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"oscar charleston" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:16 min | 5 d ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"About ER been a Dodger red powder a slugger, you're already probably now a giant. All right, let's get the guest list from you gotta do the you're hitting homers in April that way. Yeah. Yeah. You're showing upon toman eight rolls showing up late. May. Yeah. Uh, turnout balls at first base, but not in a nice nice pipes. That sounds good. Cops knows that's like that's his jam. Tell you that. Yes. You told me that you used to play it for me on my way to track That's when I was in, like, first and second grade. I've been AH, hard Lor a shot put her what we've got today, but I'll get in a big burden. Fly seven o'clock Bob Kendrick and join US president of the Negro League Baseball Museum an incredible place today and I was really you know, I was gone all day. Yes, they play golf, and I missed the whole Twitter sensation of the 100 year anniversary of the Negro League founding and And I just really want to make sure we got some love out there because it's it's just a place that moves me beyond belief. You tell the story. Guys get moved to tears there, Ozzie Smith, they said, when Ozzie Smith took the tour And I'm not nosey guy. But so when you take the tour and at the end you finished coach. Remember at that diamond. You go around, you kind of around the outskirts of it. You do the theater thing, and then you come all the way around to the kind of back to like that little gift shop right around the diner, and there's a diamond and you see all the in this They're all in bronze statue form. You know, there's Oscar Charleston in center field. There's Satchel Paige on the mound. There's Josh Gibson catching and and it did it hit you, You know, man and said Ozzie Smith got there, which is weeping, you know, and it's intense, but Also a joyous thing, too. And it's a historical thing. And and Bob Kendricks great. He's been on the radio show before, and he did amazing stuff when he came out, spoke to our little league too. All the way from Kansas City. So this'll be cool that did you see the cups? You see that Cubs hat that Clinton was? Where do you feel me on? That was it wasn't the best hat. Did you feel kind of resting on his hair? Yeah. Good call about Obama with the teleprompter because you can see him reading and the way he was dropping the names. I was like, Well, you didn't have this on the counter, man. Can't you do like Could you look at it? No card for a minute before you did. It did And if we could go back just one set to on on Bush, man. The reason he was so good is he probably should have been Commissioner of baseball, not President. United States threw a baseball guy and he was great in his little speech. Really? Wass. You see, Manford at the end, I wantto know I go. I want to. I want to pose that I can't stand that kind of thing. Didn't oppose you, though. You tried to depose him. He just don't opposing you. He's just maybe get a deal done his speech at the end. I hope waterboarded cut that for the COC. But there's some great One's in there. Ah, ah as well. A Bruce Po cheese in their night s O CI is great sea poach me, But I think the other hat with capital that it's kind of a Kangol hat right before one's candle, Kangol. His little speech on Satchel Paige is a lair. Yeah, it's pretty good. Okay, sit on the balcony. 7th 7 30 We'll get started with the other power are doing Kuipers going. Tojoin us talking Ball 8 35 Terry Crowley described from the Bay Area newsgroups go to stop more giants. So good. Yeah. On DH, then Mick, mixing the play by play Voice of the Carlyle Hotel. You 9 15? Yeah. Friend of the program, Alya. No, It's a good holiday week. If you have mixing and Kendrick coming on the show. He's a great friend of the show. Yes, he is on can be are one of 45 and six. The sports later thesis. He's Murph in Mac, Hear it on the to nap through your smartphone. We are knbr 1045 and 6 80 the sports leader. I told her Kruger and Brooks San Francisco Giants and a letter announcing because they're playing games without fans at a local park. We're going to still be able to fill the stands to a certain extent, because they will have the giant fan cut out program, huh? Doubts will be displayed in the stands. They should have a celebrity in there like one game, Elvis one game, Elton John. Mama Gandhi spot like you watching the game. And you like he said Such Ibaka? Yes. Is that Herbert Hoover? What? Wait a minute, Mr Krug and Rod B..

Ozzie Smith Bob Kendrick Satchel Paige Commissioner Manford US president Obama San Francisco Giants Bob Kendricks Negro League Negro League Baseball Museum Elton John Oscar Charleston Herbert Hoover baseball Josh Gibson Kangol Cubs golf
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

09:23 min | 2 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Producing from his home studio in Connecticut. Taylor Schwenk buster only working from my home studio. He just north of New York City Taylor. I remember early on during the lockdown. That you were every Friday every Saturday. You're taking a long drive. You still doing that now. That we're more than a month into this. The drives have dried up in the last two weekends. We might go for one this coming up next weekend but I'll pull back the curtain a little bit. My wife and I are two consecutive weekends to different people We've done these like zoom murder mystery parties which are a lot of fun. Actually I know that people do them face to face in real life. But we've gotten a little creative here and if you guys are looking to do something like that I would highly recommend it. It's fun to dress up a little bit. You know we did a twenty s era one and a seventy era once we made some different cocktails for it and My first time I wasn't really sure what to expect and I enjoyed it quite a bit. So that's taken over the drives a little bit so that's your recommendation. Mine is digging up. Dandelions which has become an obsession for me. Because you know because I'm home I've made up my mind. I'm going to have the best lawn in my neighborhoods and so over the weekend. My fifteen year old son who certainly has moments. When he doesn't like me very much. This weekend I assign him digging up two hundred dandelions. I dug up that many myself. We are on a hunt for Dandelions at our place. Is that sound. Like Fun Taylor It sounds like a negative fund. But where do you think you are on your quest to have the best looking lawn in the neighborhood like are you like seventy five percent of the way there or where where do you stand? Doodo mobster good start like my lawn is looking really good like I cut around the edges. All the things in the past where I get back from Sunday night baseball and Monday and I'd be tired and I'd see some clipping that I need to do and I wouldn't do it now. Like up at five in the morning just dying for that. I like to get out and do it so trying to make the best of it so you got you know. Murder Mystery Zoom. I've got dandelions it's all what whatever you need to get through it. It's it's dragging on here so you gotta you gotTa take what you can get there. You go well this is contributors week. Folks who helped the sport of baseball not necessarily as players managers are front optics executives. And we'll start with Bob Kendrick. Who is the President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City? In Alaska who he thinks is the greatest player of all time. We'll hear from Sarah Lines as well. I The news and notes retired Los Angeles dodgers broadcaster. Been scully's back home. After falling and being hospitalized the team quoted scully in twitter Saturday saying home and resting comfortably with my wife and we are both eagerly awaiting the time for dodger baseball. I almost can't say without trying to imitate. I'm not GONNA do that. The Cape Cod Baseball League. Renounce Summer League for top college stars cancelled. Its Two thousand twenty season due to the corona virus pandemic. It announced on Friday. The Cleveland Indians will pay regular salaries to full-time employees through June thirtieth. But the club has had to furlough others due to the Kobe. Nineteen pandemic the teams that senior executives took voluntary salary reductions to ensure the team could continue to pay staffers. The Indians confirm they furloughed Many of their part time employees and interns those will take effect on. May first and there is sad. News Steve Del Hausky a while. Left-hander was said to have been dubbed the fastest pitcher in baseball history. By Ted Williams died this week in new Britain Connecticut. He was eight years old. Before we get to Sarah into Bob. Don't forget about Jalen and Jacoby. The after show the guys are recapping episodes. Three and four of the last dance. The shows went up right after the last dance aired. And they'll continue doing that throughout the run of this Docu series Jalen and Jacoby. The after show is brought to you by State Farm and at and T. You can find it wherever you get your podcasts numbers game. They're laying say reporter producer for MLB DOT COM. And Sarah in a moment. We're GONNA be talking about Kendrick head of the Negro Leagues Museum in Baseball Museum in Kansas City. And so Sarah what I sent you an email over the weekend saying you know what? I'm curious about your perspective on who or the Five Best Negro Leagues players of all time. How would you rank them? Starting with number five. Yeah so I love looking into this and I love thinking about this because you know this is an area of baseball history that we don't know quite as much about and I know I personally have learned a lot about maybe over the last ten years or so but I feel like I'm always learning more and more about these players in reading more of these legends so it was a great great opportunity to dig back into this and I love it so my number five is Oscar Charleston. And you know they're so many great comparisons when you read about these players. Everybody is compared to some absolute legend and the one that I have for Oscar Charleston. Buck O'Neil said. He was the greatest player that he ever saw. He was compared to tie Cobb interest speaker and he was considered the Negro National in Israel. I real- superstar back in nineteen twenty and he could hit close to four hundred played a great outfield. Iran. Base while and Satchel page side. You have to see him to believe him anyway. And so the hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy six and of course buck. O'neil was a longtime first baseman and a manager and he we scout. He's got it later in life. There's actually an award at the hall of fame given every year now That's name for Buck O'Neil. Whose NUMBER FOUR. So number four. I've got cool Papa. Bell you know legendary speed one story. I saw said that he went from home home. In twelve seconds which is really fun. You know we can actually contextualized that now whether or not it's true we don't know but you know the fact that people thought that was true. I mean that's right there with the fastest home-to-home times who see on home runs you know now a stack cast so and he taught. Lubar have a steel basis. I think that almost tells you all you need to know in humans. The Hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy four and cool papa. Bell of course. The great story about said tongue in cheek was that he was so fast when he turned off the lights which he'd be back under the covers before the late actually went out. Who's number three so number? Three is Buck Leonard. He was the homestead grays first base for seventeen years which made him the longest tenure player with one team in the entire history of the Negro Leagues. He Josh Gibson were outstanding. Duo led the team to nine Negro nationally pennants and five world series. Aaron says and he went to the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two number. Two number. Two is Josh Gibson so dizzy Dean called him. One of the best that he ever saw it for a ton of power. The legends are absolutely incredible. They talk about five hundred foot home runs and maybe he hit nine. Hundred home runs in his career. We don't know you know for sure. But he certainly was. You know an absolute outstanding catcher an outstanding a power hitter and he wins the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two as well number one all time. So Am I number one. I have sexual page. I'm not sure that he was the absolute best player in the history of the Negro Leagues. But I think he is certainly the most famous on so I was sort of going back and forth between him Gibson whose number one number two I ended up with Satchel page number one. He was the first to go into the hall of fame. He's the most associated with the league. I think a lot of ways and you know a lot of people thought he was the greatest pitcher whoever left and I want to ask you about the greatest player of all time in any league for me. It's always been willie. Mays who to me? He did so many things well he was fast. He could play defense. He hit for power. He won the Most Valuable Player in the National League. A couple of times Led the League in a home runs multiple times. He won a batting title in One Thousand. Nine hundred fifty four. It's six hundred. Sixty homers had three thousand two hundred eighty three hits scored over two thousand runs in his career. That would be my pick for greatest player of all time. How about you? Yeah I mean I you. I have talked about many times on here. My mother grew up a huge giant. Stand a huge giant fan. Let's hear about Willie mays since I you know basically couldn't talk yet and I've always always default to him but I will say that you know as I learn more and more about these Negro Leagues players. I mean I do think that you know there are so many players who you hear that you know could have been the greatest of all time or would have been considered the greatest of all time in major league history. Had they gotten the chance to play their gotten a chance to play. They're in their prime. So I think that there certainly are You know other considerations to take but I always go slowly mace yes. Some people would argue Babe Ruth. Some people would argue Henry Aaron. I'm going to put that question of Bob in just a moment. Sarah thanks for doing this. Always great to talk with you. Basis for having me investor. Kendrick is President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Missouri and Bob. Thanks for joining us. Sit at time when everybody's looking for distraction and I know you've got a lot of stories always exciting for me because I'm looking forward to those same distracting about these baseball and baseball history because the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum like everybody else has been so greatly impacted by the health situation that we're currently.

