26 Burst results for "Osos"

"osos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:16 min | 1 d ago

"osos" Discussed on KCRW

"Casey, are you FM Oxnard? Hey, er w Los Osos pay with Park KCRW Community Service of Santa Monica College News, Music, CULTURE and NPR for Southern California Stream eclectic 20. What Yeah. Suicide. You are men, but let's me In the middle seventies dreams that were dreamed. Try me. The middle in the middle, where it's one. Touch what we're feeling for. You got your saying I got my Me give middle Turn me in the middle. It's away. No Miss escape. We will we will guy back in the middle. Little where it's would. We'll touch what we're feeling I can tell you and me. We're gonna be It all. I can tell me we're going to be in the middle. 1234567789 wound up tight the way too long. Let go half the time. If I had done Alone if I die Be some bitter, live high. Sunglass on Drop Top down Favorite part of your song in town. Favorite part made it through the dark. Don't look back. Have a hurt. Make this last dance tonight. You hold on tight way too long round up right? Like a spring Take your safe Enjoy the scene. If you something tough How's your instagram these days? Did you get a lot of action? When you had Braves spring look good on that beach that turn near the maze and the pumpkin fry. Center near the park. Then that couple had it all lined up for the full tones talking. What I tried my great Papon trip Larger or the radio. It's bother anybody. I could turn to town because me and you both. We share this town. What you don't like Doug Flutie ever had dropped dropped. Louis ever seen credit the barrel painting? Collapse orange frame Snoopy ever had created barrel collapse. Spiegel never had created barrel collapse. Poofy or drop in Djibouti ever had Crate and barrel on a bagel. A bagel ever had. Steve Nash Low Rock cradle? Mm.

What Is the 'Freedom Phone'?

The 3:59

01:39 min | 4 d ago

What Is the 'Freedom Phone'?

"You may have heard some chatter about a freedom phone. Five hundred dollar hands at that. Supposedly focuses on free speech and privacy. There's so many red flags of lethal recommend boy in this device. Let's break it down. Jane this is your daily charge joining me again to discuss. The freedom phone is seen. That's on expert and fellow. Lego disease patrick colin. Welcome patrick readings greetings. My fellow brick brother. So you're on yesterday to talk about the galaxy fifty two which was a decent five hundred dollar android smartphone. And today we're talking about different. Five hundred dollar hand said. Tell me about this freedom phone man. We're laughing because it. I think you gotta look at it as the whole thing in two things and if you look at the whole thing it's a five hundred dollar phone. It's on preorder now. And there's virtually nothing we know about in terms of specs and other features that we would normally spend probably this whole podcast talking about then. There's the other side of it. Which is the name freedom. Phone and its tagline is that it will prioritize free speech and privacy above anything else. It's backed by a self-proclaimed. Bitcoin millionaire named eric feynman he's funding the phone and he claims that it's freedom. Oso's ios or android will protect your privacy and that the app store is uncensored unsinkable. As the word he uses and the app stores called the patriot store so There's a lot of big claims A lot of this is tied to the second part of the phone. which is clearly. It's tied to

Patrick Colin Lego Jane Patrick Eric Feynman App Stores Patriot Store App Store
Pompeo: Afghan fight against Taliban 'a matter of will'

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Pompeo: Afghan fight against Taliban 'a matter of will'

"Former secretary of state Mike Pompeii OSI's president Joe Biden was right to decide to withdraw from Afghanistan Taliban forces are making broad gains in northern Afghanistan has thousands of government troops flee across borders to avoid the fight even so former trump administration secretary of state Mike Pompeo says he believes the government troops can secure their country we give them twenty years thirty billion dollars a year of our systems we give them all the training they could handle it's time for them to step forward and actually deliver on security for themselves under trump Pompeii oversaw negotiations with the Taliban he applauds president Biden's decision to withdraw since the end of trump's term Pompey was formed a political action committee and is considered a potential twenty twenty four presidential candidates I'm Tim acquire

Mike Pompeii Trump Administration Mike Pompeo Afghanistan Taliban Joe Biden President Biden Pompey Donald Trump TIM
Wrestlemania 37 Review Special (Part 1) ft. Pro Wrestling Insider Shane Peacher (Ball & Buds Podcast Episode #14)

Ball & Buds

03:33 min | 2 months ago

Wrestlemania 37 Review Special (Part 1) ft. Pro Wrestling Insider Shane Peacher (Ball & Buds Podcast Episode #14)

"It felt like the old wwf. You know where they would have the pre match interviews and they just did like a thousand one before the before the show. It was great. It was awesome. I was actually happy that the rain happened. So let's start from the top. And i know you told me to talk about this and i was gonna ask you anyways. How do you. Because you are the biggest cogan hogan fan in the world titus and hulk hogan forever pirates soups. What are you kidding. Me ho me. tease john. Now i love hulk you know that man that was ridiculous and i love the whole a guest host. I guess but i mean it's just so scripted in horrible but it was so tacking it was it was eight hogan and it was hilarious and i loved it anyways just because it was hawk. I'm biased though osos soobee. you're biased. I love to do though even though it was awkward as well like they really tried to force this pairing together and it was like really didn't need to do this right and then of course you know you. They forced it because of the whole inward situation. Because if you remember when it first happened in hall they let hawk come back like titus kind of had an issue if you remember if you remember that whole scenario so i think they did. I think it was forced because that which is awkward. And i think hilarious because although titus forgave. I don't think he forgets to say i heard that. China's said technically forgiving him. But i heard that he was also still feeling that obviously so i was really awkward but it was kind of funny to me and i'm sure well speaking of they let that happen. Also because titus was in tampa so they actually tried to prop him up in his hometown but biggie. They took the championship from. Why do wwf keep letting or keep wanting to humiliate the wrestlers by having them losing their hometown. Do they think that this is good. Because it's not no. I don't know if it's hometown thing. I just think if you look back after the fat none of the world championship changed and so they had to change the littler titles. I think that's really it. You know what i mean. Because how many mania is does a world title never changed especially nixon had to one for each show. You know what i mean you have the world title and then undisputed title. Neither changed hands. And that's rare for mania. You always usually have a title change Meanwhile when i heard it will trump ender explanation is. I'm gonna beat you so it sounds like a drum is like okay. These kids don't even know what the matches but it was just a weapons manage. You know why. Why why you know what i'm saying. I mean they had like a whole bunch of guys around the ding beating drums. And you know the exact same thing you know. Maybe the an open pit you know like the african wrestling. I don't know if you've ever seen it looks like we're like scooting around in dirt. Yes can you know single knees wrestling that whack. I know the the matches it was kinda. Get his get his turn to because kofi had a big wrestlemainia match aside from the tag team for when he went for the title. This is big east big match. But of course he's got to lose because he's in results were rating so far right now the only result i think that was correct was owens. This was correct if it wasn't in his hometown but

Entertainment Sports Wrestlemainia Hulk Hogan Titus O'neil Big E Kofi Kingston Apollo Crews WWE Wrestling Pop Culture Cogan Hogan Titus Osos Hogan Biggie John Tampa China Nixon Kofi Owens
"osos" Discussed on The Python Podcast.__init__

The Python Podcast.__init__

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"osos" Discussed on The Python Podcast.__init__

"The hello and welcome to podcast dot it the podcast about python and the people who make it great when you're ready to launch your next app or want to try a project here about on the show you'll need somewhere to deploy it. So take a look at our friends over at leonard but the launch of their.

What Is Tail Risk?

Money For the Rest of Us

06:54 min | 5 months ago

What Is Tail Risk?

