19 Burst results for "Oroville Dam"

What Would Happen If Chabot Dam in the East Bay Hills Broke Open?

Bay Curious

04:37 min | 7 months ago

What Would Happen If Chabot Dam in the East Bay Hills Broke Open?

"What would happen if chicago damn cracked open an empty the lake behind it onto neighborhoods in san leandro and east oakland. It's an alarming thought. We asked cake. Ud's dan bricky. Who's reported on safety issues at california's oroville dam to find the answer. Holly and vickers kings question is a really good one because it reminds us that all dams pose risks of some kind given the nature of the job they perform holding back huge volumes of water they can turn from placid lake into deadly torrent. If unleashed all at once. They deserve very close attention. When that attention lapses catastrophes can do happen in late may eighteen eighty nine flood. Water overflowed badly maintained private dam in western pennsylvania. Triggering its collapse. A wall of water race down the valley below a century later. Historian david mccullough said. The johnstown flood was so vividly alive in the local consciousness. I grew up in western pennsylvania. I'd heard about the johnstown flood my whole life as children. We used to shout run for the hills. The damas busted little knowing what real terror is in those words. The flood wiped entire towns off the map and killed twenty. Two hundred people in california owns its own special chapter in the history of dam disasters with a tragedy that unfolded more than ninety years ago in a remote canyon fifty miles north of downtown los angeles from the day. The saint francis dam opened in one thousand nine hundred twenty six. It leaked the folks in the farm. Towns downstream used to joke. They'd see you later if the damn don't break on march twelfth nine hundred twenty eight. The saint francis damn disintegrated just hours after it was pronounced sound by los angeles water. Chief william mulholland who had designed and built the two year old structure when the massive concrete dam broke apart water raised more than fifty miles to the pacific ocean killing about four hundred fifty people along the way but those events one hundred thirty years ago in johnstown ninety some years ago in los angeles county sound like ancient history much more recently california. Got a lesson in how dangerous and costly failure of even part of a major dam can be failure ambiance spillway structure results in an uncontrolled. Lisa flood waters from link oroville and eating evacuation from the low twenty. Seventeen collapse the spillway at oroville dam in the northern sierra foothills one hundred thirty miles northeast of san francisco touched off a series of events that lead local officials to order one hundred eighty eight thousand people to flee their homes. This is not a drill. Repeat this is not a drill. Spill ways are crucial to preventing overtopping. That's what happens. When a reservoir rises over the top of the dam and simply spills over a spillway is like an emergency valve. Damn managers can open to safely release water from a reservoir bills over the top but back in february twenty seventeen oroville dam spillway began to disintegrate just as a series of winter storms dumped huge amounts of rain across northern california without a fully functioning. Spillway lake oroville rose rapidly water poured over a hillside that was supposed to serve as an emergency spillway. That emergency spillway began to fail to leading to the mass evacuation. In the aftermath investigators found the emergency spillway was ill conceived and the main spillway was badly designed poorly built and inadequately maintained. So how is should bowe damn different from all those bad dams and what does east bay mud have to say about. Chaba cracking open and unleashing catastrophe on the east bay. Simple answer to that question is that the dam would never crack open. That's jimmy yolly east bay mud director of engineering and chief damn safety officer he oversees the district twenty six times including chabad. Damn the reality is that the dams are designed such that. They don't just crack open. You will see signs of a failure if one is to occur and The dan's designs with monitoring equipment to make sure that you can see that happening if it was a east bay mud confidence that a dam built within a quarter mile of a dangerous fault will stand up to violent shaking. Let's take a look at how the dam was first built. Nearly one hundred fifty years ago and how it's been maintained since

Oroville Dam Johnstown Dan Bricky California Saint Francis Dam Placid Lake Chief William Mulholland Pennsylvania San Leandro David Mccullough Vickers Lisa Flood Northern Sierra Foothills Los Angeles Oakland Holly Chicago Oroville Dam Spillway
Trump administration denies California relief for 6 fires