baseball Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Sarah Lines Bob Kendrick Negro Leagues Josh Gibson Kansas City murder Cape Cod Baseball League Buck O'Neil Willie mays Oscar Charleston Negro Leagues Museum Henry Aaron League Taylor Schwenk President Summer League Connecticut New York
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:46 min | 3 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"N? P. That you're particularly proud of whether they were big hits financially or whether they were just something you've thought was really important and were able to give it a home that it couldn't find elsewhere. Sure well if I go back to the very beginning. One of the first books that I acquired was a biography of true speaker by an author named Timothy. Gay and so that book was that book is special to me because it was really the first original a new book that I acquired at the press. And there've been so many along the way that I've been grateful to have the opportunity to acquire and work on but if I just name a couple I mean one book. That was a a really big deal for. Us WAS PHILIPPA lose. Autobiography Co authored with Peter. Kara Sodas from a couple of ago because that for us was a real move up in terms of the visibility of Of the author and as probably the biggest book that. I've acquired so far a couple more that I'd like to mention that I've really been grateful for the opportunity to work on and some other books that are in the pipeline more recently republished Jeremy Beers biography of Oscar Charleston. Which we were lucky to win. The two thousand Nineteen Sabre Seymour Medal. Which is awarded to Best Baseball Book of the year? Few Years Back published a book called Home Team by Rob Garrett which is a sort of a cultural history of the San Francisco giants from really the move from New York. Up to the building of the new ballpark and the sort of turbulent history of that period. I'm also really excited about just a few months. Here we're going to be publishing Along with sabre a Partnership With Sabre Sabres Fiftieth Sixty which is a a collection of what sabre has chosen as the most representative work by sabre members US and SABERS INCEPTION? And we partnered with them on that. And we're really looking forward to bring that book out. In June and early July and building on that relationship that we have with sabre both in terms of working with them over the years as both their distributor but also the the relationship that we have with sabre readers who have been so good about buying and supporting our books over the last twenty plus years and I guess lastly because we've had a lot of aspiring writers in our audience and people who will occasionally reach out to ask for advice about getting a baseball book published. What are some pieces of advice that you could dispense about how to come up with an idea that would intrigue you or other publishers? And how to put together a proposal? What you're looking for. Essentially or some of the mistakes may that some aspiring authors make. Well I would say in terms of what goes into a book proposal. There's we have guidelines on our website and there's so many books and other resources that go over that I won't spend too much time on that but I think what I think it goes back to. You know if you want. If you're trying to write a baseball book you really just should spend a lotta time on the idea itself. And whether or not there are competing books. Is it really book links? Are you going to be able to have the material to put it together to make it book length and as I see a lot of that I see a lot of stuff that comes in and it's not even book length an and some authors don't even know what that is but you know I think it you have to have an idea that that doesn't have competition you'd have to have you have to bring something to it in terms of your track record as a writer you know? What can you show us about how we know you're going to be able to to make this book happen and pull it off if you're given a contract and and really don't be in a hurry. That's the other thing I would. I would always. I mean everybody wants to be published next year or the year after at a book is something that you're going to have to invest in for years and in order for it to be the best that it can possibly be. And so that's what I would say to you but I think the the big two things are just the originality of the idea. And how you know it's going to be able to find an audience who you think have supported similar related books in the category and what you can do as an author to help publicize those are the main three things and when most people submit a proposal have many of them written book already or written a few chapters. Because I know when I did my books we really hadn't written much at all and it was all sort of hopeful and aspirational. And here's what we're GONNA do. And because of the nature of those books we couldn't really have written them or any large chunk of them before we actually submitted. But if you're someone who's writing a biography of a long dead player let's say or a long ago team. You could in theory do some work on that before. You actually get a contract if you're able to do that so do people typically submit long proposals with a lot of the book already completed and if so. I guess how big a staff you have that you're able to actually review all those things because I would imagine that there's a lot of reading to do when you're getting as many proposals baseball books as you are well. It's true that some people submit the barest of proposals. And sometimes that's fine if they have a good enough idea and they can get right to it and the pitch letter and then they can say. Well here's my credentials here so I am. You know that's sometimes enough but sometimes I do see not even a sample chapter because author say well. I I WANNA do this you know. I hope this shows the vision for the book that I'm proposing but I don't really WanNa start it until I have a contract and that makes that makes total sense. And maybe that's kind of what you were feeling like when you were trying to sell that proposal and that's fine too and sometimes. I'll get complete manuscript with almost no proposal. And that's really what you don't want actually because because then you really do have to just sit with probably the first forty to fifty and sometimes that's not. GonNa Really Tell you where. Where's this thing going? And that's why proposal is really the best vehicle along with a sample chapter two if you have it and if you don't even shorts writing sample that just shows the style that would plan to use for the book or something close to it. That's completely acceptable to all right. Well thank you for doing that. Work and providing this service that you provide to the baseball community of getting some of these books published that are definitely in line with my interests and I think many of our listeners and maybe would never see the light of day if not for U. N. P. So we're glad that you're out there and best of luck weathering this difficult time for book. Sales will thanks Ben. And thanks for providing this outlet to Not just authors but other baseball authors who continue to write about it and continue to tell baseball history while we wait for it to come back. Yes all right. Thank you rob. Thank you Ben. All right I wanted to mention that if you're interested in purchasing any of the University of Nebraska books that I just talked about with rob or the wax pack for that matter. Those books.

Rob Garrett Nineteen Sabre Seymour Medal baseball PHILIPPA Timothy Kara Sodas Sabres US San Francisco Jeremy Beers Oscar Charleston University of Nebraska writer Co representative New York Peter
"oscar charleston" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

08:19 min | 5 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"The one hundredth anniversary of the formation of the Negro National League is being celebrated particularly at the Negro leagues baseball museum in Kansas city Missouri there's been an exhibit there for the last year celebrating the history and the rich traditions the legacy of the Negro baseball leagues of course were so many brilliant African American players plied their talents before the integration of Major League Baseball the twentieth century by Jackie Robinson in nineteen forty seven with the Brooklyn Dodgers one of the remarkable aspects of the exhibit taking place our series of oil portraits of prominent players from the Negro baseball leagues by the artist who joins us now Greg Chrysler Greg thank you for being with us thank you for having me Jeremy Greg you you paint these remarkable these remarkable oil portraits and scenes from baseball's history how did how did a fine artists such as yourself choose baseball as his primary topic well you know it kind of started with my dad's baseball card collection you know when I was very little he he grew up you know in the forties and fifties and collected baseball cards as you know most kids his age death and his mother summarily through most of them out like most mothers did I I had that experience my eyes a little more complicated but it's it's the same general story yeah yeah same same kind of thing but yeah he was able to hold on to a few of them and I guess when I was younger I kind of discovered them and and you know he used to tell me about the players that he watched and and load you know Mickey mantle yogi bear Yankee St still have the Yankees Sam and that's why you're Greg G. R. A. I. G. exactly the third baseman Greg yeah you're the only two G. R. A. I. Jeez I think I've ever heard of Greg since well they're not many of us we're speaking with Greg Chrysler the artist the baseball artist remarkably gifted painter at this point in time two hundred and thirty portraits of his are being exhibited at the Negro leagues baseball museum in Kansas city Missouri it's a spectacular museum and it's celebrating right now the one hundredth anniversary of the formation of the Negro National League which was organized by Rube foster in nineteen twenty and February nineteen twenty of course the really existed before nineteen twenty but that was the formation of the pre eminent black baseball league the Negro National League in nineteen twenty and their two hundred thirty two over thirty portraits you've done right there five by seven their Maisie how long does it take to pay two hundred thirty portraits no man will be project was about two and a half to three years long so yeah it it it took awhile each painting cook you know probably at least five to six hours but you know some we're ten hours twelve hours but in the research that goes into each painting that can usually they can usually go past you know any training time that that I could be easily some of these players of course are are very prominent figures known by all true fans of the games whether it's Josh Gibson or a Buck Leonard or a James cool Papa Ballard Oscar Charleston but some are are more obscure at how with these players chosen as your subjects well we the fellow who put the put the show together the guy who commissioned at all J. called well he he kind of had a vision for this thing you know not only representing the stars of the Negro leagues and you know the outsider leaks but but also you know kind of the role players or or people who had interesting stories in in one way or another and I think the scope of it he just kind of wanted to to show you know a slice of everything if that makes sense we're speaking with the artist Greg Chrysler about his paintings which are now being exhibited starting this week in celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the formation of the Negro National League they're being exhibited at the Negro leagues baseball museum it is in Kansas city Missouri correct correct yes it is okay I'm I'm I'm not being facetious that the museum is in Kansas city Missouri I think it's been open for about ten years or so if they do great great work at the museum celebrating the rich heritage of African American baseball pre dating the integration of the game in nineteen forty seven I'm looking out your Twitter feed at a portrait of the great Buck o'neil who is one of the better players in the Negro leagues in its waning days and then of course became kind of in it eloquence historian of the leagues and spokesperson for leagues later in life and was among the key figures in Ken burns his documentary on baseball it's it's a it's a great portrait obviously you're not of your subjects were sitting for you most of them are no longer with us how did you go about finding the photographs that you would model your oil portraits after well luckily I I do have a lot of friends who are you know into collecting people who are in the memorabilia industry and they were able to help with a lot of those players but you know it just it took a lot of taking you know whether it was the old newspapers or books or you know whatever I I just I kind of went to basically every lank they could to find images of some of these guys and it was definitely not easy the server you know the Negro leagues were not as well documented visually as as the white league so it it was just kind of tough finding the look of this history and trying to get it right is there a way I mean I I I don't know much about portraiture but obviously it's more than just it it's more it's about finding a depth to the subjects that goes beyond the physical characteristics of whoever it is you're painting in when you're we're painting legendary figures such is a Josh Gibson or Oscar Charleston or a satchel Paige whose personalities are even well known these days a long after their deaths how do you view those portraits was something beyond just what they look like well it's you know I think what I what I would try to do or what I did try to do is you know I would read up on on each painting on our each you know subject I was painting and I I try to kind of internalized I guess the character that that they were or at least from you know what accounts callous and I I kind of wish I I hope that some of that kind of gets the Butte into the painting you know it's kind of an intangible thing I find I think my main concern was actually just trying to get you to pick them you know kind of accurately as accurately as possible so you so you're giving the viewer kind of a look at what these guys actually looked like and you're showing them that they were real people that you know brief the same error that that we actually breed so it's you know it's it's kind of like I'm trying to act like a visual reporter this that makes sense just kind of showing what what life was like and what it was like Greg Chrysler's portraits of two hundred thirty figures from Negro leagues baseball are on display at the Negro leagues baseball museum in Kansas city starting this week they're really remarkable Greg and they're just bursting with vitality beautiful its it's it's a pleasure having you on the show in thank you for this great work thank you Jeremy I appreciate you having me on.