"Last week. The proven i got stuck in a rare snow and ice storm that hit texas where millions were without power and unable to heat their homes. We spent saturday night in el paso. Texas we saw there was going to be a winter storm between el paso and san antonio where we were heading where we were dropping off. My son and daughter in law's subaru that they had repaired back in tucson where we spend the winters we debated whether we should stay in el paso or not maybe way today but i thought i've driven in the snow a lot. It's a subaru. It has new tires. We should be just fine and indeed the car at least for the first day perform quite well. It was an absolute mess. There were so many wrecks at one point. There was a chinese woman in the middle of the highway waving us down. We thought it was another wreck. Turns turns out. She and her husband had got stranded on the other side of the expressway and needed a ride back to the next town where they had a hotel. It took us eight hours of driving. And we realized we wouldn't be able to reach san antonio. I rather son book too so hotel in oso texas because our cell phones weren't working right. The next morning the car was dead we put in a battery and then we started driving again. We didn't make it far. We got stuck at a rest. Stop our cell. Phones didn't work. It was fifteen degrees. I found found somebody that call the police for us rescue us but before the police arrived the car started against so we thought well at least try to get to the next exit and maybe we could get a hotel. The car stalled again. We posted about a half a mile off the highway and ended up stranded on the side of the road in sonora texas. It's not a very big town. There's no taxis there's no uber. We presume the problem was the alternator was out. We got a hold of my son who wanted to come and install a new one so we had to get back about thirty eight miles to sona texas where we had a hotel room. I least had the presence of mind to book another nights room at the hotel just in case something came up. We couldn't get back. I called the police. They said they couldn't help. They didn't have the resources that operator said call tow truck. Why did they weren't going to pick us up. They only tow cars. Aaa doesn't do it. Either they only arrange for toes reaced needed a ride back to her hotel. Was i call the auto parts store where i had paid a couple of guys to put the battery in. They didn't want to come pick us up. I had brett check. If we had any plus members in the area the closest one was in kerrville too. Far away i called our web developers in houston. Do they know anybody. In sonora turn their neighbor had family that live there but he was eighty and they couldn't get a hold of him on the phone. Finally brat got in touch with a local leader from the church of jesus christ of latter day saints that live an hour and a half away and it turns out he knew a couple in zona who said they were willing to come and get us complete strangers. They both worked for the school district. The husband and wife and they came. We were on the side of the road about two hours and it was cold the next day. His father in law came. They picked us up. And we made it san antonio barely because we had the head any gasoline because they're filling stations were closed or out of gas because of power. It was extremely rare event. The coldest that has been in texas since nineteen eighty nine. If we look at the weather in san antonio in a typical year it varies between forty. Three degrees in ninety six degrees. it rarely falls below. Freezing plotted graph. Temperatures in texas. Most of the observations would be in the middle around seventy degrees. This is a bell curve. A normal distribution fifteen degrees fahrenheit is where we were to the far left of this distribution and that far left is the tail tail events are extreme outcomes or very rare observations. Because they're in the tail on the ends of the distribution there called talibans tail. Risk is the personal harm. That's these extreme events can cause. How does it impact us. In the worst case we could be ruined. We could die or we could go bankrupt. We could run out of money. This weather event was hey tail event. It was an extreme of it. It was rare now. Pearl and i were in a. I wouldn't call it a dangerous situation. Certainly very uncomfortable. I have not been that stranded in many years. It took a while to find help. I've you were kind of at wit's end as investors we can control the amount of tail risk that we take we can protect against by buying insurance. We can self insure in have enough buffer to survive extreme risk or we can ensure others and sell tail risk protection before we continue. Let me pause and share some words from a new sponsor to the show babble. When the as. I'm eagles as you know. I learned spanish many years ago and recently i've been practicing trying to improve my spanish by using babble. The number one language learning apps each lesson on babbel's about fifteen minutes. That's the perfect way to learn a new language. I've also been practicing with the french lessons on babble. Because i have a hard time pronouncing french. It was cool about babble. Is they design their courses for practical real world conversations in mind things that you'll use every day when you travel babba lessons were created by over one hundred language experts with the app you can choose from fourteen different languages so if you just want to toy with a particular language learn to say hello to order some food. You can do that if you wanna take a deeper dive like. I'm doing with

El Paso Texas San Antonio Sonora OSO Tucson Sona Kerrville Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latt Zona Brett Houston United States
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

02:38 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"His computer uninstalled wasn't as well. You gotta edit something here you go tech senate has gone. Sorry kind of stunned me heaviest codes like crazy we taking over the world. But it's interesting i find. It surprises me a little bit because it came out of the whole microsoft side of things. I thought that there would be a lot of communities that were out. Just no yeah but it. Somehow it's hit the right notes and people really love it so yeah it's definitely successful these days and then notable pipe. Pi package anything. Sam you've come across. Maybe that like cool libraries like oh man you should really know about this or maybe we arrest integration with that or so on so. Finally someone of things like python as sometimes. I'm not even wear from using package built in the library. Yeah so like. I'm a big fan like all the typing stuff that pythons being graduating in i think partially that's because i went through my like rust phase and now i'm back in wearing the types typing extensions. I love the type stuff. I put it like all the python code than i write on the boundaries. Like say not every bit of code but where some part code is written in some other parts going to serve externally consuming it types on that straightaway and yeah. I think it's another standard library staff but will the meta programming you can do is python. it's you can really do some crazy stuff for that. But it's kinda fun yeah awesome. I'll throw two things out there for people that are really related there. So my pie is a a static type checker little verify all the types you put in our consistent and then there's my pie c. Which will actually compile native code some of your python based on those types of understand avidan devoid but anyway but of fun stuff around the types out there indeed. Yep yep i find a whole action. People are interested in letting someone else handle their authorization and some library may be putting that into a one of these polar files. How do they started. What do they do if they want to get some of your projects you guys go to switch dot com. Br the fastest way. There's a big button on the front. That'll take you to the quickstart. I would check that out awesome. Well thank you both for being on the show and for work on this project for the last couple of years it looks really helpful us and it was great to be your thank you. Yep you bet bye bye guys by. This has been another episode of talk python to me or guessing. This upset were grim. Neary and sam scott. It's been brought to you by us over at top by training. One to level up your python. If you're just getting started try my python jump. Start my building ten apps course or if you're.

senate Sam microsoft sam scott Neary
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

08:38 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"You built or work still exactly exactly. Is this interaction by. Interaction layer part of the open source. Stuff that you have out there absolutely. Everything is open source. Yeah yeah we'll probably see a blog post coming fairly so you don't how bill because i think it is like a really nice simple appreciating this kind of thing and i'm pushing a huge huge westbound. That's kind of a big reason why we're using it and so i'd love to see people taking this approach to building is like cross platform cross language. Rust calls the awesome grammy throwback to you with a business question. Sure yeah so we've been talking about how cool it is open source and yet we start off the conversation saying you guys started the business two years ago. I'm really fascinated in admire companies that are able to make legitimate meaningful open source things and then use some interesting extra thing that you get more if if you support them or if you buy some product or service from them and it sounds like that that is the kind of thing you all are building as well right because the the library in the debugger in the ripple and all that stuff is open source get help people can forecast today and and that's that right absolutely okay. So what's the story. What is your specific. Plan here yeah so in the near term we're focused on open source and the reason for that is we believe that the right way to build this company in the right way to build this community is to put enough weight behind the enough weight behind the body of people who are actually writing code in polar and giving them everything that they need to be successful and so that's like the focus for us for the next year or two years plus when we think about obviously we're company and we have every intention of being around for the long term and so the way that we need to do that is to create a sustainable business so the way that we think about doing that is by offering a path for teams that want to run insecure also in production and giving them things that make that really viable and easy. So give you some examples. You know right now. Osos packaged as the library. Imagine a scenario where you wanna run a bunch of oso libraries in a micro services context and we had folks already asked us for this today. So now you've got a bunch of libraries with different policies running across a bunch of different services. And you a way to ensure that. Those always have the most up-to-date policy the most up-to-date version of the library. And you're doing that and they're properly version and so on and so forth so i know so service that would handle something like that is one way you could imagine monetize ing right because if you're one of these complicated share point sort of organizations their stuff everywhere everywhere and it's so easy for like one apt to get its policy out of sync with the other. And how do you know you've got them all. Just sounds like a nightmare. Yeah or security teams. Equally have assessed Also being a library on the critical path of every request puts it in a unique position to be auditing requests. Which is something that you talked about back at the beginning and this is something that a lot of security teams surprisingly really struggle with. It's not an easy problem to solve. And but it's something that this particular piece of software is in a unique position to do and so you can easily imagine. Also providing auditing capabilities security teams in the future showing them who was authorized to do what at what point and because we're making authorization decision ourselves we can actually tell them why they were authorized because they were in this role because they sit in this department and they report up to this person stuff like that. Yeah that's super interesting. Because you're right you are already in the middle of all those exchanges so it's easy for you to add that visibility. Yeah so i mean for us. As i said like the philosophies relatively clear we want to give developers the tools that they need to be successful with though so period and that technology will always be open source the way that we think about the technology that will use to sustain the commercial side of the business will be the sort of organizational pieces that larger businesses rely on in order to be secure compliant run large operational teams and applications in production. Yeah well i think that's a it. Sounds like a pretty solid idea. You've got this legitimate open source thing that's meaningful and useful and grow that and get the companies that got the deep pockets who are often unlikely or unwilling or incapable of contributing back to open source. Give them a thing that they'll pay for that will indirectly basically give back open source absolutely as an example. Before this i worked at an open source company called mongo db and over for for many many years and over that period of time we invested several hundred million dollars worth of rnd into the database product. Which is directly straight from the companies that were providing revenue to the business through the paid products. So it's very clear tie between you know the company's paying money to the company building the product itself. Yeah i was going to ask you about mongo. Db as well as like what inspiration there. Because i think one of the things that were start at least me and the folks who i've spoken to are starting to realize is that it doesn't matter how much money a company has. They won't donate the idea of a donation is like i don't know where that goes into the accounting spreadsheet it doesn't make sense I can't tell my shareholders that we donate a million dollars to django. Because i don't know it just doesn't make they can't put that into their structure right but we pay for service level agreements. We pay for additional services. We pay for better support like that fits into their accounting software. And i think that's the story that's going to work and so if you can offer them something more they're very likely to pay for it to get that like you are. Yeah absolutely and i think for us again like whenever there's books upon books on books written about this topic not in the context of open source software but like in the context of like philosophy over lunch in the sixteenth seventeenth eighteenth century. You know people writing about tragic the comments. This is not a new topic like in the world but in the context of like open source our philosophy is. We need to give something. That's good enough for someone to be able to use on their own where they wouldn't feel like they're going to be held hostage if they're not gonna pay money. That's just not a sensible thing for anyone to do. We try to put ourselves in the shoes of our users. We would never adopt a product where we felt. We'd be at risk of being held hostage but but instead give them an opportunity but hey here's something that you can that you can take advantage of that you can get value from and that if you find yourself in this other scenario where you think you want to want to get something like auditing you wanna get additional visibility. You want this way to run something at scale than we're going to be there for you. We're going to provide a commercial product for you in that situation as fantastic. And i'm a huge fan among a db i told you this earlier before we record but all of our stuff runs a mongo and its has for by six years. It's been beautiful. I actually just looked at the stack. Overflow developer survey from twenty twenty and under the most won a database. Mugabe is five percent above post grass than it's like those are the two that offering so pretty neat. What lessons did you take your time at mongo. Db that maybe you wouldn't have otherwise brought to this venture by far the number. One thing that i learned there is focused on the developer. And i mean if you look at the mission and vision of our company we put security in the hands of the makers that is all we care about. We have a singular focus on developers if you woke up anyone on the team and shook them at night. And you ask them. Who is the number one focus of this company. I guarantee you that anyone would say developers and that has been clear from the beginning and will continue to be clear for us and that was definitely the main thing i took away from my time at. Db yes super cool. All right awesome. Well i think we're about out of time but what any project and wish you guys. Good luck with a. Let me ask you the final two questions. Oh before you get out of here graham. Sorry i if you're going to write some code but editor do use these days said you do some not a ton but if you are what are using it was definitely. Vs code all right right on as popular. I think that's pretty. Because of my is forced it on crime yes by stanford i went through. His computer uninstalled wasn't as well. You gotta edit something here you go tech senate has gone. Sorry.

