17 Burst results for "Orville Schell"

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:50 min | Last month

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Because it was so real and they blessed it tears in their eyes weeping buckets. They had come home to tibet. The only problem was they were in argentina but it suggested the power of fantasy the power that hollywood actually has to recreate the semblance of reality. I was a very difficult thing for me to get down there. But i felt it was absolutely important to do that because i was writing this book and i needed to actually be there to watch them. Recreate the dream. The projection of tibet. That way to bet was in the forties when tibetan culture and tibetan society still cohered and had not yet been ripped apart by all of china's revolutionary political reforms. And so that's really what the movie is done and if you see it it's very convincing. There's a tremendous faithfulness detail. Some of the script is you know. Maybe you might cavill with the debate. And it has hollywood and places but then hollywood is hollywood. Any film that cost seventy million dollars is probably not going to be the kind of film martin. Scorsese would make his film is going to be very interesting to see no stars. No caucasians nothing just tibetans. But there was this confusion the whole time between illusion reality and the effect on all of the actors. There are people from twenty two countries down there a living with all these tibetans month. After month reenacting tibetan history was profound. Many people become very became very infatuated and dedicated to buddhism. They became deep and very respectful friends of many of the tibetans. There was a profound and curious. Interchange rarely happens on any other film because of this blurring of reality and the hollywood dreaming but to the chinese. Got it. no they don't think Cuddly dalai lama spiritually evolved. Telling rational reasonable compassionate. All of the things that we associate. He's trying to run away with part of china. He's a splittist. They think Tibet that's the place. The monks were drinking blood out of skullcaps of murdered serfs. They're not lining up to to go there on a tracker tour so what china sees when it sees tibet is something very different from what we see because the projections that they put on it a very different. They're they've been cultivated by fifty years of chinese communist propaganda which views about utterly differently. And they're very nationalistic about it. Very intelligent chinese. Don't think there's any grounds whatsoever for for tibet to be autonomous or independent. And i think the westerners who are concerned should get out of their face that they're meddling in the internal affairs of china and chinese sovereignty. And it's intolerable so you can see it's a very different projection. A very different view of things and it this laws at the heart in a certain way of why. This is such a sensitive and such an emotionally supercharged issue because each of the sees it very differently and there's great elements of truth and much of what we appreciate about tibet or understand about and some of it is a bit romanticized. Some of it is really tells as much about ourselves as it does about tibet..

hollywood tibet china cavill argentina Scorsese confusion martin dalai lama Tibet
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:15 min | Last month

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"You really must see the movie because it fits right in with all these other movies. The movie star star ronald colman an urban brit. And it's really quite wonderful. Because when they arrive in shangri la hollywood's version back in nineteen thirty seven thirty eight. They filmed it in ohio valley in back of los angeles and the the equivalent of the potila that beautiful fortress the dalai lama's winter palace that sits on red hill in the middle of lhasa. Was a it's an amazing building. It looks like It looks like some sort of a country club. Golf house frank lloyd. Wright's bad apprentice designed and are all sorts of fountains arrive and bearskin coats in the eighty degree. California weather but never mind at the time. It was magic. It was magic to people because we wanted to believe that somewhere in the world. There wasn't escape. Maybe we wouldn't want to go there but we wanted that mental idea that there was some place that had remained that it arrogated a special space outside of the nightmare that was gathering at that time that had commonsense civilization humanity that had opted out of the world that we all felt so ambivalent about and i think that element is still very strong in our fascination with tibet. Today it has much to do with why we are. It's a sort of sub-conscious text for why we are so enamored of this place also has a lot to do with other things and we'll talk a little bit about that. Well so things went along until nineteen forty nine till the chinese came in and for i think westerners this was terribly devastating moment in the sense that we were forced to wake from a dream. Our dream of tibet and this film which some of you have seen that. I was on public television three or four weeks ago. That i did about bed was called dreams of tibet. Because i think we do dream about tibet. The chinese in a certain sense not only occupied. Tibet and not only wreaked tavak and misery on tibetans acting out. I might add. Kind of a reverse form of anti-colonialism. I think within the whole experience of china's occupation of tibet. We see the real. The closeness between oppressed oppressor colonialized colonialized. And how one can morph into the other just as an abuse person or reviews child often becomes abusive china and away was acting out. It's fantasy of becoming a colonial power and overlord having its little place full of funny brown skin people who could bring civilization and enlightenment to bully around sad but perhaps true. Anyway as the chinese came in we had our dreams. This ripped open.

ronald colman tibet shangri la ohio valley red hill frank lloyd lhasa dalai lama hollywood Wright los angeles Golf California Tibet china
"orville schell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 5 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on KCRW