Negro National League Missouri Kansas city
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

03:50 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"And the and the other his generation who didn't get the chance so he does play that sort of mentoring coaching role. He's really calmed down by now because remember in really beloved terms by players who Who played under him during that time and then in nineteen fifty four? His last year in the game he manages the team called the Indianapolis clowns which is essentially just a barnstorming team Henry era and has played for the clowns the year before. Unfortunately they don't have anybody that good on the nineteen fifty four teams but he does win one last championship. The clowns win the Negro American League Championship at the last week standing thing and So Charleston kind of gets to go out a winner and soon after the season ends he Fall down a flight of stairs and his home is diagnosed with cancer reese paralyzed from the waist. Down and dies very soon thereafter. Well at least he had sort of that that that luxury at the end there You wonder what happened. I mean he died relatively young right he was in his late. Fifty s fifty seven. Yeah definitely I mean he had he had twenty thirty more years in nature taking a different course all right well. So what have you taken out of the you mentioned at the at the outset that that you you kind. China had a sense of what Oscar Charleston Charleston was like. And what was going to be and you got a sense of something quite different by the time. This project was all said and done what you know. Here's the sort of the softball right. What is the sort of August because it took until nineteen seventy six for whatever reasons to kind of the Veterans Committee to to to bring him into the hall of fame right so what happens in those decades in between and and what is the legacy now that were arguably baseball and sports and culture is much more can we say woke about you? Know everything right. Yeah well he does. And the force he's sort of just falls back into obscurity after nineteen seventy six James that ranking leads to a blip of of interest interest but Not much you know. He's sort of have stayed obscure And for all sorts of reasons. I've mentioned Hopefully that will start to end now. Not just for him but for others especially his generation before in the Negro Leagues. His legacy In particular is Is clearly one of the greatest American athletes of all time. There's really no way to look at the evidence and not come to that conclusion and I do think think if it were better known There might be even more agreement with the claim I make that He may have the greatest all around complete resume. Resume of any figure in baseball history. When you take into account not only the fact that he was a maybe a top five top ten player all the time but he's also a great manager? Go to the greatest manager of Negro Leagues History by poll of ex players and was Pioneering Scout You know who broke the scouting color line and And that's a lot to put together into one. You Know Babe Ruth Babe Ruth on the field. He doesn't really have anything after that right Just in terms of his baseball resume So it's a very unique combination of achievements And not only that. He was an admirable admirable. Man That's that's the thing that surprised me. I find that. But he's a leader He was You really showed the toughness that it takes to make it under difficult conditions and I think that's just a great Great lesson you know. It's a great life to to to read about and get to know. Because of the toughness he displayed and the sort of steadfast does.

Oscar Charleston Charleston reese James Negro American League Ruth Babe Ruth Negro Leagues Indianapolis baseball China softball Veterans Committee
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

11:41 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"I don't think we've kind of talked about this. Is he obviously played in this thing. Called the East West All Star game which was a big deal in Chicago's Comiskey Park for years and he had a couple of great years around this time. That game too. So maybe you can give it a little sense of of how you know what that was. And and why he was just a regular bright in for for those games in the Mid Thirties. Yeah he The East West game was gus green and these idea. He was being the first Major League All Star game and it just got play these all an opportunity to promote the game and make some money and it became. I'm one of the most celebrated social occasions on the calendar actually in the African American community especially in Chicago but people came from all over to go to the game and KALEO showcase for the League's later on a lot of White Scouts show up at that game looking for talent but often was the leading vote getter in the first game Making thirty four. I believe Is What we're talking about now so it. It speaks to his popularity that he was still even at that time. during relate just career the most popular player in the game and later he's often selected to be manager the manager of various teams In that game name And it's really probably know player probably received more cumulative votes you know at least in the first few years Then Oskar did and It was a showcase for him for sure. So th that didn't hurt his popularity not only in the Negro Leagues but I guess also more. Broadly broadly around baseball. Generally but it also it just seems to me now. I know this is probably too obvious but it seems to me that as his career was starting to you know along aid and Wayne get older and your your your skills can decline over time. But also the Crawford's themselves seem to kind of wobble wobble as the third war on and it was almost a just a Qismat or the right word parallel that both he and the team were kind of sort of segway. I guess into away and and sort of him winding down his playing career to go more fully early managerial by the end of the decade well Yes or no I mean certainly Oscars declining skills didn't help And you know by Nineteen nineteen thirty five. He really struggled the first bad here since he was rookie. Had A good year in nineteen thirty six but that was pretty much it for him. But what really killed. The coffers were Gus Greenlees Illegal street lottery empire crumbled and so we had no money anymore and He had he had basically sell off Josh Gibson terrible trade and then the other thing they kill them was it's actual page In a bunch of players jumping team nineteen thirty seven to go play in the Dominican Republic for Rafael Trujillo the dictator and the Dominican Republic. You were them all with the pilot cash. Yes we want to get into that at some point notorious team right right exactly so it really those things. What killed the Crawford's just as much as Oscars out in deteriorating skills? Well it's interesting because I I. I think a lot of people based on what I've read and maybe a research corroborates that are augmented. Or maybe even Denigrates a little bit but I mean a lot of people look at the Crawford's team team in say thirty five is being one of the best of best ever in Negro League in the Negro Leagues History yet. Br Relatively soon thereafter it. It kind of falls apart right. Exactly yeah really. You could pick of the nineteen thirty two team actually sort of under achieves but the nineteen thirty three three in nineteen thirty five teams both on championships of sorts. Thirty five team dirty clear championship And they were good again in nineteen thirty six exterior good again in nineteen thirty six but yet it all crumbles into that never to come back The end up going to Toledo. And Jesse Owens editors the story around that time as well well okay. So why. Don't we round third base than in that. Let's maybe make that illusion there and I really WanNa get into his Charleston's Charleston's managerial and scouting fulltime job in particular his relationship with a one branch rickey. Because it's clear that he's made some kind of impression. Charleston hens with perhaps more influential Owners in Major League Baseball at the time. But maybe you can kind of walk us through how that sort of all comes out. I wish I knew how Ricky in Charleston I met But I have is a little. Bit Speculative He Ricky was managing the Saint Louis Cardinals when Charleston was playing in postseason exhibition contests against them in the early nineteen twenties. Certainly possible that they met then And Ricky has some things in his in his archives in the library of Congress like programs from Oscar Charleston manage teams even later after after he was connected with him so anyway they had some sort of connection that we don't know exactly how it came about but we do know that nineteen forty five Ricky is in the midst of trying trying to find the first African American players signed the dodgers and the plan to get a jump on the rest of the League and be ready to win. The war ends right right but he has a problem He's His scouts or him personally Really can't go to Negro Leagues Contests without drawing attention to themselves and making it. It kind of clear what they might be doing. Because there's a lot of agitation for integration at this point so his answer solution to that problem is to is to hire hire Charleston to scout for him and to cover for that is Charleston becomes a manager of a team called the Brooklyn dodgers which plays in ebbets field in a new the call. The United States league that ricky gets involved with Probably just for this reason to scout black players more easily so We know from the testimony of Ricky's lead Scout Clyde soup fourth. That Charleston did a lot of scouting for the dodgers in nineteen. Forty five he background is Roy. Campanella For Them I convinced the campanella wasn't too old to sign their real age. He said was Israel Age and he probably also also scouted a number of the other early Black Fair sign by the dodgers We have that again directly from soup for so. Yeah that was Charleston's and scouting for organized baseball role. Probably the first African American to be paid to scout for a major league team I don't never gotten credit for that but I think I think that is the case. So so what this United States league it feels like almost a an artificial slash retention for. I guess what was effectively understood is going to be eventually an integrated approach to baseball once the war was over Cetera. It was weird it was it was gus greenlees idea. We'll ricky's idea Greenlee wanted to get back into big time Negro Leagues Baseball. I guess it's finances inches had had recovered. And he starts the United States League with a few other guys and He is just meant to rival. The two other Major Negro. The League and in Charleston comes on board to manage the team in Philadelphia and that sort of where things stand when ricky gets wind. The league probably from Pittsburgh Courier Journalists Wendell Smith and Ricky decision opportunities like how you're looking they're put a team in New York how about ebbets field. First of all I you can make some money doing that. But secondly he he just saw the opportunity was opportunistic on Ricky's part and then he grandstands about it. You'll the press conference and says how the other leagues are. Big Time rackets. This is going to be different and you know and maybe someday Kinda thought was maybe someday this will go into organized baseball as the league like as a minor league it's a feeder just like any other minor league is Two Major League baseball let seems to have been sort of the thought behind. The very short lived United States. Yeah and in this book. There's a couple of great pictures that you've got in the inset of of Charleston in his dodgers uniform as well as able with with branch rickey and and some other some other gentlemen in that process and almost feels like it's you know maybe he he's arguably maybe trying trying out out for being a manager wants integration. SORTA happens having a role. I'll be not as a player in in an integrated sort of major league system Yeah exactly I wonder if you lived beyond one thousand nine hundred eighty four I wonder if you would just at least become a coach you know. And maybe for Ricky maybe it was the pirates at that point back in Pittsburgh entirely plausible. That would have happened. You know he did manage an integrated baseball team in nineteen Forty two forty three. I think even into nineteen forty four but it was a semi pro team playing in the Philadelphia industrial but he was very proud of that eclipse. A bunch of photos of that for as personal scrapbook There were newspaper articles about black press and again. I wonder like what's did any other African American manage even a semi pro team there was integrated before nineteen forty two until the nineteen sixties still happens in organized baseball. So so you may have been a pioneer there as well but it tells you kind of how he's regarded. He could do that. Okay so let me ask you a couple of last questions. So what's what's his waning years because it almost feels to me like. He was almost sort of an elder statesman at that point having at least some some credibility with the quote unquote white establishment On managerial terms and scouting terms Clearly it didn't sort of net out into into something more substantial in the majors after after integration happened. But maybe a sense of sort of his later years was he was he maybe uproar or in the midst of being considered for some some other roles or were his health issues or or whatever. Were there other distractions. That may be prevented it or was was it. Just kind of just didn't happen for him for whatever reason. Yeah well we don't know and I kind of think whether there'd even been a black coach at the time abby died in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. I'm not sure there had Yeah alright thank Neil those the cubs maybe around that time but The new manager directing US right now. But I'm sorry about that whatever. They're saying they're correcting as as we as we speak here. Great So he he. He's measuring the Philadelphia Stars after Jackie. integrates baseball nineteen forty seven year. In which Oskar sort of out of the game on firing He gets back in the game in nineteen forty eight and from nineteen forty eight through nineteen fifty two. He manages the stars and and says publicly oftentimes. Like you know here's goal was just to send up as many as these players as you can to the majors everyone goes up makes up a little bit for him. Yeah you know..