Osos mongo db grammy Rust Mugabe graham stanford senate
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:56 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"That's a pretty good airport is like it's just like all these weird permissions and it's like well. We can't really. I don't know just always feel like. Oh this is like messed up enough that you really need some healthier. So i thought you're going to get maybe a different direction without which is if you would be so embarrassed or out of business if somebody data was was then you this also. Yeah yeah for sure. For sure is aren't giving some more examples so we spoke about like the social media art at the beginning which is kind of an interesting one because as a few slice of that and actually we recently did a bunch of blog posts on social media feed app the together but even some the simple ones that you mentioned could be reasonably complex can conc- posted or they can see their friends posts. They can see the. Maybe if they're like tagged oppose things like that that can be involved in like look at like the post wairoa's put and like who was referencing that things like that this kind of the two sides that as well as the use of that and then internally how company like twitter manages how employees can access things and obviously this is a pretty topic not too long ago it was super hot. Yeah there was blinking on the details. Maybe you remembering help people but yeah there was had to do celebrities right right it was. I think it was effectively. The intel employees of twitter. We're able to way more than they should be such as offline anybody exactly. I should ever really need to have. But i imagine it's pretty convenient way to build up. You want to test how it looks you see that and you see a all right your customers having a problem. That like hey. I'm unable to tweet. But i'm able to do this in my count. You want us to be like step in and help them out and be like i can see your permissions on quite right. Let me try this. And the reasons that you'd have that much power but it just like overlays is like entire extra dimension as like us us missions and then like y'all customers pull wraps behaving as if they're a user but with different and so on and it's one thing if that's like internal data and okay so they probably should do this but if you log in as them they can like in the app you could maybe do a little more within but it's another to have that on production yep in a live broadcast of the world like i can make this random politician or celebrity. Say this do this thing and to varying degrees. It'll be believed i. Yep yep and then yeah so. That's so there's a good chance. And then beyond that all of the kind of typical cases you could imagine very common insight like an hr could manage employee relationship. You mentioned very organizationally driven up in access control so hr payroll things like that. You'll see this law similarly like banking and finance like any of those cases where you imagine that the data sensitive and you have some concept of groups hierarchies organizations is where this comes up a lot. An echo so said the languages available or the api's available for a lot of different languages and one of the thing. That's interesting here. Is you all decided to build it with rust. Thus right which is a pretty hot neat language and at some point though. Rust has to talk to python. So i've seen a few examples of people creating a traditional example as i'm going to create some lower level thing for python somebody you see. Maybe i'll go crazy and you see plus plus but expose it s see but i think i'd rather right rust and how did you. How did you pull that off. How did you do that. Integration yes the ecosystem of embedding rust in python archie or even vice versa embedding python and rust according inspired from the associated as a futile is out there which solve that specific problem that they have interfaces specifically for exposing a rough struck as a python class things like that. We didn't really have that option available to us because we weren't support multiple we sort of needed some api. That was simple enough. That i see it would have language all the run time you combine the python russ tightly together as an option and probably if you're a goals only to write it as a base for python thing it might make sense but exactly that wasn't your goal right nor exactly so instead we sort of okay one of the engineers and the team had this pretty grave vision of how this would look which is sort of like a kind of an event driven. Api so like or. The rust code is driven through a very very simple api from like the host language sites. It from like python or ruby simply just kind of like do the next thing the internal evaluation on through vector machines as like bush machine. Go to your next instruction good to your next instruction and kinda attends jason blob of data back to say like i said earlier. Hey what's the name filled on the objects number one which maybe as they use a type soundlessly realized that conversation between the python rostov hyphen is like hey do more do more work until rest comes back and says i need more information which means that like there is no when when the policies no running. There's no background thread disner. There's nothing like running. it's python is free to kind of pulls version machine for as long as it needs in the case of things like have done this for the net but in the case of norwich's you have synchronous codes. That always walks. It's like super nice. Yeah oh yeah that's cool. That would be nice if python also mentioned a fast. Api earlier yeah. Yeah that one's all about the acs. Wait so it's not quite yet a big deal but it's like some of the new frameworks are going down that path. At the same time you could still use it. It just won't benefit from the way. I would suspect right exactly so where this would matter and this this would be essentially a pretty important thing to do for something. Like api's if as i said the because the policy language can call into the operation defense data that cold itself like a database query. And so maybe if you multiple threads you trying to send multiple requests like. You're gonna want that as sing so that the policy is a seriously getting that data back. Yeah for sure every time you can await some other external resource you. Just get better off for doing it. Yeah exactly okay. Very cool well. It sounds like a neat integration. And i guess it's challenge. I didn't really expect. I figured you'd have to integrate it with russ by didn't expect we needed to be so bidirectional communication and work across the different languages. That's a pretty good accomplishment. Yeah yeah it was. I mean it was a little fun to bills at say. The hottest part of it all was the the packaging. And i finally enough because now we have this rust library. We're trying to add to add to the python. Package we cover. What number up to this point that we have maybe like three hundred jobs for over hyphen version to test like every combination. So you want to do like build a wheel for like mac. Os on python. Three eight mac os on pie them three nine and so on. Yeah exactly so. You have the mini lennox. It's a format would be or speckles. Something the us the hundred approach so that we can build these prebuilt all these wheels including the rest code but once you get them out you wanna make sure that those fifty different wheels.

wairoa twitter intel us jason norwich bush russ
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

01:45 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Right. You know something right. Man is like oh. It's coming back as a single key. Not a less in the way you put it in jahmil or whatever it is right like having the ability to like step through. It is really interesting. He has a debugger is great farm for exactly that you just drop into the debugger and just kind of like how next and just like watch it doing its thing. Do you have or have you dreamed of any. Like id integrations like the code or charm or more broadly intelligence. Yeah so i think dreams paci the right. The right word for it you know we already do have syntax highlighting available for codes. I think there's been conflict there as well. There are some stuff we want to do with like the language of approach cold and hooking up the d. bugah to i d like bs coach that you get that experience like in you'll in your id. Yeah this is us off. We wanna do all right. I've been beating my example of manager employees to death. Give us more use cases or you might see people using this kind of stuff. Yeah so i think one of the one of the show us we have for this is kinda prototypical authorization use case. They are building electric. Health records software deployed currently in hospitals and stuff. They come up with like every day. Just astonishes me some the authorization kin that really costs gustaf which is like you can. Doctor can see a patient's records if they sold them in the last seven days or if they have an upcoming visit like that's the kind of level of granularity like hopeful. I want to go down to. Yeah yeah that sounds like a perfect use case. Just here's a general heuristic for deciding whether some company organization might have good use for this if they share point..

