19 Burst results for "Oscar Fernandez"

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

02:48 min | 4 months ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"This is oscar fernandez. And today on his show we add a new chapter two are undocumented and lgbtq series the caravan with caravan the marginalized group within the marginalized group. And we have the pleasure. Today of having on the show with us. Oscar lopez whose decio and national casey director of boroughs which is based in the rio grande valley in texas. He joins us over the phone. Today is a pleasure and honor. Welcome to show oscar lopez you very very much and i appreciate meeting my long lost cousin. Oscar fernandes mundus. So we'll get.

oscar fernandez Oscar lopez decio national casey rio grande valley oscar lopez texas Oscar fernandes
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on GSMC Baseball Podcast

GSMC Baseball Podcast

06:38 min | 4 months ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on GSMC Baseball Podcast

"Welcome back to the gmc. Baseball podcast wreck ridenour with you. All an inner first segment. I got right into the latest news. Going around the mlb. I mentioned a couple of moves that have been made recently in anything else involving this offseason fisher to stick around for the final few minutes of the show today as will jump into discussing which starting pitcher. You'd rather have to start in a playoff game. I'll play the scenario and then pick which pitcher. I would want in that case but i wanna get into some of the latest free agents that have become free agents recently because there were a number of players who wound up getting non tender a few days ago so basically a lot of teams just said to some of these guys that were up for arbitration this year. Hey we're going to just let you go. We're going to let you walk explore free agency. Good luck moving forward. And i think there was about sixty players in total. A couple wound up getting resigned and so went down to about fifty five or fifty six but there was a quite a bit of of Quite a bit of players that wound up getting a non tendered which was again alarming. I mean i had never seen a number that high in my entire life of players that were just let you know wound up letting go for pretty much You know for for free agency. So i'm going to get into a couple of the names couple of the guys that i really kind of you know kind of caught. My eye and i was very intrigued by on. That could possibly become kind of sleeper picks in this free agency market. So the first one i want to mention his hands are berta former player for the baltimore orioles and he was a very very good infielder for them. I mean i think what's very ideal for alberto and said he can play multiple positions. he can play third. He can play second. He can play shortstop. He can play a lot of different positions in the infield. And i saw i think that it kind of opens the door for possibilities of where he could land even more than some guys that are just. Strictly d. h. Is or that are strictly center fielder with his ability in the infield i think it kind of opens the door for possibilities and for him to really go anywhere that he would like in twenty nine thousand nine. He actually had a very very good year. He batted three. Oh five at twelve homers to fifty. Rbi's there were all career highs. And the pretty. I mean the stats were fairly nonexistent. Before twenty nine thousand nine so you can definitely see that. There's a little bit of a a rise in his performance in his production in his career. And again. I think that could be something that would be very very important for a lot of these teams to see in kind of realize that. Hey this guy. Before twenty nine hundred was not doing so hot but then in twenty nine thousand nine had a really really good year twenty twenty. Honestly he wasn't that far behind again. We played a fraction of the games as they did in two thousand nineteen so he had three homers and twenty. Two are very different from you. Know twelve homers and fifty. One rb is but in all honesty. If that was his numbers through sixty games are so let's just say i'm sure he probably would have been well on his win in close numbers to what he had in two thousand nine hundred. He had a two eighty three average and twenty twenty and then a six ninety eight so not a great power guy not a guy that's going to hit you know for great power. I mean he's never had an. Ps plus one hundred. He had one hundred sixty hit last year. Which i jumped really jumped out at me about five hundred fifty plate appearances so you know a good portion of the time that he's up at bat he's getting ahead not to mention. He's a low strikeout guy. He only struck out fifty times in five hundred and fifty plate appearances in two thousand nineteen. So somebody that is going to be very patient now. His on base percentage is not great. It's never been higher than three fifty so he doesn't have a really good on base percentage but if he's again not striking out. He's at least getting active outs. He's at putting the ball in play and giving if somebody's on base an opportunity to advance or score or something so he's at least going up and swinging. He's not just sitting there and letting pitches go by him and taking pitch after pitch so. I think alberto would be a very interesting player to have on really any team but in particular. I think the blue jays would be a likely candidate the f. oakland athletics. The marlins they're all low payroll teams. I don't think he's going to get some crazy contract. Because i just don't see in his career and really in the numbers he's put up any sort of reason to give him some long. You know very serious contract especially with all these teams losing money in the pandemic year whatnot. What i think that you know. He's a steady infielder with a good bat. All three teams have openings at different spots in their infield. I mean the marlins have an opening at second. Oakland has an opening at second. The blue jays have an opening at third. I think alberta would be very interesting to insert over at third base for the blue jays. You'd have gurriel you'd also have T oscar fernandez body junior. You've got a lot of different boba. Shed obviously and i think that alburto shed it'd be interesting to see how that left left side of the infield woodwork. And not to mention it would probably be a pretty solid Hitting lineup too. I mean a great addition into the lineup lineup for sure. So it'll be interesting to see where alberto winds up. But i think that he's going to get a nice contract. Nothing huge but i definitely think he's. He's one of the more under the radar free agents. That i think team should pay a little bit more attention to so the next guy that i want to mention delano shield. He's a very interesting case. I mean he's had average numbers but this past year we had the second highest batting average in his career. He doesn't have great opium. Numbers i mean. He's under seven hundred over the last three years but as a center fielder he could be a potential commodity for teams again. The center fielder position is pretty open. This year i wouldn't say it's wide open but there's a lot of teams that are going to have to fill. That need out in the outfield. And he was part of that. Very poor hitting outfielder. The indians again not a great outfield and he was one of those reasons. Why but he's somebody that has had much better success. Recently as opposed to before and i think that when he was in texas he was pretty decent one year two years where his average was above to sixty. But other than that. I mean the opium has never gone higher than seven eighteen. So he's not a huge power hitter guy and i mean he did have a you know pretty steady. Rbi numbers for the most part. But i don't think he's somebody that is going to make a major major impact but i think what could be interesting about him is this. It's a case where you can get him for a bargain and he could have a huge year and you got him for a fraction of the cost. And then if you think about it down the road and if you're looking kind of long term then you can kind of use him as maybe trade bait and you could use him as a piece in some bigger move to try and get somebody else down the road. You obviously have hope that he's going to have a really really good year because if not then you've lost x. amount of money but i think that this is gonna sound really crazy where he can land but i could see him blaming with the pittsburgh pirates. And here's why they need a center fielder. Because the pirates batted a collective one eighty this year for out of all the guys that played center fielder or center field. That is literally their collective average sure reynolds. He just had a down year. That brian reynolds is very very good. Very talented baseball player. One of the better up and coming players.