"Music playing, and it was very, You know, it was just very rousing, You know, very It was like being in a movie. Really. It was just very dramatic. The team had been in Japan competing in the world Championships two days before the tournament ended team China surprised the Americans with an invitation to come to their country and play some games. The U. S team had to get a green light from the State Department and as a minor whore. Frost, whose maiden name is Bo Henske, had to get permission from her parents. Then, of course, they said, Yes, we could go Good evening. The bamboo cut has been cracked by a think on ball. That improbable moment might not have been a spontaneous as it looked. President Nixon thought engagement with China could help end the Vietnam War. And Chinese leader Maza don't knew that isolation and perpetual estrangement from the U. S was bad for China. They also shared a common foe, the Soviet Union. But there was a hitch by the time lick. Some become president in early 90 60 lying there was no contact new channel for the two sides toe talk to each other from she is an expert in Cold War China US relations at Long Island University. He says Nixon told his national security adviser Henry Kissinger to reopen talks with China in Poland. Kissinger, in turn, asked the U. S ambassador there to make contact and it happened in December 1969 at a fashion show in the Polish capital. U S ambassador spotted the second secretary from the Chinese Embassy who promptly bolted and America ambassador run after him as said, I have important message for your country. Your ambassador China got the message. The Warsaw Channel was reopened in 1970. The stage was soon set for a Ping Pong invitation. Orville Schell is director of the center on US China relations at the Asia Society. He was a journalist covering China in the seventies. The whole policy of engagement began with Ping Pong diplomacy. Three months after the Ping Pong games, Nixon made a stunning announcement. Premier Chou en lai on behalf of the government. The People's Republic of China. Has extended an invitation to President Nixon to visit China. Beijing was soon admitted to the United Nations and by the end of the decade, China and the U. S had established diplomatic ties Orville Schell again You could say that 1971 was the book of Genesis. For the chapter, which we now conclusively come to an end in namely that somehow we would find a way. Get along and work things out. Back. Then there was political will for rapprochement, and he says it made strategic sense. Now we're heading in the other direction. There's bipartisan support for a tougher posture toward China as its power grows. Trump Administration officials proclaimed the policy of engagement of failure and set out to decouple the world's two biggest economies. So far, the Biden administration is taking a similar attack. I can 71 China was impoverished and weak. That's not the case anymore, and Shell says its leader is feeling emboldened. Shi Jin ping is very unrepentant. And presently, I think she Jinping's motive is not to show any difference to the West, not to events any need to come together or compromised, all of which makes it hard to imagine anything like Ping Pong diplomacy happening today, he says. Was even growing talk of a possible boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics in China over human rights. Connie Swears was on the trip to China 50 years ago that broke the ice. She says. A boycott is the opposite of what's needed. You're stopping the exchange of normal people and athletes getting together and And that's where I feel. Barriers get broken down, including barriers that nobody thought could be broken. John Rue Itch. NPR news candidate kept its coronavirus numbers down during most of the pandemic and envy to its southern.

Orville Schell Connie Swears Bo Henske 1970 December 1969 1971 John Rue Kissinger Henry Kissinger Vietnam War 2022 Winter Olympics Shi Jin ping Asia Society Frost President Jinping Poland NPR early 90 60 Trump Administration
"orville schell" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"And it was very, You know, it was just very rousing, You know, very it was like being in Movie. Really? It was just very dramatic. The team had been in Japan competing in the world Championships two days before the tournament ended team China surprised the Americans with an invitation to come to their country and play some games. The U. S team had to get a green light from the State Department and as a minor whore. Frost, whose maiden name is Bo Henske, had to get permission from her parents. Then, of course, they said, Yes, we could go. Good evening, The bamboo curtain has been cracked by a think on ball. That improbable moment might not have been a spontaneous as it looked. President Nixon thought engagement with China could help end the Vietnam War. And Chinese leader Maza don't knew that isolation and perpetual estrangement from the U. S was bad for China. They also shared a common foe, the Soviet Union. But there was a hitch by the time licks and become president in early 90 60 lying there was no contact new channel for the two sides, toe talk to each other. Yeah, from she is an expert in Cold War China US relations at Long Island University. He says Nixon told his national security adviser Henry Kissinger to reopen talks with China in Poland. Kissinger, in turn, asked the U. S ambassador there to make contact and it happened in December 1969 at a fashion show in the Polish capital. U S ambassador spotted the second secretary from the Chinese Embassy who promptly bolted and America ambassador run after him as said, I have important message for your country. Your ambassador China got the message. The Warsaw Channel was reopened in 1970. The stage was soon said for a Ping Pong invitation. Orville Schell is director of the center on US China relations at the Asia Society. He was a journalist covering China in the seventies. The whole policy of engagement began with Ping Pong diplomacy. Three months after the Ping Pong games, Nixon made a stunning announcement. Premier Chou en lai on behalf of the government. The People's Republic of China. Has extended an invitation to President Nixon to visit China. Beijing was soon admitted to the United Nations and by the end of the decade, China and the U. S had established diplomatic ties Orville Schell again You could say that 1971 was the book of Genesis. For the chapter, which we now conclusively come to an end in namely that somehow we would find a way. Get along and work things out. Back. Then there was political will for rapprochement, and he says it made strategic sense. Now we're heading in the other direction. There's bipartisan support for a tougher posture toward China as its power grows. Trump Administration officials proclaimed the policy of engagement of failure and set out to decouple the world's two biggest economies. So far, the Biden administration is taking a similar attack. Back in 71, China was impoverished and weak. That's not the case anymore, and Shell says its leader is feeling emboldened. Shi Jin ping is very unrepentant. And presently, I think she Jinping's motive is not to show any difference to the West, not to events any need to come together or compromised, all of which makes it hard to imagine anything like Ping Pong diplomacy happening today, he says. Was even growing talk of a possible boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics in China over human rights. Connie Swears was on the trip to China 50 years ago that broke the ice. She says. A boycott is the opposite of what's needed. You're stopping the exchange of normal people and athletes getting together and And that's where I feel. Barriers get broken down, including barriers that nobody thought could be broken. John Rue Itch. NPR news candidate kept its coronavirus numbers down during.

Orville Schell Connie Swears 1970 Bo Henske December 1969 1971 Vietnam War Kissinger John Rue Henry Kissinger 2022 Winter Olympics Asia Society Jinping Frost Shi Jin ping Poland President NPR early 90 60 Trump Administration
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:06 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"It was the center of life and it died and that was a very sad moment. So the film's innocent or trying to recreate this world. If not in fact at least as an illusion. And what is hollywood. But the dream machine. It is the illusion factory of the world. I went down to argentina. Now tell you why. I went down there. There's a wonderful ogden national limerick that occurred to me when i was in the andes. I remember how it goes. A one l. lama is a priest a to l. lama is a beast but i'll bet my suede pajamas. There is no such thing as a three l. lama or this is quite a relevant little poem. When you got to the andes to find jacques. I know the director of the brad pitt. Film had reconstructed lhasa in an alpine desert in argentina. Why because he couldn't go to tibet he was shut out. Just like all the people in the books in my office. They had to dream because so few of them actually got there. And where did martin scorsese go. He couldn't go to tabet in fact. The indians were so scared of the chinese. They wouldn't even let them shoot in la doc where there is a tabet and buddhist culture and society so he had to go and recreate lhasa in the atlas mountains of morocco. It was a kind of a curious diaspora but they didn't just stop at creating the facades of big important monasteries and buildings. Each film flew in in the case of georgia and no in seven years in tibet. They flew in one hundred and fifty tibetans and one hundred and fifty actual llamas to play the bit parts now. I've got to quickly tell you the story of seven years in tibet. It's about austrian mountain climber. A nice nazia turns out who went to climb a mountain with a nazi a sponsored trip in the late thirties and god busted when war broke out by the brits put in a prison camp he escaped. He went on the most harrowing almost two year trip over the himalayas. Tibet was neutral any ended up in lhasa. You spent seven years. There became a tutor of sorts of the dalai lama. He actually wasn't particularly interested in tibetan buddhism. And i've met and interviewed him. And i will not say. He is. The most spiritually enlightened soul in the world but never mind he wrote a fantastic book book that enchants everybody who reads it. And that's what the film is about. And brad pitt plays heinrich car and so down in argentina springing forth like you know a tina out of the head of zeus was this incredible recreation of lhasa. And when the monks and the lamas who had been flown in from indian switzerland in the united states and everywhere around the world when they arrived there on the set in front of the joe kong out on the.