paci bugah gustaf
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

03:19 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Right and now the rule which would say managers can reads like us a can reads a some employees some personnel data if the target employees manager right. And you know there's two roles now combined together you've just written those like kind of flat policy and the underlying engine is basically the one that navigates through those such as through tries to find if it's true cool and i'm looking through those syntax here. It's clearly not python but it not that far from python like exactly father by the birth in person could jump in here okay well mercury and object. Yeah got put the new keyword but new person and such and such. That seems pretty straightforward. Yeah yeah the rules. Look like methods narrow. They have type specializes which look exactly the same python type onstage. But they're actually in full set runtime okay to house data. Get from like my application over into one of these. All execution instance like calling running the policy. Basically i've got like a user in my. I don't know request session or something like that. Yes so they get they get postulated right so the the also library in the python app posit in regular objects from python. You pass it in their quest usa you pasta and the thing that trying to access and basically we still have the policy engine. There is a sort of a an interface between the pisces. Librarian tunnel policy. Engine that it. Let's deal with the objects but it can do this. Policy evaluation overlays objects. And isn't he's no they are. It's just like if you say. use a a username. Once the policy that gets the it'll be like hey thin what's the We'll see uses username. And it's it's sam and it continues on his. I call nine a string. Yeah nice super cool. So one of the things that's interesting about thon and some of the other languages you mentioned with the integration right like ruby for example is that we have a rebel redevelop. Rindt brian you just typed python. Hopefully that runs python on three type item three. And you just get triple triple greater than rebel and you can start typing in python commands and going from there and i do feel sometimes. People are learning python into heavily on that like they don't just go create a foul because it's like a pain to make any corrections and stuff but it is really nice as exploratory mode and what surprised me when we spoke first about this. Is you guys have a rep. Oh for this polar policy thing right we do. We have we exactly. We have a rep bugah and that's right because like as you said right. It's clearly not by python but the underlying model is different expecting it's not imperative. Logic basis decorative and so we appreciate there is a degree of like having to learn how the language works and so for us. Yeah you're going to build a language on the power of a language. You wanna have a replica dive into testings out and check something as simple syntax oil. Just a sense. Check the got the expect to result back then so we have a rebel. You can load on your policy. Files allows you to interactively. Query them so you can just dive in and make sure things are working as you'd expect yeah. I suspect that that would be hugely valuable. Haven't actually tried it. But you know. I think of things like jahmil configuration files and stuff your psyche. It's not working. Why like those times. He just wanted to yell at you. Why don't you work. it looks.

Rindt brian usa sam
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

07:07 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Yep yep yeah and you bring up. An interesting point is why people say architecture is like wet cement for a while. Yeah yeah absolutely. I was just gonna say the the idea about it being exposed to us as well as interesting on. It's i think a lot of the struggles. Frustrations people have with security both on similar things as well where you end up you trying to use a website or something that have these like crazy complicated permission role systems way. You're trying to decide what you can do. The app and when you told teams like that you realize it's because they've infants authorization system and they're basically just like exposing the in tunnels of that threat to the end uses so you kind of need to understand how the app works in all society we can do inside and that kinda crazy. Yeah for sure. So you all saw problem out there and you built this policy system this authorization system and i guess one of the things we wanna be clear about. Is i see this as an advantage is it is not specifically not about logging and users managing their passwords or their party off stop. It's about once you know who someone is regardless like using password you can have gulag. And what are we feel like. Once you've got that. Now what can they do right. That's exactly right. And in addition to that it can be can have the multiple different ways that people have identities right. They might log it in the web app they might have an epa key and authorization might depend upon that. That was like a main inputs. He's decisions yeah interesting like so for our mobile for the training courses. We have you log in with us ambassador but then it actually exchanges an api key is the law and get your api key and then from there on its exchange with all the calls. So yeah ahead. David i thought about the api side of things as well. But that makes a lot of sense that you'd want to separate those. Yep it doesn't matter how you log in if it's api key or you do with these new passwords like all right. well now. we're going to figure out what they can do. So i guess. Tell me what problems it was that you saw like what we gotta do this differently. And then tell us about so and like how we can use it by on and so on. Yeah absolutely so the. I think the biggest problem that we out there is that pretty much every single engineering team. We see now that we've spoken to has repeated this themselves from scratch in as we just discussed right. Whether it's through that code is a decorates whatever it is like everybody's repeating the same look and nobody's going to get it like puff it on the first attempts and so they end up having to reflect her time and add things quite get it right well in another thing. The way i think about the stuff is adds no value to your application in a unique feature aspect is like one of those things that it has to exist it's table stakes for being in the game but it's not like somebody's like i love that app because the office so author only like dragon molasses if you have to do it yourself and you get it wrong but it's not a bonus so it's the reason i say it's not something you want to try to invent in or whatever i just wanted to work really well and get out of your way absolutely exactly. It's one of those. If you do it right. They won't even know it's the kind of thing exactly so. Yeah so that's what we're out that you to solve is to make that experience forever. It involves like that much better for the developers who ability and spending time on it and hopefully getting it wrong to the end users who are like dealing with these crazy of missions to to navigate so basically the way we solve. This is through open source policy engine quo and this kind of two main pieces of this. There is the policy language called pola. This is what you write your authorized chicken. And i can speak about that and bit more in in a sec. Yeah that's what a piece one and then peace to the library. Which is the policy. Engine itself reads in those policy files and basically has very very simple. Api single method of effectively to make an authorization. Sison right in forward. Like i was looking through some of your dachshund for flask you have some built in integration. Yes that's right. Right you create a flask oso thing and you just say initialized app you give the flask app. And then you tell. What routes to authorize basically exactly. Yeah so the library itself is actually available for multiple languages so currently we support python ruby java and rust. So that's kind of like the core of this and then we build additional framework integration accurate. You know we have one foot floss. John and frigid lawyers. We try and provides sort of framework idiomatic approaches to authorization. Flock is pretty keen with things like decorators with django. it's more about middleware ultimately registering making available online data models. How hard would it be to add it to a new shiny framework. That didn't make your list like. I'm super excited about fast. Api right now. Yeah right look really nice but probably you don't have integration with that yet. It seems like it probably wouldn't be that hard to replicate what you've done with last or something along those lines exactly. Each framework integration effectively equivalent. To how hot is to set your application in general and we're talking about pistol also then creating new objects looting policy file and you're good to go full. In the case of january for example will register automatically like the django models because the policy followed can actually access objects and classes from your application seen as a little bit of work that we automatically registered four right. Yeah very jingo like to do that. Exactly nice okay. So i talked about this complicated story of. I wanna be the manager. But there's only some people where i am the manager of and i could be managed myself and so on There's other people have no relationship with other than co employees and so on one of the options was. We could write code in the application to do that. Yep it sounds like this. Polar language policy file is where that would go here. Yeah that's right so. The anchorage is a declarative language. It actually takes inspiration from logic. Programming language called prologue sor this decades-old pretty well established logic programming language but pearl get self typically is. It's going to be nine type of pretty high like barriers entry. Kind of hot dylan. Yeah so we saw. That's what we started with shelves to make it as easy to use something like python and so along the way you know. We've added stuff that you would expect to find in python. You can look up attributes on your python objects you can call methods. You can use variable q it arguments. The logic is written and letters as opposed to you. Know some arcane if things like yeah. That's the language. Paula and then some by building on something like prologue is that she makes rising expressing logic. Like you just like you said. Arounds representing complex hierarchies or things like that is this you very very powerful way to represent lers you can write are accustomed rule like that which says you're a manager of an employee if the employee managerial the employees managers manager or something like that you can write like a little rock customer role in a couple of lines you cannot use throughout your policy can right and now the rule which would say managers can reads like us a can reads a some employees some personnel data if the target employees manager right..

epa pola Sison David sec John anchorage dylan Paula
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

05:15 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Let's talk about some of the coating approaches in current python projects. And i guess. I talked about one. Shammy put down as like a diy do yourself. And that's the well. We gotta have managers and people for whom they manage. We've got to which is write some code and sort of put that logic in there. And maybe we've got that overlaid on some groups. Maybe give us some of the common approaches. You might see common python web apps. Yes overwhelmingly common is that this is kind of seen as just the regular code and applications. Just the things you have to do in an app to build it so in that case it just ends up baked into every method. You have is going to have a set amount this logic. I think either you're going to see people who are just sprinklers. Throughout the code base adding the more it's necessary and that's just kind of like handles all like considered sunday just deal with oftentimes. Sometimes people will try and go to the approach of stretching that al pulling it out through into you know maybe something like a decorates and that ends up becoming this like five hundred line decorates the which has ten levels of nesting statements and things like a decorated already. Hard to put your mind. Or although that's what i do my stuff i'll have like a michael permissions decorator at least the thing that i like about that even though it has disadvantages the thing that i like is i can go to the functions have to read the function and no is this thing being dealt with like does it have the decorator than the function is. Okay you know what i mean. Yep yep exactly and there's you know those like one set of things and it not like nothing to do these things we're talking about like depending on the application right so a lot of the kind of stuff we'd be describing doesn't have to happen in the codes it might be stored in a management system or something. I active directory is typically a place where you can store all the information about uses and you can ask them to groups and assign them permissions to different things. That is sort of like the manual. Adamant approaches might be familiar with to maybe like manage permissions inside an organization but it's not kind of suitable for the kind of thing we've been talking about for like an application application are application. You don't want to have someone manually. Going into like an active directory thing like assigning people roles missions right so it's kinda like one set and then i think similarly some of the frameworks out there for example have built-in things for similar patterns. There's jiang house things like django adleman. Which again is baked in. I and system to manage like uses permissions. But it's kind of like the flavor it's like a a. Ui might manually go in and figure in our at santa's group and this group staying time can do these missions not for the sort of like. How am i going to provide a consistent interface to all my end uses like how do that sort of dynamic automatic configuration. How do you feel about multi tenant apps. So i've got a cloud service and maybe i've got one company and within that company they have certain roles but then other customers come along they buy setup for their system you think like slack. Yep or get hub with organizations or something like that so you gave two very interesting examples. I think gav is a pretty good example of doing multi tendency in an unreasonable way in that you have your single user account and you can belong to many organizations you can have different roles inside the organizations you can have. You can even have roles inside repositories. Let's not that obvious but you can be a new our collaborates poetry right. And it's kind of like handles all of those in the sort of reason consistent way the if you don't think too deep it kind of makes sense but you can imagine you're on the back end to support that or they have to do is have a reasonably complex data relationship model between users organizations or posit trees if you go deeper teams sub teams infinitely because of teams things like that. Yeah yeah slack. I feel like they did the at least initially. They kind of forced you to account for every workspace presumably on the back end. This looks like somewhat different ways. They didn't try to make it so that it like you could use it to multiple organizations roles. It's like you haven't use a inside edition. And they have a role and this. I think this is probably. I can imagine this might be something based on how they originated authorisation. Sort of might have been painted them into a corner there now. The stock with a model is hard to get away. From yeah side notre sidebar slack. Authentication model drives me crazy. That i can just log in and see what groups like. I'm with you. I gotta remember the prideaux. The pre the it's brutal. I part of the domain that belongs to it and then the password may or may not be the same as like what am i why am i doing. It's silverdome man yup authorization to purchase wrong. But maybe it was just in shows that you need to be careful about this. How you think about this and the fact that we are talking about it at all means that it's like an issue for users people experience in an ideal world. You shouldn't even think about like well. I didn't think about it but yet that it is restricted to me. What i should be doing and it just works right. Yep yep yeah and you bring up. An interesting point is why people say architecture is like wet cement.