alberto baseball ridenour berta baltimore orioles marlins fisher jays oscar fernandez Rbi blue jays athletics oakland Oakland alberta delano indians texas pittsburgh pirates pirates
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 7 months ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Once again, , this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, , and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. . American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. . Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. . Thank you for having me. . Excited to be here is good to have you with us. . I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. . Once again, , the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. . So, with , that in mind, let , me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. . Yeah for sure. . So what envisioning <hes> what I was in? ? When I came up with the article title <hes> you know those with everything that's going on. . There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US <hes> I find a lot of conversations especially. . I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. . I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly <hes> an African American movement <hes>, , which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. . particularly in the US. . <hes> but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. . Caribbean. . <hes> Europe other places. . Outside <hes> saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. . <hes>. . So. . In the case, of , Central, , America <hes> you know black lives have always mattered. . There's always been struggles of <hes>. . On, the , ground with black people fighting again, , know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially <hes> what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? ? America. . <hes>. . So that's what I was thinking about. . That's what I had in mind when I, , came up with this article <hes> and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long <hes> history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. . Even. Delve . into <hes> what You, , know black lives. . Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. . Black Communities and black histories in the region I. . so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. . Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. . Belize as well. . So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. . But with that said, , there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, , there's some other groups that need to be recognized. . So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, , their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. . Correct. . Yes for sure. . And that's even including myself <hes>. . I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. . So depending on. . The vantage point, , but you look at central. . America play believes etc. . Gua. . Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. . Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. . <hes>. . So thinking about that identity <hes> in believes to historic. . Black Group <HES> are black creoles. . And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. . It's <hes> common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, , who visually looks why to also call themselves. . And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. . So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion <hes>. . So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. . And of course. . When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. . <hes> black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. . <hes> migration and group within believe. . So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. . You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. . So that's also present there. . <hes>, , and then recently you have a lot of immigrants <hes> from. . The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. . Think someone someone from Ghana, , and then of course, , <hes> from Haiti as well. . <hes> considering migration Haitians to central. . So there's like different levels of that. . But in terms of like historic, , it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. . Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. . It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. . Father vice versa <hes>. . So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct <hes> and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. . Experience within the country <hes>. . which kind of <hes> work to conceptualize <hes> how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important <hes> to also considering language racial formations. . So yeah. .

America Central America Belize Black Group Caribbean Latin America Europe US. Gutty Funez Duras Los Angeles Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Belizean Diaspora Gutty Fuda Nick Harnessing Rasiah A. Father Haiti Ghana
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 7 months ago

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:19 min | 9 months ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"So if you're fan of Latino rebels radio, you know that the Latino media collective which is radio program out of DC fills in for US sometimes. So I've gotten to know Oscar Fernandez. Who is of the Latino media collective very well the last couple of years he's a great guy. Basin the DMV. and. The last time I talked to him about a month ago. I found out that his dad had passed away to covid. When I found out I I wanted to connect with. Oscar about it. To See if he would be willing to talk about it. And he said he would. And we connected over the weekend. So. Here's what we talked about on Latino rebels radio over the weekend. With Oscar Fernandez of the Latino media. Collective. Oscar. Fernandez. Welcome back to Latino rebels radio. What's up brother? I'm doing good I'm doing good life is beautiful. My Mom's birthday was quite recently. So I have to say plan your mom while she's listening to this I, wanted to bring you on because. I. I was struggling and we we we stay in touch but then you told me the news of your father and it really crushed me as a friend someone because you've you've given a lot to yourself, you project what you do but also you're part of the family I mean, you are our guest co host when I decided to take breaker to how are you feeling tell me a little bit about what happened first let's start there. Sure first of all, thank you very much for inviting me to discuss this haven't discussed this in public manner like this. and. So just to give you the basics on May Twenty First, my dad had a stroke. And so he was hospitalized and during his hospitalization desks when they discovered that he had tested positive for the coronavirus. Now, knee him but five other members of my Dad's side family. Tested positive as well, and they all have very close in a suburb in DC called Wheaton Maryland. And so. Obviously I was keeping track and keeping inform with the hospital above my desk condition. Obviously, I can go there to physically see him because of the circumstances. But yet at the time when she told me that he had positive, he was not. On a ventilator. And for three or four days after the twenty first, that was keeping in contact with the hospital. And I'll tell you that every as recently as Monday. The week that he passed away as recently as Monday that which the social worker at the hospital that actually called me. To discuss plans about him having physical therapy with regards to stroke because they felt like his condition at improved. Well enough that the plan you know some form of physical therapy because he had lost all. Movement in in his right side of his body because of stroke. Unfortunately about four days later on the twenty eighth like at. One thirty in the morning I get that phone call and said phone call that we all. Dread. In. Our. Lives. In the middle of the night from the hospital, and they basically told me that during the course of that evening that his his His heart stopped three times. And they had to resuscitate him use a defibrillator. And at that point he. was back on the ventilator and so this is. You know. Primarily because of defects, the effects of the of the virus that has conditioned completing took a one eighty. Overnight. and. So the hospital called me and said, you know in no uncertain terms that she should come to the hospital to see him because he was in a condition where. He. Could basically go at any moment. And so. You know again it's hard to go to hospital right now to visit anyone because. Everyone's covered from head to tell you know nurses doctors everyone especially in the ICU. But nonetheless, they allow me to go into the ICU to see him. And to say, you know basically my final goodbyes to him because that's the condition where he was at at that moment in time. And Yeah all the twenty eighth at like around four thirty when he passed away. And I was there biocide when his heart stopped? Well. Thank you for sharing. Tell me about your your your dad, your e whole I mean, I say, behold for my dad. What kind of soul was he for you? He was very hard working guy again A Guy. A few words I would say which is quite ironic because i. Obviously talk a lot considering the work I do on the radio review he came to the US from Salvador and seventy six he first made his way to California. Then actually drove from San Francisco to Washington DC where me and the rest of my family lives. and. So this is the type of journey that a lot of Salvadoran. Immigrants took during this period of time he came to the US with best. An eighth grade education. But he was an amazing auto mechanic that was the majority of his work here in the US was that of an auto mechanic And I could see that you know he pretty much in every autoshop they worked at during his lifetime he was You. Know. Mr Mr Reliable Mr Dependable You know if you go to any auto body shop. You know there's always you know. Forms of AFC certificates and diplomas. On mechanics have to show you know to the public. To to show people, you know their credentials as far as you know, they're working in auto repair most guys had like five or six degrees on the wall. My Dad, would have his own section of the wall altogether with seventeen to eighteen degrees. And that just spoke soon how much how hard he worked? and. How committed he was to his his type of job and how he was pretty much Mr reliable Mister Kimble. In, every autoshop worked at and I would have to say that you know in hindsight's con reflecting over my dad's. Life and career in the country that a lot of that he passed down to me whether directly or indirectly. so He sure he was very hardworking. and. You know considering where his liberal education was when he came to us and to where his career took him, it's quite impressive when I look back on it Oscar I forgot to ask Your Dad's name and and also how has your family? Been Grieving your loss still my dad's name is Danilo Bond Mortar Fernandez. So he's originally from Salvador. Born in fifty five. And actually what we're recording this in, July this month would have been his sixty fifth birthday. And so there's still a lot of reminders every now, and then about you know his passing I still faced with from.

