35 Burst results for "Orson"

Mallory Millet Saw the Human Side of Marlon Brando

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:41 min | Last month

Mallory Millet Saw the Human Side of Marlon Brando

"Have so many stories you so you were friends. Good friends with marlon brando Who grew grew to be the size of a house at the end. I mean it's the kind of an amazing thing orson welles. Dan ackroyd There's people that they just blow up beyond reckoning. You keep you try to imagine. Excuse me what what's going on over there. You knew him when he was thin. He was glamorous beautiful beautiful human being. I mean beautiful physically physically and as an actor. Sometimes i always wonder. What's the big deal about certain people and then you see something. When he was in. I guess was julius caesar when he when he does the romans conference room. It's gonna when. I saw that. I thought to myself now i get it. You just thought to myself. I never really had seen whatever that was the sukhois about him. I mean everybody knows. He's a great actor but we were you finally see like oh my goodness there's he's a genius But you saw the human side of him so in the late sixties. He's calling you up. You said during the break that you talked him out of suicide. Marie would call me and she'd be she say i'm up in san francisco right now and It would be midnight or something. I'm up in san francisco right now and marlins home alone and he's going to kill himself and you've got to get over there right now and i'd go murray is midnight is marlin. He's you know please mallory. You've got to go there now. You've got to get in your car and get up there right this minute

Dan Ackroyd Marlon Brando Orson Welles Julius Caesar San Francisco Marie Marlins Marlin Murray Mallory
An Event That Struck Terror Into Portland Oregon Residents

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

02:06 min | 3 months ago

An Event That Struck Terror Into Portland Oregon Residents

"Over eighty years ago. Today people across america woke up to discover that the night before they had been the victim of a theatrical radio presentation. the date was october thirtieth. Nineteen thirty eight. The radio show was orson welles mercury on the air version of h. g. wells war of the worlds nineteen thirty. Eight war was brewing. As germany invaded austria japan was strongly aligned with the invader prior to world war two. It was forecast. That britain would suffer night air bombing attacks causing large numbers of civilian casualties and mass destruction. It was widely agreed that navigation targeting would be more difficult if manmade lights on the ground could be extinguished as early as july nineteen thirty eight. American citizens were urged to practice lights out beginning at dusk it would not be called blackout drills until nineteen thirty nine. Fear across the country as rumor spread about coming to the aid of our british allies. Should war break out that the sounds of war that came over the radio that october thirtieth nineteen thirty eight were not from europe but from mars. This was a live broadcast across america five. Pm in the west which would have made it eight pm eastern time meant. There was no time to warn the west about what was to come a wave of hysteria that swept across the united states at night before halloween as a realistic radio. Dramatization reached all the way to portland oregon. Two thousand five hundred miles from the scene. The fictional invasion the telephone switchboard of the oregonian newspaper was swamped by hundreds of excited calls. People rushed into the business offices of the newspaper demanding information. Hundreds of calls were made to the portland police wanting to know what protection the city offer. And what place might be safe in the event that wholesale destruction spread to the pacific coast.

Orson Welles America Austria Wells Germany Britain Japan Europe Portland Oregon Pacific Coast
'Citizen Kane' Has Faced a Rotten Day

Doug Stephan

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

'Citizen Kane' Has Faced a Rotten Day

"It a classic Baby sees Jason Nathan's and says it's no longer one of the best reviewed Mr Kane was a man who got everything he wanted and then lost it. Citizen game, losing its 100% fresh rating on rotten tomatoes and old review from the Chicago Tribune in 1940 one's then unearth in which the reviewer was done. Pressed with Orson Welles Masterpiece headline boldly proclaims the movie fails to impress critic is greatest ever filmed. So Citizen Kane goes from over 100 straight positive reviews to just 99% positive on rotten tomatoes films now above Citizen Kane with 100% include the Terminator Toy story Happy on Paddington to Jason Evans. An ABC News only way this is

Jason Nathan Mr Kane Chicago Tribune Orson Welles Kane Jason Evans Abc News
Is Zach Snyder's 'Justice League' a Good Movie?

The No Film School Podcast

09:36 min | 6 months ago

Is Zach Snyder's 'Justice League' a Good Movie?

"The very controversial for so many reasons for content reasons for formatting reasons i saw so many memes about the fact that it was reformatted. Four three zack zack. Snyder's justice league has officially dropped. We say dropped on the internet right. It's not like premiering a movie theater. It's just dropping on on. Streamers is fishy dropped on hbo. Max there's a complicated back story where zacks under had to leave mid production because of a family tragedy which is very sad judd app not try that patel just we took over just we apparently was a total asshole and there were all sorts of lawsuits. About what a dickey was and then you know. The film by many fans was not felt to reflects what zach snyder intended and there was long discussion of a zacks undercut image. Peo- max put in seventy million dollars to shoot a whole bunch more footage to make the zack snyder. Cut of justice league. Come out for years later. This is an interesting story because it is different. From a lot of directors cut stories. A lot of directors cut stories are ten years later. I'm grateful the studio give me access to the archive to rescan the negative and re-cut it is very rare in fact i can't think of an example where someone's like four years later. I got an extra seventy five million dollars to shoot additional footage to make an alternate movie like it is. Is there another example. That are missing where somebody got that. I don't know but what i do know. Is that in the history of film. There have been many many many directors cuts and extended editions and versions. That were revisited. We've talked about some of them here before. And most of our audience familiar with many of them It is not unheard of obviously for there to be something that prevents the original vision to be completed by the person who had it. And obviously there are many instances where somebody could go back and try and piece things together. Only orson welles. A number of times We even talked to. I talked to walter merch about going back in and recruiting and working on touch of evil. There are the magnificent emerson's with him as well. I think he's one of the early versions. Were early famous versions but bladerunner famously for anybody mir charles age And so much inbetween. It's such a common story but this one does stand apart because yeah he was given basically a massive feature film budget to make more of it his version of it and it is an interesting thing like will this happen more often. Will we get criminal. And saying actually i want to shoot a whole different ending too dark dark knight rises fifteen years later. Because i've rethought it. And i wanna go into a very complicated sort of relationship between the artists and the work when you remove the theatrical premiere and when you open up the idea of shooting original additional footage it is a it's vastly different so Full disclosure wasn't able to finish it have a two year olds. Get very sleepy very easily. Don't have four hours with two year. Old where i can watch the whole thing but universally in my social media of the people in my life everyone i know seems to have really enjoyed the new cup more than the last cut. I do not understand why people hate on sex neither so much. I genuinely enjoyed his dawn of the dead. I thought it was solid. I also am a like. I wanted to get into movies. Originally to make watchmen. When i was nice school. I don't hate his watchman. Cut like everyone else does. I don't understand whether so mad about it. I think people to hate sex. Neither for some reason that does not make sense to me. I'll also disclosed and then michelle. I know michelle is actually watched both right but so i have watched the new one. I watched the snyder cut. I did it. I made it through. Well di i not a big comic book movie fan. In general i have seen many of them though. And i did not see the original justice league so i had to do some research on what changed which was really interesting to me. I also actually really think highly of him from a visual standpoint. I find that even when he's not like a lot of the movies directed this one included. The material is just not great in my opinion but he's visually so committed to the bit that he does that his sequences really worked for me. And i think he's a great comic book movie director choice. Because i think he's really. His camera is like ballot. Check i think his action sequences are visually compelling. And i think his approach like to me the thing that felt the weakest about this. I mean obviously the some some major casting problems major script problems but all that aside i think it it mimicked. Some of what marvel does too much sometimes which i don't really like. They're some straight up. Like this is just an avenger. Seen but not as good. And i don't really love what it was in the first place personally but all my my personal take aside. I think filmmakers He is just he really doesn't. He's earnest he's not tongue in cheek and sometimes it gets a little silly and you might laugh. But i think his earnest approach to how dramatic he is with his camera like from dawn of the dead to the three hundred to a and tackling real quick charles before michelle I think that warner brothers is known to have some really tight released times. They don't have the same war chest that disney does for like they. They set these release dates. They they have to make them. I'm not going to get into the wise. And if sets really true but and that puts a lot of pressure on finishing something and delivering something. And i think that some of the the flaws in some of these dc comic book movies have to do with some of that some of us so anyway onto you. Michelle i f Well done on watching. The center is a endeavor. I i think i knew what the runtime was. But it doesn't click in my head until i was watching and the timeline at the bottom. It has like how long you've watched. And i miss read it. I thought it was much like when it said two and a half hours at the bottom. I thought that was a total Not they meant time that i had laughed and that was quite a surprise. So it's long. Don't don't kid yourself jack. Knifed mini series has parts could have been released in parts. My first input. If you will is i feel like i. Keep reading the quote snyder cut. That snyder wouldn't release in two thousand seventeen and i would argue that. I don't know this is i. Don't think this is at all what would have been released for so many reasons. It's a it's a post weeden post tragedy post. Hbo max snyder display. I don't think we would be able to release a for. I could be wrong. A four hour epic in a theater in twenty seventeen. I don't obviously say that. There are many teaser. There are changes are subtle there. Some people have pointed them out and in terms of very subtle and different. Like stolen changes. That i think are in there now. For example there's a billboard others billboard in the city at some point in the messages you're not alone and a lot of people have guessed that something that snyder put in in reference to his daughter. Like these little things that have been put in log away 'cause post years of reflection on it and i just don't think not content aside just the run time. I'm not sure how many people really yes for hours within a theatre. Let's do it. I don't know if we the same. i do. Think a really interesting experiment if anyone ever wants to ever play with this idea of same footage different story concept of how to edit something together. Because i started watching the josh sweden version the same evening. Don't do this same evening through off after watching case for a minute i thought you were. You said you meant side by side like you had to i. Four by three setup does allow you. I will say to have it on the side of my screen. As i was like doing some work so i will say the former three at least helpful in the arrangements of your browser window because like i'm not cutting anything off because it's not a letterbox or other format so the four by three is is is makes it easier to have the size. No i tried watching the conversion right. After some of the scenes giving away some of the scenes that feel pivotal in the story. Line are like thrown in the credits. The opening like oh i get with. This is going to do you. I don't know if i can sit through