django adleman jiang al santa
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

05:53 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"But you're right like the result of that is authentication. Yes when. I say that there's not any really authors. I'm thinking that that doesn't tell the app what you're allowed to do. It does feel like say twitter. What are you allow. Is this app allowed to tweet on your behalf according to twitter. Yes exactly right but it doesn't help within your app. Like if i wanted out by one in la okay this user. They can view invoices but they can't create invoices precisely but they can't ever see the bank details of anyone like that right. There's no social that's going to help you with that. Side of the story is what i was thinking does exactly right right. That's fundamentally An authorisation question what you just asked yeah okay exactly cool and so this is the core problem that you guys are trying to solve. And we're gonna talk about some of the open source stuff that you've done and the python api's and all that but you'll maybe let's just continue this part of the conversation by talking about some common access patterns and what is out there like we talked about the social often what that means. We talked about creating users with these names and passwords. What are some of the patterns you or seen out there. Yeah it's basically every application out there needs to let its users in some way shape or form see their data and do something to their data and so fundamentally that's doing some kind of authorization and then you'll have a basic like social app. That might be like what posts can you see. In what posts can you edit or something like that and then you'll have. Yeah so in some sense. i guess. There's an implicit default authorization that every application has in. Its usually. i can see my stuff in public stuff and that's right like right. There's no rules like okay when i go to twitter. I just see my stuff and public of right. I go to my profile. But there's no expectation that would ever be able to see someone else's profile those sorts of things. So i guess if you don't do anything that's generally the access pattern people have is. I create an account and that account could see it stuff. Yes absolutely and i think that's kind of like the common paradigm in particular in like a consumer application context particularly when you start to look at like. Is this the business applications. You up with like very quickly. The patterns get a lot more complex so could be. Hr application or a serum application or medical records application and very quickly what people will do building these types of apps is they'll reach for pattern called roles role they'll group set of permissions or capabilities. Together the lump them together into something called a role. They'll say anyone that has this role like admin or billing or dirty or whatever it may be can do these sets of things and then if you wanna be able to do those things you gotta get signed that role and that's kind of like a handy thing because it means they every time you wanna make sure that someone can do those things you don't have to repeat that work which is kind of nice right but also kind of limited because effectively. What that's doing is it's creating sort of representing all your permissions as like to bite you. You basically have a bunch of roles on one axis and you've got a bunch of capabilities on another access. And the truth. Is that most apps. Don't they're sort of like underlying data model isn't a two by two. They may be. They may have all kinds of other things going on. They may have they may want to represent hierarchical patterns like to represent an organization they may want to represent inheritance they may wanna represent some kind of graphs and so like oftentimes after you adopt a role model. Let me throw ninety out here and you can tell me what you think of that. Like so for example. If i'm a manager at a company i can see my work right plus my teams work exactly right but i don't wanna see another teams were. I don't want that person to be able to see everyone's work. Just the people for whom they are the manager like that seem. And then you know how do you. You can't really easily manage that setup right. That's a perfect example. Because that's not a role that's like a manager in that context isn't a static thing that you just assigned to someone that's kind of dynamic based on where you sit in the or you might be a manager of lung team you might be a vp in which case your manager of like five teams and so it's not this thing that's assigned to you. It's more like a function of maybe some other data that sets elsewhere in your application. Yeah so you end up having to do all kinds of crazy things to hack around the role model and make that work for your application wishes all kinds of stuff that we see. That's where it starts to get fun. Yeah exactly so. That's probably means like of just having say a decorator or some simple if statement says if they are manager. There's usually like some custom logic checking in that section right. there's like code. That's been written somewhere. The checks basically does those things and looks. Okay my manager. But who do they manage. And right and so on all the sudden this rolls idea sorta it somewhat falls down injured putting in the logic into your outright right and there's other examples of where the sort of roles model stops and other things begin and you sort of have to start just adding more whatever it is if statements or maybe you bring the logic to some other part of the application because that's where it makes more sense to you but yet the example you gave us a perfect one thing about that kind of stuff that scares me is what if i forgot right. I've got a web app with hundreds of end points. One of the one section is like an admin section and that doesn't do the proper checks all sorts of badness is going to happen right absolutely so you put your coat in. I mean i. How do you guys feel about that. Because i'm always like i'm triple checking. Then guy gotta go back and check this again. This is this could be bad. It's super super common. And that's where we see. We see large organizations. That's where often like a security team will spend a large portion of that time create teams who have their own little reggae..

twitter la
"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

05:32 min | 8 months ago

"osos" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Sam graham. Welcome to buy me. Thanks for having us. Thanks it's great to have you guys here. I'm excited to talk about this. Whole managing what people can do computers from a slightly different perspective from the authorization side of things which i think gets underserved and program in general. So that's going to be a lot of fun but before we get to all that stuff. Let's start with your stories. How'd you get into a program in a python zam. You wanna go first. Yeah sure so. I think for meals for the kind of typical programmer entry. Which was i had a very monotonous data entry job which. I was like this shortly. There's a better way. I was young enough that i reach for bb. Micros fuse late. Though i actually ended up picking up hyphen primarily through mass degree. I had a professor who is like riding to number theory and worked on the sage math package. Oh yes h mathis fantastic. Yeah i've had william stein on. It is incredible. Oh nice yeah. It's cool what they're doing. Yeah actually dug up. My first contribution has a sage math ticket from nine years ago. Okay cool yeah. What kind of math. Resetting so that was during undergrad. Maths so that stuff was the number. Theoretical side of things after that actually went onto a massive cryptography in a phd in cryptography and security. Which is nice. How here basically yeah. A sort of indirectly roundabout lease. You hear graham. How about yourself i. Actually i took an entry level. Course when i was an undergrad and actually the end of my undergraduate experience which took me way farther than i ever would have expected to and i don't do that much programming on a day to day basis but i try to whenever i can including at a recent company hackathon so i still like to dabble when i can a super these as you both work at oso. Yeah give us the rundown on why i guess maybe introduced what. Oh so is your company since you both work there and then when you guys do day to day yeah so osos accompany what we're all about is putting security in the hands of developers. That's how salmon. I got to know each other. That's like the thing that we really connected on as like the thing that we wanna do and the way that we think about doing that is by building consumer quality developer tools for security and so the area that we're starting which is area that we'll talk about today is authorization but that's really sort of the ethos of the company and what's kind of what's nice for salmon me i think for a lot of founders. It's not always clear how to think about division of responsibility but for salmiya tends to be pretty clear. I take responsibility for the business side of the company. So sales marketing financing everything on the operational side. Sam is responsible for everything on the technical side of the business so running. The engineering team at sam built the first versus the product by himself and we share responsibility for the product. Roadmap sounds pretty clear and he gets a cool project. How long has the company been around for super bowl right. So we've been working together for a little over two years but we only open sourced the project that ten weeks ago. Okay so in the open source side quite new but still two years is pretty young for a company in. It's easy to think of the stuff that you're building just as technology in is clearly like developer tools and api's and things like that but man that marketing stuff and getting the word out and sales without that you. You just can't go man. It's he has to hot stuff. Exactly give you some cryptography in a compiling a language but don't make me right a lightning. I'm seriously though that that is a super hard part of situ critical part of technical companies open source companies and so on and it's easy to overlook that side. Yeah absolutely but it's fun. Yeah for sure so. We're going to talk about one of the three. As i was recently told there might before as in this whole identity authorization sorta story but i don't remember what the fourth when they go with the three as we've got authentication we authorization so authentication authorization. Okay now i know who you are. What can you do and then auditing. What have you done right you guys. You're a fan of the middle. A yeah that's right. Yeah and i think you nailed it. And a lot of the products out there. Really focus a lot on authentication. Which is i think the thing that most for instance like consumer users would be most familiar with are like logging into getting a log in page having your username and password doing things like password reset or more recently two factor authentication. How all that stuff is managed. That's the authentication pitches. Making sure that you can get in the door even the signing with google signing with get hub is really primarily about just right usually. That's about two things one who are you time. That's about what part of get hub. Do you want to let this app access. Or what part of this app do you want to let access your google data. But it's not it doesn't work in the reverse way doesn't tell you what the users allowed to do on that application. It's just connecting those jobs together from data side. So it's even the social off stuff is really just authentication. Yeah this landscape pretty blurry right because you are allowing some other websites access information about yourself. So they can check who you are so there is an element of authorization going on between those two services..