argentina martin scorsese seven years Each film tabet one hundred and fifty Tibet late thirties lhasa united states morocco indian switzerland hollywood one hundred and fifty actual l joe kong tibetan himalayas tibet chinese brad pitt
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:33 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"But there's more to come martin scorsese's film about the dalai lama's life is coming out on christmas. And none other than this reincarnated lama steven seagal. The apostle of the highest form of violence on television in the latter part of the century. Who believes that. He is a buddhist lama. The reincarnation of a seventeenth century lama film. He got up a script under quote development as we to say down south and it is about the ci aiding tibetan guerrillas in the fifties. And of course steven seagal will be out there with a machine gun. Hosing down the p. l. a. And rescuing months he has a very rich fantasy life. I think sometimes his movies are more real to him then life itself and this would be one way to make this part of his fantasy a little more and carnet. There are a number of other smaller budget films feature films. One that was shot secretly tibet by an academy award winning documentary filmmaker paul wagner cold wind. Horse that's just being released and there was another one just being shot. There is a kind of an epidemic and it makes one wonder what's going on. Well i think what is going on is that we still yearn for this place. This lost place and if we cannot have it in fact and indeed. If you go to lhasa today i mean it's filled with karaoke bars. Chinese restaurants massage parlors. There's traffic there's nothing very romantic about las today except the total is sitting up there on its mountain and it's no longer the home of the dalai lama. It's a kind of a dead museum but all that aside the attornal that somehow lhasa will restore itself. Two thousand monasteries were destroyed during the cultural revolution. And i mean really destroyed. Many of them were just bombed. They were blown up with. Dynamite knocked to the ground some have rebuilt somewhat into a couple of the big ones were protected but it was a terrible grass. Rastas -ation of culture because in tibet lama. A high lama is the reincarnation of previous high lama whose sole reached a state of of of enlightenment chose to become a boat assata rather than go to nirvana to come back down to earth to reincarnate himself or herself in the case of a of a keeney. Call them in the corporal. Being of a young child to help others become enlightened. Now these are called living buddhism chinese llamas in tibetan and they are the centers around which every monastery centers and tibet was. A patchwork of little monasteries with one lomb one high lama. Low high lama or big monasteries with the dalai lama or with the panchen lama. The second-highest lama so when everybody began to be imprisoned in the monasteries were destroyed. The high llamas vanished. Indeed there was no ability when they died to replace them. So the core of life the monasteries. Which is where the trading went on because this is a nomadic society is where people came into have festivals is where they got together to buy things to worship..

martin scorsese lhasa paul wagner seventeenth century steven seagal today second Two thousand monasteries dalai lama lama one way christmas earth one lomb One Chinese fifties one high lama chinese tibetan
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"The movie is fabulous. You really must see the movie because it fits right in with all these other movies. The movie star star ronald colman an urban brit. And it's really quite wonderful. Because when they arrive in shangri la hollywood's version back in nineteen thirty seven thirty eight. They filmed it. In the ohio valley in back of los angeles and the the equivalent of the potila that beautiful fortress the dalai lama's winter palace that sits on red hill in the middle of lhasa. Was a. it's an amazing building. It looks like a it. Looks like some sort of a country club. Golf house frank lloyd. Wright's bad apprentice designed and there are all sorts of fountains and they arrive in bearskin coats in the eighty degree. California weather but never mind at the time. It was magic. It was magic to people because we wanted to believe that somewhere in the world. There wasn't escape. Maybe we wouldn't want to go there but we wanted that mental idea that there was some place that had remained that it arrogated a special space outside of the nightmare that was gathering at that time that had commonsense civilization humanity that had opted out of the world that we all felt so ambivalent about and i think that element is still very strong in our fascination with tibet. Today it has much to do with why we are. It's a sort of subconscious text for why we are so enamored of this place also has a lot to do with other things and we'll talk a little bit about that. Well so things went along until nine hundred forty nine till the chinese came in and for i think westerners this was terribly a devastating moment in the sense that we were forced to wake from a dream. Our dream of tibet and this film which some of you have seen that. I was on public television three or four weeks ago. That i did about tibet was called dreams of tibet. Because i think we do dream about tabet. The chinese in a certain sense not only occupied. Tibet and not only wreaked tavak and misery on tibetans acting out. I might add. Kind of a reverse form of anti-colonialism. I think within the whole experience of china's occupation of tibet. We see the real. The closeness between oppressed oppressor colonialized colonialized. And how one can morph into the other just as an abuse person reviews child often becomes abusive china and away was acting out. It's fantasy of becoming a colonial power and overlord having its little place full of funny brown skin people who could bring civilization and enlightenment to and bully around sad but perhaps true. Anyway as the chinese came in we had our dreams. This ripped open.