Zach Snyder Zack Zack Walter Merch Mir Charles Michelle Zacks Dickey Judd Patel Snyder Orson Welles HBO Emerson MAX Justice League Max Snyder Warner Brothers
Democrats to work on Covid relief throughout a critical week in Washington

The World and Everything In It

00:51 sec | 8 months ago

Democrats to work on Covid relief throughout a critical week in Washington

"Lawmakers and the white house. Continue to haggle over. What the next big covid nineteen relief. Bill will look like but it appears all but certain that democrats will use a process called budget reconciliation to pass the nearly two trillion dollar package that would cut republicans out of the process. Gop leaders have urged president biden to consider a more targeted and scaled down relief measure but some questions remain among them who will qualify for the next round of stimulus payments white house press secretary jen psaki said president biden is talking with lawmakers it proposed kind of a threshold a discussion right now about what that threshold will look like Conclusion hasn't been finalized that will be worked through congress the threshold being some kind of income cap for those receiving full stimulus payments. Right now. the package is expected to send fourteen hundred dollar payments to most americans

President Biden White House Jen Psaki GOP Bill Congress
Family of missing toddlers speaks out, says they're public targets

News, Traffic and Weather

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

Family of missing toddlers speaks out, says they're public targets

"The investigation continues into the disappearance of two California toddlers they're adopted family is speaking out against claims they harm their Children, a family of the adoptive father of two California City brothers who vanished four year old Orrin and three year old Orson speaking to ABC, exclusively. I just know that they were really good parents. As far as I was concerned, the family now saying they're being targeted by members of the public Showing up outside their home not to support them, but to accuse them. They adopted the boys in 2019 the parents, saying they last saw them in their backyard late December before they vanished Species.

California City Orrin Orson California ABC
Show 7a  "Magic of Hollywood" Redux with Larry Wilson - burst 02

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:34 min | 9 months ago

Show 7a "Magic of Hollywood" Redux with Larry Wilson - burst 02

"Film we do a we do a cut away and walks through the door and then we cut to the other side of them come in well it doesn't mean the doorways the same location right right. It's exactly like magic and it's no surprise that serves interesting. Great filmmakers like orson welles huge magic fan interest but it does make sense. What you're saying is i mean. There's the term movie. Magic for a reason will the first magicians Starting up the first. Magicians but the first filmmakers george me as frenchman filmmaker in paris. He was a stage magician. I saw a tv special about him. didn't do the movie man in the moon. Yes yeah and that was all tricks. Well we'll scorsese's films yes scorsese's film. Hugo is about george malays and his origins and he realized it's typical of magicians. He just saw this film medium as a way to do his magic act. Better you know you can do all these tricks. You could shoot him walking onstage. Then stop the camera. Move someone off. Start the camera and they would appear to disappear in the film right exactly so all these. There's a huge huge history film of affects

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Larry Wilson Playboy Hugh Hefner Orson Welles Scorsese George Paris Hugo
"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:36 min | 10 months ago

"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

"No <Speech_Male> and also <Speech_Male> find space for kane <Speech_Male> within its form <Speech_Male> which makes david <Speech_Male> fincher lake director. <SpeakerChange> Three <Speech_Male> hundred ninety seven <Speech_Male> to do a citizen <Speech_Male> kane ammash. <Speech_Male> He's a little closer <Speech_Male> to it because the movies <Speech_Male> also the making <Speech_Male> of citizen kane <Speech_Male> but again social <Speech_Male> network is more <Silence> his citizen kane <Speech_Male> than may <Speech_Male> is necessarily his <Speech_Male> citizen kane where i <Speech_Male> make his version of citizen <Speech_Male> kane but the kind <Speech_Male> of isolating <Speech_Male> powered and bishen adventures <Speech_Male> into he <Speech_Male> found a way very creatively <Speech_Male> and artistically <Speech_Male> integrate that into <Speech_Male> certain other <Speech_Male> movies <Speech_Male> he he he he <Speech_Male> finds a way to <Speech_Male> put it into <Speech_Male> this one. I think the other thing. <Speech_Male> That's tripping people up <Speech_Male> and i wonder if you guys <Speech_Male> we'll talk with us in listen <Speech_Male> to hear if you do <Speech_Male> it's that idea <Speech_Male> of recreating old <Speech_Male> movie style in a way. <Speech_Male> That's also kind of <Speech_Male> acronyms and off <Speech_Male> like people are talking <Speech_Male> about like the <Speech_Male> frame. Changes <Speech_Male> are wrong. <Speech_Male> And why is <Speech_Male> he shooting a movie about <Speech_Male> the early forties <Speech_Male> an animal effect <Speech_Male> wide <Speech_Male> screen. And whatever else <Speech_Male> these are <Speech_Male> interested in the wrong aspect <Speech_Male> ratio. These things <Speech_Male> are interesting kind of talk <Speech_Male> about two for such <Speech_Male> a perfectionist. <Speech_Male> But any hail caesar <Speech_Male> shot in the wrong aspect <Speech_Male> ratio two <Speech_Male> and the way <Speech_Male> we see the movies being made <Speech_Male> in hail. Caesar is <Speech_Male> totally accurate. I don't <Speech_Male> think it undermines what <Speech_Male> it has to say about <Speech_Male> that system in that <Speech_Male> period and that <Speech_Male> sense maybe make is <Speech_Male> a bit of a writer's movie <Speech_Male> or a bit of a <Speech_Male> bit of themes <Speech_Male> ideas moving. <Speech_Male> But i think the things it <Speech_Male> says about the hollywood <Speech_Male> the period often <Speech_Male> some of them are very <Speech_Male> smart. <Speech_Male> A lot <SpeakerChange> of its smart <Speech_Male> to me. <Speech_Male> Adam <Speech_Male> Before you go. Can <Speech_Male> you please plug <SpeakerChange> your book that <Silence> everyone should buy. <Speech_Music_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> i a book <Speech_Music_Male> called raising. <Speech_Music_Male> Cain <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> no i have. <Speech_Male> I have a new book on. Paul <Speech_Male> thomas anderson <Speech_Male> that i cannot <Speech_Male> say how grateful <Speech_Male> i am to <Speech_Male> the ringer for publishing <Speech_Male> an <Speech_Male> excerpt and for also <Speech_Male> a couple of <Speech_Male> pieces i've written about anderson. <Speech_Male> The kinda got <Speech_Male> rework them <Speech_Male> and put in the <Speech_Male> book Paul <Speech_Male> thomas anderson is allowed <Speech_Male> like orson welles and <Speech_Male> he's a white male filmmaker <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Which you know the ones you. <Speech_Male> Write books obey. <Speech_Music_Male> No he's <Speech_Male> a. he's a. <Speech_Male> He's <Speech_Male> alzheimer's. Thomas anderson's <Speech_Male> pretty good. <Speech_Male> I think sean <Silence> thinks he's okay. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Sean really <Speech_Male> all thomas anderson. <Speech_Male> Baffled <Speech_Male> now i mean <Speech_Male> the the <Speech_Male> book been out since <Speech_Male> october and proud <Speech_Male> of it <Speech_Male> Stan well <Speech_Male> it's called. Masterworks <Speech_Male> has interviews with <Speech_Male> a lot of anderson's <Speech_Male> collaborators including <Speech_Male> my favorite thing. I've ever <Speech_Male> put in a book or <Speech_Male> anything which is a long <Speech_Male> interview with vicky craps <Speech_Male> about playing alma <Speech_Male> in phantom threads. <Speech_Male> If you're a phantom thread <Speech_Male> had and if you like <Speech_Male> alma and want <Speech_Male> to hear but vicky <Speech_Male> crabs is like <Speech_Male> spoiler. She's wonderful <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> her her interviews <Speech_Male> really really nice <Speech_Male> and the book exists. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> It's out there <Speech_Female> adam. <Speech_Female> I i <Speech_Female> wanted to tell you. <Speech_Female> I went to <Speech_Female> my local bookstore. <Speech_Female> Romans support your <Speech_Female> local bookstore. And <Speech_Female> there was there to <Speech_Female> giant displays and <Speech_Female> one was a bra <Speech_Male> obama's memoir <Speech_Male> and then the other was your book <Speech_Female> and they were right next to each other <Speech_Male> and i was <SpeakerChange> so excited <Speech_Male> it looked great <Speech_Male> well. They're both <Speech_Male> apologies for american <Speech_Music_Male>

david <Speech Paul <Speech thomas anderson sean <Silence Caesar anderson orson welles Thomas anderson hollywood alzheimer Sean vicky obama
"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:48 min | 10 months ago

"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I'm gonna let you go now. And i'm i'm gonna give. I want to give them ten minutes to talk about bank. So chris farewell. It was great. So you guys. I'll talk to you soon. Bye chris. you're the pauline kill of this podcast very entertaining but full of lies by guys if you have not seen bank. Don't listen yet but please return to this episode when you do see it so you can hear adam starts later this week. Amanda and i are going to talk depth about bank if you can imagine an even longer conversation about what. We've just been going through here. But adam thought you wrote beautifully about the movie on the ringer. And i wanted you to kind of expand upon that because one of the things that i liked about your piece was that you are not score-settling. Either and you. I found that the piece was not engaging in the kind of emotional responsive. I wave of reviews that i felt like were fairly dominant. I think that there was. It was pretty clear that there were people who were well zeitz. Who were frustrated by certain aspects of this movie and there were also people who were a fincher who were Just looking for something to be excited about that. Maybe when a little over the top about the movie too. And i found that the balance that you strike was really interesting. So what did you think of. The movie means review reads positive I am very interested in data center. Reasons that i can can't fully articulate at the moment but you have a serious but you know been on my mind on a lot of people's minds for about fifteen years now because he's in a way a very autonomous almost autocratic filmmaker and yet he gratefully works within the studio system and in some ways. Aspirational we in terms of the size of budgets that he wants to work within the kinds of movies. He makes very commercially inclined but he has this crime scene of alien three which just gave him this chip shoulder which is like a chronic condition. Right when he was with the social network and people were like. So what do you think. America's edberg like. I know what it's like to be twenty one year old kid sitting in front of a group of adults who you're smarter net and well let you do what you wanna do like. Well you literally never got over this. You know like never ever ever get over it. And that's not him comparing himself to wells because he's not orson welles because he's not a writer and he's not an actress. He's spoken about this very galateri. That people should do what they wanna do. But also i tell people what to do right and then everyone does what they do. As long as it's kind of what i want. And if that's not how you do it my way but actor should act and ridership brightens Cinematography and you know. I direct So all of that just makes him making. We've built wells very interesting. Because he's not a wealthy director you know. There's other filmmakers. Who are more wells ian than david fincher in in even in his generation. You know i mean all thomas. Anderson has some of that the grandeur and the humanity that pinchers movies access differently and then he's also making a screenwriter when he has not written any of his movies and this is all framed by his own incredible loyalty loyalty..

