgravity effects in human tissues in in-vitro system. So that's going to be useful for the space research field space biomedical research field, but also microgravity seems to cause changes in human physiology that actually directly translate to disease pathology here. So some of the fluid shifts stuff that occurs in microgravity is directly correlation, some different kinds of cardiovascular disease. There's a higher incidence of kidney stones up in microgravity, which we don't really understand. Why kidney-stones big clinical problem aging of the immune system will immunise an essence is seen as people get older down here on earth. Will they get exposed to more kinds of different, viruses and cold and bacteria. Their immune system responds appropriately or inappropriately and there's been anecdotal evidence. And some evidence of how t cells, for example, respond differently to microgravity in space. And I think Dr Brian crucial was actually talking about that one of your previous podcast. Yeah. So there's all these changes that happen up in microgravity that a really interesting and important and potentially very informative for human disease here enough. So that's what we're using these tissue chips for in spaces that we can muddle things that might take months or years to occur down here on earth. Feel looking at. Soccer Pena, which is muscle loss or osteoperosis, which is loss of bone density, which is huge issue for astronauts in space. We can muddle something that might take ten or fifteen years here on earth to become even clinically relevant in a couple of weeks up in microgravity. So we're able to really try and stall understanding disease pathologies, an uncovering disease pathologies in a very exhilarated way that we couldn't do down here on earth. How is that? How is how is the time line accelerated with my grab? Well, that's what we don't understand. So that's why it's of interest both for us as researchers for human health here on earth because we want to understand what is it the causes osteoporosis. Is it genetic is environmental. What is it up in space, the has to be huge environmental aspect to it? So what is the actual biological mechanisms and molecular biology underpinning that loss of bone density up on station that is so fast? Could we potentially uncover new molecules that tissues respond to up in space? That mean that it gives us potential new therapeutic talk. To target osteoporosis here on earth. Could it gives us insight into genetic mechanisms and genetic predispositions? So we're really looking to understand new things by being able to utilize microgravity on station. Well, and this kind of goes back to your point of how small they are. Right. This is a huge consideration for sending things up to space is mass is also a consideration. When you're when you're sending things have a cargo vehicle, so you can send all of these chips with all these different organs and functions yell together. That'll give you some some time, and some some I guess flexibility with what you can accomplish yet. And so the key pointing at you just raised there is how the chips small. Yes, absolutely true. But if you look at the pumps and the computational needs that are needed to supply these chips with Mike career fluid channels with all of the plasma. And all of the takeaway, all of the effluent that comes out of the chip then all of a sudden, yo teeny tiny chip could need something to support it this the size of your kitchen refrigerator.

National Center Osteoporosis Soccer Pena Dr Brian Mike Fifteen Years
Hip Fracture, Osteoporosis and Osteo Pena discussed on Purity Products

Purity Products

00:55 sec | 4 years ago

Hip Fracture, Osteoporosis and Osteo Pena discussed on Purity Products

"It's, based on studies of thirty one, thousand people, a, thirty, percent reduced, risk of hip fracture but also reduction in. Risk fracture broken ankle broken ribs spinal fracture So, here's the CDC center for disease control and, prevention one in four women over, the age, of, sixty, have osteoporosis Many others have osteoporosis Forty. Eight percent of seniors almost half of seniors have osteo Pena almost half Twenty five percent of all the women. Have a worst case scenario osteoporosis? Six percent, of men of, us your process what. Percent of men of osteo Pena forty four percent fifty two. Percent of

Hip Fracture Osteoporosis Osteo Pena CDC Twenty Five Percent Forty Four Percent Fifteen Percent Eight Percent Six Percent
Osteoporosis: Mediterranean diet may slow bone loss

Atlanta's Morning News

01:32 min | 4 years ago

Osteoporosis: Mediterranean diet may slow bone loss

"In metro atlanta search for the alleged mastermind of a stolen tire rang the anthony stevens is suspected in thefts from cobb clayton to cab and fulton counties one of the victims tele nisha mccollum tells channel two action news she had just gotten her dream car it was something that i want it it was the color that i want it the package that i wanted but when she came outside to her driveway my car my brand new charger is sitting on two blocks jennifer griffiths wsb israel hopes to become just the fourth nation in the world to complete a moonshot israel aerospace teams up with a space i l to launch the spacecraft in december from spacex falcon nine rocket successful it'll be the smallest spacecraft ever to land on the moon just five feet high and six hundred kilos it'll take pictures and measurements but the landings the real goal wsb news about your head the mediterranean diet may help brittle bones according to a study of sixty and seventy year olds in europe some followed the mediterranean diet and some did not all were taking low doses of vitamin d people who already had osteoporosis and went onto the diet and increases in hip bone strength abc's dave schreiber says that's a common area of osteoporosis and bone fractures in the elderly emmy nominations come out this morning the american should get an odd lassie's in the crown is well for season two and the critically acclaimed new bbc series killing fees could make its debut abc's jason nathanson says game of thrones is eligible even though there was no new season and it was ineligible last year don't ask me the primetime emmys are handed out lives september seventeenth in la wsb news time seven twenty five imagine.