ronald colman California los angeles ohio valley eighty degree Wright Today lhasa three china chinese four weeks ago frank lloyd nineteen thirty seven thirty Tibet tibetans shangri la hollywood nine hundred forty nine eight
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:45 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Again. You couldn't get into. you still couldn't get into lhasa. And this provoked people more and more. But by this point there was a new element had been added to the mix and that was the element that the missionary said. I had quite dismissed and that was bet was the land of spiritual burity of spiritual density. It was the land where people really understood what it was that made people tick and the tendency was for the west trying to escape. Its materialism to escape the industrial revolution to escape. The malaise of modern life was to romanticize tibet as a place of enlightenment. A place where you could understand what your life was about. If you could just get to. Lhasa would unlock the riddle of the universe. It was like mecca. It was closed and you remember the role mecca played amongst explorers. Who were fascinated to somehow kennedy trait mysterious of this forbidden city so now lhasa had a whole new dimension to it. The golden roof of the la. All sorts of mythologies began to build up that this was the riddle of human existence. Tibetans understood mystical power. They could fly it could do astral projection. They could you know diane and come back to life again. There was all sorts of sort of hocus pocus and projections onto tibet. And then another wave hit in europe. Hitler started to march. And as europe teetered on the brink of world war two and ultimately the holocaust. Kind of seminal. Thing happened and probably many of you have read this book and seeing this movie. Lost horizon came out. And you remember what that was about. Shangri la and shangri la it was this mythic utopia hidden away and the himalayas where no one got old. No one had to work where the grand lama played romo and scarlatti on the harpsichord read buddhist scriptures. It was hodgepodge of sort of all the elements of west and east but it was civilization. It was written by a an oxford don very literate interesting book and it was his fantasy projection of the place europe pine for as it headed toward the abyss and it had a profound effect. That word shangri la still in our minds in fact. There's a hotel chain out on the far east. Call the shangri la hotels and every night instead of putting a mint on your pillow. They put a quotation from lost horizons. The imputation being that you have arrived in shangri la and you will sleep peacefully and this is a refuge from the hurly-burly of the world outside. It's an interesting image to all of us. And you remember what happened when conway plane takes off from china some revolution and it gets hijacked mysteriously it lands in the mountains and the people on it therefore four of them get taken into shangri la and conway finally comes out and when he comes out immediately gets old and the woman he loves manchu woman. He's found in. Shangri la gets old and finally goes back. England has a breakdown. And then he returns to shangri la. It's all sort of mysterious then. The movie came out now..

lhasa Hitler europe china Lhasa world war two scarlatti England shangri la conway four Shangri la Lost horizon oxford europe pine romo la Tibetans manchu shangri
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:04 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Wherever were not wanted. We feel we really need to get there and get there quick. Because the royal geographical society will fatten celebrate us and to beth with a certain sense was the jewel in the crown of places. You couldn't get and this provoked a whole new generation of explorers and they all wrote books those who made it back again and they're all on my desk but then a curious thing began to happen. In the middle of the nineteenth century. People thought mountains were cold places. Places certainly would walk around. You would never walk up one if you could avoid it. There was no magic to mountains. They were inhospitable places. Hardly had the sense of majesty we now that they now evoked fourth but later on in the nineteenth century a curious phenomenon began to happen. And you see it in. Our people began to paint landscapes. Never used to do that. They painted saints painted portrait's but they didn't paint landscapes just empty vistas natural. This there was a kind of fascination with naturalism and a fascination with mountains and this arose as people were being sort of snarled up been ground down by the industrial revolution reading dickens in the mud and filth and the smoke and the destitution of urban life was beginning to come over people so what happened was a kind of romanticism of mountains of solitude of nature and people started wanting to go up. Mountains and mountaineering was born. Now remember that guy. They found dressed in a leather suit up and some austrian glacier about five ten years ago. Well this man was not a mountain climber. this guy was hundreds of. I can't remember when what era he came from but rest assured he was not up there with his lycra jacket and his gortex pants. He was probably trying to chase him. Sheep down get them authorized glacier and he ended up going to his ultimate reward. Mountains were feared but now people suddenly found the challenge so they began to climb them well. All of the british and india of course had no alps british back in great. Britain had no alps there alps. It turned out where the himalayas and they had avoided. It hadn't really been very interested in them in one of the things they did because they couldn't go there that abedin's wouldn't let them in. They trained a very interesting group of indians. Called the pundits nuts where the word pundit comes from. They train them to go in disguise dressed us to batons with hidden in their canes and rosary beads. That had the just the proper number of beads on not like normal tibetan rosaries but so they could count the miles as they walked. And the pundits went all over tibet and matt to bet for the british and this was the first acquaintance really the first way that they began to fill in the great blank on the map and then the lure of getting to lhasa culminated for a moment. Nine thousand nine hundred four when the british fearful that the russians were going to colonize all of central asia and that they had some grand plan had succeeded through a brat mongol and winning over the dalai lama. they launched an expedition the military expedition to lhasa. Young husband expedition and they slaughtered a whole army of tibetans and they reach lawson. They forced law so to sign an agreement with them allowing a trade representative in some sort of intercourse between lhasa and delhi..

lhasa nineteenth century hundreds central asia delhi first way first acquaintance india middle of the nineteenth centu Nine thousand nine hundred fou austrian about five ten years ago one of things indians Britain industrial revolution one british russians
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