Sam graham william stein salmiya salmon mathis graham Sam google
Google Is Bucking Trends with the Pixel 5, and It's Awesome

Android Central Podcast

03:07 min | 10 months ago

Google Is Bucking Trends with the Pixel 5, and It's Awesome

"Auto you and I kind of shared responsibilities on this alex the video. But you did a bunch of the photo samples. You took all the mazing photos in the review. You've spent some time with it so I would like to know what you think of the phone and whether people should think about it in the same way as they thought about the Pixel for Pixel three and all the other flagships that Google's released over the last few years. Yes. So I said a few weeks ago in the PODCAST I wasn't really excited for the Pixel five and as is often the case I'm happy to have been wrong. I really really liked this phone it's it's It's cheaper than a lot of the phones that have come out lately. Especially, the ones that I've been reviewing lots of phones that cost over thousand bucks this wins only seven hundred which saying only sounds insane considering how cheap phones used to be but this one, this one is. A very affordable flagship tear phone and it's it's sort of. Everything you would expect good and bad. I would say about about Pixel phone, right so the the specs are nothing crazy the the cameras are great but maybe not quite as as improved as we might have hoped but. I think my overall take with the Pixel five is that it's one of the friendliest phones. This year and by that I mean, it's just a very comfortable phone. You know it's it's got rounded corners and a nice size that fits well in your hand. It's very, you know generally fast and responsive and reliable They really just kind of nailed all the basics and I think that's what's most important to get right in a phone these days and and everything else is secondary but the Pixel has always had some kind of of major flaw that that keeps it from being like an easy recommendation and I think for the first time that's just not the case this year and I'm really really happy about that. So. You got the sword of sage college like I did. What's is your take on that because I'M I'm kind of in love with this color to be honest but I know it's been a little divisive. If somebody likes say the Oso orange you know really pop out there versions of the pixels from from years past what's your take on this more subtle color way? Well, you know I. Don't I. Don't need my phone to look like a traffic cone so I don't really miss the orange but. I really I really liked the sage I. Think this year has been a big a big year for different shades of of Blues and Greens in general and sort of any of the. Any of the colors in between those two. and I really liked the sage I still think my favorite finish that's been showing up on phones has been something like the whatever the Nebula Green I think it's called on the one plus eight pro. But I really really liked this the sage, the fact that it's this this you know sort of matte texture with a little bit of a speckled on it. So you can. You can kind of feel little bits of the of the back of the phone that are raised just a touch It's a really really nice finish I. I like it a lot.

Google Greens
How procrastination is About Managing Emotions, Not Time.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:34 min | 11 months ago

How procrastination is About Managing Emotions, Not Time.

"I want to expand on something I. talked about in last week's Podcast, and that's procrastination because many of us are really getting stuck in this in the time of Cove Ed, and now back to school is happening and parents specifically, mothers are sitting back and procrastinating their own needs in lieu of, of course, taking care of their kids. So I wanted to touch on a couple of deeper things when it comes to procrastination I'm going to be quote mostly from an author, a professor of psychology rather from University Tim Pikal and he writes for psychology today. So I've been playing as I normally do lots of different information. Blogs. so that I can share them with you. One thing I want you to hear today is that. Most People Associate Procrastination with laziness it is not laziness. It's not failure. It's not an motivation it's not distraction. It's something deeper. It's mostly an unease, an unwillingness process emotions. It's not about time management. It's about emotional management which makes sense. If you really think about how you go about procrastinating, you start to learn you become more aware of the fact that you're trying to not feel a certain way, which is why procrastination and perfectionists them are Yin and Yang to each other Pikal goes on to explain in his book solving the procrastination puzzle. That procrastination is a voluntary delay of an intended act despite the knowledge that this delay may harm us. That is procrastination is by definition in irrational behavior because it runs counter to our own idea of what's going to make us happy. Specifically, he goes on to say procrastination isn't emotionally focused coping strategy to do with negative emotions. It goes something like this. We sit down to do a task. We project into the future about what the tax will feel like we predict that the task will not feel good meaning that we're going to stress out. We're GONNA feel bad and our emotional coping strategy kicks in to keep us away from that bad feeling. Therefore, we avoid the task this emotional void in technique that our brain takes on. Often subconsciously employees in such a way that is similar to what underlies many types of anxiety people with anxiety often do everything we can to avoid the perceived external threat and then we shut off access to both. Good and bad feeling which of course, leads us toward depression but also peaks anxiety when we're confronted with getting things done in our internal world in this brain that's been produced for us. What happens is that we procrastinate and when we procrastinate were avoiding the task with the assumption that the task isn't going to feel good and that means we're missing out on feeling something good an accomplishment or a success. Another Study Co authored by Dr Michael Fallon links between procrastination and negative emotions like frustration and resentment. Hello resentments. And that makes it even more difficult to cope with potential negative emotions. We predict our task will create. So instead of feeling even worse we opt for something that makes us feel good like our phone or petting the dog or multitude of other things giving into feel good. Is the term given to this phenomenon win? We seek short-term good feelings at the cost of long term satisfaction something that most of us learn in those early years of being a toddler, what we're doing is were giving in to. This hijacking of our brain by the inner critic we're leading this voice takeover us that says, oh no, no, no, no. No you don't want to do something Mike Start the project, get the ball rolling. You need to run far away from that because you are anticipating that you're going to feel bad. So your fight flight or freeze kicks said your inner toddler Hickson the inner critic takes over. Here's what's really interesting about what this fella found out. He noted that the relationship between self compassion and procrastination. Because it's both counter intuitive and Oso revealing is. Foundational to how we cope with

Tim Pikal Professor Of Psychology Cove Ed Dr Michael Fallon OSO Yang Depression
Don't @ Me: This CS:GO Player Faked His Own Death

theScore Esports Podcasts

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Don't @ Me: This CS:GO Player Faked His Own Death

"Sunday. June, fourteenth at twitter account with the handle. Handle CS rough, tweeted out quote, rip me Ho. He was a good kid. It really sucks. What happened and quote the person he was talking about was his friend who goes by the name Mi-ho a see us go player with a long history applying playing on ESPN now. If you guys aren't Cisco, heads, ESPN is basically a platform that for a price gives you access to better servers in a more robust anti cheat system. Also has its own amateur league system. Where you in a five stack can sign up to play organized. Go well rubs. Tweet was pretty low key in me. Ho is by no means well known in the go seen. This news quickly spiraled out of control. Because the reality is me, Ho wasn't dead Yep me Ho faked his death, but why he did. It is a little more complicated than it seems, and we'll get to that in just a second I promise now I've deemed back and forth with rough and to be clear. He did not know this news fake when he originally tweeted, he legitimately thought his friend had died and was told this news by. By people he trusted eventually. The news caught the attention of Oso. Dank on top of having a fantastic handle works a support staff for rank s for Ese a and if you guys didn't know, rank s is basically as highest level of competition, a ton of pros past and present got their start there and I actually talked. Dank was sad to hear the news about me. Hope passing especially because he just talked two hours before he got the news, and then around two thirty is when I saw the first tweet from his teammate Ashley from his friend, or whatever it was saying that he died. Was You know in a car accident etcetera? So I'm shocked him on twitter and ask them like you know. What like you know what happened in like? I'm sorry you're that etc and told me that his. Cousin said he got hit by a drunk driver in the in any died. So that's all I had to go on. So I made that tweet of mine, just 'cause. It sucks to see people you know. Pass away in the community, and it's like you know it's. Never a thing to see soon after that people notice that me, Ho was playing ceus. Go on, ESPN A and well. Yeah, he wasn't dead and once Oh. Dang found fat out. He tweeted out that he was disappointed. Such news was played for laughs. Now here's where the why he did. It comes back into play, and it is a little confusing. After people found out that me wasn't debt and was playing ESPN. League matches with his friends multiple East sports news outlets broke above the situation and the article state that me Ho allegedly faked his death in order to get a thirty day. Ban on his. Account and they attributed this fact to him, but that's not true, and here's why first off after the story blew up me. Ho tweeted out that he didn't do it to get around the thirty day ban, but because him and his friends thought it would be funny on top of that. That's not how the sea community guidelines work. Basically me, hope is given the thirty day ban for threatening another player while competing in rank. Rank s qualifier match. This was his fourth banned for threatening another player in his eighth GSA band since two thousand seventeen, and it was this latest thirty day offense that also Dang was talking to me Ho about hours before he died, he reached out to me through discord, and like asking me about the ban, and like asked me about multiple things like I'm not like I'm not gonNA. Sit there and argue with somebody like. I didn't really talk much more after that I just I told them like why he was and what he said. And what you know, the reason is now. If you banned ESPN qualifier, you are still allowed to compete at the league with the team that you signed up with and I know that sounds confusing, but basically why does it this way comes down to a matter of scheduling? It only applies really severe. Bans like Dan Abrasion you can't play league batches, but with like community conduct violations where like you get banned from a Pug or saints on a platform like we still allow us to play league matches or does because. There would there would be a lot of scheduling problems if if that wasn't allowed so the idea that me faked his own death in order to get around thirty day, ban on his account makes no sense because under Ese community guidelines me, hope was still allowed to play an as league, which is exactly what he did, which ultimately how he got caught, and now we've ended up here. Okay, so we've gone this far, and we haven't heard from me. Ho yet well DMZ him. Asking how this all started UAE, he decided to fake his own death, and basically he told me that he was peer pressured into it by A. Teammate, and yeah, he apparently signed to Valentim, called trillium, and he's making racks so good for him I guess now according to Oso Dank he doesn't think me. Hosts going to get another fan because this happened on twitter and had nothing to do with the sea, so as me, weights out his latest band, continuing to play CS, Goer Valor and it's safe to say that this story is pretty