Anthony Stevens Cobb Clayton Nisha Mccollum Dave Schreiber Osteoporosis ABC Jason Nathanson Atlanta Fulton Israel Spacex Europe Emmy BBC Six Hundred Kilos Seventy Year Five Feet
Joel, Vandalism and European Union discussed on Joel Riley

Joel Riley

02:03 min | 4 years ago

Joel, Vandalism and European Union discussed on Joel Riley

"Weight changes over three years in more than four thousand women aged between fifty and seventy once it continued smoking ones that quit those who continue to smoke show no weight gain or loss regardless of exercise level old quitters did gain some weight after stopping smoking but adding physical activity even just ninety minutes of walking week minimized the wait game they found that even obese former smokers could have minimum game if they just continued a little physical activity so it's a pretty simple thing eat less exercise more and usually works out pretty good a mediterranean diet renowned for being tasty and having beneficial health effects may be adding a new reason to try new study shows that the diet may affect bone health if you have osteoporosis researchers followed more than one thousand people for years some followed the mediterranean diet some did not people that already had osteoperosis went on the diet they had increases in hip bone strength those osteoporosis and did not follow the diet well they continue to have bone troubles the hip bone common site for us you paralysis common cause of debilitating fractures in the elderly so mediterranean diet looks good tastes good may be good for your bones plus plus plus six nineteen traffic and weather in just a quick minute let's get you into the newsroom ken stevens tracking some van was german village right ken yup and this is actually the second neighborhood this happened in joel they were spray painted and keyed early yesterday apparently in german villas now police say that vandalism pretty close to the same thing that happened to seventy vehicles in clinton ville neighborhood is past weekend investigation continues president trump airing his grievances at the european union at the nato summit well here's some of his comments coming up at six thirty thanks a beautiful rights guys over columbus right now is six twenty let's update that traffic and weather we do it every ten minutes on the tens from tempstar heating and cooling products look pretty good into downtown in all four directions skip on hold the wrong with.

Joel Vandalism European Union Columbus Osteoporosis Ken Stevens Clinton Ville President Trump Nato Tempstar Ninety Minutes Ten Minutes Three Years
Conor Mcgregor, Brooklyn and Ray Bork discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

01:02 min | 4 years ago

Conor Mcgregor, Brooklyn and Ray Bork discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"Who absorbed more alcohol and break it down more slowly can make their bone mass suffer the women in the study who admitted to binge drinking twice a month in high school and college or found who have not reached their peak bone density though more research is needed researchers say avoiding binge drinking as a teenager may help decrease the odds of osteoporosis down the road linda lopez abc news mixed martial arts star conor mcgregor trying to resolve criminal charges after a melee in brooklyn conor mcgregor left court in brooklyn after prosecutors said clean ago she asics are underway to resolve the charges that stay will come in hurling a hand truck and a bus full of mixed martial arts fighter the latest of this matter see fighters mica and ray bork were injured in the april altercation backstage at barclay center mcgregor remains free on bail and is due back in court next month aaron katersky abc news new york what should you expect as a business owner do you ever wonder if your business ever closes early when you aren't there or if.

Conor Mcgregor Brooklyn Ray Bork Aaron Katersky New York Business Owner Barclay Center Mcgregor
Senator, Indiana and Gop discussed on The Mike Opelka Show

The Mike Opelka Show

02:23 min | 4 years ago

Senator, Indiana and Gop discussed on The Mike Opelka Show

"On this morning jennifer kushinka is here with more of america's first news brennan president trump has withdrawn the us from the landmark nuclear accord with iran abruptly restoring harsh sanctions in the most consequential foreign policy action of his presidency he declared he was making the world safer but he also deepened his isolation on the world stage and revived doubts about us credibility powerful sanctions will go into full effect if the regime continues its nuclear aspirations it will have bigger problems than it has ever had before two thousand fifteen agreement which was negotiated by the obama administration included germany france and britain had lifted most us and international economic sanctions against iran today francis foreign minister said the deal is not dead and that french president emmanuel macron will speak to his iranian counterpart has on ronnie later in the day iran also signaled its willingness to talk secretary of state mike pompeo is in north korea to finalize plans for a summit between president trump and kim jong un pompeo will also press north korea for the release of three detained us citizens whose imminent release trump has been hinting at republican voters have rejected ex convict don blankenship and a west virginia senate primary in which he sold himself as trump here then trump but was opposed by the president gop voters in indiana chose wealthy businessman mike braun over two sitting congressmen to lead the party's charge against a democratic senator in the fall bronze celebrated his victory built my company on the idea that you can be horror i mean you get out there and dig every day but you also find a way to kind of get along with competition gubernatorial primary richard cordray the former director of the consumer financial protection bureau under president obama easily won his primary against former democratic congressman dennis kucinich here's some great news for many of you listening this morning a potential new cure for baldness has been discovered using a drug originally intended to treat osteoporosis researchers from the uk say the new cure could make a real difference to people who suffer hair loss since the two drugs currently on the market both have side effects and are not always effective i don't i don't see me going that route we have receding hairline now but when i go ball that i think it just gonna leave it.

Senator Indiana GOP Senate West Virginia Kim Jong Mike Pompeo Germany UK Congressman Dennis Kucinich Barack Obama Director Richard Cordray Jennifer Kushinka Mike Braun President Trump Don Blankenship