02:53 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Numerous a very fascinating accounts of failed attempts. Many people died and some of the accounts are heartbreak. And there's a kind of a progression of the fascination which will end up in hollywood. And i will describe this to you well. It all began back in the eighteenth century with some missionaries it was pretty matter-of-fact some some jesuits computer games were sent out by the vatican. Of course they were all over the world to save souls to harvest heathens in the name of the lord and a few misbegotten fathers landed in lhasa and they struggled away for ten twenty thirty years. There was some rivalries between them. He didn't get very far. They found the people who were pretty satisfied with their own faith and were little bit mystified by all this mumbo jumbo about. Jesus christ's crucifixion. And you know it didn't go down very well but these men left some interesting accounts and as jesuits often do they learned tibetan. They studied the scriptures of buddhism. And they were in a curious way at the same time that they were offended by the dirt. The cold the primitiveness of tibet. They were captivated by the people captivated by the culture. They sense that something was up and they often compare it to what they knew back in italy. The dalai lama was the pope monks. Priests and you see how they can make an argument. Well soon enough. They vanished and the next great wave of fascination with to pay arose as britain consolidated the raj in india and they began to think. Well perhaps there's a nice route through tabet into the back door of china to get some trade going so the east india company sent up. Some people tried to get to lhasa. Nobody could because the tibetans were very loath to have anyone come in as were the chinese who had emissaries there at the time. They felt that they really needed nothing from the outside world and i thought it was dangerous to have strange people. They didn't understand bumping around and lhasa so they were very assiduous about guarding all passes and repelling all borders so it was very difficult to get to lhasa now. Curiously enough this was also the age of exploration people were finding the headwaters of the nile. There in the belgian congo. They were going all over the world exploring going up the amazon. This was the era. The house days of british exploration and the animating people behind that was basically. You know if we can't get there we want to go..

italy india china lhasa eighteenth century ten twenty thirty years amazon Jesus christ nile east india tabet belgian congo chinese britain misbegotten fathers Many people dalai lama tibetan tibetans buddhism
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:26 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"In fact i think communist fundamentally don't get that element they don't understand. Religion did when the dalai lama went to beijing in one thousand nine hundred fifty four. He imagined himself to be quite friendly to now. This is before the reforms had really started to be implemented into bed. I did a conversation with him onstage a few months ago and we talked about this and i asked him what his attitude was toward the communist revolution. He said well. You know as a buddhist i believe in equality and when i saw what the chinese revolution was. Propounding a fundamentally egalitarian based ideology. I thought this sounds good. And he went to beijing hoping to work out some sort of reproche mall but at one point he said chairman mao turn to him and this was after many conversations and he was there for many months and chairman. Mouse said to him. He said but you know of course religiousness poison and he says at that at that point he began to realize that there really was a fundamental contradiction at work here that it probably wouldn't work out very well now. This is really the what went on between china and tibet. It was two different worlds sort of sailing over the heads of each other without impeding good or bad motives to either side and certainly tibet needed some reforms. And in a certain way china. I think had the zeal of any utopian movement and was trying to do good things they were just locked into a kind of an extremist position but those are two legs on. What really is the triangle. China on the one hand to bet on the other. That's two legs now. The third leg. I think is in many ways more interesting to us because it is us we are them. We are it. We are the third leg on this very curious triangle. And i want to talk a little bit about that tonight. Because it has great relevance to what happens in tibet in between tibetan china..

third leg china two legs one thousand tonight Mouse few months ago one point two different worlds tibetan nine hundred fifty four tibet one hand China mao dalai lama each buddhist beijing chinese
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:09 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Did they see. They saw a kind of a god king in the person of the dalai lama chosen through a lot of mumbo jumbo and give a nation dreams and consulting magical oracle's and staring into lakes revisions and all sorts of other other unscientific modes of selection. They saw theocracy that had vast estates and on those estates there were serfs were basically indentured and they saw an error stock crecy something like their own scholar. Gentry class back home. That didn't work. Did no manual labor war funny hats and brightly colored robes and lived a life of luxury while the ordinary people have tabet lived in rather primitive conditions. And i thought well perfect. These people are ripe to join our revolution and they moved in well when they started to implement their reforms. They're quote democratic reforms in tibet. They really fail to appreciate that. Despite the way things looked up there there have been no history of rebellion. it'd be no history of famine. Basically this very odd place was unified by. Tabet and buddhism was an ideology a religion a common cord between all classes between the theocracy the monasteries the monks and one out of four chinese males became a monk and the peasants and of course all nomads. Most tibetans were nomads. Roaming around out on this vast arid very desolate wasteland space. I might add that. Not as you might imagine it. A cuddly little buddhist kingdom top up there behind mount everest but it's larger than western europe. It's vast it's huge. And i will get a moment to how we look at that. 'cause it's a very interesting subject now. This is what the chinese thought they were doing. They thought they would be welcomed as saviors and they set about dismantling this old structure and when the cultural revolution hit hit china with a vengeance and it hit two back with an equal vengeance and it was aimed at destroying every vestige of china's old society and tibet soul society and culture and this meant literally raising monasteries to the ground imprisoning monks llamas and.

one western europe buddhism two mount everest china chinese tibetans Tabet four tibet buddhist dalai lama
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:02 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"The present day from the dangerous tendency to believe simply what we wish. Were so your show. Thank you a great pleasure to be here. This is i think an appropriate moment to reflect to bid on the what i think we have to describe as the tragedy of tibet. Not only the chinese president and communist party chief jiang zemin just been to washington and been saluted with a twenty one gun salute and had a state dinner in the white house but the president himself will soon travel to beijing and this puts the issue to bet very much on the front burner now. I think it's really difficult to understand. Even talk about tibet without understanding a little bit about china because it is a marriage of sorts perhaps an unfortunate marriage of two societies we. They're not call them to countries which in many respects simply don't understand each other and never have and yet they're insoluble bound together in a way which has cast their fates As one and sometimes it's very perplexing i think to americans To foreigners when they look at the situation they hear what happened and they wonder. Why doesn't china just take care of it. Why don't they just let china have a little more autonomy. Let the dalai lama return well. It's more complicated than that. It's an incredibly sensitive issue. And i want to tell you a little bit about how it arose because it's not quite as simple as it may appear from afar when mao zedong finally came to power in one thousand nine hundred forty nine one of the things he was he was very adamant about. Was this notion of reunifying china. And this was important to him because over the last hundred years since the opium wars in the eighteen forties china had an effect peck depart. Both by its own. Centrifugal forces disunity warlords regionalism but also by foreign powers. Britain started actually. Portugal started in macau hundreds of years before then. Britain seized hong kong went up the coast and all the way up to north china. It began to open up treaty ports and in these treaty ports like shanghai and those of you who have been there will know of i speak. They established not colonies per se. But what they call foreign concessions where foreign law. Whether it was french. English german ruled that had their own police forces that had their own tax collecting They were in a sense. Mini colonies within china. And this was an extreme humiliation for china. Because china had always imagined itself as being central to everything that it was in fact the source of much of the culture of asia korea japan vietnam confucian culture those countries also adapted chinese characters of the countries were related to china through a tribute system they pay tribute to the emperor sent missions to beijing to send gifts and acknowledged in fact at least the cultural suzerainty of china. Well here came the west with superior guns superior warships with entrepreneurs this loaded for forbear wanting to trade and a the western powers wanted to be treated as equals in..