chris farewell Bye chris zeitz adam fincher Amanda galateri orson welles wells America david fincher pinchers Anderson thomas
"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:44 min | 10 months ago

"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Famed screen writer and columnist and a member of the oregon roundtable and an important figure who will talk about a lot more because of bank but she cites or sort of almost sort of refuses to site The origins of this authorship throughout this story and there is a series of reactions to this story that ran across two issues and then was ultimately published in a book about about cain that also featured the shooting script in the movie. She essentially notes that mankiewicz his relationship to hearst and his understand her his understanding of that world and frankly it seems like her access to john. Houseman who was a partner of wells' at a time and then eventually they split apart informs this big theory about who really made came. I don't know how to talk about this from here because we run the risk of getting into the weeds of a bunch of people fighting even before the internet. But this kind of feels like an internet fight to me in many ways as i look back on it i think she must pay you three hundred dollars for this piece and clearly worth every penny worth exactly three hundred. Us the best thing is that like. Can you write the intro to the got. You know what that's worth inflation. But it's like it's so funny as talking. About how calling kale judges orson welles it becomes a referendum on kale is also a major figure. Shot as important as orson welles to film history. But she helped write a lot of film district or the opinionated part of film history because she was one of those people who's like movies or something critic movies or something you feel. There's something you understand. It's subjective it's passionate. And when she went to write a work of scholarship she just shift the bed right and then because she was the same pennant critically. Never watch a movie. A second time famously. She like went and republished it even after she was criticized from not just. His friends like from serious scholars. Like this is not correct. She didn't care. And there's an obstinate there. That's as much a rosetta stone or a rosebud to colleen kale as the sled is to Cain or cain is is to wells but when she was doing that internet fighting that sean referring to is and it's not that it's not worth talking about what she got wrong even before you talked what you got wrong. She's just litigating. The turbulent that she was having with andrew sarah's she was like you know what's bad is totally ising narratives of a creative controls. You know what i'm gonna do. He was a total ising narrative about creative control. Don't do that unless you're meet right and in doing that. She was taking shots at the big gun tour of all time at that point in the nineteen seventies wasn't just a well. It was about the entire therese critical establishment. She couldn't win the fight the first time she sort of trying to win it the second time through the writing of this and trying to diminish not just wells that you beat her on kane she's like. This is a shallow masterpiece. This is not a deep observation..

mankiewicz kale cain Houseman hearst oregon colleen kale orson welles andrew sarah john Cain Us sean kane
"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:31 min | 10 months ago

"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I don't know if he has a ballot body of work kubrick. It feels a little bit more inconsistent. It feels almost to go back to a term lease earlier. Mercurial like that. There is a degree of squandered potential. There which is a shame. Because i think he's one of the true geniuses of the last century you know. I mean you you just see the way in which he was able to bring his His talents of somebody different mediums and even the medium of being a celebrity even the medium of being iraq and tour of just being like a guy who was on tv and chose to do that instead of anything else or was last sort of venue for his talents. I always kind of look back a little bit. Bitter bitter sweetly. It had a him. Yeah part of the story of. Cain obviously is that it was not a financial success and that he had to rework has contract with our ko that led to his loss of total control. Over emerson's which led to anderson's getting mutilated which then led to basically a career long fight to raise the money he needed to have an experience. That was again like cain. Which is adam apology. Talk about him as a filmmaker and kind of what his legacy is through these other films but it is interesting that it basically feels like he's in this war to get back to this primal state that he started at and i think for a lot of people and i include myself in that it's not squandered that's heroism now the question what heroism becomes dogma. And you suddenly can't literally make two minute scene in the movie. Where orson welles is not nice. Without inciting the wrath of well scholars is a whole other thing. Yes but that's not squandered potential to me that's kinda heroism that's a byproduct not if hubris or were delusion but of a kind of principle and then he finds a way to angle that into art. That's what quinlan is in touch of evil you know he is diminished and. The movie is great because hank quinlan is diminished. That's falstaff in chimes at midnight years a steadfast true boil person. He is not rewarded for it. By the time you get tough is for fake is playing. With all of this including amana. What you're saying about him being available in very spite truly smart. I agree like he talks to everyone i talk. All the time and some of it was grievance and some of it was anecdotes. Showmen inside Bitching and some of it is incredibly moving but enough is for fake. He's like i'm worse in wells. And i am the most reliably unreliable person. You'll you'll ever meet. I give off. Strong child magician vibes in my second. Here's my here's my movie about that. And i don't think you can get movies like that without what he went through. So it's not squandered potential to me it's more like movies made in the image of what happened to which by and large for me our ingenious so it's not about like whether he's the greatest filmmaker or on a rushmore. Or whatever but i will say what's interesting is citizen kane kind of the consensus. Great movie ever made the listeners. Tired of a citing the list. It's on when you read well scholars or when you re people who love orson welles. The argument is in some ways. He improved deepen or that. The later films have the kind of depth that citizen kane is imagine because it's a twenty five year old imagining. What does a lifetime of regret..

kubrick hank quinlan Cain orson welles emerson cain iraq anderson quinlan Showmen kane
"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:14 min | 10 months ago

"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Job. I think the thing is It depends on what you're looking for in the movie. You know if you're looking for you're trying to observe technique. There's a lot to look at it every frame. There's a lot to understand about the choices that they're making if you're looking at it as an entertainment it's not always the best entertainment. Most movies that are that aspire to this important are not always necessarily the best entertainments and frankly they're didactic I think there is a little bit of didacticism in this. Orson welles certainly felt like he had a pretty clear view of the world even at a young age and he was famously fond of hearing his own voice. So but i never feels academic to me and the the melodrama. I think works. I think you kind of need that. Susan alexander stuff to understand the complete meltdown that he has in her room when she leaves. Like you need to understand that this is person that has a hard time having any feelings or or facing his feelings in a meaningful way and that she represented some keyhole-size entry to his feelings. When he famously like first encounters her and sits down and listens to her singing at the piano. That's such an important little. Frankly freudian droplet of information and then his whole world spirals out because he had one genuine honest human moment. And that's really it's really powerful the way that he does that. And maybe he makes you endure a little bit more susan alexander than you want to but it does feel like it's essentially a series of interlinking chain so i don't i get bored necessarily i don't think citizen kane's movie. Should watch five times a year. Either though i don't know what do you think. I think that these are these questions. All dancer interesting stuff. That i know will come into flower at the end of the podcast which also just has to do with mike. Do people do. Do people give wells enough reverence. Not just credit but reverence and is it possible for movie. That's considered the best movie of all time to still kind of be under appreciated in the question of wells as own arguably or sort of purportedly. Cain like trajectory of peaking early which is not me saying this about him. It's just an argument that's often made about him and so also the question. Are you allowed to not like citizen kane. And if you don't buy the ritz 'cause you're like a twenty two year old writing buzzfeed article or because you're just a person doesn't love it as much as you love something else like. Are you allowed to do that. And the answer should always be. Yes you know you bully yourself into liking something. You're not you don't win. You know you're young enough to do that. But i think that of all the claims of oh wells and what. He's good at nothing people. Don't say he's a good dramatist. Best citizen kane is just evidence. What a wonderful dramatise. He's not just a stylist and polemicist anna a showman. A juggler as someone just said about him in that stuff. You know like the great dramatist and you are constantly understanding what these people want your understanding what kane once through other people's impressions of him but the other characters in the film but sean massena but susan's really well said but it's true. Jeddah diets Everyone else they're dramatically cogent characters. I think when you watch a lot of contemporary american movies even good ones. Those verities are kind of lost. Or.

susan alexander kane Orson welles Cain wells mike sean massena anna Jeddah susan
"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:56 min | 10 months ago

"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

"In addition to the experts believed the camera. I mean the modern idea of the writer director star was not invented by orson welles. Charlie chaplin predates george nearly as predates. That i mean can go one hundred and twenty years back but the modern idea of it the idea of the writer director star in the question of is this vanity is the self criticism is this nurses says this about his own persona is orson welles making to some extent. Not just me. But hearse tweeting to like this about himself is this about his conception of his own promise and how you might see his life in career going at a time. When hollywood industry media were super interested in personalities an offscreen and gossip and celebrity. Not that that's changed but that was really kind of coming into. Its own late. Twenties thirties forties. That's a huge part of citizen kane especially because he's an outsider not a nobody. No one was listening to this. Who doesn't it history should save. Lycee or smells came to hollywood that he was like. Who's this guy. I mean he was one of the great entertainers. Showman are actually used that word. It's apparently a bad word. Showman now verson wells. But he didn't come out of nowhere. He was incredibly famous. And the here. He is putting himself onscreen aging eighty years on screen. It's amazing yeah. So there's there's two things but what you guys are saying that that trigger me here so one of them is that the movie itself is a manifestation of that mirror shot that you're talking about atom where it feels like a number of different people competing to capture the reflection of the cane character. And who that person is that the way that the script is structured by having these series of flashbacks in these series of unreliable narrators. You get what feels like a portrait of a person. There's really no way to know whether it's an accurate portrait of a person. In the same way that all movies are just sort of perspective driven then the other thing is that the remembrances and the controversies in the history of this movie is is a reflection of that storytelling choice and that everyone is competing with their own agendas to tell the story properly. I think what's most amazing to me about it from likable the technical and emotional perspective as it does feel like for somebody who was while not new to this. Adam was still an outsider to hollywood. He did manage to convene some of the very best people that would ever work in the history of the medium. This is bernard herman's first film. I believe as a film composer and he does the score. It's one of robert wise's first credits as an editor. And he goes on to be one of the most hallowed filmmakers of the fifties and sixties in hollywood. His assistant is mark robson who is also a great filmmaker. We talked about toland. We talked about all these actors. Joseph cotten and agnes moorehead and all these incredible people who had not mostly not acted in films before and.