Oscar Fernandez US Danilo Bond Mortar Fernandez Salvador DMV. Mister Kimble DC AFC Wheaton Maryland San Francisco California Washington
Losing Your Father to COVID-19

Latino Rebels Radio

06:20 min | 9 months ago

Losing Your Father to COVID-19

"So if you're fan of Latino rebels radio, you know that the Latino media collective which is radio program out of DC fills in for US sometimes. So I've gotten to know Oscar Fernandez. Who is of the Latino media collective very well the last couple of years he's a great guy. Basin the DMV. and. The last time I talked to him about a month ago. I found out that his dad had passed away to covid. When I found out I I wanted to connect with. Oscar about it. To See if he would be willing to talk about it. And he said he would. And we connected over the weekend. So. Here's what we talked about on Latino rebels radio over the weekend. With Oscar Fernandez of the Latino media. Collective. Oscar. Fernandez. Welcome back to Latino rebels radio. What's up brother? I'm doing good I'm doing good life is beautiful. My Mom's birthday was quite recently. So I have to say plan your mom while she's listening to this I, wanted to bring you on because. I. I was struggling and we we we stay in touch but then you told me the news of your father and it really crushed me as a friend someone because you've you've given a lot to yourself, you project what you do but also you're part of the family I mean, you are our guest co host when I decided to take breaker to how are you feeling tell me a little bit about what happened first let's start there. Sure first of all, thank you very much for inviting me to discuss this haven't discussed this in public manner like this. and. So just to give you the basics on May Twenty First, my dad had a stroke. And so he was hospitalized and during his hospitalization desks when they discovered that he had tested positive for the coronavirus. Now, knee him but five other members of my Dad's side family. Tested positive as well, and they all have very close in a suburb in DC called Wheaton Maryland. And so. Obviously I was keeping track and keeping inform with the hospital above my desk condition. Obviously, I can go there to physically see him because of the circumstances. But yet at the time when she told me that he had positive, he was not. On a ventilator. And for three or four days after the twenty first, that was keeping in contact with the hospital. And I'll tell you that every as recently as Monday. The week that he passed away as recently as Monday that which the social worker at the hospital that actually called me. To discuss plans about him having physical therapy with regards to stroke because they felt like his condition at improved. Well enough that the plan you know some form of physical therapy because he had lost all. Movement in in his right side of his body because of stroke. Unfortunately about four days later on the twenty eighth like at. One thirty in the morning I get that phone call and said phone call that we all. Dread. In. Our. Lives. In the middle of the night from the hospital, and they basically told me that during the course of that evening that his his His heart stopped three times. And they had to resuscitate him use a defibrillator. And at that point he. was back on the ventilator and so this is. You know. Primarily because of defects, the effects of the of the virus that has conditioned completing took a one eighty. Overnight. and. So the hospital called me and said, you know in no uncertain terms that she should come to the hospital to see him because he was in a condition where. He. Could basically go at any moment. And so. You know again it's hard to go to hospital right now to visit anyone because. Everyone's covered from head to tell you know nurses doctors everyone especially in the ICU. But nonetheless, they allow me to go into the ICU to see him. And to say, you know basically my final goodbyes to him because that's the condition where he was at at that moment in time. And Yeah all the twenty eighth at like around four thirty when he passed away. And I was there biocide when his heart stopped? Well. Thank you for sharing. Tell me about your your your dad, your e whole I mean, I say, behold for my dad. What kind of soul was he for you? He was very hard working guy again A Guy. A few words I would say which is quite ironic because i. Obviously talk a lot considering the work I do on the radio review he came to the US from Salvador and seventy six he first made his way to California. Then actually drove from San Francisco to Washington DC where me and the rest of my family lives. and. So this is the type of journey that a lot of Salvadoran. Immigrants took during this period of time he came to the US with best. An eighth grade education. But he was an amazing auto mechanic that was the majority of his work here in the US was that of an auto mechanic And I could see that you know he pretty much in every autoshop they worked at during his lifetime he was You. Know. Mr Mr Reliable Mr Dependable

Oscar Fernandez United States Dmv. DC San Francisco California Wheaton Maryland Salvador Washington
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

06:31 min | 9 months ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Once again this is Oscar Fernandez and today on the show we put the spotlight on Costa Rica and how the Black Lives Matter Movement challenges the stereotype of Costa Rica as a quote Unquote Switzerland of Latin, America. Any true student of Latin American history knows that the African diaspora has long face struggles for equal rights and social justice in places like Lumbia Brazil. The Dominican Republic etc, etc.. Costa Rica Hand flies under the radar on the struggles for social justice because of its perception as a stable democracy free from the same geopolitical struggles faced by other countries in the Western Hemisphere. But in the struggle for social justice, perception is not always reality. Costa Rica Micro notice. Costa Rica might fly under the radar. And a few problems facing Costa Rican society today might be minor compared to historical problems in other countries in that America. However black lives matter movement has changed the game. There is a new dawn developing forever Latinos. Is challenging the complacency and perception of Costa Rica. Switzerland of Latin America. And so this movement in Costa Rica under the Lens of black lives, matter deserves a new examination of what it means to be an Afro Costa Rican and so witless on the show today is Pamela Cunningham. She's an Afro Costa Rican activist and the CO founder of Costa Rica Afro. She joins us over the phone today from Costa. Rica welcome to Chopin on Cunningham. I are. Are You thinking? Is a pleasure to have you on the show I today. We've been dying to do a show on Costa Rica for a long time. And for the black lives, matter of movement and the momentum that is carried various in America is gives us the opportunity to do so, but before we get into detail about the movement as it pertains to Costa Rica. Let's first begin by talking about. What is your organization? Go Study Afro and the work that you guys do. Of course, so puts the Cup an apple feminist organization. We're focused on providing visibility. Lobbying in favor of the human rights of the Africa getting population, and he really started as A. Response of sorts of Of the exclusion that we felt from the white feminist movement industry. So? We decided to to create our owner. Invasion a lot less structured I'm more focused on results. THAN ON HIGHER So we've been working for the last five to six years of sharing our our knowledge and learning from others both in and outside of academia. Lobbying for change and using social media specialty to provide education and disability to the struggle. Yeah indeed, and that's what brought us to our attention Costa Rica Afro was social media. Let's through the few Costa, Rican. Followers of ours our twitter bodice to your attention, so in light of recent momentum created by the black lives matter movement. How has it perhaps magnified some issues? The African study community that has otherwise been neglected by the rest of the country. Because again you know part is, conversation is not just black lives, matter, but also sort of as a form of deconstructing the myth of Costa Rica's. Shangri law the Switzerland of land America where nothing. Really happens when compared to its neighbors and other historical. You know history historical points inland American history. Correct show. It is true and we. Went compared to our neighbors in Central America or South America. We've had relative piece, right? We don't have an army so We haven't seen civil war since nineteen forty eight. Doesn't. That doesn't. Mean that we haven't had our internal conflicts with ric. Rica's deeply. Racist Society and the nationals ace identity has been created in a position to what is a black or indigent, so the the whole idea of being Costa Rican has been constructed Abban whiteness rate so the. Afro descendants indigenous population amongst others in the country have been ignored or have disability rights so. This this have been issues that have been happening. Since forever but the idea nine countries that you know we don't have this issues. racial problems are problems are outside because. We're all the same rate in Costa Rica. We like to do the. We like to call ourselves because I. we like to call ourselves. Because race, so we are all the same you reality. We're not the black individuals populations have. Less access to help less actors to work to to help services to education to leadership positions. So, and we don't have a lot of data. On on exactly, what are our needs? Because we are not being tracked, we might even track upper clean census rate, so would vishnu momentum. It has generated a lot of questions right, so I look. People have asking themselves This happened in Costa Rica. We have issues of race in Costa Rica. Of course, it has created as well so backlash because some people want to believe that we don't have issue so race. It Costa Rica that racism doesn't. Rate but it has highlighted some some of those issues. It has given us an opportunity to discuss things.