Forum

05:54 min | 1 year ago

Trump administration denies California relief for 6 fires

"Hey, Michael. Good morning. Good morning to you. Well, the Trump Administration did reject this request. It was in a letter from Governor Newsome back in September late September. This would mean essentially hundreds of millions of dollars to clean up damage from the six recent fires across the state, and it can be appealed. It will be appealed, but let's look at the motives behind the Trump administration's decision. What are they? Well, I don't want to see what the motives are, because this is a very much developing story. I did talk with Brian Ferguson of the Office of Emergency Services just within the last half hour. And you know, he makes it clear that they will be appealing. They don't seem particularly stunned by this they have. The Trump Administration has approved these kinds of requests for a presidential declarations in the past for wildfires and other disasters on clearly, you know, this wildfire season has been a particularly bad a historically bad one with Really bad fires in L, a Fresno Madeira counties and Casino San Bernadino, San Diego and Siskiyou. And so the administration sent this letter requesting disaster relief funds. More than four million acres burned in 2020. That's I think, double the state's previous record. And so the Trump Administration in responding FEMA in responding Said that the standards have not been met based on their review. So I did a said talk to Brian Ferguson and earlier this morning and this is how he described what the status of this request is. You know, this is not the end of our discussions in our process with the federal government. We were very much in the middle of this. Discussions with which the mother with other federal agencies can continue the letters and the legal documents for for months or even years. So we continued T work expeditiously that You know, turn on those programs leverages every ounce of federal support we can get, But this is very much an ongoing process. And he did say Michael that there are other parts of federal money that are available, like for small businesses and for you know individuals, A Zay said. This presidential declaration is the highest standard. On. So they know they only apply for these when they think they've got all of the verification and the data that they need to get it. So you know, I think they're not pulling the you know, pushing the panic button at this point. But clearly it was a surprise. And of course, you know your question was, you know, one of the motives and the initial. I think you know, the tendency is going to be to say, Oh, this is political. This is a psycho. This is trump trying to get you some back. You know, That may be true. It may not be true and it may all work out. In the end. This is not the first time That this sort of haggling back and forth has happened over an emergency declaration A few years ago, something similar happened with parts of the Oroville Dam. There were no questions about whether it was on state land federal land, so they haggled back and forth. And they finally resolved that. So you know, a cz Brian Ferguson suggested. This is not the end of the story. But it is surprising to say the least. Well, the president did approve welfare relief over the summer, and there are other sources of funding. FEMA grants, for example, is you mentioned, but no reasons were given, which is why I asked about motive, but remember the president and claim the state was not doing enough to prevent wildfires. He said. Governor Newsome did a terrible job forest management not breaking enough leaves, I guess like they do in Finland and The state faces over a $54 billion deficit because of the pandemic. It needs these funds to rebuild communities to rebuild buildings. Tio essentially fix damage roads and bridges. Absolutely, and you know, that was all included in the letter that the governor sent to FEMA into the president. Damage. As you said, you know, all kinds of infrastructure, not just the homes and buildings but bridges, schools, libraries, water and power facilities. Other infrastructure number of people have been killed. And you know this is extremely expensive and there are tremendous costs hundreds of millions of dollars for equipment and firefighters, fire retardant. There are all kinds of planes and helicopters, emergency emergency shelters, of course that get set up. So you know this is very expensive. It is a somewhat standard kind of request the kind of things that we see for hurricanes and Floods, wildfires and so on on. And as you said Trump has so far FEMA through and the Trump Administration have granted all of these on, you know, the president has said very recently that he has a good relationship with Newsome. You've Newsome was even featured briefly in an ad, which I'm sure he was not happy with the governor, but nonetheless, they do try to maintain despite all the political differences, which are major They do try toe team maintain a good relationship for just things like this, And we should mention that some of the stories that have come about as a result of this denial or refusal at this point have mentioned Wade Crow Foot. California Cabinet secretary confronting President Trump on climate change that one could assume falling on deaf ears. Well, you know, certainly. That was big news A few weeks ago when the president was here and yes, the governor's natural resource is director did confront him and I'm sure the president no did not appreciate the half. But I think we need to be careful to ascribe what what has happened here with this request to be directly related to that it might be, but it's not something that we're going to know. It's easy to speculate about Andi. It certainly wouldn't be inconsistent with the president's behavior on other issues in the past, But as I said FEMA are the Office of Emergency Services this morning at least, is not saying that and you know they're going to be appealing this initial rejection of the request.