HO Espn Dang Twitter Cisco Oso Dank UAE Ashley GSA Cousin Valentim
Leave These Words Out Of Your Prospecting Messages - Liz Wendling

Daily Sales Tips

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Leave These Words Out Of Your Prospecting Messages - Liz Wendling

"Are you using filler? Words crutch phrases and lazy language in your email communication. The most common an outdated mail opening lines that irritate and aggravate and come across. Oso cheesy and phony sound like this. The following examples used to be friendly pleasantries back in the day. Now they have become useless phrase grenades that add value and also keep in mind. Many spam messages start out with this inauthentic and impersonal approach. And here's what they sound like. Hope you doing great. Hope he had a great weekend. I trust this email finds you well. I hope you're having a productive day. Hope all is going. Well really do you. I if you don't know me at all and you start interacting with me that way. It comes across phony and completely insincere. I don't care if you know me even just a little bit. Those are what I call throwaway phrases that everyone else is using and they add no value. Now I know you're trying to be nice and you want to start your messages attempting to make a connection with someone. But why a why would you want to sound like you've got stuck in the nineteen nineties and use the sales language that millions of other people are using? Your first sentence needs to assist the recipient around the intention of your email. This allows people to decide if your message needs to be addressed immediately filed away as informational or can be handled later or sent right to the junk folder don't waste precious seconds being inauthentic with fluff and crutch words and get to the point because remember spam messages. Start out with this inauthentic approach. Every time I teach this concept to someone he will always push back and say well. Why can't I be nice? Why can I say something? That's not all about business and I tell them that not suggesting that they don't be kind. I'm not suggesting that they don't be a human but I teach them to write their email. Backwards put these pleasantries at the end. If

OSO
"osos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

19:57 min | 1 year ago

"osos" Discussed on KCRW

"To Oxnard KCRW Los Osos bay would park KCRW Berlin and one of four point one FM Berlin Germany stream eclectic twenty four anytime KCRW dot com slash P. twenty four more from my KCRW app remember thank you so I'm proud we bring I only drank I've been the same old same so what a setting I setting yeah I said I got a yelling in case you're W. sponsors include prime video presenting the case you must grace Christmas show a new Amazon original premiering on prime video tomorrow learn more at the top of it at the grow starting at noon tomorrow support for KCRW comes from water why city of Santa Barbara right now is the best time of year to plant for a vibrant spring garden plants need to put down their roots in the fall rebates.

"osos" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

08:46 min | 2 years ago

"osos" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

"The. Cricket media. Hysteria is a weekly podcast hosted by political commentator and comedy writer, Aaron Ryan who joined by former White House deputy chief of staff or operations, Elissa master Monaco in a bike Osos squad of opinionated, a mouth women to discuss news, politics and stories and culture that affect women's lives from the serious to the absurd. Episodes range from news, the culture, two conversations with female, comedians, documentarian, and political experts. Listen to Syria weekly on Thursdays. Women fifty one percent of the population and a hundred percent of the hysteria podcast. Welcome back. Brown girls were glad to have you. Joining us again last episode. I spoke with Amy Allison president of democracy in color and thunder. She the people, and we talked about the upcoming she the people presidential forums happening on April twenty fourth live from Houston. Texas this episode. We talked to a trailblazer in congress congresswoman dab Hollin. I got to know dab through my work at emerging Erica. When I first started. I was going through our list of alums, and I got to New Mexico, and I saw that the chair of New Mexico Democratic Party was an merged woman when people think of positions, they really don't think about state hardy physicians, but the fact is you are elected to them you have to campaign you have to garner votes. You have to talk about what you wanna do. It is an amazing steppingstone for women. Who want to do more politically in the future? Deb stirred off as the chair of the New Mexico Democratic Party in now, she sits in congress as one of the first indigenous women elected in twenty eighteen when we sat down to talk to Deb. She was rounded by the young women in her office is always exciting to see a woman leading. By example, who lists as she climbs who shares her knowledge with others? I also got choked up when I saw Deb sitting in the speaker share of the house as the first indigenous woman to ever sit in that chair. Although it's twenty nineteen dab is reminder. How far we have to go as women of color, but particularly how far are native women have to go to still reach parody in equal representation in elected office. The first question now we want to ask you is win. Did you catch the political? When was that moment when you knew I have to get involved in. Politics because I can make a difference in the community here in New Mexico. I mean when I really decided I have to do this was two thousand two when the democratic Senator for South Dakota. They thought he had lost the election election night in then it turned out when the votes from Indian country came in late like three in the morning or something the following morning. He had won the election. And it was very clear that the native American votes won that election for him like that sort of cement. I was already doing some stuff that really cemented me that we can make a difference. If we if we really get out to vote, and so that's when I really started working in Indian country, and I started out as a phone call on tier started out as a phone volunteer. Now, I'm a member of congress. So I feel that like you can work hard, and you can still get somewhere because you. You work hard. You don't have to be rich. You don't have to be anything you can work hard in accomplish things. And I love that. She said that because I feel that you had one of the most powerful ads that I saw in the twin eighteen cycle hauled. The Klein look like most people in congress. My life is different to push your college and law school is a single mom, and I'm thirty years sober, but struggle made me fierce, my work is to fight for all of us clean energy jobs, Medicare for all no more money in politics. Trump won't hand us a thing. If we asked politely, I'm Deb, Holland, and I approve I was actually speaking to the class of Martha McKenna who did your ad and I worked for emerging Erica, Martha is the board chair verge, Maryland, you are an alum of emerging in Mexico, and she showed this video. And we were all this is amazing. Hang and I went into the office next week the next day, and I told her concert or have you seen Deb's new had it and she said, no. So we googled it. She said this fabulous said, yes. And she goes we have to incorporate this into the training our doing a few weeks we were doing a boot camp in Michigan. And during the communications training, we show that at and the women said way, she did a merge she started at where I started. She was sitting in this chair. And we said, yes. And then they say she'll again show it again in that video. You talk about the struggle. The fact that you can overcome and you can run for congress in be this amazing powerful trailblazer that you are. Right. Right. Well, and just to highlight part of the where I say that I'm thirty years. So Bor wanted to accomplish a lot of. With that one two seconds statement. I know that we have in addition problem in our state in this country. I understand it. And I want to do something about it. And I feel that people who have suffered from addiction deserve second chances. Because that's really who we are as Democrats part of our values is giving people an opportunity to overcome struggle. So that they can be productive members of society that was Martha's idea, and we embraced it. Because I felt like a lot of people would be able to identify with me on that issue and just with linen like us, and the other democratic women in congress, you all have been so often take about who you are your journey. And that's something that is resonating with women who want to run for political office. But also young girls who are seeing you that you can walking your truth and alone. Stop you. I know you inspire me my as I can only imagine how it is for young girls watching you. But also being women of color politics. One of things that we have to deal with is not being enough. Sometimes you hear you're not black enough. Sometimes you're not Latina Nuff in in your general election. You actually had your opponent questioning were you indigenous and Brian by my heredity. Yes. It's you know, my dad was in the military and so traveled around in grow up in my point blow community, even though I spent a lot of time there. I didn't grow up there. And so yes, my opponent did try to say that issue is trying to discredit guess for being native American. But that's a little hard to hit me on. On cheat. Try. Certain of your own identity. Everything right. We all identify the way that we feel comfortable, and I could identify as a Norwegian American because my dad was Norwegian American, but the Mike the culture that my grandparents taught me in that. My mother raised me on is definitely blow Indians. And so it just is. I mean, we we should all embrace who we are. Right as no one else's call. Yeah. Do you identify yourself the way you want to and nobody can say anything about I mean, they could try, but it doesn't work that way. It doesn't in identity is something that's very personal in particularly for women of color, it really shapes our life. I tell people I didn't buy a black woman because every day in this country. I'm reminded that I'm laugh I'm in. And I really appreciate you saying that.

congress Deb New Mexico Democratic Party New Mexico Martha McKenna Erica Houston dab Hollin Syria Amy Allison Brown deputy chief of staff writer Aaron Ryan president White House South Dakota Texas Senator
"osos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"osos" Discussed on KCRW

"Due to Santa Barbara Casey are HD two Indio. Casey. Are you HD two Oxnard Casey are y HD two Mojave KCRW HD two Santa Monica key, ER w Los Osos the park KCRW Berlin, one of four point one FM, Berlin, Germany. Breath zone. Me. I could show you do what's wrong with that. I. I'm deserted. I'm no surface..