Charleston baseball Ricky Brooklyn dodgers Negro League United States league Major League Philadelphia Major League Baseball Crawford Oskar Chicago United States Comiskey Park Pittsburgh gus green Oscar Charleston rickey Dominican Republic Jesse Owens
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

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06:50 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Let's talk about that because this is i. I'm guessing the first time that he not only is is a player but also a manager or is able to source straddle both of those roles goals for the first time. Yeah that's exactly right and and being a manager At least at that time at least for Charleston meant really putting together the roster. You're the general manager. As much as you are a manager The mandate the teams. A man named Colonel Struthers who was like the second black policemen? Lebron Harrisburg Way. Something like three hundred pounds but taught ballet dancing to use the parents use quite a character He wasn't necessarily so well connected in the world of Major League Baseball to put together To be able to together really good roster that was that was Charleston's job and that was something I think he really I wanted to do so. Give me a sense. Then of of of the Harrisburg experience because I think it's also important period of time In the Negro Leagues generally right. Where a lot of things in this country things kind of stumbled along as the Great Depression effectively took root if you will electronically macro to the point where there was a from all indications? It seems like You know the leagues that had had sort of gotten sort of their starting in the early part of the twentieth kind of kind of crumbling and and really kind of you know kind of went dark after a while after say twenty nine nine and thirty but this is during his time in Harrisburg where he's arguably kind of the peak but he's he's being able to do both thinks thanks right and and kind of stand out in in both those categories both managing and playing. Yeah absolutely it. Is it definitely part of his peak. I mean some of the statistics. Sixty was up in Harrisburg Are Crazy they were considered crazy at the time. And and and this sort of more exacting research down in the last few years that people going back to them. All box scores There's still crazy can nineteen twenty four. It's four zero five. Nineteen twenty five. It looks like he hit like four twenty seven. I mean insane numbers But Harrisburg this is twenty four twenty five. This is before the Great Depression. His four year. Run Their Eastern color the had probably problems were not caused by the incipient Great Depression. That was probably just more. The usual. All endemic now under capitalization issues of the Negro Leagues. It's when he goes to Hildale and that's in twenty eight twenty nine that's from. The depression starts to catch up with him. Another league folds in which Dale is playing and That creates a lot of this Again player movement like crazy only with L. deal for a couple of years and that's with the depression and the folding of that team in that league pushes them out to Pittsburgh Eric where he spends the last sort of prime vague if he's playing career and ends up with a man named Cumberland Posey and his homestead Greece. All going Eh. Get to come hosie in this in a minute and held in Pittsburgh in particular in a second but but maybe this is a good opportunity to kind of maybe delve in a little bit in to some of the the numbers that he's putting up both on all parts I guess fielding certainly in hitting and maybe as you sort of answer or give give our audience a sense of just how dominant and standout his stats and his play was slash work. Can you square that though also with what I would imagine magin would be you know a a trust factor when it came to statistics in these. Because you know how how how credible how not or how we're lucky exactly the question dead. That's exactly the question asked the question I asked right. I WANNA know that too. I don't WanNa just rely on sort of mythical. Oh number Unfortunately we don't have to so let me answer your question. In a couple of ways I bush is. How good are Negro League statistics today? Can we trust them. And it's really odd in if you think about it but the stats we have. Today are much much better than we've ever had before including at the time When teams were very lax about affording stats or league certainly relaxed about collecting them? oftentimes and then you know numbers just sort of get made up in the press o without too much to back them up so what happened and this is just one of the great things happen in sports forth in the last generation the last ten or fifteen years really this army of volunteer researchers have gone back all. These newspapers have been digitized. A lot of box scores were reported. And they compiled like we compile statistics from those scores and and the site. I'd recommend any of your listeners are interested in this this I called team heads dot com houses. All of this and it's really well done and only counts gains against top competition petition. So this isn't just games against the little sisters of the poor. This is Major Negro League competition and also includes games at these teams played against Major League. Teams As well as you'd like the Latin America as well so. That's a pretty good answer that first question the quality we don't have all of them The estimate that I've gotten from people who are really know this well. It's like seventy five eighty percent of the box scores between teams so it good representative sample for the stats are pretty good Sorry if you wanted to jump in there but the second thing is We know that and we know. I know that Oscar right now and they're still putting a new numbers from time to time. Box Go right now at about half the plate appearances Willie mays add get some context tax. He had two hundred ten runs. Three hundred fifty five stolen bases hits three fifty one four thirty one days five seventy five slugging percentage. That's really good and I've sort of played around constructing. Like what would an alternative Major League Oscar truly been able to do it seems to me. You just very conservative and say well what did he at least three hundred home runs. He would've still in at least four hundred basis. He almost does again in half the plate. Appearances may have. It was very durable. He would hit at least three hundred three fifty one the Negro Leagues Um and we know who would have been like a positive defender you know in the advanced analytics language language you know above zero defensive wins above replacement who else in major league history has done that nobody nobody has has hit those used for marks..