orson welles Lycee hollywood verson wells Charlie chaplin kane george bernard herman robert wise Adam mark robson toland agnes moorehead Joseph cotten
"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:11 min | 10 months ago

"orson" Discussed on The Big Picture

"That's not something to hold against something because what is at very little ever could be again because how nowhere that movie king. I'm glad you raised the sight and sound poll aspect of this. I was gonna bring it up later. And i just wanted to point out that i wouldn't underestimate the levels of horny nece among gen-x and gen y. Voters as they grow older and what vertigo will mean for them too. So i'm not sure. The vertical will necessarily be displaced triple frontier cruise christian christian pencil might vote for dennis eve's towelettes. That would be fabulous. News is news. Let me just let me provide some some context for people who are listening. Who maybe don't know very much about cain or have only seen it once or wanna just have a little bit deeper understanding of how this movie was made. And i think we should talk about how it was made because i think that's big part of understanding why it matters so much. So obviously as you mentioned at orson welles was incredible young. When he made this movie he was only twenty four years old. He had just signed a three picture deal with archaic in which he was granted essentially complete autonomy to make whatever he wanted so long as he co wrote directed produced and starred in the films which is a fascinating idea in general and the movie he was originally going to make was adaptation of joseph conrad's heart of darkness which would have been an amazing movie and maybe itself could be fascinating podcast about the way he was going to make that movie which was he was going to play. Both marlowe n kurtz and the film would be entirely shot from the perspective of marlow so even at this really young age with no film experience you could see. Orson was the kind of person who had just had incredible sense of daring and creativity in approaching everything that he was doing. Obviously he was a star in the mercury theatre which he helped co found he was a radio star at this time and hollywood you know he was an outsider to the space and he brought with him his mercury theatre troupe to act in this movie obviously the performances are amazing. None more so than wells. But i wanted to. I think we should just talk directly immediately about why..

orson welles cain dennis marlowe n kurtz joseph conrad heart of darkness marlow Orson mercury theatre hollywood
War of the Worlds: A Wave of Halloween Hysteria

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:56 min | 1 year ago

War of the Worlds: A Wave of Halloween Hysteria

"We're going to look back eighty-two years. Why because it's almost Halloween eighty-two years ago people America woke up to discover that the night before they had been the victim of a theatrical radio presentation. The date was October 30th 1938 the radio show was Orson Welles Mercury on the error version of HG Wells War of the Worlds now in 1938 war was brewing Germany invaded Austria. And Japan was strongly along with the Invader prior to World War II. It was forecasted Britain would suffer night are bombing attacks causing large numbers of Civilian casualties in Mass Destruction. It was widely agreed that navigation and targeting would be more difficult if man-made lights on the ground could be extinguished as early as July 1938 American citizens were off. To practice lights out beginning at dusk. It would not be called blackout drills until nineteen thirty-nine fear across the country as rumors spread about coming to the aid of our British allies should War break out but the sounds of war that came over the radio that October 30th 1938 were not from Europe but from Mars Choice a live broadcast Across America 5 p.m. In the west which would have made it about 8 p.m. Eastern time meant that there was no time to warn the West Palm about what was to come a wave of Hysteria that swept across United States at night before Halloween has risked realistic radio dramatization reached all the way to Portland, Oregon 2500 miles from the scene of the fictional Invasion. The telephone switchboard of The Oregonian newspaper in Portland was swamped by hundreds of excited dog. As people rushed into the business office of the newspaper demanding information hundreds of calls were made to the Portland Police most wanting to know what protection the city could off and what place might be safe in the event that wholesale destruction spread to the Pacific coast doctors reported cases of women fainting a mandamus reported to a loaded his family into a car and driven frantically through the streets of Portland searching for a Haven of Refuge Portland officers or the Western Union Telegraph company were jammed with person seeking to send off of grams to relatives in the East inquiring as to their safety just as an announcer was choked off by poisonous gas in what he had said might be the last broadcast ever made the town plunged Into Darkness would be the town of War again Portland, Oregon. Of course, this was the effect of the early blackout program announced a previous week off. Few people remembered that elsewhere in the Northwest calls poured into newspapers and press Association offices by the thousands a Seattle newspaper switchboard report hysterical calls from persons wanting to know if it was true that New York had disappeared beneath the Atlantic Ocean phrases, like here they come Paula skyscrapers, they're throwing Heatwave shocked and horrified listeners one, Oregon Journal newspaper reporter returning from the coast pulled into a gas station and was informed by a pack stricken McMinnville attendant not to bother gassing up that the world was coming to an end. That was Nineteen thirty-eight Americans today are much more Savvy and have many more ways of or receiving news other than radio. And of course if message came over Facebook Twitter or one of the other internet services, we wouldn't be fooled or would we change? Portland Oregon's response

Portland Oregon America Orson Welles Portland Police Oregon Journal Facebook Britain Japan Germany Europe West Palm The Oregonian United States Press Association Atlantic Ocean Twitter Seattle
Shenanigans Again

Your Brain on Facts

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Shenanigans Again

"Parents are naturally worried for their children and it doesn't seem to take much to send them into a tizzy. and. It's not just parents. We as people are pretty prone to overreacting to the first piece of information we receive. Modern media makes the spreading of these new urban legends basically effortless. But false panics and hoaxes are far from a new invention. Always. been with us. Most people know the story surrounding Orson Welles radio play the war of the worlds by H. G. Wells. No relation it was presented in the form of a newscast detailing the invasion of earth by beings from another world clearly bent on our destruction. Listeners thought the broadcast was real. There was mayhem in the streets as as many as a million people fled their homes or armed themselves and made ready to fight off the alien hordes. We know all about the panic that this radio play cost it was in all the papers. Therein lies the problem. Newspapers of the day greatly exaggerated the situation. To begin with not that many people were tuned in to the Mercury Theatre on the air that evening only two percent of households with radios even heard the play. which repeatedly identified itself as such during the performance. Some CBS radio affiliates even cut away from the broadcast in favor of local programming further shrinking the potential audience. Most people were listening instead to the ratings, Juggernaut, ventriloquist at Gergen. I still fail to understand how a ventriloquist act really worked on the radio. If it makes you happy. So. Why then if so few people. and. Fewer still were confused by it did newspapers separately and independently make the situation sound much worse than it was. They were motivated by fear not of aliens but of the radio. The wireless radio was the first real threat to the superiority of the newspaper as the public's primary source of information. Reporters and editors saw this as an opportunity to prove to advertisers and regulators that radio was dangerous irresponsible and not to be trusted. A similar thing happened in. England. Twelve years earlier with a fictitious report that an angry mob of unemployed workers were running amok in London looting and destroying everything in sight. The National Gallery had been ransacked the Savoy hotel blown up. The houses of parliament were being attacked with trench mortars and the Big Ben. Clock, tower had been raised to the ground. Like any good radio play? The narration was accompanied by sound effects. Of Fear Few people did take to the streets, even fleeing past the famous buildings that had been reportedly destroyed while others desperately clogged police phone lines. The BBC tried to ease tensions by reminding people that the report was a comedy skit entitled broadcasting in the barricades. anding their message with London is safe Big Ben is still chiming and all his well. You can't trust the BBC at least we can still rely on armed forces, radio. People fought until nineteen, forty seven. When in May W v TR in Tokyo began to issue a series of bulletins about a twenty foot high monster that had risen from the sea to lay waste to the area. Bullets were useless against this dragon like creature listeners could hear terrified shrieks, people shouting orders over bullhorns, heavy weapons and Massu vehicles rolling by. When the beast reached downtown and the intrepid reporter who provided the play by play snuck closer, the monster opened its mouth. And congratulated T.. R. On its fifth anniversary in a high soprano voice. That's right an hour's worth of breaking news to pat themselves on the back. During the broadcast police phone lines were tied up with people trying to get information.

London BBC Orson Welles CBS Gergen H. G. Wells England Reporter Mercury Theatre National Gallery Tokyo
Shenanigans Again

Your Brain on Facts

04:38 min | 1 year ago

Shenanigans Again

"In two, thousand, three Oprah Winfrey used her massive daytime television platform to warn millions of people that teenage girls were attending parties, wearing wild shades of lipstick and performing oral sex on boys. The boy with the most colors of lipstick smudges would win the accolade of his peers. These were called Rainbow Parties. The story was picked up by newspapers television stations across the country parents were panicking. There was one small detail that Oprah missed though. There had not been a single verifiable instance of a Rainbow Party F-. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Parents are naturally worried for their children and it doesn't seem to take much to send them into a tizzy. and. It's not just parents. We as people are pretty prone to overreacting to the first piece of information we receive. Modern media makes the spreading of these new urban legends basically effortless. But false panics and hoaxes are far from a new invention. Always. been with us. Most people know the story surrounding Orson Welles radio play the war of the worlds by H. G. Wells. No relation it was presented in the form of a newscast detailing the invasion of earth by beings from another world clearly bent on our destruction. Listeners thought the broadcast was real. There was mayhem in the streets as as many as a million people fled their homes or armed themselves and made ready to fight off the alien hordes. We know all about the panic that this radio play cost it was in all the papers. Therein lies the problem. Newspapers of the day greatly exaggerated the situation. To begin with not that many people were tuned in to the Mercury Theatre on the air that evening only two percent of households with radios even heard the play. which repeatedly identified itself as such during the performance. Some CBS radio affiliates even cut away from the broadcast in favor of local programming further shrinking the potential audience. Most people were listening instead to the ratings, Juggernaut, ventriloquist at Gergen. I still fail to understand how a ventriloquist act really worked on the radio. If it makes you happy. So. Why then if so few people. and. Fewer still were confused by it did newspapers separately and independently make the situation sound much worse than it was. They were motivated by fear not of aliens but of the radio. The wireless radio was the first real threat to the superiority of the newspaper as the public's primary source of information. Reporters and editors saw this as an opportunity to prove to advertisers and regulators that radio was dangerous irresponsible and not to be trusted. A similar thing happened in. England. Twelve years earlier with a fictitious report that an angry mob of unemployed workers were running amok in London looting and destroying everything in sight. The National Gallery had been ransacked the Savoy hotel blown up. The houses of parliament were being attacked with trench mortars and the Big Ben. Clock, tower had been raised to the ground. Like any good radio play? The narration was accompanied by sound effects. Of Fear Few people did take to the streets, even fleeing past the famous buildings that had been reportedly destroyed while others desperately clogged police phone lines. The BBC tried to ease tensions by reminding people that the report was a comedy skit entitled broadcasting in the barricades. anding their message with London is safe Big Ben is still chiming and all his well. You can't trust the BBC at least we can still rely on armed forces, radio. People fought until nineteen, forty seven. When in May W v TR in Tokyo began to issue a series of bulletins about a twenty foot high monster that had risen from the sea to lay waste to the area. Bullets were useless against this dragon like creature listeners could hear terrified shrieks, people shouting orders over bullhorns, heavy weapons and Massu vehicles rolling

Oprah Winfrey London BBC Rainbow Parties Orson Welles CBS Gergen H. G. Wells England Mercury Theatre Tokyo National Gallery
"All's Wells That Ends Welles!"