asia jiang zemin washington macau two societies eighteen forties beijing English shanghai north china china Britain confucian mao zedong Both japan one thousand hundreds of years before twenty one gun communist party
"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

02:21 min | 7 months ago

"orville schell" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Hey it's andrew the director of literary arts literary arts. We rely on our community. People like you for support to help make this podcast and all our programming possible give today literary dash arts dot org forward slash donate welcome to the project. I'm andrew procter executive director of the arts. The archive project is a retrospective of some of the most engaging talks from the world's best writers for more than thirty five years of literary arts in portland support for the archive project is provided by cole. Haan cohen shoes bags. And adora with you while you work your way to extraordinary more at cole. Haan dot com in this episode. We're going back into the archive all the way in nineteen ninety-seven to bring you journalist and author orville schell since one thousand nine hundred. Seventy show has been reporting widely on china for mainstream newspapers and magazines like the new york times. The new yorker and the atlantic to more academic publications like china quarterly and foreign affairs his interviewed on stage. Everyone from al gore to the dalai lama. At the time of this lecture. Shell was at work on a book. Entitled virtual tibet searching for shangrila from the himalayas to hollywood that book and this talk are kind of response to a cultural phenomenon at the time fascination an idealization even of tibet movies were being made. Hollywood stars were making high profile. Trips to the country and public was peeking. Which shall saw was not a new phenomenon but one that periodically returns over and over in the west his question was why and so shell takes us into the history of tibet and it's fraught relationship with both china and the west and attempts to sort out what is fact and what is simply a projection of spiritual and political fantasies about the country. And this to me is the very definition of the service. Great writers can provide helping us separate the facts of history and.

"orville schell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"orville schell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Explain some of the historical parallels for us is Orville Schell the Arthur Ross director for the center on US China relations at the Asia society or thanks for being with us on the take away pleasure you witness the nineteen eighty nine protests in Beijing can you tell us Orville how do the tenements where protests and the demands the protesters made then compare to the protests were seen in Hong Kong today well what's hauntingly familiar is the way it's working ark of the demonstrations the way they gather momentum and keep reinventing themselves in order to keep people engaged I think your report from the Hong Kong airport reminds me very much of what happened when in may and Beijing in nineteen eighty nine the students decided to do a hunger strike as a tactic to kind of reinvigorate the protest and I think it was a very clever tactical move the students moved to the airport highly symbolic place where people come and go all the nerve center of Hong Kong and also a public space big lobby of the big airport so there are lots of ways that we see similar kinds of escalations and I think the very worrisome part is that each time there is an escalation and each time they gather a new sort of group a new grievance in new demand of course it becomes more impossible to imagine a resolution short of confrontation over when it comes to the Chinese government's response so far are you seeing similarities and how the government was acting in the lead up to Tiananmen Square well I think the government is first in Beijing tried to be quite restrained but it does of course consider Hong Kong a sovereign part of China and really nothing like this so visible and so public has happened to China in terms of rhyme inspiration since nineteen eighty nine and yet in Hong Kong it's a little bit more difficult for them because they don't control it directly so they're sort of the hand in the glove of the special administrative region government under Carrie lam which isn't to say she has much independence but it's sort of like having a spastic arm that keeps entering its own will but ultimately I think it's undeniable that China will feel so affronted that it will feel compelled to act and of course that gets us to the military solution well let's talk a little bit about that let's drill down a little bit in that relationship between Hong Kong and mainland China because if this was a situation that were happening in mainland China as Tiananmen Square that the payments were massacred did that gives China obviously different different jurisdiction over what it can do from a military standpoint we've seen early reports that China is beginning to amass troops near by not in Hong Kong itself but nearby how does this relationship between Hong Kong and mainland China complicate a potential intervention by the Chinese well one country two systems presupposes that Hong Kong has a high degree of autonomy in one of the elements and not autonomy sits on police force so for China to come across the border either with the people's Liberation Army or the people's armed police which is a paramilitary group would be agree this sort of blow to that notion of one country two systems what sort of astounding when you think about it because I've been going to Hong Kong since nineteen sixty one in it for decades was known as a city without a political bone spotty it was criticized for all it wanted to do was to make money politics were sort of strained out of everything except when they spill over from the mainland and now we find this city galvanized into the poster child for worldwide political consciousness in protest it's a pretty stark transformation we know it's it's early to predict but given everything particularly the Chinese government saying that there are quote signs of terrorism Orville is there a possibility that the Chinese government could carry out a similar crackdown in Hong Kong I think if you actually look at the way as I said at the outset the demonstrations have arc have fed on themselves have gained in momentum and gained and militancy it's very to imagine how the Beijing government for the Hong Kong government can step down to answer enough of the heap of commands that is piled up so it's with a kind of a terrible sense of inevitability that one looks towards a military solution but then one has to also remember this would be a terrible blow to China I think China would rather not do this and then after they send in forces then they end up with a kind of a potential battle of Algiers situation where they may have gotten the people off the streets but they could be in a kind of an urban guerrilla war situation this awful lot of angry politicize young people in Hong Kong right now or will stick with us we're gonna take a quick break but we'll be right back.