Costa Rica Costa Rica Afro Costa Rica Micro Costa Rica Hand Costa Rican society Latin America Costa Rican Switzerland Pamela Cunningham Dominican Republic Central America Oscar Fernandez South America twitter Lumbia Brazil Western Hemisphere
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:19 min | 10 months ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Usually I am behind the scenes as your engineer and today I'm filling in for your host Oscar Fernandez who is temporarily away from the show after his father's tragic and untimely passing due to Covid nineteen. Oscar will be back soon and in the meantime, Oscar, our hearts are in mourning with you during this terrible time. Today on the show, we put a spotlight on the movement against anti black violence in Brazil. In a country where the president is an open fascist and the police murder nearly seven times more people per capita than the United States to say that police murders of black people is a pandemic is almost an understatement. To shed some more light on this issue is curate Yana. Furlan a freelance journalist based in Brazil who has compiled a very informative newsletter called does Brazil have a black lives matter movement, English, language resources to help you understand Brazil's movement against black genocide. Thank you for being with US Today Carolina. Thanks so much. Very excited to kind of break down. What's going on in Brazil? Because everybody needs to know right now. So! I know. We're GONNA talk about police violence over the next forty five minutes, but before kind of delve into specifics I like to get everybody on the same page. Brazil in breakdown, some basic facts history that you have to know to understand. What we're GonNA talk about today. So I, some promos Brazil a country of two hundred million people in which fifty five percent identify as black or Brown, which corresponds to a lighter skinned. Race Person. and I know you're wondering why. How is it possible that Brazil can be fifty? Five percent black, well Brazil was actually the largest importer of enslaved Africans over the course of more than three hundred years. More than four million enslaved Africans from West Central, Africa arrived on its shores, and it was also the last country in the West who abolish slavery. It did so in eighteen eighty eight. And one in abolish slavery, and subsequently became a republic. There was no government to attempt to actually include blacks in society whether it be through education through housing through Employment Black Brazilians were simply left to fend for themselves. And around this time this is when we see for Bellas sprout around major cities for villas. Swab communities. That are created by people who are building their own houses and on communities without government support. and. A lot of the stuff that. I'm going to talk about as it relates to police. Violence in Brazil can be tied to those facts that I just listed about Brazil. So can you tell us a little about the state of police violence in Brazil? Can you characterize for our audience? While I'll I'll try to be brief, but there's a lot to say about it so. Police violence police harassment isn't to Brazil. It's brutal goes unpunished. It's getting worse and worse, and it's inherently anti-black. The Pool. People who suffer from police violence are almost always. Black Impor-. Black impoverished. Let me just give you some basic numbers and stats because I think it's best to start there, and then we can go from there. So in the first five months of twenty twenty realization Eto has already broken the record for murders by police within a five month period they've been seven hundred and forty four murders, and this is the most in twenty two years. Now Mind you. This is happening during a pen Dimic. Last year. There were almost six thousand murders compete committed by police throughout the entire country. in two thousand fifteen, there were three thousand and three hundred forty five, so obviously the shows that police violence is increasing. And at least eighty percent of these people are black. So for Brazilians and especially Brazilians. Who are activists? Many people call this genocide against black people, because so many people are dying every gear. that. Just to. To emphasize how horrible it is. They people call genocide. There are two things that I wanted to talk about that kind of really get to the heart of this violence. Since Brazil is A. Very mixed country, mixed race country, the lines between black and white are often very fuzzy like. Sometimes, you just don't know sometimes. It's possible that a person could be black in one part of the country and white in another part of their country, but in Brazil. There's common saying that the police always knows who is black. Mainly because the police targets black people, and in the second, saying that is, that is almost always repeated by government officials police, and even you know regular people in the street is. Monje, it'll mortal Ed Bongino bone that means a dead bug is a good book. So, we combine these two. Sayings and thoughts that means that black people in Brazil are suffering. At the hands of police. Police, violence. One thing that I wanted to kind of get at. I wanted to kind of describe like how police violence take place. The police violence almost always. Takes place infidel communities. which are the communities that have been in Brazil since the end of slavery? And impoverished suburban communities that people often referred to as the periphery in these communities are almost always majority black. And this is how the scene usually plays out. Obviously, you know it can vary, but usually what happens is. Brazil's police, which is actually referred to as military police will enter the community as if they're actually going into a war, so there have huge guns though have huge trucks that are bulletproof. In these cuny communities on operations. To clump. Operations targeting drug traffickers. The issue with this, is that usually every black man that they see enough Avello or suburban community is considered a drug trafficker trafficker. Regardless of if that person is actually involved in not so black men will die. During, an operation regardless of their involvement, and then when you have these shootouts, woman children. Residents will die from stray bullets. And police are only brought to court in the old, the most egregious offensive that we will call massacres and when there's proof, but in general they they enjoy impunity. And finally. I don't want to know that the stats do focus on you know young black men, being the target of violence like a young black men between the ages of fifteen and twenty nine is mainly the target. I. Don't think we can forget that. When violence like this happens in communities, mothers are affected. Wives are affected. Girlfriends are affected. The kids of these people are affected, so it really is a violence that. Affects the whole entire community. Can you talk about the recent murder of fourteen year old Drought Pedro and have recent protests been set up by this. How does it fit into the larger movement against police brutality toward black people in Brazil? So. John Petro Fourteen John Federal. And his murder is actually very typical. A police violence in Brazil and let me explain what happened to him. John batchelor lived in Fabella community that is pretty close to rotation, so it's actually a like a satellite impoverished at Lake City outside of Rio.