Negro Leagues Major League Baseball Harrisburg Major Negro League Charleston general manager Colonel Struthers Pittsburgh Lebron Hildale Willie mays Cumberland Posey Oscar magin Latin America Dale representative
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11:10 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"There were no if you will organize leagues per se obviously a bunch that came shortly thereafter. But but he's been a good amount of his time time in the earliest part of his career playing with the ABC's and or independently. No yes right. The first formal Negro League isn't formed until nineteen twenty so next year is the one hundredth anniversary of its formation Before that you just have as you say the independent teams Not playing in any leagues and sort of like college football. It used to be you have sort of mythical championships that are awarded often by themselves from teams themselves but The press Kinda gets involved before that time kind of identifying the best teams are there barnstorming across the country playing playing each other and it sort of becomes clear. So yeah that's what he's doing from Nineteen fifteen when he debuts ABC's through nineteen nineteen gene What that means is as you point out like in postseason play? He might hook up with the team from St Louis to play some barnstorming warming Players from the Tigers or something like that or from the Saint. Louis Cardinals Andy might you know. Go to this team or that team very briefly just just to get in on some action you know basically to make some money. That's that's what baseball was alive. Not just before formal leisure started but even after the formal Komo Leagues are started If an opportunity not a player often would take advantage of it and oftentimes owner would would allow them to do that. especially if they could kind of split cuts so that's that part of the Negro Leagues Story. It's almost like You know being sort of a wrap for a concert tour right there. You're promoter really I mean you really. You're talking about gigs and stadiums and selling tickets and attracting as many people as you can. And then you know what it's done getting ready to move on to the next town and do the same thing all over again. Yeah exactly right so you might go to a like Oscar. A couple of years goes to Florida after sort of baseball to over north and plays in something called the Hotel League in Palm Beach where there were two hotels fielded teams eighteen two black players that played against one another one of the first the first time Buck O'Neil saw Oscar Charleston play totally for Later in the twenties he's going to Cuba the almost every year to play. Winter Ball goes to California one year in the winter and plays against white major leaguers out there so yeah there was always something going on it makes the giddying history but at the time but it felt like was just. What's the next opportunity down the road work and I go make some money flying my craft? Well give me a sense. It's in these in these pre league years with Charleston. I in your research like how does he start or in your mind. How does uh when does he starts to sort of get some Some notice I guess in in maybe in the in the research and the clippings and the the writings and stuff because obviously he's he's he emerges as one of the early players to To make his mark in the leagues as they got formed right. We'll get to foster. Ah but was was he standing out versus anybody else or was he just a solid player. That was just around and just naturally like everybody else kind of just gravitated you too now. A more semi professional league once it got going or was he a standout. was he becoming an attraction even his independent days he he stood out Right away He starts in Nineteen fifteen. He's only eighteen years old just out of the army. He's been playing baseball in the Philippines and he stand went out he. He shows a lot of power and it was a time. You know. deadball era when power was a rare. So he's like a couple of home runs in the first few games of his career and its file definitely blows people away and it doesn't hit anymore the rest of the year but he's still a call you know a powerful fugger for the rest of the rest of that year and the only way way stood out with his defense. He played really shallow Centerfield and and he went back on balls and made catches that people just could not believe So that was the other way stood out. And then there's a third way. He stood out and that was for getting into fights he got he got into a spectacular fight on the field. Feel an exhibition contest against a white team in Nineteen fifteen in Indianapolis In which he slides in a buyer that a white umpire at second base who is fighting with one of Charles Teammates at the time and that caused a riot of considerable scale. Like fuck page news news the next day in Indianapolis Star and Atlanta jail He's bailed out by his owner and they go to Cuba on a tour And it it doesn't end up paying a fine and that's pretty much but he's he makes them march is some good ways one bad way right away And so by the the time you then in nineteen eighteen I would say is I really great year. Hit something like three ninety by the best statistics we have today in Nineteen nineteen mice playing foster in Chicago. This is right after world. War One He it's something like four hundred and is just that's when he really becomes becomes a superstar. It's nine thousand. Nine hundred eighty twenty. Two people are starting to talk about him as the greatest player in the black game. So that's about when that would happen. Wow that's amazing especially given the fact that the the play was obviously not even quote unquote organized. I mean it was it was it was is not sort of within the league play but maybe maybe a little bit of a sense. I mean the fact that he was playing for the ABC's which was already a notable franchise perhaps along on the lines may of of folks like The Chicago American giants Recross Team Right. It seems like around that sort of turn of the decade. Those were kind of the two teams in this even pre league kind of play that were kind of standing out already. I mean it probably didn't hurt the fact that he was on one of those teams teams as as a League was starting to get formed. Yeah definitely didn't It they were to the bigger teams going at that time. ABC's actually didn't feel the team in one thousand nine hundred ninety or at least didn't at the beginning of the season because of Gordon some complications. That arose from that. The east defy. You have a couple of big teams in the East in New York like the Lincoln Stars. I think at that time would have been a a a big team or the giants and may be mixing those up so the names are so similar hardware. Yeah mix mix all these teams up right. I the students have a tough time all of it. I don't try I'll say this when when the League is formed when Rube Foster gathered together all these prospective owners he calls into a meeting in Kansas City the Ymca is still standing near the Negro Leagues Museum today and he hands them all All these articles inc.. I've started the you know. And he's registered the corporation all these different estates and they're very suspicious because rube was ultracompetitive and they're like what's the angle at one of the ways. He persuaded and everybody that he was doing this for the greater good of black baseball was he gave Charleston back to the Indianapolis. AP's he he. We have to have competitive. You know. Some parody right and Gave them back. So that's author SORTA figures into the League's formation in that way. Not only. What's he probably the biggest superstar within the League started but Re rubes great gesture giving an Oscar. ABC's regarded as proof of his goodwill. Well but foster's also the guy behind the the rise of the Chicago American giants right and I'm guessing that And now you correct me on this right so when Charleston goes to Harrisburg known as the giants. Is there a relationship there with the Chicago. Okay okay this is me moment so many yearly teams or call the giants okay. It seems like nobody knows exactly why but it became sort of code for this is probably probably a team if you just read it in print got it so I was just getting a sense of. I was trying to figure out to your point earlier. What was fosters angle right? Because it's clearly the American John was his baby and arguably it's I don charitable. He was trying to be by creating a leaky boys. I think he used league was gonNA raise all boats. I mean he knew he was going to ultimately profit and benefit from the formation of a leaf but I think he rupe was able occasionally to transcend narrow self interest. And I think that was one of the occasions if he did that Yeah I mean there's a later occasion which he loans money to the Olivia Taylor who see I Taylor's widow who come into possession of the ABC's and finances are in terrible shape and he loves Our money To get through the rest of the season with the idea digital trade him Charleston. After this season now he's going to benefit from that arrangement but at the same time he snows. I can't just want. The team collapsed during the year. We gotTa have people play you know. We have to have some stability so ru always looking out for himself but at the same time he can take you take a big picture view all right. So how does Charleston get from a relatively seems stable and standout Kind of situation in Indianapolis Annapolis and go go to Harrisburg which was independent in twenty two and twenty three and joins this. I guess rival League or direct Challenger to the Negro National League the first one the eastern Colored League it comes back to what I was just saying. the ABC's we're a financial mess and and Olivia Taylor had driven some players off and there was all sorts of fights intention. So that's that's the first first thing like Indianapolis was no longer a possibility but the real reason whether to other reasons want his wife was from Harrisburg and she was a strong. A woman Very attractive both physically and inner personality l. from everything I could tell and she I think played a big part wanting to get back east near family To whom she was close and third he could manage at Harrisburg You you couldn't go back to Chicago. Manage Rube Foster had asking So I think all those factors coming together are what led him out to the. You know fairly small town Harrisburg and this upstart league. Why are so?.

ABC Charleston Indianapolis Rube Foster baseball Chicago giants Harrisburg Negro League Oscar Negro National League Olivia Taylor Cuba eastern Colored League Tigers rival League St Louis Hotel League Louis Cardinals California
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