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"All's Wells That Ends Welles!"

"Ask them so we're not here to Florida pushing for Grant Rebecca Chin Voids Mother's Pomeranian. Probably Mr Perry were stranded diamonds. Pastry midstream collision incapacitated that. They're Taivon spaceship. There sure is a lot more traffic in this section of the time and space during Dr Floyd. Yes which one of them would help us. Hold that cardboard windshield blazer higher chips one of these vehicles as start there goes another laureate. Yeah but that one has red rims on all those starship. Those guys are always running through here. I wonder how many times I've screwed up the fabric of time. Who knows Dr Floyd? How are we going to stop Dr Steve? He's probably already causing havoc in one thousand nine thirty that we can do until we get some help with this time and space you at that very moment of time and space vehicle pulls up alongside our heroes ship. The vehicle looks like a helicopter without blades. Piloting it is a stout old man. Seventy eight hours the ownership and steps off on Dr Floyd ship having a little trouble. Why yes we are say. Aren't you H. G. Wells the famous author? Yes I am. How did you know that Dr Grant Pictures Anyway Mr Wells? I didn't know you time travel. No of course I had to do some research my book and decided that I should just go ahead and build and test a real time machine lobby Horn. Schwebel eventually done quite a bit of time. Traveling I even stopped Jack. The ripper using this machine but no one believes me enough about me to you. Guys are stuck here. Yeah we left ourselves. But I don't don't explain it to them. Dr Grant. It gives me a brain cramp every time. You take a look and see what you've got most of all your little crystal key has fallen out just back into place secondly flux capacitor is dented. Duma here let me just as h g wells works on our heroes Thailand spaceship. Let's see what evil mastermind Dr Steven. It's actually this is up to the year. Nineteen thirty eight here. We are at the. Cbs Radio Studios in New York City inside studio one. Orson Welles the rest of the actors Mercury Theatre of repairing to go live on the air with that production of war of the worlds. We will slip into the theater right before. Eight o'clock and Swipe Orson Welles script that we'll be back in time and space ship before the panic. Ensues we'll just tell them out of the door that I'm one of those people who make sound effects for the radio show. Yes a phony. A Foley artist are you should who will anyway. I'll tell them that I'm going to make the sounds of the show and then let me in now. I just have to figure out how to sneaky. You fidget. I've got it. I'll just put you on my foots. Come you stop weekly lit up now. Let's you there. We go quiet fidget. We're almost there. Hey what do you think your goal and I am a Foley artist. That's the person who makes the sound's also referred to as full as for the radio shows. I need to gain entrance theater so I can obviously make Foley's for Wales's Radio Show George thing. Come on in. Thank you squeaky Shula Stephen Frazier now. Two steps away from swiping well script. We'll heroes be able to stop them. Let's see what progress is being made on our time and space ship. That should do it. You're all set G. THANKS MR wells. Yeah thanks we can be on our way to October. Thirtieth nineteen thirty eight inch Dr Steve. Thirty nine hundred thirty eight. That's where I heading. I'm actually just going back one day. So that I can stop Olsen Wilson putting on his ridiculous Radio Play of Waltham. He sent panic through entire cities even though most of them will just in New Jersey. I was going to just sue him but then I remembered my time machine Mr Wills. I probably shouldn't be telling you this because I risked messing up the very fabric of time. But you should probably let them do it after the panic down. Sales of Your Book Might Skyrocket Green. Well my sales have been lacking recently either way. I have to finish my trip before I go back so I'll just tag along with you and hope you defeat this doctor Steve Fellow was he planning on doing anyway. Leadership around the back of ours and park it in the cargo bay we'll explain it to you underway and this time. I'm driving Dr Green. Yeah Yeah Sorry. Rose the man that many say is the father of science fiction head off towards nineteen thirty eight. Steve is now in the studio recording. More the world's we'll take two here. He is also wells about to do his radio. Show here let me take you off. Michael you distract him and I'll steal. The script came back in the air. Vigilance W protozoan wells and taps on the ankle world. Is there a Saas? What what did you say Rosebud? What does that mean to Steve Grabs Orson Welles? The script from his music team. I have the script to put all usual. Plan into action rugby. Hd West. Front Dr Steve. While Dr Floyd gets on his hands and knees behind Ya g shelby. She wells pushes. Dr Steve whose deaths back in trip he falls backwards and as he does. Chips knocks creeped out of his hands. The script flies over grants head and he reaches up and catches it and falls over and Orson Welles speed and right on top of fidget. Here's your script Mr Wells. Now go put on a great show we are live wasn't wells runs to the microphone on proceeds to make radio history and all is well again or at least always the chaotic mess. It's supposed to like a Florida H. G. Wells and the rest of the gang. Get so engrossed in watching worth of work that they don't notice. Dr Steven slip out the back door and into the night after the show is over H. G. Wells congratulates Dr Floyd and his crew. We're going to meet Orson Welles you WANNA come with as H G no. I'm not supposed to meet him for another two years. I'm going to head back tomorrow. You guys keep up the good work and keep on Reading Books. We will hd. I've almost read all of them. You know it was a pleasure working with you Mr Wells. I wouldn't have missed it for all the time in the world as it gave. I'm going to use that against you. Wells walks off into the night and after a brief meeting with wasn't wells. Dr Grant and chips are back in their time and space ship heading for another adventure. Where will they exploit to? The next will ever be able to work like a fever. And we'll get a taste of Dr Steve. Out of his mouth

Dr Steve Dr Floyd H. G. Wells Orson Welles Dr Grant Dr Steven Mr Wells Wells Mr Perry Dr Green Taivon Spaceship Florida Cbs Radio Studios Steve Fellow Rebecca Chin Duma Steve Grabs Mr Wills
"Accident In Time!"

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"Accident In Time!"

"Endless weeks of chasing Dr Steven Federal through the time and space. His young protege decker brand. Nothing companionship's are hoping to hit back to their own time. It got showing the latest Star Wars Film and being true at heart. They are going in costume. Golly chips your rookie costume looks really good. Laugh IT UP FUZZBALL CARE. Help me get this white sheet over my head. Hey that e walk costume you made for Mr Pitches looks great man. I love the walks. They were just a little bit of cute and Fuzzy that that movie needed okay. Is everyone ready to go right chips? I never realized the resemblance but now that I see him in the costume which is now on nothing. You just really look a lot like Yoda. That's all I'm not sure if I should take a complimentary nuts at any rate. Why are you dressed as a ghost? Don't we were all going in Star Wars characters and OBI Wan Kanobi after he died and founded coming down to tell you that oh be one is dead. He was struck down and then he faded away. Why can't own doctor? Stevens made a time jump. Agree great now. I'll never find out what happens to antic in at the end of episode three Total Control Room W grant you forgot to wax the Poles again. Just take the stairs bolger so much fun okay. As our heroes begin their journey through time and space. We find that no good near to well Stephen. Sasha in fidgets racing through time and space juryman full ball. We'RE DR Steve Behind the wheel. Not Tell me how to drive. I was driving way before you were showing off the back of his sheep. I am not following. Close that steam train up ahead is moving too slow. I have to stay over. Eighty eight miles. An hour will drop out of the time and space streets. Aren't you'll right. There does seem to be an awful lot of traffic in this part of the time and space treats reserve. We are going to October. Thirtieth nineteen thirty eight. It was on that date that Orson. Welles created quite a panic by putting on a dramatic contemporary production of H G wells war of the worlds. I'm going to steal his script from the production to sell on Ebay in our own time. I just love that script. He was a brilliant bit of evil genius. In Austin Center City Independent he was on inspiring even if it was just a city in New Jersey. What do you mean? He wasn't an evil genius. Loss and wells was one of my inspirations to become an evil genius. That's what we live for striking terror into the hearts of cities even if they are just cities in New Jersey. I remember Oh no Dr Steven plotting steel awesome well script from the radio. Production of war of the worlds can our heroes toward his evil machinations list granite chips and find out Dr Lu. You can't drive this fast through traffic heavy. Whatever that delorean Dr Floyd? I'd never hit anyone before. That doesn't mean you won't read word on a motorcycle. Wear right over there. That's really cool. You know he was always guided is on the road is jumping your host Dr Grant. When are you gonNa hit that phone booth? You distracted me with Fred Ward judge. Oh boy. They're getting out of the phone booth roll down a window Dr Grant but you said we couldn't roll down the windows and the time and space during I know what I said but just roll it down. Do you do all right? Well yea walk. Who'll light or toot swayed in a flash? The phone on its three occupants are gone back in time and space stream great took off. Our ship won't start. What are we going to do? Dr Four till quadruple comes by. I'll give them a call right now to fold. Thank you for calling quadruple when you're not around around wind around midday meal stuck in an endless loop. I'm positive all companies do that on purpose because they're on a coffee break. Let me see the phone. Dr Floyd where are you calling? I'm calling our lab. Nobody's there yeah but we will be there in the future so I'll just leave a message for us to come get us and we'll get it later and then come get ourselves as well. That's assuming that we even get out of here. But if you call us there before we leave here then brain cramp low. Who is this Dr? Doug who's this grant he dr? Doug how are you? We haven't seen in a long time. Where have you been around? Hey listen you left the door wide open so I came in mind. That's good. We need your help actually good. I love to help. What can I do for you? We need you to write a note for us to come rescue ourselves out in the time and space dream we'll do vitamins space stream guys. Kill me okay I gotta go now. Have a good time. We all well. I hope he leaves the note for. I don't think he did because we didn't show up. Maybe we're late. But how can we show up if we're already don't start now? Sit on the hood of their incapacitated time spaceships. Throwing rocks waiting patiently. Someone to come rescue me mild onto seat in almost to the year. Nineteen thirty eight where they are going to attempt to steal while script for more of the world. We'll next ZIVA plans succeed. We log heroes find a way to fix their ship. Or will they find the known? The future of they've left for themselves in my head if I know next