Santa Barbara Casey KCRW Berlin Los Osos Oxnard Germany
"osos" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"osos" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Osos the Mets at seven oh. Five the NATs take, on the cardinals in Saint Louis and eight fifteen, doubled your mayo traffic and weather next Finished summer strong at GNC save on, mix and match TNC vitamins vital proteins collagen. Force factor slim Vance and GNC and buy one get one half off for a. Limited time shop, online or in store. Today GNC live well exclusions apply seen associated GNC dot com for details down you can listen to WMA l. at home at work or anywhere in the world on your Amazon echo device. From one. Time setup say Alexa WMA l. skill once stop whenever you want to listen simply say Alexa play. WFAN More details at WM AL dot com, the news is? Brought to you by Debbie dole rule and associates if. You're looking to. Sell your home in the metro DC area then called Debbie dole rule associates of long and foster Debbie and her team of doing real estate for thirty years and have helped. People just like you sell and, buy over, seven thousand homes, they're, the number. One team, in long, and foster and, for good reason Debbie dole rule, is changing the way real estate. Is sold whether you're wanting. Maximum value or maximum convenience. Debbie has, you covered. They're friendly and, professional team, gets you more money period no gimmicks necessary it's as easy as three. To one sold three contact Debbie, to get. An onsite evaluation and one in twenty four. Hours have an. Offer on your home and a suggested list price called Debbie's team at five seven one two hundred five three. Two one that's five, seven one. Two hundred five three to one or visit three two one home sold, dot.

Debbie dole GNC Alexa Mets TNC dot Osos cardinals Vance Saint Louis Amazon thirty years
"osos" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"osos" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"You can find me i have a facebook page to your oso and i'll be posted a lot of just you know i'll be more update soon i from all my activism and organizing and then the cherry on top of last year's election i have taken myself off the front line working zane and give myself a break and a sabbatical this year i have a lot of things in development that i'll be rolling out but right now just kind of giving myself a break you know to pulling off my super black women kate for a little while so yeah folks can tune into my twitter facebook and the website for updates and things things about that one i stand okay it's overseas now here be careful people like this is not light desire like before you know what i mean it's not so yeah be careful out there and then to to thank you you know you like i say your inspirational person and you do so much and also you know like i said when you got on that stage man i'll i was so inspired and i remember when i get interview afterwards it was so funny like we want to interview about this and i was like okay i wasn't even on the stage i didn't like what about that though like does go back to our main job in people and they were still like they're just those lobby like the media's those like i would be like well you actually interviewed here also like yeah that's nice yes and then in the article they'd be like black lives matter activists rod marles i know i know i know do not put that on me and i had activated cofounders in the people of my god man like i like i know you talked about the organizing of it which is like a brilliant structure for oh my god the media completely just like threw that away like they were like nope pugh to have an you know i've really learned a lot about this since the time it doesn't compute to have an uninvited yuno full figured nappy haired black woman running things and being the center of attention and it was almost as though trying to filter all of that through all of our lenders everybody was just like so and also part of it is the kind of we're talk about as far as black women's labor being expected as i go well they did that and now we get to decide how we feel about it and talk about it and we don't really necessarily need to ask them shout out to marc lamont hill he's one of the folks who did invite myself and some of the other organizers they had us on into post live like right after a couple of other times there couple did you know get it gave me a courtesy right of follow up discussion but yeah there's just i it's a case study in media analysis i know strategy wise there were people that are like well we don't want to do interviews or we don't want to go on every outlet and stuff like like i get that but in absent of people doing the interview i still don't understand you've been turned around and be like well listen anybody when we talked to just gone on black lives matter i like how did that how did that stuff have it like wouldn't it be like when we couldn't get the black lives matter but we got disney row you know and you know is i feel like that's the beauty of black people wages we are magical you know people act like black culture black politics black everything just appears out of thin air that's it applying however i would like that looks beautiful these are now boxer brain that sounds catchy that's what they mean black michael they're like black girls of magic because visible we don't even seen him we take their work and we just pop up guys ours it a figment of our metal oh yeah they're magical like that harry potter cloak where you just disappear like okay all right guys thank you so much to you thank you so much for being here we appreciate it i gotta have you on a regular show mate you up about that so you can come here from behind the pay while and talk to people and like i say follow her work and we'll be back with another one in east soon until then peace.

facebook
"osos" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"osos" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Sarily were malicious i think their ineptitude and just not knowing how bad things could get is absolutely still you know like the effect is still the same like whether they mean to or not like i don't think like this somebody who's not white right in privilege might have thought about it twice as about to say is is the problem for me is that the people at the top are white men typically and the white white man see the world is richard spencer is just as much about freedom of speech as tier osos about freedom of speech to them like though the just to size of different coin like and and that is how you end up with what we have is that you know twitter now is i think right before i hopped on here they suspended rose mcgowan who is an actress actress yes who's speaking out against a harvey weinstein and hollywood and this environment that allowed the sexual predator to rome unchecked and even in abled they suspend their why they say she violated the rose suspended for twelve hours he posted a screen shot on instagram or something right and they told her she either delete whatever the question between the date they decided questionable or or she could white twelve hours and she could posting in that's the environment that like they're they don't see that as a biased environment like white men don't see that as a as an environment that favours white man the biggest sexual predator that is also president they've never gonna they're never gonna suspend him never going to suspend his account right no matter what he says no matter what you know the jamal hill you know djamil hill gets ended from espn and they and espn doesn't see themselves as an extension of the environment by suspending djamil hill but allowing a sage still to top bad about people who protested at the airport when those listen when i was tweets like i don't know who safe still is i'm not a sports fan yeah but who asked you yet and like in for the regular like i like i just find that odd that she's allowed sports sports personality she's allowed to get political in that moment djamil and right djamil but local and she has the pay and they're still they don't even see that that is a biased like they see that as fairness like will you know look she got to minerals like no she saw talking about stuff on agree with like this oh my gosh i went to a form recently at usc university of southern california about sports and politics and there was espn executive i think there also was one of the panelists and i think it's so interesting that they want to keep politics out of sports but it's very clearly a plantation really all of america is a plantation set up and the idea that there's anything neutral i mean it's false like basically white man set up the parameters what's neutral and they kind of locate themselves as the neutral party and everybody else's by exactly so that's why those algorithms i said up i don't know i don't know what the offending tweet was at rose mcgowan tweeted but i mean there's plenty of trolls on twitter roman free and i just don't see her i literally have been problematic i went through all her tweets and was i don't see any of them what was the problem i i like i like yeah but twitter just decided at some point like these men fill the tax you gotta go it's the it's like it's like a crowd source decision it's like he's got this many complaints in almost like the volume of the complaints is what determined that she should be suspended i haven't a lot on facebook where nikko just be general post about mike brown's should never have been murdered white police officers need to stop killing people indiscriminately you ban what what rices i've been banned a couple times like cash what was one of them was.

twelve hours
Rape, Bangladesh and Tefron discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

02:25 min | 3 years ago

Rape, Bangladesh and Tefron discussed on BBC World Service

"Still to come on the forum we'll be looking more closely at the impact that plastic has had on the human race both positive and negative is it a force for good or evil it's undoubtedly saved many lives and developed into an icon of modern society but now science is greatest problem is what we're gonna do about oso flexible friend especially how do we dispose of it or even replace it said join me for parts of the forum straight out of the news summary bbc news with stuart mcintosh the most senior roman catholic to be charged with sexual abuse cardinal george pell has pleaded not guilty at a court in australia he was attending a hearing at which a magistrate said there was enough evidence for him to stand trial multiple abuse charges dating back to the nineteen seventy s and nineteen ninety s cardinal pell pleaded not guilty the us secretary of state mike pompeo says secret documents israel claims to have tamed on a rams nuclear program show that tefron lied about its nuclear capabilities he said this showed the international deal to curb iran's nuclear ambitions wasn't built on good faith the armenian parliament is due to meet shortly to elect a new prime minister following weeks of demonstrations that forced the resignation of the country's longstanding leader says the protest leader nicole passion young is standing unopposed although he'll still need the support of some ruling party politicians to win the united states says it's detained eleven members of a migrant caravan which had traveled from central america to the mexican border with the us the migrants were detained on suspicion of trying to enter america illegally eight other members of the convoy have entered us territory to seek asylum the head of the army of myanmar has denied that his forces were guilty of sexual violence including rape during the campaign he ordered against a hinge muslims in a reference to the seven hundred thousand muslims who fed the bangladesh general min own clearing also said myanmar was ready to accept what he described as the bank goalies who left the country under the agreement between the two countries scientists have decoded the genome of the rose in a study that could lead to new varieties of flour being read the research which took eight years to complete revealed.

Rape Bangladesh Tefron Israel Mike Pompeo Stuart Mcintosh BBC Myanmar America United States Nicole Passion Prime Minister Iran Cardinal Pell Australia Eight Years