Brazil murder Black Impor Oscar Fernandez United States engineer Covid Carolina president John batchelor John Petro West Central harassment Eto Rio Brown Monje Avello Africa
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"That was the more on. You're listening to Latino media collective yawn. WPF W eighty nine nine point three FM Washington reminding everyone that you could check us out on own website. which is Latino media collective DOT COM? You also follow us on twitter at in the named at MC underscores showed that is at L. MC underscores show and of course live on WBZ FM dot org that's WB FW FM Dot Org. Once again this is Oscar Fernandez. And you're listening to the undocumented in LGBTQ series on a Latino media collective the caravan within the caravan. And we're speaking with Giuliani Alvarenga. WHO's a freelance writer for body DOT COM and we speak about the late great horatio rookie dummies? So let's try to apply S- Summer Ramirez is teachings and an idea as to what's going on Andrei now in this present moment time with regards to you know the as it's called the immigration crisis and we've touched touchstones several stories with regards to discrimination against LGBTQ migrants coming to the US whether be from Salvador Honduras. Or what. Where have you so in your opinion? How would you apply? Ramirez work in trying to understand the plight of undocumented. LGBTQ Hugh migrants today. Because one of the first names of the comes to mind and one that we've covered several times here is death of transmigrants Alexander Nandes under under ice custody unfortunately several other similar type cases have taken place under. US attention so give us your thoughts. Here yeah yeah I think that like he would be really good at capturing people's stories and making sure that that readers would understand what took replace. who was this person? Why did they die? And they're in the people that he interviewed were very much queer marginalized people transgender folks folks. Who may not even make it in mainstream? LGBT spaces right because of the fact that they're migrants and they're not white and so I feel like he really just. I just tried to like challenge like a a more a more like mainstream. LGBT Lens as well as challenging Central American Latin Americans is right and and understanding and recognizing that there are people are dying. You know that for example in this case was on during the DACA threat and that she represented the under in community as a whole and that the enduring community needs to recognizer and the H.. Like that like you know this this this more mainstream. LGBT platform also needs to recognize her. You know that she is also just as valuable as a matter of Matthew. Shepard kind of person you know that she died there was an injustice that was done to her and we need to remember people collectively as as as as our communities you know so I feel like he definitely challenged that intersection. That S is it chocolate right of of different identities and he tried to like make visible their their history their lived experiences. And I think that it's I'm really glad that Roxana that people recognize Roxana. Is this community. This was a community effort people to recognize the death of of of a trans ends woman who died the complications of HIV in detention center. She's not the first to have suffered there have been about maybe eighteen or more deaths under ice due to h complications. And it's one of those things where by obligation they need to treat people who who who need treatment right who Who may need HIV treatment? Those conditions are terrible and the journey itself just takes a lot out of you. Oh I haven't had a chance to accompany folks in the caravans but having been in the WanNa firsthand. Having been in the shelters in the motorcity WanNa LaSalle baristas. I could see firsthand just how draining that that journey must have been for people how dehydrated people were how little resources that they had shoes. WHO's close CETERA? Those things and I can imagine that that journey really have had taken a toll on her body and then I wonder had she been taking her medicine thin and so you know those are the things that U s people who are HIV positive and have the capacity to take care of themselves Tried to recognize. It's like taking my medicine in my And my healthy how am I doing. What's my body telling me? And so and then I can only imagine that journey that she took gone you know with or without medicine and so when she was finally detained I feel like her body in the condition that she was going through really was just like I can't take this anymore. You know especially if the guards were mistreating. Her and physically abusing her when after the topsy in addition we had your call the Kenyan feral. Who's WHO's the senior editor for the body dot com with us on the show some time ago and he pointed out rightfully still that under? US Law migrants are supposed to be given medical treatment especially for conditions like HIV AIDS in among among other diseases. So this is just lends itself more to to the lack of humanity and and dare I say criminality of the immigration system here in the US. You just reminded me that we spoke to you. You write about this time last year when you were in Doina or right along the border when when this whole thing went down where Border Patrol blee was shooting shooting. Tear gas at migrants. At this time. Yeah actually I was there that day I wasn't I wasn't there by the river where they were teargas correct. No I wasn't the one that yeah I could see the helicopters shooting at people or I don't know how he went through. But I could see helicopters in that part of the area. I didn't really At that moment I didn't understand what was going on. I was at on in Glavic goal. which is the space where literally helps a lot of the migrants going on on? That are that are coming through so I was just helping with some intakes and stuff but I recall that there was a group of folks because this was right around November. So yeah we're getting close to that date. This was in November when that happened A group of of migrants from the caravans were GONNA do a demonstration right by the border. And that's when the. US started needed tear-gas seen into Mahyco which is a huge. Like human rights violation right there like that's like almost you know I don't know what that would be in terms of international laws but they definitely violated Sunday and You see the images right you see the women fleeing with the children yes and and It's just it's just really discussing. That had to happen. But then when you're on the other side of the border and may go I remember when we were trying to get to Tie the Otay border. We had to go back to the space because the pull the Mexican police were coming through and at that point I saw them putting on like their ski masks. Their ski masks guide their face and at that point I was like that does not look good. That does not look good and so we mmediately got back in the car and we drove back into WHO Downtown WanNa you know what would be the Komo set cover Mussa said and so we were just hanging out there until the the coast was clear. But you know I just remembered having this image in my head of all these police officers in their pickup trucks and these like Mexican police peace officers with ski masks on Shooting Rubber Bullets at people you know that was a very like I had never seen anything like that. You know. Yeah anyone who's ever been to lend America. America has seen something that is very real when you see at first hand but unfortunately I would have to say that in the case of El Salvador. You're you know the struggle for LGBTQ rights isn't GonNa get necessarily any better because there's a new president in Salvador who ducked ducked and dived regards to the question of LGBTQ rights. Before he was elected president returned neighbor Kelly here and now he has been present and a short time. He's cut various social programs some of which included programs that promoted women's rights and LGBTQ rights as well. And if we are to be honest here and I think Rocard. I'm you're SORTA leads to this is that we could say this from one. Sapna uh-huh into another that. There's a lot of transphobia and homophobia within Salvadoran Society that's very accepted open and normalize allies. There's a reason why on this show we call this community. The marginalized group within the margin is group. Not just because it's a fact but because it's an inconvenient convenient fact in an uncomfortable reality of of of society particularly Salvadoran Society that we're both a part of the Russell sort of embarrassed about in this. There's a lot of honesty. I think that rookie Amir's Lewd.

US HIV WanNa Summer Ramirez Salvadoran Society twitter Oscar Fernandez Giuliani Salvador Honduras Washington WanNa LaSalle writer MC L. MC Roxana horatio America Alexander Nandes Andrei
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