Trump Administration Fema Governor Newsome President Trump Brian Ferguson Michael Wade Crow Foot Oroville Dam Finland Cabinet Siskiyou San Bernadino Fresno Madeira California Director Secretary San Diego
"oroville dam" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The reconstruction of Butte county's Oroville dam spillway which failed two years ago is hitting a potentially huge financial snag. The state's department of water resources has rebuilt the massive concrete spillway and short up the dance emergency spillway at a cost of more than one billion dollars. And the department was expecting the Federal Emergency Management agency to reimburse a sizable amount of that cost. But this week the denied at three hundred and six million dollar reimbursement. Request for a key part of that work kick, Dan Brekke has been following this. And he joins me now. And Dan before we get to this news. Let's rewind a little bit. Can you recap? Why the spillway at Oroville dam failed two years ago, and what's been done since that failure? So the spillway began. To disintegrate in early February twenty seventeen and from afar, I mean, this is a massive concrete structure three thousand feet long one hundred fifty feet wide, and it looked indestructible. But what happened was with water running down at all of a sudden, huge chunks of concrete some as big as Volkswagen buses. I'm told went hurtling down the spillway. So they knew something was wrong. And eventually what happened was they had to shut down the spillway, temporarily water came spilling over the top of the emergency spillway, and they had a serious in problem, a shattered main spillway and fears that there would be a massive release of water that prompted the evacuation of one hundred eighty eight thousand people, and what was the reasoning behind its decision to not fulfil all of the department of water resources reimbursement. Request studies after the failure of the spillway in two thousand seventeen there is an independent forensic review of this. For instance, found that the. Reason the spillway failed was because of very poor design substandard construction and poor maintenance and FEMA has been getting what amount two invoices from the state for the for this one billion dollar project, and it has paid some of them. So for instance, it paid the first one which was just for cleanup and immediate disaster response, and it has paid for another one which is for reconstruction of part of this big concrete spillway when it came to another part of the spillway where the study say there were pre existing flaws. He say, listen, that's not the kind of thing that we're going to reimburse you for that's not a natural disaster, essentially, so with you know, you're not eligible for repayment. So could this jeopardize further work on this spillway? Well, the spillway is really completely rebuilt. Now, there is still work going on on the emergency spillway, and that's a crucial part of this system to. It's such an important project, though, that even if FEMA doesn't come through with the money, there will be other ways to pay in that work will be completed. What will the other ways to pay be? Well, this is going to be a matter of debate the state water project which were dam is part of is really paid for by a group of water agencies called the state water contractors? It includes agencies like the metropolitan water district in the Los Angeles area. And so the assumption has been that any amount that FEMA doesn't pay for will go to the state water contractors now, I just talked to the state water contractors, and they don't have a lot to say about this right now, they want to know a lot more detail about females decision. And it should be noted that the state is appealing that decision. So there's always a chance that this money will be forthcoming in the end. All right. Thank you, Dan. You're welcome..

Dan Brekke FEMA Oroville dam Federal Emergency Management Butte county Volkswagen Los Angeles two years one hundred fifty feet one billion dollars three thousand feet one billion dollar six million dollar
"oroville dam" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on NPR News Now

"An expert panel says the spillway that disintegrated at california's oroville dam in february was riddled with defects that went unnoticed during state and federal safety reviews as kqed's dan breaking reports from san francisco the panel's says poor construction and design contributed to the spill ways failure a forensic team investigating the spillway failure says enter preliminary report that cracked concrete poor drainage and highly iroda ball rock all played a role in destroying the structure the failure triggered the emergency evacuation of one hundred eighty thousand people living downstream the team says it has found no evidence that past safety reviews ever considered a long list of factors that indicated the spillway had major design construction and maintenance problems the california department of water resources which owns and operates the damn said in a statement that it is already applying lessons learned from the incident for npr news i'm dan preki in san francisco a second round of talks on renegotiating the north american free trade agreement is ended in mexico city among the major issues this time were wages in mexico and how to resolve disputes negotiators from all countries involved say there was progress but some major challenges still must be overcome i'm shea stevens npr news in washington support for npr and the following message come from wells fargo working with you in your communities to create change for the better learn more at wells fargo dot com slash better.

california oroville dam san francisco dan preki mexico shea stevens npr kqed north american free trade washington
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

47:05 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Put on top of that that this is a thermal regulatory swept land that's going to respond differently than sweat glands and the palms showing in general in summing up sweating is a good thing that sweating is a very very good thing and it's really um actually i'm gonna go ahead and plug this so they're studies that go back to the 1930s in the 1940s um by japanese scientists which actually demonstrated that where are you spend your first two years of life dictates how many of the sweat glands you are actually born with will become activated so which uh makes it so sweating is very important so keeping your children purely an airconditioning um is is going to affect their ability to thurmer regulate later in life so it's important to sweat to be exposed to heat to sweat during those first two years of life get the kids out of a house get the kids out of the house exactly all right that's a great way to sum up thank you that's all the time we have and of cameras assistant professor of genetic at the promo school of medicine at university of pennsylvania and rotella mieko was postdoctoral scholar in the department of biological sciences and auburn university i think we learned so much about swift knew that thank you both for taking time to be with us today thank you thank you you're walk good weekend charles breakfast is our director senior producer is christopher until he oughta our producers are alexa lim christie taylor katie hiler which came as our technical director sarah fishman a jack harwit's our engineers at the controls here at the studios of partners the city university of new york usually say don't sweat it that looks like sweating is good for your so.