Orville Schell director US Arthur Ross China
"orville schell" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"orville schell" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"This is my walkup song for when I when I go to testify in the congress, are you evil. The question for the congress to this up. Up songs for for witnesses in the congress are now coming to bat kitchen, look like. The attorney for the for the president of the United States. Here's what listen. Walkup song for Michael Cohen today. There was one song and one song only and that is mega deaths trust, that's what you had to have. Okay. Yeah. To have mega distrust because the question was whether or not you trust what he was saying. But more importantly, there was a very sketchy character over his shoulder. Did you notice that person sitting over his shoulder that that that nasty partisan FANG fried egg sandwich smelling Lanny Davis? Lanny Davis was very interesting to me because if you look over Coen's left shoulder at any of these news clips that are showing you see him looming out there like impending doom. He's an amazing guy sitting there, and he's such a good guy. Lanny davis. You know, he he's he's like an unindicted co-conspirator of every crime the Clintons ever committed basically, he's one of their BFF, apps and emphasis under the last half. He is just super tight with them. And he defends him. No matter what I mean. Literally, no matter what. And wasn't it for two. It is the Michael Cohen will be able to turn a bland Davis to help him in a jam like this to help them out. You know, the very person who is probably most upset and not named Clinton the day after the election was probably Lanny Davis. I would argue Davis was probably anger even more than Tim Kaine who knew he just never was going to go anywhere in life. But Lanny Davis had been with the Clintons forever. He had a put up with their just with every scheme and flimflam that they could cook up every graft every graft play that they could come up with. And there was Lanny Davis who was along for the ride you probably envision himself. Maybe he's an attorney general under the Clintons. You know? It's interesting about Lanny Davis. If you look it up I put this out on Wikipedia earlier to out on Twitter earlier today. Lanny Davis God blessed man, he's just always in the wrong place at the right time. Lanny Davis up until September the eleventh two thousand and one which is an important date. And I can't remember exactly why that is he was a lobbyist for the Pakistanis. He lobbied for the Pakistanis the people. Who next Osama bin Laden wished us the most ill on the planet? Yeah. He was a lobbyist. Like, I there are there are things I would do to protect and preserve my family and my family's livelihood. I think I would live in car before I would take a check from Pakistan ever. What about Saudi Arabia? No, I wouldn't take one from them ever. Lanny Davis was a lobbyist for Pakistan like let that sink in Pakistan who funded and supported and supplied the Taliban who came to power while William Jefferson, Blythe Clinton was busily using an internal humidor. But Lanny Davis is Michael Cohen's lawyer. And Lanny Davis road is opening statement today, and he got Michael Cohen to get the most important thing in the entire hearing. And that was that we paid stormy Daniels off to keep her quiet for the election knowing full well that that disclosure alone was going to be the thing that could trigger impeachment that Trump junior actually find for it. And he and he he no, no, no. Yes. And no, but it, but the important thing was to put Trump in the room in the White House in two thousand seventeen green lighting reimbursement to Cohen in furtherance of this scheme to pay off stormy Daniels, and that was the most important thing because up to then collusion Russians all that sorta stuff. That's that's one thing. What he needed was something that was going to be the great equalizer for for Bill Clinton's impeachment because remember why Bill Clinton got impeached. He got impeached for lying in front of a grand jury about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky, but that was all against the backdrop of the whitewater deal Russian collusion and the Russian investigation those were all tangential to the presidency. They happened before the president was the president. They needed a quote crime to be committed while he was the president. And that crime could be say perjury, if he didn't answer truthfully to Bob Muller. Right. They figured they could trip him up with that. But Lanny Davis made sure Michael Cohen had in his opening statement. And. A statement of paying off Stephanie Clifford. Well, paying off Michael Cohen who paid off Stephanie Clifford you see what I'm saying. So they got him quote doing something in the White House. This is now their insurance policy because all the other insurance policies have fallen apart. So Lanny Davis is doing this strictly to avenge the the maiden honor wearing the white pantsuit of Hillary Clinton. The morbidly obese William Jefferson Clinton who can't keep his hands to himself. Now, they've got and this is why I keep saying now that they've got this. We've got a force them to do the thing. They do not want to do which is to go all the way end of conversation. Eight hundred seven sixty eight hundred seven sixty five three six to Jeff out and talk people patiently holding on Doug is at Hummel. Hello, doug. What's on your mind today? A brand like that conversation with progressive. Joe you're outstanding cordial in civil like, always thank you. So bad. I can't say that. But this is what progressive Joe, and all the other Democrats out there to think that this thirty five thousand dollars that the pay off a gold digger is some sort of campaign finance violation which it's not, but he but progressive joke progressive of President Barack Obama in two thousand and eight was fine. But three hundred seventy five thousand dollars by the Federal Election Commission for campaign revolting, a reporting violations that most any injury almost I think it's the most of the history he was fine three hundred seventy five thousand dollars for campaign reporting violations, and the Democrats never thought about impeaching you pick Republicans dead nine FBI didn't indict him. But we're going to go nuts over British thirty five thousand paid for high Smutny, supposedly. But that's even worse with the Bama treasurer secretary. Something God didn't pay thirty five thousand the same number thirty five thousand in taxes. He never went to jail. And so this is we have a double standard. They want us to be accountable to their idea. What the rule I which really? Isn't it? Selective enforcement. That's what he's about. Selective enforcement. We're supposed to be punished for everything while they get away. Scot-free? That's that's what bothers me the most. It's not equal Justice. They don't care about being objective. They just wanna get Trump. And now, you gotta argue today was great television. I loved it. But for the record that democrat congresswoman, which one. Accused queues you-know-who. Talita races. Yes. A racist. She did it. And then she backtracked. Young cues them of being a racist. She does no doubt about his shirt. He accused him of being a racist. So that's what they had to do that. That's what they do. And it's just amazing. They can't be a check for the life of them. You can't get an progressive. Like Joe to be objective anything because once you become a Gesta they have to abandon your progressive dog. And they're not gonna do that. So they're going to stay in the little bubble. And they're gonna keep spouting. Trump's a western spy, how many of those progressive jokes actually believe that Trump had that golden showers thing, then the dossier or do you think they don't really believe it? Well, Cohen said tonight Cohen said today, it is testimony. He doesn't think that exists. He said he does not believe that exists. He went through a number of things that he said didn't think they existed, and that was one of them a number of these other stories that they tell us. My point is I I really believe they believed that like an millennia Trump like Trump supposedly beat his wife. I bet they really believe. Come on. They listen. Yes. Doug is all of it. They do believe all of that. But that's fine. You can you can believe what you want. I mean there there are people who still think nine eleven didn't happen. I mean, it's it's just it's one of those. It's one of those crazy things out there. But remember, and this is what's so important. This all started because of Russian collusion. They relied on Donald Trump having to reach out to WikiLeaks via Roger stone. That was the big reveal from from Cohen early on into this thing. So if we had a back channel if Trump had a back channel to the Russian intelligence agencies to to help him out to get elected. Why does he have to talk to WikiLeaks about any WikiLeaks? And if if if he's got WikiLeaks, why does he need the Russians? I mean in some very silly sort of state of affairs, Eric and powei a line to Eric welcome to the show. What's on your mind? Hey, how's it going? Thanks for taking my call. Thank you. I thought today's hearing was high comedy. It was high comedy from beginning to end. I mean, he comes out saying is his he was lying then, but he's not lying now. Right. And then you've got all of the I read all of the Republicans kinda overplaying their hands saying it over and over again. Why would we trust you? Why would we trust you? Why would we trust? You. You didn't say anything. And then you've got the Democrats coming out. And I mean for the love of pay. I don't know why we have miss Cleo. Because I mean, we've got all these people that obviously know everything about everyone. I am. They almost have high degrees because well for heaven for heaven's sake. They're sitting there saying, oh, this is what it feels. This is what he meant. I, and you know, what if I if? Cohen gets out of jail anytime soon, then you can always start a new roping a telephone telephone. Yeah. Telephone psychic. He may do that. He's got he's got a lot of opportunities in front of them. They wanna make a movie of the week. And they want to do a car to Saturday morning cartoon series form, a stormy may wanna make a porno womb. I don't know that battle go good with the the lucky Pierre. All right. We'll see what happens plenty of room for you guys to be part of the conversation straight ahead. Eight hundred seven sixty KFI. It's the Brentwood Orville Schell AM seven sixty talk and breaking news Jim Sharpe met with big headlines. What's going on Jim authorities released the names today every young couple who died in a murder suicide and lake Murray last night, the bodies of Thomas Hayes, and willow singer both nineteen were found in the front doorway of the singer family home on Budlong. Lake avenue shortly after eight detectives determined that hey, shot singer, whom he had been dating before killing himself with the same handgun more than four dozen felony charges were filed today against a man who allegedly flooded all eight floors of a little Italy apartment complex by opening several. Fire valves within the building Thirty-seven-year-old Francisco. Morales played not guilty in San Diego courtroom, the building on State Street is uninhabitable. In around two hundred people have been displaced the US State Department named San Diego county's passport application office, the best of its kind in the country. The county's passport office was honored for its customer service and streamline tools, including an online appointment system. You're never more than fifteen minutes.