10:18 min | 1 year ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Got an readings. Greetings greetings manuals that dominated the Washington all points beyond this is Oscar Fernandes. And you're listening to a Latino Media Calico recorded did the studios are WPF w eighty nine point three FM Washington and. He's to Columbia here on this Friday November first two thousand Nineteen Russell also heard on the Internet on own website. which is Latino media collective DOT COM? You can also find us on twitter. The name at L.. MC underscores show and of course live live on WPF WWL FM that orgy WBZ FW FM Dot. Org once again. This is Oscar Fernandez today on a show. We'll continue our special series on the undocumented and LGBTQ experience the marginalized group within the marginalized group the caravan within the caravan. And on this episode we spend the hour remembering while the unsung heroes in documenting the Latinos. LGBTQ community the late. Great Professor Horatio Rookie Ramirez recognized by his peers as a scholar of the invisible able and forgotten. The work of Amita shows how close to the front lines the Latinos Lgbtq community really was to the beginnings of the AIDS AIDS epidemic in one thousand nine hundred eighty s during his academic career. He helped bring ideas like queer survival and queer theory three to Latinos academia as a result a younger generation of Latina scholars have taken his teachings and research urge to further raise awareness of the struggle for Latinos. LGBTQ rights both here and abroad horatio sure rookie. Ramirez may no longer be with us but his legacy lives on thanks to help scholars and independent journalists like today's guests so we're I was in studio. Today is Giuliani Album Inga. He's a freelance writer for the body DOT com. He has a two thousand eighteen. Obituary entitled Remembering Horatio Roquette Roquette Ramirez and. He joins us again in studio today. Welcome to show Giuliani album anger. Thank you so much for having me Oscar and actually is good to have you with us because we had you right about this time last year as well in this undocumented and the LGBTQ Sary's so it's actually great to meet you in person here. It's really nice to be here. I Love ACM excited to to you. Know what else you ain't GonNa like share the work that he's done. I know a lot of people have a connection and feel very I'm saddened over the fact that he left us. Oh abruptly but they're still so much to talk about so much to honor so thank you for having me. Yeah it's been four years years since his passing and it's not an understatement to say these unsung heroes in this type of academia. So let's just start right there. Let's go straight to the million dollar question for those people who do not know even those within the Lgbtq community who was ratio rocket. AMEDEE's Yes yes. So professor will get Ramirez was a gay Salvadorian man who grew up in Los Angeles His his sister is actually a reporter. She works for I don't know if it's either Telemundo. Only these young. She's very well known in the Los Angeles community as a reporter as an anchor and Yeah so he he definitely left behind a legacy of like Central American identity especially in Los Angeles because an and also me having grown up in east Los Angeles you know like he his his legacy and what he wrote about also really resonates with a lot of us. Queer Central Ngel Americans who grew up in so cal and so even though his research also took place in San Francisco area. Because that's where he did his research he went to ooh Berkeley and then He. He's just started to like a lot of what he did. As a Grad student came from interviewing queer people in Seon John who are like you know Latinos and honestly like Lemme cion also has like that very similar quality that Los Angeles folks have you. You know it's definitely about being with Winnie that and and just being able to like walks the streets and you kind of feel the sense that you're at home especially with like the dialogue log that you hear. And and the people that you encounter and so. His research really did heavily focused on Queer Latino Latino folks living in the mission and how. HIV played such a huge role back then especially in his time. When this was a very new MM situation that people were going through very different than my own generation now I I became HIV positive in a time when there was now medicine. Edison that you could become undetectable back then. Undetectable wasn't even a word. People would have thought that they could accomplish. You know and so it was definitely a different world world than I appreciate that. He was brave enough to sue. Take those stories with him and and be the scholar of the invisible and your article recall also brought to my attention this particular field of Latino. LGBTQ -demia is really very lively more so on the a west coast in it is perhaps here in the east coast and rookie dummied is is is a fine example of that so one of his works that you mentioned in in your article remembering him is essay entitled that this this desire for queer survival this desire for queer survival. Can you tell us about this. I say 'cause you actually read it you yes so this essay he He he really does talk a lot about his His struggles with with with his research and also being like understanding himself as a gay Salvadoran Person. You know it's a very personal almost like manifesto memoir for that he writes and it's very intimate and well written and this is actually one of the few pieces of writing that I have where I feel like. I can deeply connect with Osceola because like I said before though he did guide me along with some of my research. He wasn't Santa Barbara when I was an Undergrad at Berkeley so we didn't really get a chance to see each other a lot. You know I would write to him. Every so often he would respond. He would give me a list of readings that I could. You know. Brush up on for the work that I was doing because I was doing a summer fellowship at the time and I was doing research around Queer Central American Literature Quranic literature and so he was just giving me some riders to brush up on some queer riders that could connect with and so those were the few interactions that I had with us and so reading this memoir. I feel like I got to see another side of him a little bit more intimate outside of like corresponding talking about research. This is definitely something more intimate that he was sharing for people to understand and what really really resonates with me and this is obviously me reading this article. After his passing was something kind of reading between the lines. You could sense where he was talking about how. I don't want academia to kill me because he also shared how you know. He had lost people as well along this way. And it just really resonated with me because it just told me how violent these institutions are. How institutional racism can really grapple you and That's actually something that I'm personally dealing with in my law school too so now coming from that perspective and understanding how it is to be Queer Central American person person in the spaces and the politics of it all can be very consuming. And what do you do. What are your healthy outlets? You know so. Even though he was no longer with us I always see him as one of my ancestors. One of my mentors and for better for worse you know I I understand that he was battling demons and so so and things that he had you know and so for me. It's always like regardless of that like understanding him as a mess throat. Like what would what could I do. Also to navigate situation nations similar to the ones he may be had faced in as in these institutions. And so that that article that that piece of writing that he wrote was just just very well written and intimate for me absolutely and this is precisely wanted to reasons why we do this undocumented and Lgbtq series to bring the spotlight to unsung heroes like Horatio Rookie Ramirez and I myself may not be as you queue but as a student of journalism. Listen one of the things in your article in remembering him. They really caught my attention. That really excited me. As as far you're seeing how does can be used a right way. In a productive way is perhaps to USA bitchy raise in documenting the Latinos Sergio Btcu community. I wonder if you could walk us through Horatio's method of using obituaries as a means of documentation. And before you answer that the reason this stimulates me is because for lack of better term. I was taught in journalism school that you know studying or or in this case covering the obituaries the graveyard shift of newspapers in that. You know it's a lot of sadness and heartbreak conveyed in in documenting documenting these sort of things but at the same time as journalists. This is information. That's in the public record. And based on what rookie administed very very valuable information as a result can so. Can you walk us through this this use of obituaries in documentation yes so his methodologies were very very unique nique and I know that must have not been easy to document these stories. As a matter of fact I remember doing my research and recalling that one of his colleagues who he wrote the book with Roy wrote a book with had mentioned that Yeah.

Horatio Roquette Roquette Rami Los Angeles Queer Central American Literat Giuliani Oscar Fernandes HIV professor Berkeley twitter Oscar Fernandez Washington Latinos Sergio Btcu community reporter Columbia Telemundo AIDS USA Oscar Russell San Francisco
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Don't feel tear. I don't think think I feel strongly one way or the other. But I think what's what's missing is in recognition analysis of these larger structures. That are incentivizing. Both workers and employers is to gauge in unauthorized work. And the ways in which these are are making people so vulnerable to exploitation and yeah. I don't blame you if there's if there is in a concrete answer for that because this is the type of story did really it does not lend lend itself to any sort of optimism or any Ernie hope that people from the top down or going to make any change. But if there's anything to be to be taught from forgotten immigrant rights that you know and I'll make it very blunt myself that these white male power structures that are the food processing assessing industry and government is especially those in powered. Mississippi are not agents for social change. It starts from the bottom up. It starts from organizations such as the one that you work with in Mississippi and the various other African American organizations in Mississippi that have stepped up in solidarity to the immigrant community in in Mississippi as well in light of what took place I'm channel. Do you have any any the opinion or any thoughts of you know the young girl that was put on TV. Who was crying for her father when when the raids took place This is kind of hard to to you know see those sort of images but at the same time it it personally for me. It kind of infuriates me that we have to wait for something like that to be put on the spotlight and rather than instead of speaking to grassroots organizations like the ones that you worked in and hear them talk about the work that they've been doing an up for years now to raise awareness about labor exploitation nation in places like Mississippi. Yeah I mean I think I don't know if this is responding directly to your question but but I think that all this is all happening in context of of growing white nationalism across the across the country White supremacy seems to be gaining More of a hold or at least more people feel more free to to express These issues I think we need to keep in mind in this context texts. That racism isn't a Mississippi problem. It's not a southern problem. It's not a black problem. It's not a lot the next problem. Racism is a white problem. It's all of our problem right and also I think we need to remember that. It's not just about good people and bad people which I think we tend and to think about a lot when we're looking at at the shooter who came out in Moscow in all the other mass shootings that are going on but it also has the Jewish structural actual racism? I think we see this really clearly. In the in the case of these raids in case of the in the case of the lives of the folks that who were affected by these raids and the work that they were doing the lives that they're living structural racism is is embedded in our institutions. And I think you're saying you know the the answer isn't GonNa come from above and I agree. I think it requires all of us. Working for Racial Justice for immigrant. Justice for Social Justice in our community is doing feeling what each of us what we can absolutely and again. It's a hard thing to discuss because again. This story Loyd does not lend himself to any sort of optimism. But you know I always tell people that you know. People in the global south cannot afford for dissidents in privilege society. Such as you and I to become cynical it's not our lives salutes and it's not our future to mortgage so the struggle for workers rights is going to continue in Mississippi at the very least so I mentioned a few organizations. I WanNa know before we let you go love if there are any other organizations that you believe are worth mentioning that works on these cases or just any good organizations in general in Mississippi. They're struggling only for workers rights but for social justice as well in the state of Mississippi. Yeah I think the MISSISSIPPI CBS Immigrant Rights Alliance is a crucial organization. That's operating at the statewide level to try to stop anti immigrant legislation from passing and connecting server legislative issues and racial and immigrant issues with Labor issues. Pueblo is a small organization that is supporting workers. Pro Bono Immigration support following the raids the Aclu of Mississippi. The city is doing really important work and the Mississippi Center for Justice and then I would also mention this is not a Mississippi based organization but for folks for interested in thinking more about the consequences of criminalising immigrant labor her and and I guess the consequences not just for immigrants but for our economy I mean and for all workers I really admire the work of the break. The chains alliance Who are who are are trying to educate folks on this issue and encourage us to think about repealing the e- Orca employer sanctions provisions? That I was talking about earlier. So the struggle for workers rights in immigrant rights continues and thanks to the good work as well by Angela Stews for bringing this allied as as well. So we've been speaking with Angela stews. She's a cultural anthropologist. At the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She's the author of scratching out a living Latinos Tinos race and work in the deep South. Her latest article can be found on progressive DOT ORG. That's progressive dot org entitled workplace is rates are not the answer Angela. Thank you very much for being on the show with us. Thanks so much. Thank you once again with. That said that is it for today's show. We WanNa remind everyone that you check out this episode in our previous episodes on Latino media collective dot com you also follow us on twitter under the name at LLC underscores show and of course live on WPF WFAN dot org that's WPF W FM. That org so on behalf of my co-producer Abby Be Roberts this is Oscar Fernandez saying very much everyone for listening to his show. That's it for today show a deal November Chow.