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14:08 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"You are and sort of how you came across the the Oscar Charleston Story and I gotta think it's somewhat wrapped popped up in the Negro Leagues generally and or baseball interest overall. Right it's more the latter Oscar led me to the the Negro Leagues More generally I just a baseball fan Not Not a journalist Have have a doctorate in psychology. Actually actually in some sort of frustrated academic WHO's working in consulting now and really Just a baseball fan and James Fan and was reading his New Bill James Historical abstract ten years ago or so and going through his top off one hundred players of all time list and it's the first time he had included Negro Leagues players in that he hadn't in the first edition of the book. The second edition Because he thought he had more numbers to go on now. More information and number one was Babe Ruth which is totally understandable number two honus wagner. You're fine number three Willie mays pretty conventional so far and number four was Oscar Charleston and blew my mind it could possibly possibly be the case that one of the top five players of all time could be somebody I'd never heard of and I thought it was a baseball fan. I thought I knew something about the Games history. So that really just surprised me. And then I found out. He's from Indiana as I am and that really piqued my interest. I again I thought my friends and I would always went back and forth about the greatest. You know baseball players of all time from Indiana basketball players greatest musicians whatever. It's just like Indiana Hannah stuff. And he was not on any of our radar screen so that really interested in kind of ticked me off that there. was somebody like that. Who who could escape my historical consciousness? So that is how I got interested in Charleston which led me to do A deep dive into the Negro Leagues And African American history and the twentieth century. A little bit As well and Led to the book. So That's interesting. So Robert Peterson right who you know one of the more seminal works only. The ball was white. I quote from his book and this is a sort of leads into my next question at his peak Charleston was perhaps the most popular player in the game when he was with Hildale in nineteen. Twenty eight to twenty nine. He was to Philadelphia Alpha. What smokey Joe Williams was to New Yorkers when the latter was with the Lincoln giants their hero Rochester L. Washington and the Pittsburgh courier quote scores school? School kids turned out regularly just to see Oscar. Perform he was to them. What Babe Ruth is two kids a lighter hue and it leads? Let me just sort of the the general question and I think he kind of sort of stumbled across it a little bit in your answer random people who have passing understanding of baseball and a little bit of history right. Nope people like Satchel page and arguably Cool Papa Bell Right but Oscar Charleston right despite being so highly ranked by somebody like Bill James Right and so due to those in the know well regarded and were lauded frankly for his talents and we'll get into a bunch of how come his name and his persona ONA is arguably lesser known than some of those other names. Yeah not arguably I mean definitely definitely lesser known. It's there there are a lot of facets to that answer You know page First of all played in the major leagues and Lived Don to see himself be inducted into the hall of fame and was he quote machine and I- total character page Had the sort of Steinem once in a generation personality that is just Unforgettable right so he's in the category of his own Bell had the good luck to be talked about by page. He's he figures in central page anecdotes. That's primarily cow. Most how he sort of came into our view is also A blessed with a great nickname And he lived for quite a while after his career and also had a Family family members who who tended his flame Charleston. Didn't have any of that luck He he died young in nineteen fifty four. He wasn't a self promoter while Oh he was alive he did not leave any descendants no children and no one was separated from his wife and she was a quiet person and it was no one tending. His flame and his city didn't claim Indianapolis didn't sort of hold him up as a favorite song that they could be Nablus. It's sort of forgotten about him by the time he died. And then you have this period really from the fifties through the seventies really until Robert Peterson writes only the ball was like where they'll historians and researchers really seem to do much with the Negro Leagues There wasn't a lot of incentive in the the white community or the Black Community for remembering the Negro Leagues. It was sort of a painful memory. And so you have this period where there's not much done. By the time we get past that period Charleston's calm most of the men who saw him play in his prime We're gone and my family members to talk to and so I think it's all those things one more thing I would add He's not the only one right among and players who played their entire careers in the Negro Leagues. We know generally the random person like you said. He was interested in sports. Knows about Josh Gibson. To some extent they they might know. That ain't Cool Papa. Bell knew anybody else from the Negro Leagues you know. Don't know John Donaldson or bullet Rogan or John Henry Lloyd or Cristobal Taurean Day. It's not a guy so Charleston it away should stand for us to sort of like representative of the entire field. Still Open to us to get to know. So how did he stand out on on your radar. Obviously there's the the the Indiana connection I guess but how how did I mean was it would simply was James. As listing were. There were clearly other nearly players that that stood out that we're that list to well it was. It was James List. I mean he's the he's the best of all time and from the Negro Leagues in James's list. So that's something and being from Indiana's definitely something for me But the other thing stood out was he clearly was a really interesting guy and it I started the project I thought he was something very very different than he turned out to be. Because if you just google around and read where you can online wikipedia and just random articles that have been written over the last generation. He comes off as maybe sort of borderline psychopath. You know a very violent man kind of a bursar worker and I thought he was I that's what I thought I was going. Did you account or that interested me. I thought well it must be really good stories here And also interested me that it was a lot of contradictory information about clearly. He hasn't been taken seriously historical figure so kind of how I got interested in him and they learned that he was somebody much different than I expected. It meet in a good way. Well it's also interesting to and I guess for our little genre of exploration on the show. It's also kind of a convenient excuse to kind of give. Thank you revel in all of the Negro Leagues Generally. Because you know here's a guy. And and maybe this is indicative of the Negro League lifestyle You know played on almost a dozen or so teams or variations of such across a number of of leagues which I think both speak to the relative well less than shall we say standardized consistency. I guess of the the quote Unquote Negro Leagues Right. I mean some of the more little more league centric and wealth the fog than others right. And maybe maybe you can give a little general. Background is sort of Li-. He was playing with Indianapolis for so many years and went through. I don't know but it must have been ten or eleven or twelve different teams over the course of his almost thirty year. Career Freight Yeah you you hit on it Probably the fundamental problem I in the Negro League in terms of their institutional structure was that they were chronically undercapitalised. There just wasn't enough money to make for stability and so you had owners have to sell players off. oftentimes you had players is just a leaving teams because owners couldn't pay them or because they get paid more over here and league structures. Were strong enough to Fortunately sort of discipline with respect to contracts and that sort of thing again because they simply the money wasn't there to make that possible They couldn't afford Essentially to enforce that kind of discipline. So what you have is a very fluid player movement yes lewd sort of team move it instead of them coming and going And that accounts for a lot of Oscars career is not that he was Particularly Disloyal He wasn't Satchel page age where Yeah no team spirit or no sense of sort of team cohesion. I mean really had none of that right That was one of the virtues he brought brought brought to the Brought to the table page was was the star attraction. He knew it and most other people to right right. But he also had the sort of soul all sorts of solid cystic soul. That he just didn't feel like any loyalty nicotine. Yeah he knew he was the star attraction other guys to Oscar News The star attraction for most of his career but he generally did you know these. Go play on a North Dakota auto dealer steam middle of the season like like pasted So they were just the different very different personalities but anyway that accounts for a lot of it you know. He Bites there early in his career. He got into some culture towns with his managers Only a couple of them. Ci Taylor his mentor. I man he ended up very much On the Indianapolis. ABC's they sometimes a but it has put a lot of times it was just He was he was a victim Of of teams financial fortunes. You know so. That explains a lot. why he and others moved from team to team another thing L. to say quickly So the teams he said to play for the Detroit Stars. That was only like that'd be like for a few games in the season when he'd be bones is to play for them against a team of white major leaguers Or some particularly big game. That's the sort of thing that also happened in the Negro Leagues a lot. And if you don't really delve into the history story you might think that he was like playing equally for this. You know two or three teams in the season and that often learned ever what the case. We'll so that that's that's interesting. So so maybe you can give a bit of a bit of a sense of I guess more of the the teams he was mostly prolific with versus. Say Sort of the the Dalliances Stars Act Certainly Annapolis. ABC's certainly had the beginning of his career. Certainly certainly the Harrisburg giants are in the middle of his career in Pittsburgh and the and the various Crawford's diaspora I say after that but maybe can give audience a sense of sort of where most of his exploits kind of were routed. During his career playing was right I would say those are the three main caned They use associated with Indianapolis. ABC's came up with An played a more or less I think six of his first eight seasons with them or or something like that then he goes to Harrisburg nineteen twenty four for two reasons. He's I he's married. A woman from Harrisburg and she was like to be near. You're her family. And secondly he gets the opportunity to manage a team for the first time he's twenty seven years old at the prime of his career and it's just a natural leader. He's it's not a natural follower and the the The Times these most frustrated when he's not in charge so he's in charge of that team helps shape the roster So he's with the Harrisburg giants. Nineteen twenty four through nineteen twenty seven when they fold essentially he has to move again and the Crawford's from nineteen thirty. Two you really until that team Folds after the nineteen forty season. I believe so those are the three main teams and then with the two other stints. So it'd be worth mentioning would be his a couple of years with the Hildale Club Basically Philadelphia and homestead grays in the other major. Her neither leaks in Pittsburgh Those those would be the team's with whom he would be most closely associated. Well before we sort of get into sort of his his hopscotching and and and I'm calling guest starring but but going to other teams up. Maybe we can talk about the origins of of the career because Y- it also interesting to it overlaps with I guess what The early days of the Indianapolis. ABC's Club was about because like a lot of clubs in the in the teens and the very early part of the twenties there were they were mostly independent right or certainly ABC's ABC's were right..

Negro Leagues The Times Indiana Indianapolis Bill James baseball Charleston Oscar Charleston ABC Oscar Babe Ruth Pittsburgh Robert Peterson Bell Willie mays James Fan basketball Josh Gibson Harrisburg giants
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

05:35 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Little exploration each and every week if you can believe it into what used to be in professional sports. Thank acute tremendously for finding us and putting us in your ear buds. This week we know you got A quadrivalent amount of choices out there in podcast slammed into Despite all the odds and all the consternation We continue to put out a show each and every week on on what we like to FASCINATE an obsess about which is teams and leagues and the various stories. No longer with us for whatever reasons and we're GONNA continue our our our our journey into the Negro Leagues this week with our guest. Jeremy Beer and You know I know a number of you out there you know look at sort of old will baseball stuff is as not as exciting say is the travails of the Alliance of American football from six months ago or maybe the the XFL and a couple of months. Serb knock on wood as it gets ready to attempt to a life as well but We continue to be fascinated by stories regardless of how old they are Because because if they're a team or league or were were plural of such That are no longer with us. So that's all part of the Tableau of pro sports and This week Sir. Conversation is truly a standout one and one that I learned a tremendous amount about not only in our conversation but in this book The Germany Bureau has written. It's called Oscar Charleston the life and legend of baseball's greatest forgotten player. And you know for those even baseball scholars I think are lost upon them as The talent and the standout nature of this player known as Oscar Charleston arguably not even arguably perhaps the best player in Negro League history now a name though that that most people even historians baseball historians don't really know a lot about I think even you know even in the realm of of Negro League history people know Cool Papa Bell and and and certainly you know folks like sexual page. Those are names that even even the cursory sports fan you know just knows from from legend and all this other things but you get into it. as you'll hear our conversation with Jeremy Beer and in a few moments those in the know and arguably not As well publicized would would strongly suggest a guy like Oscar Charleston was the preeminent player centerfielder and a slugger extraordinaire and frankly In in the realm of this conversation in our little our little sojourn every week to Teams and leagues. No longer with us. A really good frankly excuse an example of just the very compelling and interesting and a somewhat zigzag nature feature of of what it was to be a player and manager and a team in the Negro Leagues Oscar Charleston. Besides being a standout player air and then ultimately a manager and a scout. And we'll get into some of that stuff I in our conversation in a few moments was on a ton of teams right teams like the Indianapolis Annapolis. ABC's a very well regarded and long standing a team in the Negro Leagues the Harrisburg giants for sure. And of course the Pittsburgh Crawford's efforts who in the nineteen thirties were you know Among especially that nineteen thirty five team regarded as arguably the best team ever in the in the Negro Leagues You know we're talking about teams like the Philadelphia Stars in the Saint Louis giants and the Chicago American giants. And and the Hildale Club. These are all a an in leagues. Not only the Negro National Leagues Two of them. The Negro American league the East West All Star game which was The the showcase for for African American ballplayer talent in Chicago for many years the eastern Colored League I mean there's all kinds of Variations in things in all all of these are for US check boxes of of clubs and leagues no longer with us that are absolutely and asleep fascinating and the history and life of this amazing ballplayer by the name of Oscar Charleston. That's our that's our conversation this week With Jeremy Germany beer and I will tell you not only. Is this conversation interesting and fascinating but the book Jeremy is written is is well worth The deep dive in and frankly a- as they say makes a great gift not only. Is it well researched. But it's just a IT'S A. It's a very interesting read. And if you're looking frankly for a quintessential example of what Negro League baseball was all about In the The personification of one of its best players You could do worse than to Get a copy of this book Oscar Charleston. The life and legend of baseball's greatest forgotten player player It is published by our friends at University of Nebraska Press. I highly recommended and I learned to a whole bunch and I think even to the cursory the interest of folks Just generally interested in baseball or just you know African American sports history. It is. It's a it's a fascinating book and well L. Worth pursuing and of course we have a link to it on our website and good seats still available dot com but I highly recommend it And.