Dr Grant Dr Floyd Doug Dr Four Dr Steven Federal Obi Wan Kanobi Welles Dr Steve Dr Steven Dr Lu New Jersey Mr Pitches Stephen Ebay Fred Ward Bolger Stevens Brain Cramp Wells Sasha
"orson" Discussed on The Johnny Carson Show

The Johnny Carson Show

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"orson" Discussed on The Johnny Carson Show

"Dyer paraphrase the message of your book wrongly and but basically make that please you that make you happy and now in relation to that? I was reading some reviews of your book and some other. I guess you'd say self help books as as what it is and one of them was how to be your own best friend. And I think the book reviewer said he thought maybe there was little hedonistic in a way that you always please yourself or do what pleases you. It sounds like a little over simplified. Yeah except I think that's one of the things that I really get tired of hearing people. Tell me options that loving yourself means that you're being hedonistic that you're that you're putting yourself first. Where does anybody get the idea that you can be good at loving somebody else or that you can be good at giving to another human being unless you start out with the attitude that you're worthwhile that you count and that you're not going into the relationship having to get something out of it all the time people who are always looking for approval? Who are always saying please like me and are always sacrificing their life. I really a pain in the neck to be around the really not fun people to so call right. It's a person who really digs himself and feels good about himself. That gets a lot of love in their life and gets a lot of the things. That done doers are people who who feel good about themselves. People that are like on this panel. You Know Orson Welles A guy who's been doing all of his life.

Orson Welles Dyer
"orson" Discussed on The Johnny Carson Show

The Johnny Carson Show

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"orson" Discussed on The Johnny Carson Show

"Orson Welles? Welcome back is it really Freddie's birthday today. Maybe I was suspecting that he was doing what I used to do. A fake birthdays. Did you really hot unmarried years? Yes just so people will know you take the girl out you say. Tonight is my birthday off saying they bring to the table at the end a little cake. She says that you'll be answered by Would well on trouble. Was that some friends of mine. Who had the same birthday as I do? Would come into the restaurant in January in mind is May and see that cake coming out. Now when you're desperate you do. Almost anything during the service in the war was you. Don't believe the best overseas tomorrow. That's it you guys never left the state and they were constantly going on a troop transport. I used to say I was leaving to. Yeah I wasn't in the the trouble was I wasn't in uniform but I told him that I was on dangerous secret. See it's a little hard to say that now last time you were here we started talking and we got into a longest gushed radio days and when I got back yesterday and saw the names up on the Board. I said my God. We didn't have time to put together what we had talked about last time. But you must promise me the next time you come back. We'll know about an advanced. We want you to bring one of the old the mercury theater scripts or whatever you'd like to bring you. Have you still have the radio scripts will I? I can get all of them. I think we can get hold of some kind of a script. One of those great radio shows and we want to recreate it on stage here with a you. Actress will get the people out to play a small part. We'll get what you mean a smallpox. Well whatever you think lie. I see you in commanding role large rule. Yes being humble but I was going to be something fine for two. I was looking for something. And then we'll get the sound man and we'll show the people what they used to do in a radio broadcasting studio when they did something like The Mercury theatre suspense or when it was when they actually will sit there and read the lines. Did all the sound effects from the door opening two gunshots two screams to thunder and lightning and show you the illusion that can be coming. They all ladies who played crying babies. That was always fun interesting. I did not realize they were Suisse's fires and they took infants. This very well to very serious little elderly ladies would come in and you'd see there was nothing in the script for them until it said. Oh isn't isn't cute. And they take the check and go home but we're GonNa do that happened to them. There isn't much of a feel for that anymore. It's not a big at home but next time we are going to recreate all right. Those great shows all right are you. Are you getting What's that you're taking a anything I.

Freddie Orson Welles Board
Actor Orson Bean, 91, hit and killed by car in LA

WBZ Midday News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Actor Orson Bean, 91, hit and killed by car in LA

"Actor Orson bean has died he was struck and killed by car in southern California last night this happened in Venice investigators say the initial indication is this was just a tragic accident the driver did stay on the scene Orson bean was best known for his appearances on TV gaming talk shows here he wasn't Johnny Carson is a book on breaking it up the best routines of the stand up comics they sent it to me in the and the last thing the other day and I'm in there I am the very first one because it is chronological above the new

California Johnny Carson Venice
Actor Orson Bean hit and killed by car in L.A.

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:13 sec | 1 year ago

Actor Orson Bean hit and killed by car in L.A.

"The actor and comedian Orson bean has died he was ninety one the Los Angeles county coroner's office confirmed his death in a truck epic incident last night being was crossing a busy street in Venice when he was struck by two

Venice Orson Bean Los Angeles
Actor-comedian Orson Bean, 91, hit and killed by car in LA

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Actor-comedian Orson Bean, 91, hit and killed by car in LA

"Or is it being the witty actor and comedian was killed as he was crossing the street in Los Angeles Friday night according to authorities he was ninety one third ranking number three our do you know anything about contact lenses for chickens being was a panelist on to tell the truth in the sixties the actor appeared in more than a hundred TV shows and films his career spanned more than six decades including a recurring role on desperate housewives we now these are our last days together so what's the point of holding back police say being was walking in Venice when he was led by one vehicle and bell a second robber that struck and killed him the actor is survived by a wife and four children who was also the father in law of the late conservative commentator Andrew Breitbart I'm Julie Walker

Los Angeles Venice Andrew Breitbart Julie Walker
6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:53 min | 1 year ago

6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

"Heck Bolden is an eighty three year old undergraduate at the heart school of music in Connecticut is also an atomic vet one of thousands of soldiers exposed to secret nuclear weapons tests during the Cold War Connecticut public radio's Diane Orson has the story of one man's remarkable journey in nineteen fifty five Hank Bolden was in his late teens and stationed in California one day the young musician was told he'd been chosen to participate in a special military exercise I had no idea what I was selected for he was flown to desert rock Nevada where he joined hundreds of other soldiers from across the country he didn't know anyone else there a day later they were marched out to trenches and the trash that I was and there was nothing but so does that look like me our our black faces a countdown began when it got down to zero that's when the big flash one of the big flash with the dropping of the atomic bomb for the testing and they had us place two point eight miles from ground zero not only in the path of the fallout but in the predicted path for the fallout then came a wave of heat and dust and there weren't any goggles a debt that we have to place our rise just had a helmet in arms supposedly to protect the eyes and give visibly see so your bones and he visibly see or other folks skeletons in our that's what I saw yes after the tests pulled in and the other soldiers had to swear an oath of secrecy never to talk about when it happened not to family doctors or to each other violation of the oath was punishable by ten years in prison and a ten thousand dollar fine golden says for decades he never talked but as the years went on he was diagnosed with bladder cancer multiple myeloma and subcapsular cataracts he began to worry that his health problems might be connected to what he'd seen there were a lot of tests in this period Alex Muller Steen isn't a story in of nuclear weapons at the Stevens institute of technology he's speaking by Skype these are really tests to see what happens to soldiers if they see a live nuclear weapon go off can they still be command do they become hysterical and no longer take orders did they become so overcome with fear that they can't do anything at the same time military commanders were not fully aware of the risks of exposing soldiers to ionizing radiation says well Steen slowly veterans who'd been unwittingly used as human research subjects began quietly sharing their stories Congress lifted the oath of secrecy in nineteen ninety six today those who can demonstrate their atomic veterans and have developed one of several specific medical conditions are eligible for compensation last year after receiving his compensation Hank bold and decided to go back to college when he got out of the army back in the fifties hidden rolled at the heart school of music but never got a degree but dropped out of college to go on a rope and music and I love to complete before right but have started so the eighty three year old audition for renowned saxophonist trevan Jackson director of hearts jazz studies division it was apparent to me that he is a practitioner about to said musician who can do it but he wants to come in and learn a little bit more about the nuts and bolts of music which I think is some to be an off old and was accepted and awarded a scholarship he says he's come to terms with what happened decades ago when he was a young soldier I have no regrets about being involuntarily volunteered because after he has played a part in and to my being here now where Matt as for sitting in classes alongside students one quarter his age Bouldin says well music will keep

Heck Bolden
Shootings, blasts prompt Denmark to tighten border controls

BBC World Service

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Shootings, blasts prompt Denmark to tighten border controls

"Denmark is introducing random border controls with Sweden from today to try to combat organized crime moves been prompted by a number of attacks in Denmark this year in which Swedes are the prime suspects Mike Sanders reports the market's been rattled by recent violence in August industrial explosives wrecked the engines to the Danish tax agency in Copenhagen and two killings in a suburb of the Danish capital in June Denmark is holding seven Swedish suspects Sweden has approved the new measures they'll be in force on that some road and rail bridge connecting Copenhagen and mama in Sweden and that full ferry ports Danish police is setting up an Orson border center to collect intelligence on known criminals their vehicles and associates the thousands of daily commute is a device to carry passports

Denmark Sweden Mike Sanders Copenhagen Orson Border Center
Dennis' Moment Lives up to the Hype in Iroquois