Lanny Davis Michael Cohen Donald Trump president William Jefferson Clintons congress White House attorney Blythe Clinton Doug Joe Osama bin Laden Pakistan United States Hillary Clinton Saudi Arabia Twitter Monica Lewinsky Orville Schell
"orville schell" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"orville schell" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Right. I mean, I mean, remember that accompany the size of Alibaba, even in normal country, like China, ultimately, it has to has to globalize if it's going to keep growing and Alibaba and every other Chinese company now that that wants to globalize, particularly in Europe in the United st-. States is running into some extraordinarily strong headwinds. I mean, we have fiftieth up in arms, you know, the committee on foreign investment in US and the the new Bill going through congress, making it much more difficult to mergers and acquisitions and invest in America. So there I, if there is going to be a trade war, and if there is a kind of a Neo containment policy being sort of lost it in Washington, and there is this is going to have an inhibiting effect on the ability of these big Chinese companies to expand kind of naturally organically in the world. Well, that idea or of there being one million new jobs created through that conversation that the Jack Mon and President Trump had. What about a year and a half ago? I mean, there's been a lot of talk about whether or not that was actually going to be physical jobs here in the US or it was going to be an impact of some sort of business relationship between Alibaba and. Other entities here in the United States or whether it's going to be nothing at all right. I mean, we've learned with President Trump, you know, very often. A lot of sort of overheated talk comes to nothing. So I mean, everything is in the practice. It's easy to to have some ask Gration but how you're going to bring it about another thing. So I think that again, Jack's sort of departure from the boiler room of Alibaba, and being CEO is is pretty well time because the terms of the game or changing right now and the whole relationship between the US and China. And I should say, right China and the world is on the precipice and pretty major changes. I wanted to finish up by asking you one other question because I've seen two articles in the last couple of days about Jack Ma one called him a visionary. The other one said that his success can impart beach contributed to the fact that Alibaba, Headey, quote, unquote, dick. Dictator ship a little bit to where where does it does it actually lie? Or is it maybe even somewhere in the middle. I think Jack laws very unusual person is a visionary in the sense that he doesn't allow themselves to be constrained, didn't allow himself to be constrained in the way that many people in China did. On the other hand, there's no, it's undeniable that China has has a very restrictive trade policy, and it sets up monopolies national champions and it's very hard for other companies to compete a, particularly in information technology or media, or even in in banking because China is not presented the world and particularly United States with a level playing field, it it, it's a mercantile economy and it's it Roques off whole areas and keeps people out. And that gives companies like Alibaba, an advantage which is not to take away in any sense from, you know, the innovative quality of Jack mine what he's done, but simply. Say there's a status policy with which we don't. We're not familiar in and open countries. Great. Having both with us here today, David. Thank you for your time. Thank you or thank you for your time on the phone today. All the best foot. Cheers, thank you. David, sue from here at the school Orville Schell who's director of the Asia Society center on US China relations for more insight from knowledge Warton. Please visit knowledge dot Morton, dot u. Penn dot EDU..

Alibaba China US Jack President Trump Jack Ma Jack Mon David congress Washington Orville Schell United st Asia Society center Europe America Gration President CEO director