Oscar Charleston Negro League baseball Negro American league Jeremy Beer Chicago American giants Jeremy Germany eastern Colored League Jeremy US University of Nebraska Press Indianapolis ABC Pittsburgh Hildale Club Papa Bell Chicago Annapolis
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:46 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Tell me about that relationship. Yeah weird things. Thank that no one ever really talked about at least of all owens So of course Owens wins gold in nineteen thirty six Berlin Olympics Comes back to the United States and really struggles to capitalize on his fame. He's very famous He's a celebrity spokesman for on the Out landed I think it was the Republican candidate for president And makes several investments. They bad long story. Short by nineteen thirty nine. He's he's Basically bankrupt but he is a come to partner in an owner in a group of men who by the Pittsburgh Crawford's birds and we Christen them the Toledo Crawford and sending out barnstorming around the country. Charleston is a manager. And Owens is D- The Other celebrity draw and say other celebrity draw advisedly in the in the newspapers and NPR's the time it's you know Jesse L. and the greatest mother honorable dine and Oscar Charleston. Degrades you know Baseball player of all time. It'd be almost have equal billing for stunning to see since Owens famous contagion offers and has certainly not but they around the country for two years in a racist then and motorcycles Olson occasionally horses between doubleheader games or after games and gets the next for local children and That was how he he he made. A buck can again. The name of the book is Oscar Charleston. The life and legend of baseball's greatest forgotten player. It is a fascinating read and Jeremy Beer the author of that book. Look we continue across the country and around the world we've got you.

owens Oscar Charleston Charleston Baseball Crawford Jeremy Beer United States NPR Olson Olympics Pittsburgh Berlin president Toledo partner Jesse L.
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:18 min | 7 months ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Exchanged around first couple of days. It was no and now it's yes. Fifty three percent of the fans are saying yes it should be based solely on their record and not whether they win their division or not at forty seven percent. Say No so think about it go to the website it's on the homepage at sports. byline DOT COM by by the way on the sports byline. Bret Hedican is going to be with us. He played in the national hockey league for Seventeen Seasons One Stanley Cup championship now broadcaster with the San Jose Sharks and the reason why I wanted to have him on. You've probably heard about three coaches head coaches in the National Hockey League being fired for their conduct and also so the way they interacted with their players. And so- Bret Hedican is going to join us on the NECSPORTS byline. He played seventeen years in the NHL won a Stanley Cup championship chip now broadcaster for the San Jose Sharks. I want to get his perspective on today's players and also about coaches and how they used to confront athletes so how they tried to motivate their players and so we'll get that perspective on this major story also don't forget on Friday Roy Eisenhart drops by drops by for what we call inside right angle. Is he and I dig down. Deep on some of the interesting stories in sports sow Berry will be here for the collector's corner. So if you're into memorabilia collecting than now you want to join us for Sal Berry in that and then Bruce Marshall will drop by on Friday as he always does and other weekend in the National Football League. He'll take a look at the key games and break come down for you give you his perspective and also as predictions another later on. WE'RE GONNA be talking to Jeremy Beer. Jeremy is it true baseball historian and he has written net fascinating book called Oscar Charleston. The life and legend of baseball's greatest forgotten player. But we're GONNA kick things off with Pat Sullivan. He passed away last week. He was an all American quarterback at Auburn. He won the heisman trophy in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy one and then played six. NFL seasons with the Falcons and the redskins when we come back. We'll share with you. Our remember interview with Heisman. Trophy winner Pat Sullivan type of guy that wants to look put together but doesn't want to spend hours Kamal finding new clothes so you can look great at the office on the road or even just on the weekend with friends and family.

Bret Hedican National Hockey League Pat Sullivan San Jose Sharks National Football League Bruce Marshall Jeremy Beer redskins Roy Eisenhart Sal Berry Oscar Charleston Kamal Auburn Jeremy Falcons
"oscar charleston" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"At some point, you know, when the African Americans began to play in the major leagues, and that kind of destroyed the negro leagues so that period twenty thirty year period produced some of the great players of all time who would have probably without question. I would think been stars in the major leagues people like the great catcher, Josh Gibson, sexual page, of course, did get to the major leagues but there was so many others like Leon day and, and. Got a rate Dame's rich book, Leonard. I mean these will all tremendous players in all the stories you hear about them. In fact, there's a story that made the rounds that Josh Gibson, actually one they hit a ball out of Yankee Stadium. It's never been verified. But the legend remains that he's the only person of it hit a fair ball on of Yankee Stadium. They were great. Great players most of them denied their opportunity to play because they were either too old by the time, the color line was broken, and they were no longer at the peak of their ability, and they just never got the chance to show what they could do. I think one of the things that certainly gives validity to the negro leagues is the fact that if you take a look, Monte, Irvin started playing in the negro leagues at seventeen and there were a lot of players Willie Mays. I think was maybe sixteen seventeen years old as well. Why did they start playing professionally so early because the one opportunity one way they could make? Money, they, you know, the times will hard it was soon after the depression, most of these were came from poverty they needed the money. They love playing baseball. It seemed like a natural logical thing to do. They, they was such good players that the negro leagues went out and they sign them. I the average salary for negro league player with something like two hundred dollars a month. So they weren't making a lot of money, but that was considered big money in the twenties, and thirties, you know, pretty good pretty good living is it was a lot of travel and the, the they didn't get to stay in the finest hotel. They, they spent a lot of nights sleeping on buses, but they enjoyed it. They love playing and they were able to make a decent living. I think most people certainly know many of the names that are in this book that you talk about Willie Mays. Hank Aaron Ernie banks, Minnie Minoso, ROY Campanella, Elston Howard, Larry Doby, and of course, satchel page. But the thing that this book does that I think is very, very special is that there's a lot of. Names on the crossover that, that people don't know. And let's talk about some of them Oscar Charleston. You have a great story in here about our ska Charleston, Charleston was considered to be the, the Willie Mays of his time. He was a great center field. Outstanding center fielder story exactly you're referring to. But he was I mean I relied so much on money to tell me these stories because I knew very little about these people, but he talks about Oscar Charleston. Like he would have been Willie Mays. Equal had. He had the opportunity to play in the big leagues. And he played all three outfield positions at the same time. Oh, no though. I, I think that was one game when he he let the other place you know, they did every once in a while they would do stunts like that. It's a matter of fact, they had system where the first baseman was kind of like a, how should I say a max pod, Kintyre be with do stunts? They would do. Harlem globe trouble globe. Try to type stuff in fact, goose Tatum who played for the home Globetrotters played in eager leagues as the first base and even have do his antics throwing the ball behind his back and all that sort of thing..