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:08 min | 2 years ago

Dennis' Moment Lives up to the Hype in Iroquois

"Good morning my friend very good more this where we just played the clip type of this horse breaking his maiden Dennis's moment and have you. I know you've been around some pretty darn. Good horses my friend but this is that impressed that performance was so so so impressive yeah. It's bad in the best meaning victory ever seen so I've been around a Lotta. He acts like he's one of the best. When did you start to get in a sense that he could be this kind of horse like him a lot when they were breaking even then we came into us when the first time she prays. I'm working with some good horses. Nobody can keep up with it so figured we were on something pretty special and then he comes out in his maiden race and clips heels loses. Jockey Robbie Alvarado that was in June and then redeems himself of that nineteen eight victory what was going through your mind when you saw him clip heels and saw Robbie come off. That was a bad day. I was just I hope I saw the ratings. Were still in place in soap. They went come over said tripping wouldn't get hurt and then worried about he was hurt when we got back to the barn but he's sure got lucky that day and that's that's show how good he really is in. The stomach did get get himself up recovering. Come back in and Iran down to Orson wonder race and fifty Yup Yup. You know you were saying that that was maybe the most special maiden breaking performance performance that you've seen it. You've seen a lot of them. Nineteen lengths the final margin I as as he's drawing off through the stretch and you're watching that what's going through your mind. Well I mean. I just couldn't believe what I was seeing. He just got widening and asks the Jack said he actually never asked him to. Rani said he couldn't tell us going that fast but turnaround look. There's nobody back there. I mean it had me shaken with so impressive when now he s a stretch out go to turns in in this mile and a sixteenth Iroquois later this afternoon. What have you done to make sure he's ready to stretch out. Well yet missed a beat. I mean the thing is you don't want to Overdo it. He's but he missed a pre work then on racetrack over day since handed and he's naturally should rallied the distance with federal great yeah he should son of. Tis Now and a horse that appears to be is talented as they come and just in case you're wondering they'll just two hundred thirty one days ten hours six minutes and four seconds until the first Saturday in May that's a lot of strategy for a horse. Do you let that cross your mind at all at this point. That's way too early. I mean you can't help but to start dreaming a little bit but there's so much inbetween here and we just wanted to get through this race if you're expecting superbowl towards the Breeders Cup. You've done pretty well in this Iroquois this again looking for your third victory. you want it in two thousand thirteen we Kleber and came back in two thousand sixteen with not this time. What is it about this race. It just seems to fit your overall schedule and your philosophy was churchill downs for one. That's that's how I need to know. The last ten years we deal with a lot of courses trying to make a derby horse or triple crown horse. This is the first step in the past thirty so it's just a pretty obvious fit force you know he showed a lot of speed going to the to the front right off the bat and that seven Furlong Maiden win. Is that the strategy. You expect to see again today. There's a lot of speed in the race so it just leave it up to the ACA Iran Ortiz. The best rat countries coming in around him breaking. Put him wherever he feels comfortable. Just try not to give him. Stop talking about that relationship. You have with the al-baas obviously you've you've had a ton of success in recent years partnering with them talk about that relationship yeah. It's been good I mean. We put a system together several years ago to try to get derby horses. We've put up. We've had a five years. I've got the three times and really everybody thinks they have a Lotta. Horses will only about eight euros a year so the systems working and hopefully this horse can get us there. A two definitely deserved win the big yeah no doubt about it. This horse sold for four hundred thousand dollars as a yearling at the Saratoga sale the phasing Tipton Saratoga sale last last year. What was it you saw him as a yearling that made you think okay we gotta have him well. We got a big team. That goes out selects. The horses got from the pedigree the analyst of the shortlist very park for not come through with the final say and he just jumped through all the hoops you have to go through the cardiovascular exam a skeleton exam he jumped through all the hoops and you know the price point we thought was fair for Saratoga. Especially four hundred thousand looks like it's GonNa pay the off. Yeah it certainly does. He's he's talented. Dennis's moment in the grade three Iroquois race ten at Churchill this afternoon yet a few others to you have three other maidens ends that are entered you have to in the fourth race in one in the eleventh race following the Iroquois Tell me a little bit about cigar box and fight fight fight in the fourth scratched fight fight fight fight. I don't like him. Come out on the white running KLOM race and cigar box source. He's doing good. You never know about our debut but he's training very well. later later on we've got the very top divorce and continental clash another. Tis Now. He's a big strong. Colton who got started anymore else. He just wanted to stretch out on. I just want to get a raise at L. Cave you. You know it's funny. When you think about sport seems Dale you often hear that they don't rebuild build. They reload in every year. You come round with these top two year olds. It seems like that's all you do. You don't rebuild just reload this game. Everything starts on September. When we start on babysit hopefully continue to do that. You know the our goal is to win executor. Everyone saying the only way you can do to start with some good young horses yeah it would be special special del Romans a native of Louisville to win the Kentucky Derby at his home track in his home town would be quite remarkable. Dale is always man. I appreciate the visit and thanks thanks for spending a few minutes. I know you got a lot of things to get to today so I'll let you

Robbie Alvarado Dennis Saratoga Dale Aca Iran Ortiz Iran Louisville Rani Kentucky Iroquois Jack Superbowl Kleber Orson Analyst L. Cave Breeders Cup Colton Churchill Four Hundred Thousand Dollars
"orson" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"orson" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"The rest of your life. That is the the opposite problem of most artists he came out of the gate. Eight great. And then I'm guessing spent the rest of his life having to live up to that moment of of greatness. That's a good point. What time does telescopes in reverse? He had a good twenty five or thirty years when he was at the top of his game and arguably remained at the top of his game. It's that the world did not give him the opportunities. And he has shooed many of the opportunities that would have allowed him to continue to be in the public eye at the top of his game. Also, the here's a critical thing. The reason I call it Orson rehearsed is because of his great gloss on Moby, Dick Moby. Dick, rehearsed. Rehearsed. Yeah, it's a it was his idea to to stage Moby, Dick. But very early on in rehearsals. He realized that he enjoyed rehearsing it. More than performing it. So what he did is. This was in London. He created an omnibus sort of a sandbox piece called Moby Dick rehearsed where every time it was performed. It was different is see now, here's where I get my idea. And sometimes he would gauge what was going on in the audience, and he's he's shoved one of his team out. There said do the the p quad scene where this happens now. And then if things were just going cold in the audience, he might come out and do a monologue or talk about being Orson Welles. It was the Orson Welles variety show through the miles of Moby, Dick. This was back in London in the sixties. I think and he was already there. My I posit that. In fact, having started at the top even by the time he got to the second third four films like Amerson, and it's all true and the films that he just started leaving in hotel rooms half cut or cut. I think that he enjoyed. Rehearsing them and shooting them and going through the process of making film and theater far more than he enjoyed the process of having to sit there in a movie theater. Having critics judge him. I think that he decided quite rightfully as many artists do that was much more fun making art than having to endure the results of having made. Do you think that was born out of win? You are creating a piece of art. You're recording a piece of music painting. Whatever there is a point at which you have to call it, even though you know, that future you is going to maybe not be completely satisfied with with the work that you've done or may just hate it. Because past you was stupid, or what have you know? If you're self critical person. Do you do you think that there is some of that in wells that he? In you know, because when you when you do that when you release something out into the world, you're releasing out there for the public to judge for I'm hearing future self to judge. I think that that is again, I hate to compliment you because why should I say anything nice about anybody? But it's a great question. And here's the irony. Maybe this is why we're talking today. Here's my stance on this question in Seattle. I wrote an opera for that company called Amelia, the end of the opera consists of a woman giving birth to a daughter named Amelia, she has surrounded by hospital technicians and her doctor and so forth. But during the course of the opera has been revealed that these are the actors who also portrayed her her missing father and her husband and her best friend and other people, and it it emerges that at the moment of giving birth to this child..

Moby Dick Dick Moby Orson Welles London Seattle Amelia Amerson thirty years
"orson" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"orson" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"What you are about to witness has never been performed in front of a podcast audience before audio prestigious nation that is to see sleight of hand, or I guess in this case slight of ear. Sorry. In this episode. I chat with composer, Daron Haagen about his opera Orson rehearsed which is about Orson Welles best known as the director of the movie citizen Kane and the radio drama war of the worlds, and I'm using the term opera loosely here because what Darren is actually created just kind of uses opera as a jumping off point. He in the form of opportunities rearranged it into something new. What he has to teach us in this episode is both about fascinating person that was Orson Welles and about the creative use form in music. That's been around for a very long time this interview and Chretien are in fact magic tricks and Darren does the thing that magicians are sworn never to do. He tells us all of the tricks of how he pulls off his new opera thing. I, of course, will never tell the secrets of Maya trade, but ever that is also speaking of magic, it would be magical if you head over to I tunes or wherever you listen to us and subscribe to rate and review, the show, tell your friends and family about us, tell your enemies too. It'll make them better people. And now a word from our sponsor Meister classics was created in two thousand four by Steven Simon conductor of the Washington chamber symphony and executive director Bonnie signing for years their family. Programs..