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

News Talk 710 KNUS

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

"United states constitution and then anything else that's on your mind i will tell you a story from the denver post nobody's the worse critic of the denver post than i am that's so thin you can't even use it to line you're birdcage anymore and fortunately in on my bur died so i don't need to buy bird liner but so often the headlines yesterday had some headlines on the peter boyle show that the spin was so obnoxious a beautiful story this morning on the front page of the denver post really get to on him in a region that poem i keep talking about on facebook but let's get back to karen and talk about what's on her mind which included the idea that un troops were coming to chicago and i first of all can what was your source for that information where have you been seen her hearing i ankara i am thinking it with dr sh but then they wish they had inner huge someone uh in chicago who is a news person he was like a manager of his station there and he had uh taking pictures of it and uh she got he said he got nazifree weighty taking pictures have it this guy was arrested for doing that and here he's a news person you think you know i mean they are supposed to be well i reporting the news i have not seen any reports are pictures of any type of peacekeeping forces from the un in chicago i don't believe it's true but i can tell you where where it started there was a cook county commissioner his name was richard boy can just happened this week and this guy was traveling to new york to meet with the un assistant secretarygeneral for peacekeeping support a guy named oscar fernandez to ranko of argentina and in here's what he said he told a tv station in chicago at o'hare airport i'm hoping to appeal to the un to actually come to chicago and meet with victims of violence and maybe even possibly help out in terms of peacekeeping efforts because i think it's so critical for us to make sure that these neighborhoods are safe and you know this was all in response to president trump during his inauguration or right after it when he said and i may have to send the feds industry cargo to.

denver post facebook chicago commissioner richard boy new york oscar fernandez argentina United states peter boyle karen cook county un o'hare president
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KOIL

"Gestapo as well last week chicago tribune reported that cook county commissioner richard uh boy can he flew to new york to discuss what he described as a quiet genocide in chicago's black community with the un's assistant secretary general for peace the peacebuilding support general oscar fernandez to ranko boy can is asking for the united nations to deploy their soldiers on us soil which would sidestep posse comitatus actually i mean everything that is a nightmare with putting un soldiers on american soil could be happening in chicago in fact there are some people are reporting it's already happening in chicago be don't have big un stickers on these jeeps that go through the streets but they certainly have a great or white vehicles are going through the streets and it was reported days ago that over fifty heavily armored united nations vehicles and various pieces of equipment sufficient up to support of some small company a peacekeeper troops are sitting in a parking lot behind the us government on warehouse in maryland and the appear to be ready for some type of rapid domestic the point so sightings of un vehicles in maryland sightings of grey vehicles in chicago the cook county commissioner met with the new york un and said hey we want to put un troops on the ground president trump said we can use the national guard problem manual said no you don't do that but of course now we're looking at un troops on the ground and the and the president wanting to organize whose own private police this is some really meaty conspiratorial stuff triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred deal approve of this un troops on the ground in the.

Gestapo chicago tribune new york chicago oscar fernandez united nations us maryland commissioner trump cook county assistant secretary ranko president
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Creation such a programme raises the possibility that this effort would be used to create an intelligence apparatus which reinforce trump's political policies and that we would have these mean while the deep state is a problem the state is going on within the cia if we have to create a gestapo to put the cia in line and oil what the hell is going on here i mean organizing something like this would mean to the president would have a private spy network that could easily uh set up rendition operations and i was looking at a document that was released in 2010 called those released by the department of fed's the interment resettlement operations and there's been independent reports about hohmann square and the black site these there in chicago uh they not only use american ages to detain or our american police to detain people in this place no lawyer no due process but now we're hearing rumors of united nations being brought in and of course this was prompted by the the murder rate in chicago last week well donald trump it proposed that perhaps we should use the national guard ring or chicago but last week the chicago tribune reported that cook county commissioner richard vojkan flew to new york to discuss what he described as a quiet genocide in chicago's black community with the un's assistant secretary general for peacebuilding support oscar fernandez tarango now what boy can is asking for is he's asking for the united nations to deploy their soldiers on us soil at this would sidestep hosokowa tatas will still feel like a police state it was reported two days ago with over fifty heavily armored united nations vehicles in various pieces of equipment sufficient up to support a small company a peacekeeper troops are sitting in a parking lot behind a us government own warehouse in maryland and appear to be ready for some type of rapid domestic deployment i have a guy who sent me a message on facebook saying that people in chicago have been well aware of transport and of sea transport of un vehicles in chicago so this has been in the making for some time according to uh some people who have been a posting on my facebook page of my twitter account roger clinton called the.

maryland twitter oscar fernandez assistant secretary cook county donald trump murder fed roger clinton facebook cia us united nations new york richard vojkan commissioner chicago tribune chicago hohmann square president two days
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KELO