Oscar Charleston Josh Gibson Yankee Stadium goose Tatum Leonard baseball Leon Charleston Harlem Hank Aaron Ernie banks Monte Larry Doby Elston Howard Irvin Minnie Minoso ROY Campanella sixteen seventeen years two hundred dollars
"oscar charleston" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Favorite? According to what is this is this bet on sports Howard start as part of the fab five and had a long career. And I think he's the first guy or one of the first guys you get one hundred million dollar contract. He got broken off. Yeah. Is that a good MBA career? We get paid like a superstar Weber were buddies there for a while. And they well he was the guy that recruit helped recruit Weber. I think if you watch the fab five thirty for thirty it sounded like, you know, they got Jalen rose and Juwan Howard. And that they used those two guys to try to lure, you know. Ray Jackson, Jimmy Kimmel Weber, you know, by the way, when we're talking about you mentioned arose. You know, he's married to the young lady who hosts that the arguing show with Stephen A and Kellerman, Molly, a really, yeah. Yeah. They got married within the last year. Yeah. Look at that. You got sick. That's the doubt number. I saw video of him trying to pick up sage Steele on television. Remember that was like spitting game at her on a Chevy's. She was married anyway. But John Juwan Howard four two one favourite then Tyler do in Luke Walton of seven to one as far as who's going to be the Lakers head coach game one next year, Lucas maintaining he's coming back. You know, who's listed fifteen to two then there's not a chance in hell. There's not this might as well be five thousand one instead of fifteen to. Yeah. Because there's no chances LeBron's plan for this guy. Tom tippett? Oh, oh, hell, no. Tom does fifteen to two is unless LeBron sit out and shut up. I'll let you know when you can yell, and Jason Kidd, and Jerry Stackhouse. I'm reading stat Stackhouse is going to get the he's he's in talks to be the head coach at Vanderbilt so Stackhouse has gone looks like go to the college camp. David Steel, twelve to one Derek Fisher twelve to one Mark Jackson's twelve to one Brian Shaw. Twelve one Jeff Van Gundy twelve. You know, it'd be the best story of all get it. Get a big free agent somewhere and bring Luke Walton back. You know what I mean? How many Dead Man Walking Dead Man Walking? And all that they mother names on the cheesy wave. Becky Hammon twenty five to one Rick Pitino fifty to one crispier the Texas Tech coach sixty two one. I'm rooting for beard, Tom Izzo, one hundred to one coach K he'd of one LeBron little Izzo grabbing by the shirt, Shawn Miller gonna leave Arizona or leave him. Yeah. Charles Barkley five hundred to one they have LeBron coaching the team himself at five hundred to one and at the bottom of the list, lavar ball out of thousands of why they just have fun, Mike. What is it? Breaking news. Yeah. Hang Shulman has tweeted in the last ten minutes haven't Palomar will be in uniform tonight. All right. KP superman to the rest of us have been answered. All right. That makes tonight's game. A lot more watchable seriously. I mean, maybe watch. Anyway, they were they looked good last night. They did look at last name. To go eighty one in eighty one and I can see your they need offense. They need offense. I mean, it you kidding me. Compared to Michael Reid is Babe Ruth. God is true speaker my as he's speaker is a great hitter. Now dodgers. No, no. What you're doing? But I've never seen a video clip of trysts speaker. I've seen the old stuff Cobb and Ruth. I can go I can be multidimensional tryst speaker. I could say Oscar Charleston if I wanna go negro leagues, I can't even see Oscar Charleston was better than Willie Mays. Well, Gibson was Josh Gibson is my negro league guy. Oscar Charleston is the the greatest player ever. Now say I've heard ever buck O'Neil interviewed. And buck O'Neil said Willie Mays was the best major league player ever seen. But the best baseball player. He'd ever seen was the great Oscar Charleston man, that's incredible. And so that's all I'm saying, maybe he could be our Oscar Charleston. I told you when I was taking that little cruise with my sent around the ballpark the other day. That's the first time I actually stood and read the statue of Willie. You know what? I mean, what's on there and everything, and it's I tell you what? When he now when Willie leaves this earth. He looks great. Yeah. He's look. He's right, right. I looked. He looks terrific in the commercial. Yeah. That's a really good. Really does. Yeah. Were you describe the commercial? He's sitting up on top of what a mountain. Yeah. And then. Oh, we probably have the audio. We'd probably find the BUSTER Willie Mays Toyota commercial play the audio. But he's like, oh, great one I seek the wisdom that you have. And then and then Willie goes that's nice truck. And then busters like thinks. That's the wisdom and then takes off and Willie's. Like, hey. But that wasn't it. Yeah. Yeah. I was very good. It was. I mean, I just the fact that they're utilizing willy and BUSTER in the same commercial. I to me. I mean, that's pretty cool. Yeah. Noise for those of us who grew up here and Larry missed it by by a few years, but Willie Mays was the guy we all want to wear twenty four and Rick Barry ward, twenty four because of Willie Mays, right? When Rick came up with the warriors in the mid sixties. It's just we got to grow up and watch the greatest baseball player ever. And I don't get too corny to ever watch the Willie Mays video that they put out there. I think as NBC sports bay area plays it during rain delays. We get a lot of rain in April. So we see this called the legends. Yeah. It's just really good. And they talk about his dad. Kitty cat and how his dad made them. Learn every position. And I mean, it's just just part when he was oh for seventeen he cried semi back down Leo to the minor leagues. When when they first brought him up right to the then New York Giants is he was oh for seventeen and supposedly was in tears, send me here my center field, and you're gonna be my center fielder. Just kinda put them at ease leaving New York to go back to Minneapolis. So he must have really been feeling bad. You know to also came out in their little thing that really didn't you know, when he first found out about becoming last. He was not excited. I'm excited about coming. West is a good one to just always, that's understandable Ramey. Oh, hell, yes. And people Houston, New York and New Yorker allow a lot of people here never fully accepted, and like they did McCoy. Covey? But when you really may wonder to not to interrupt you gave me go you'd wonder you take out the polo grounds for eighty two center. Yeah. You take out the early years of the stick before the chain link fence where you actually hit it into the football seats in left to get it out Willie Mays probably would've hit eight hundred bombs. Yeah. And then you take what the military and a half years military right in the prime of his career you take away. Those you add those take bring back those military years that he gave away take out a few more home runs in the polo grounds. And a lot more at candlestick. Probably eight hundred home runs. He's probably the all time homerun king. I want to argue with you. Yeah. That's a good one to me when you look up the history books. That's the greatest Ryan of baseball for one position Duke Snider played for Brooklyn Willie played for the giants in mantle played for the Yankees all in one in one area. But I was gonna say I wonder, you know, with social media now. So many people just if you're having fun. That's one thing. But I just wonder how Willie Woody pretty sensitive guy, you know, and he had some beach with writers through the years and not many, but you would hear about that willy would take a lot of this heart. You always wonder how a guy like that would deal with the social media were so many people, you know, to make themselves feel a little taller just take shots at all these guys. I just you know, it's it's a different era, but for a sensitive guy, I just wonder. You know, Willie Mays. But I just wonder if that would have affected him in any way, it affects maybe how much negative would he get? He's talking about the greatest. Yeah. But there's enough people that the the better you are doing the more. They wanna hate you. Yeah. No. I hear you hear you when you're on top they shooting for you. But there was a joy about the way. He played the game. I mean to me there was nothing. Controversial about the way Willie Mays played the game. I mean, universally endorsed. You know, what can you say almost every you? Listen to anybody talk about the greatest attribute of a ball player. You know, Willie's on every list. Yeah. He's on your to the just real quick. The only clean guy on Twitter that I've never seen something. And again, it's just it's negative people with nothing going on in their own life. They get really Percival is Steph curry, I don't think I've ever read a negative tweet a text or a blog about Steph curry have you not mean, there are people that pick at little thing. Things. Like, I didn't think it was cool the other day when he's pointing at the wrath. Exactly. I mean, I think he was the reason they got that last fall the last call against them because I think Leon would was saying you wanna point me here appointed you enjoy the loss. Enjoy your flight. Yeah. You know what? I mean, it got you. I think that and also when he threw the mouthpiece. That's that's kind of a bad look petulant child. Look. But you know, what? Steph people realize that he's real that. He's he's totally charitable that his heart's in the right place. He's a spectacular player. He's a family, man. He's a popular teammate. I mean, pretty tough to fight a near pro golfer. I mean, I think steps pretty pretty popular era real quick. He's doing okay kid. Can't just real quick Palomar has inspired you to do what? Overtake gut. So both can overtake the sure I think you needed eighty two. And so I'm I'm overtaken you Gary eighty one eighty one isn't good enough. We got to go eighty four eighty five. I think eighty three overtakes Boccioni Durocher that would be an interesting goal for the year that would be cool to see boat. She, you know, get over a little bit in his final. I'd like to see him compete. I mean, it'll be great mean. It'd be great. If they just kept it interesting.

Willie Mays Willie Juwan Howard baseball LeBron Oscar Charleston Jimmy Kimmel Weber Willie Woody Palomar Chevy Jerry Stackhouse buck O'Neil Luke Walton willy Jalen rose Babe Ruth Ray Jackson Tom tippett Jeff Van Gundy Steele
"oscar charleston" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And his family it's one of the first national ad campaigns to feature an african american family and i think it it really speaks to how it was more than just jackie robinson was the first african american playing baseball it speaks to how important that was for american culture years before jackie robinson african american players played in the negro leagues there's a tribute here so this is oscar charleston's bat bill james baseball historian other baseball story think the oscar charleston is the fourth best player who ever played baseball but most people don't know who he is because he played his entire career in the negro leagues and what we really like about this story is in the nineteen twenties and thirties the denver post organized a tournament here in denver there were no baseball teams no professional or major league baseball teams west of the mississippi starting in in the thirties and so denver was actually one of the first places that integrated baseball was played hansen says one of those games the great pitcher satchel page did some showing off he'd go out for the first eating he'd call has outfielder to come in on the infield and tell the batteries he's not going to need them and they need to proceed to strike out the side and he did this over and over again including in front of a crowd in denver at play ball you'll see baseball memorabilia for mickey mantle willie mays ernie banks and roberto clemente just to name a few the exhibit also covers baseball warts at all there's a scandal case you know we have a few things here that you won't find in the hall of fame and you know some of those are players who have been banned from baseball for life including shoeless joe jackson and pete rose so we have shoeless joe's bat here as well as ticket to game one of the nineteen nineteen world series eddie sukati was the pitcher that day and he being the first batter he faced for the reds and that was assigned to gamblers around the country that the fix was in at the stocks we're going to throw the series and i think anyone who has seen field of dreams knows that there's some controversy around whether shoeless joe.

jackie robinson oscar charleston baseball denver post denver mississippi hansen mickey mantle eddie sukati ernie banks roberto clemente joe jackson pete rose
"oscar charleston" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on WEEI

"Get your back on the road us the play of last night's game with red sox fall under the royals four two two with kansas city scoring appear in the sabbath the red sox making some roster moves today third base smith pablo sad of all goes on the 10day deal with an inner ear infection socks also stand ready reliever ostad maddix to pawtucket they bring up infielder devon barreiro and for his basement sam travis both through the light up tonight against royals would travis batic six that for his base marierose at third base he bats night red sox curley a half game it back at a year he's for the alias lead yankees hosted the angels tonight will check in on that game in her trip around the majors segment while the royals they're looking to get to five hundred for the first time this season if they could pull out of victory tonight with red sox in kansas city this week kansas city the side of the negro league hall of fame and joe castiglione eddie opportunity tug with neighbourly the museum president bob kendrick bob so significant to read sacked when the awards it was very cool and because of the relationship that has been generated through you with the organization i think admitted even more to me to have mukhi an and rick here today to present them with the oscar charleston legacy award and the bullet rogin pitcher of the year award for the outstanding seasons that they both had in 2016 tells about tamari tony clark the president of the players association commission demand for will be here to announce a great thing for the neighborly museum the am super excited as you can well imagine we god the two leaders of base ball here at the negro buildings baseball museum to announce an exciting partnership between major league baseball major league baseball's clear association that we think is going to be instrumental in continue the effort to practice diversity in our sport and i think we talked diversity in baseball in has to start with the meek rulings and if if we are sincere about our efforts to get urban kids to play baseball is so important that they have a place like the negro leagues baseball museum joe.

royals ostad maddix devon barreiro yankees kansas city bob kendrick bob president negro buildings baseball museu baseball kansas smith pawtucket travis batic joe castiglione rick players association 10day
"oscar charleston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"oscar charleston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Beck notoriety as a fait f one ah but he thought with the eu st louis cooled in the company ilchol's codes as a picture coop up a bail hit this knock of ball that pat battles book been nuts recoup appleby i got his notoriety as a lummaux he was in his prime the fastest man on the planet who public built around the bases in wales second thirteen point more on if the bases will wit with gray but coop pump of bail said that one time he was playing with other monarchs and the st louis stars and he kept saying this guy asked the charleston come back and win coop up the bail was on the mound when they here comes ask the charleston covering up the back now off the charleston with me who dumbbell smashed two who off of a clansman he at one day down in selma alabama home and this is who coop up a bills fees oscar charleston comes up the bat mumbo with bill like be wormlike tied dole w group up ahead that not a ball he do that knuckle bought after myth the that looks the third when eating slaying practice ooh ask again mad brooke dependable when the animals oval papua walking by the dugout is transit man over reopen which i cannot alkachar i bet and the coach bill gates would see man you one who pop and that have been named gut doc but one day coop up a bail in statue page.

ilchol wales charleston brooke bill gates Beck eu pat selma alabama oscar charleston one day