Orson Welles Darren Meister classics Daron Haagen Steven Simon executive director Chretien director Kane Bonnie Washington
"orson" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"orson" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"So he was just constantly constantly begging for and it was this incredible discrepancy between the kind of PO faced reverence they showed him at like, if I Bank wits for having made, obviously citizen Kane lady from Shanghai and touch of evil on on on, but mostly citizen Kane and a complete a reluctance to show him any money at all yet. I mean, one thing the documentary was a fun watch as a sort of wells. Oh, Maggi and the first chunk of it, which is more focused on what you're talking about. His his constant struggles to get projects made the way he wanted them to get made. Is is sort of like a decent potted history of like Orson Welles is Hollywood career and European career. And the diary does make that point that this movie feels reactive to, you know, the the European movies that are coming across the shore in the sixties were wells, a sort of regarding them with like, wait, they they they're going to do this now, and I never got to do what the going on the same thing with the sexual frankness which could never have done. But this movie is dirty as hell it gets got some scenes that are that are hard ours. Sure any seen in the car. Oh my God. And exactly and this. So it I appreciated like the other side of the wind as again, this sort of like this interesting artifact wells, sort of maybe finally busting out of the constraints that had been imposed on him for almost his entire career and an almost acting out. Like, there's something babyish about it, which I enjoyed like I I like the childishness of him being like, I I get to. Play in this sand box now, but you know, as as you said, they don't like there's there's I want to know how this footage was assembled. I want to know about like Frank Marshall who I think was was someone who pioneered who spearheaded getting it onto Netflix. I wanna know how they they confronted all this footage in and got it to the finish line. Yeah. Without that. I feel like Steven answer to your question is an artifact or a movie it's kind of more of an artifact. I mean, if you are Sinophile, it's an incredibly fascinating artifact. And I'm glad it's out there. But the way that it's being presented by the documentary and just by the kind of unquestioned crediting of the people behind it makes it a little bit suspect to me as as an Orson Welles movie. Can I also just push back on your wells versus wilder diptych? I just God God is there. artificial. I mean, it's it's sort of like saying, I I liked the pilot. He wasn't shot down or something. I mean hilly wilder was was a success. He worked within the system. Right. He knew he sort of knew how to budget his resources. To push the envelope a little bit or do something like go. Go ahead. Right. Like, he didn't he his career? Obviously is not this shipwreck. So I'm not saying that you can't love Billy Wilder's films, more you, absolutely. Can you can dismiss Orson Welles out of hand if you want, but I just don't think that that's a fair parallel to horses totally unfair. And it's facile in the in to the degree. That's the point of it is. But, but, but the only idea that I would defend is that it's a fun construct for trying to understand what kind of person, you are you. I don't know whatever fuck it. I can't defend what we've talked about. We've talked about this. This is our passion project. It's become about life and death itself in a way. But anyway, it's the other side of the wind is the is the name of the Welles film that's been sort of completed. And and the love me when I'm dead is the documentary. All right now is the moment or no podcast. We talk about our sponsor day. Now, what do you have Stephen our sponsor this week is rocket mortgage from Quicken Loans..

Orson Welles hilly wilder Maggi Kane Hollywood Shanghai Quicken Loans Stephen Netflix Frank Marshall Sinophile Steven
"orson" Discussed on Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"orson" Discussed on Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

"So in the eyes of Orson Welles critic, documentary filmmaker and cinematic space. Cadets, Mark cousins dives into the collections of paintings sketches in various artworks created by the great director and actor searching for ways in which the works might reveal new meanings in Austin. Wells, films the film is delivered as a series of letters to wells written and rated by cousins in his inimitable manner. So you're drawing and painting life had begun. It continued for sixty years. You drew everywhere. You went there at least a thousand of your artworks where they now. Many are in Michigan Jin Arbor which was named after its trees. Here and the university of Michigan's kind of they have your relics. So that was a clip from the eyes of awesome wells at she, we set up cousins is I for those who may not not know who he is? He's a former critic, turned documentary, filmmaker pops up every every few years or so with one of his very personal intimate looks at some things usually like a not so much an especially visual, but more of a kind of personal mode of filmmaking collected through like the last one he did, I think was story of children in film, and he's probably most famous for the story foam which is like fifteen our force area full series epic and very, very good actually, and this one? Yeah, more of a personal love letter to awesome wells. He's, he's such a RAB really infant filmmaking criticism. I ribbon describing just in that blurbs a space cadet. He really does just throw himself into the work. Examination makes these leaps of critical magin nation makes connections between disparate imagery. You mentioned the story children film that film uses home video footage of his kids when no one else was in the room as this jumping off point for feature, length exploration of childhood and cinema, and this one, he uses this cache of sketches and art work by Orson Welles and tries to make connections between a doodle and citizen Kane, and very much puts himself at the center of his own. And sometimes that can be a bit frustrating, I think is often bordering on the two personal at times. And this film opens with, I think cringe-worthy monologue about is in New York and cousins is voice overs discussing things like just the state of the modern world..

Wells Orson Welles Mark cousins Michigan Jin Arbor university of Michigan director Austin citizen Kane New York RAB sixty years
"orson" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"orson" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Tell you. Exactly. In what ways. So long as you're keeping your nose clean, soul. Yes, fine general. I'm keeping. It's great to say, keep your nose clean. I you the one that was talking about someone doing squats over the jam. All right. Let's just clean it up. F- less because we're gonna be talking about the of the great works of Shakespeare, and we're going to be talking about the great works of Austin wells. Well, that is relative relative. Don't ever ever talk in any dispatching way about the great awesome Wales. You be one. You can talk any way you want. You can be anything you want, but please don't ever talk disparagingly about the great. Awesome. It's great. Awesome. Well. Give any speeches this early. All right. It's the Phil Hendrie show here and we have herb Sewell on the line with Margaret gray. They're going to be talking about a television event the other night, which was the televising of Orson Welles Othello now, just just for. Anybody talk about. We don't expect you to know anything about addicting. You'll mind your mind is a very slow and sluggish thing. Not anything. We can educate him. That might be the case. I don't know. I'm sorry. I had to do that there. There you go. So that's what you've got to deal with our worry about it. All right. I'm not here to judge anyone's gastric problems. I'm here to simply judge ones up till the to to adequately ascertain the day. You do that. You quit with that weird laugh and get to it is the quality of, wow, the quantity of Orson Welles where. All right. All right. Let's talk about that from them. The other night on TC m I heard some blathering fool talking about the marvellous nece and the near genius of Orson Welles authen Bobby. Bobby tweeted out that also. Well, Butch alive. Yes, pretty. That you guys shut up. All right. All right. I'm thank you boys. I'm glad that you thought it was funny, but there was much more than just that just send you said there was much more than Genting gang gang today. That tells me you don't really believe you believe what you're saying. What I'm sitting Soule and I'll tell you this rule is it and I'll tell you this. What I saw the other night, which was, of course the a production of fellow by Orson Welles was the most pretentious God, awful performance of wells in. I will say, then I will say up now I did say it then I'll did say tomorrow and I will say tomorrow, whatever. What does that mean? Well, because you didn't make much sense right there Margaret. You're like, I did say it yesterday, and I did say tomorrow. I'm sorry. And I will say tomorrow's, but I'm saying. That Orson Welles in the Puerto Rican makeup. I'm sorry, that is absolute. The Puerto Rican makeup. Can you believe? Can you absolutely believe the kind of unconscionable description of individuals people who who are trying to make as best they could a beautiful film Orson Welles with his greasy hair? Yes. His hair was loaded with Greece. Of course. There's no getting around that. But the fact of the matter is he was working very hard and he's a greasy individual Orson. Welles is a fat greasy lout guy of of just weirdness. Agai of just complete and utter stunted ability. A guy who had very little going for a guy who I don't give a shit. See, it seems to me that she's got you right there. I saw the movie. Oh, you did? Yes, I did and he overdubbed his voice. He overdubbed. He was talking for the other actors fills Phil senate's that what is? Yes. It's called over dubbing. Yeah..

Orson Welles Orson Welles Othello Orson Margaret gray Phil Hendrie Phil senate Austin Genting Bobby Wales herb Sewell Soule Butch Greece
"orson" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"orson" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"At one point we had a small thing together and he did his during this sitting in a wheelchair and it was my turn the camera turns a maintenance horizon his as action and orson welles says haul it cut and the directors yes way i mean he everybody jumped when he talks his not wait a second he said now i don't like the way gino is lit i don't like it at all anybody got white card and the white tarred folks is nothing more literally than a three by five card that's white he put it on his lap and began to focus the light on my face until he felt that i was correctly lit a nicer this nice generous nice that's you know mindboggling when you're working with someone like that is just you know you want you go home and i said i don't believe that just happened the devices man the director of citizen kane righted that for you yes about that and other people had straight you know had less than pleasant experiences with him from time to time i franc i've been very fortunate yeah i've been very very fortunate everyone i berber work with her has been charming gracious until today today if the pits today is the lowest i've ever and i can't wait to get the hell have have you ever worked good sally field we're back to sound soundly one isn't with this sally few gusting widow at can i get back to the introduction way.

orson welles gino director
"orson" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"orson" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"At one point we had a small thing together and he did his during this sitting in a wheelchair and it was my turn the camera turns a maintenance horizon his as action and orson welles says haul it cut and the directors yes way i mean he everybody jumped when he talks his not wait a second he said now i don't like the way gino is lit i don't like it at all anybody got white card and the white tarred folks is nothing more literally than a three by five card that's white he put it on his lap and began to focus the light on my face until he felt that i was correctly lit a nicer this nice generous nice that's you know mindboggling when you're working with someone like that is just you know you want you go home and i said i don't believe that just happened the devices man the director of citizen kane righted that for you yes about that and other people had straight you know had less than pleasant experiences with him from time to time i franc i've been very fortunate yeah i've been very very fortunate everyone i berber work with her has been charming gracious until today today if the pits today is the lowest i've ever and i can't wait to get the hell have have you ever worked good sally field we're back to sound soundly one isn't with this sally few gusting widow at can i get back to the introduction way.

orson welles gino director
"orson" Discussed on I'm No Expert

I'm No Expert

01:33 min | 6 years ago

"orson" Discussed on I'm No Expert

"Where they kind of go through the the broadcast of or the world's and if you don't know they they there is this the year technically was thirty eight nineteen thirty eight when um they decided to who with it exactly a the a like my ocean wells sorry yeah yeah arsenal health famous like radio in that time radio was the television yet radio was you would go and sit in the sit in for the radio and you would imagine these stories and atlantic gather right the rate right now and and in my opinion now still is that radio has better pictures than tv does any time because you can imagine anything that you want anything on his mind thigh right orson welles decided to adapt or of the world's two radio as a radio play cut but he did it in a way that very for the very first time in that time period and if you go back to the episode they explain this it was the first time that they ever broke in so it was the way that they set it up it's it's like this orchestra plane it's like an evening kind of oh you're sitting around its halloween so as it is the evening your mom and dad arseny at home and it's an they're they're listening to this very lovely orchestra music happening and then all of a sudden it's a break in in in the same time you're you're it's were were too.

orson welles halloween