"Creation of such a programme raises the possibility that this effort would be used to create an intelligence apparatus which reinforce trump's political policies and that we would have these meanwhile the deep state is a problem the state is going on within the cia if we have to create a gestapo to put the cia in line and oil what the hell is going on here i mean organizing something like this would mean that the president would have a private spy network that could easily uh set up rendition operations and i was looking at a document that was released in 2010 called those released by the department of defense called the interment and resettlement operations and there's been independent reports about hohmann square and the black site is there in chicago they not only use american ages to detain or our american police to detain people in this place no lawyer no due process but now we're hearing rumors of united nations being brought in and of course this was prompted by the murder rate in chicago last week well donald trump had proposed that perhaps we should use the national guard ring or chicago but last week the chicago tribune reported that cook county commissioner richard vojkan flew to new york to discuss what he described as a quiet genocide in chicago's black community with the un's assistant secretary general for peacebuilding support oscar fernandez to ranko that what boy can is asking for is he's asking for the united nations to deploy their soldiers on us soil that it's been sidestepped bossicovich taught us we're still feel like a police state it was reported two days ago with over fifty heavilyarmored united nations vehicles in various pieces of equipment sufficient up to support a small company a peacekeeper troops are sitting in a parking lot behind the us government owned warehouse in maryland and appear.

united nations us assistant secretary cook county donald trump murder department of defense maryland bossicovich cia oscar fernandez new york richard vojkan commissioner chicago tribune chicago hohmann square president two days
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KTRH

"Such a programme raises the possibility that this effort would be used to create an intelligence apparatus which reinforce trump's political policies and that uh we would have these meanwhile the deep state is a problem the the state is going on within the cia if we have to create a gestapo to put the cia in line and oil what the hell is going on here i mean organizing something like this would mean that the president would have a private spy network that could easily uh set up rendition operations and i was looking at a document there was released in 2010 called those released by the property the feds called the interment and resettlement operations and there's been independent reports about hohmann square and the black site these there in chicago uh they not only use american ages to detain or our american police to detain people in this place no lawyer no due process but now we're hearing rumors of united nations being brought in and of course this was prompted by the the murder rate in chicago last week well donald trump had proposed that perhaps we should use the national guard ring or chicago but last week the chicago tribune reported that cook county commissioner richard vojkan flew to new york to discuss what he described as a quiet genocide in chicago's black community with the un's assistant secretary general for peacebuilding support oscar fernandez tarango now what boycotting is asking for is he's asking for the united nations to deploy their soldiers on us soil at this would sidestep posse call the tatas will still feel like a police state it was reported two days ago with over fifty heavilyarmored united nations vehicles in various pieces of equipment sufficient up to support a small company a peacekeeper troops are sitting in a parking lot behind a us government own warehouse in maryland and appear to be ready for some type of rapid domestic deployment i have a guy who sent me a message on facebook saying that people in chicago have been well aware.

united nations oscar fernandez assistant secretary cook county donald trump murder facebook maryland us cia new york richard vojkan commissioner chicago tribune chicago hohmann square president two days
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

"The un will direct the federal population with our migrant board that than orders your government on who to let in there it is 1991 in heavy on france us at 92 so my memories of perfect today americans would be outraged of un troops entered los angeles restore order tomorrow they will be grateful this is especially true if they were told there was an outside threat from beyond but the real at promulgated that threaten arbor existence it is then that all peoples of the world will pledge with world leaders who deliver the rebels evil the one thing every man fears is the unknown what presented with this scenario individual rights will be willingly relinquish with a guarantee of their wellbeing grander them by their world government henry kissinger addressed bilderberg meeting having on france may 21st 1992 you could say oh well we don't know that paper that got that leak was right okay well here's two thousand seventeen december nineteen ghana commissioner richard boy kid isn't in talks not nations officials which bore the possibility of putting us troops on the streets of chicago to address the city's horrendous gun violence problem in the you and of course has their unity are pretty to ban all smallarms boy that a consent stance not of course they'll have it they'll be the big big mothership they'll be the big central control boy can the peacekeepers flew to new york last week met with un assistant secretary general of the peacebuilding support oscar fernandez pro nonco to discuss the issue in the nation's has a track record of protecting minority population can said before the meeting there was travel warfare between the tutsi and hutus in africa and they deploy peacekeeping troops to help save those populations and we're is bloodshed actually the un's now than caught and medically ran the mass murder of eight thousand people released the clintons over sought let's make remiss we have to do something black people chicago make up thirty percent of the population but eighty percent of those were killed by gunfire let's isn't that interesting that it was the un that went in and killed the christian minority took their property using the animist group to do it that was eddie eighty five percent of the population and then admittedly helped him get all rounded up and then slaughtered and then.

un los angeles henry kissinger france us chicago new york murder clintons bilderberg ghana commissioner assistant secretary africa eighty five percent eighty percent thirty percent
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

Chicago's Business Authority

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

"The possibility of putting un troops on the streets of chicago to address the city's horrendous gun violence problem in the you and of course has their unity treaty to ban all smallarms boy that instead of stands not of course they'll have it they'll be the big big mothership they'll be the big central control boy can the peacekeepers flew to new york last week to meet with un assistant secretary general of the peacebuilding support oscar fernandez for hongqiao to discuss the issue in an asians has a track record of protecting minority population morgan said before the meeting there was tribal warfare between the tutsi and hutus in africa and they deployed peacekeeping troops to help shape those populations and we're is bloodshed actually the un's now than caught in medley ran the mass murder of eighteen thousand people delays the clintons over sought that's make remiss we have to do something black people chicago make up thirty percent of the population but eighty percent of those were killed by gunfire wants isn't that interesting that it was the un that went in and killed the christian minority took their property using the animist group to do it that was eddie eighty five percent of the population and then admittedly helped him get all rounded up and then slaughtered and an all we need to you in the coming because they love black people barrowman you will not directly address any potential while the day chicagoans were mortars the idea of deploying un peacekeepers when us soil is likely rao many on the right the warned about international forces conducting gun confiscation operations the measure for decades which they're saying this would be the peacekeepers would do guns waves earlier here president trump suggested the plan the national guard revellers cargo as idea was first opposed by democrats there.

chicago new york oscar fernandez hongqiao morgan un murder trump assistant secretary africa president eighty five percent eighty percent thirty percent
"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"oscar fernandez" Discussed on Science for the People

"In aries that book was just so fun to read and really fascinating to get an inner look at how dictionaries are written and how their created an who edits thumb and the ideas behind what words to include what words not to include how to write definitions really fascinating book and i definitely absolutely endorsed that book for just just what anyone to read you don't need a background in any kind of particular science if you if you know how to speak and know how to use words you will probably find this book interesting france get now add some move opt some of my two armor listyev based on your recommendation of the gut microbes great lakes it's been there waiting for me as a chris while i'm in the middle of illinois but it is chicago the great lakes arm so how about a book that pleasantly surprised you may be reggie new picked it up a new were like okay this will probably be okay and then as you're reading early now this sexually really good jill the book picked the book the pleasantly surprised me was the calculus of happiness how a mathematical approach to life adds up to help wells in loves why oscar fernandez it was one of the review books that occasionally landed my on a mailbox and often there do just end up being these kind of sali's shrill way wasted time books as but i read this one and i found it really fascinating he just he takes kind of a mathematical analytical pro approach to you know topic lake falling in laws eggs a jewish in an extra stars and personal finance.

france chris illinois chicago oscar fernandez sali personal finance reggie new