the house assistant professor postdoctoral scholar director producer katie hiler sarah fishman jack harwit university of pennsylvania rotella mieko department of biological scien auburn university technical director city university of new york two years
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"It's interesting uh if we uh yana if we are sweating because we want to stay cool what about the sweating we do only get nervous weighty pom poms exactly so turns out the the way that those glands are enervate it's a remember that the ancient condition right the ancestral condition is sweat glands um in the in the the hands and feet and the way that those are enervate it is actually different then the thermal regulatory sweat glands that are in the rest of your body that are primarily responsible for cooling you off which sort of makes sense right you're not going to have a is very mentioned a tremendous amount of conviction uh when you're standing on top of your sweat glands right so um it has to do its so exactly when you get nervous your jurors hands start to sweat and that's a it's just that the neurotransmitters that are that are the main activators of the sweat glands are different than the neurotransmitters for the rest of the of the rest of the body so they may evolve a different were they at what yasui i mean what we ultimately the way to sort of going back to your earlier question of when did all this happened and why did why did humans developed this this uh uh unique system of them are regularly shen if we know what the genetic causes our for this uh then we can actually date when it happened right we know the genetic changes that are responsible for expanding sweat glands from being just on the bottom of the feet to being everywhere in the human body then we we can we can learn sort of win this occurred and have a sense of perhaps why it occurred in humans were but go ahead i'm sorry i don't know so yup no just uh s so the basic mechanism of high build a sweat clinton the palm right there's got to be a kind of a a basic mechanism of how the skin decides to build a sweat clinton versus some other skin derived organ like a hair right but then there is as you said an extra layer that's going gonna be.

clinton
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Talking about sweating with a yana camera and worry telling me go uh let me ask you this said dr campbell rob hub recent research shows that tattoos too many tattoos can interfere with these sweat glands have you heard about this i actually i i've vaguely heard about the someone ford me the article i haven't actually uh had a chance to look at it i mean it's in a way it's not surprising you're you're going to damage the skin a bit where the the sweat glands live um and you might uh you might be damaging some of the vascular some of the blood vessels you might be damaging some of the nerves that control sweating um they have that's a certainly don't i mean so yeah that would argue that you shouldn't that we cover yourself in tattoos that would be very bad sure and a hot play and worry when it was speaking hot when it when he gets hot out you know we like to go jump in a lake or or a pool or something like that is that what animals that can regulate like amphibians is that what they do also why we see the frogs them in the ponds and things like that at the fraud have to stay in the waters well just because if they try out date i um but being in the water helps because as their cooling enough of africa fooling happens just sitting in a puddle because the the skin of product which instead water so readily that they're sitting there and they're puddle they don't dry out but they're setting water allowing them to cool off and they they rarely we'll get to hot as long as they stay moines.

blood vessels fraud dr campbell ford africa
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"That's right so cats cool off by panting um but it is true uh that suing you know again humans have very very specialized kind of sweat gland i mentioned african glands which exist in horses but uh sweat glands akron sweat glands which are are the glances create water onto the surface of human skin in virtually all other mammals outside of the closest primate relatives to humans at those glenn's a restricted to the bottom of the pause in those if you look at the bottom of your cats foot remember we sees the is that thick pad um and then in between you see a bunch of hair that thick pat it's just chock full of sweat glands and what those why cleanse are actually used for in this case is not for thermal regulation but they're used for traction so how much friction there is between uh the animal and the surface that it's walking on you can sort of think about when you have a dry palm and he tried to just slide your palm across the surface it's shortages skids when you get a little bit of people spit on our hands before they fits that fred gives a little traction exactly that's kind of interesting rory week we never think of of insects as giving overheated but can they can get too hot for some insects fate they hear can they um and have a higher power of animal they can tolerate temperatures often into the upper forty two they're getting around in the low one hundred fahrenheit but they will overheat and though breakdown just like any other animal i'd get through hot so when they break down to the i mean he just collapse and have to wait for to get cooler or does it kill them.

sweat gland glenn fred rory
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Rubin different kind of sweating he had some different kind of sweating now our rory you you you're animal that you study don't sweat correct what do they do they have an entire we of trade that they can use to cool off the probably the former thing is collecting a cooler area or woman marian shuttling back and forth between some returned will you that come to two and so we're talking about lizards in an infineon insects and stuff like that yeah pretty much every animal other than a bird or a mammal so even lake nematodes will from regulate tom mitch yet so so they i i guess if for elucider an animal that lives in a hot too dry climates wedding would be very disadvantageous because then you'd have to get the water back in your body semo correct one of the main evolutionary event that happened in the evolution of reptiles in particular invest the landdwelling amniote was ways to retain water that's why they have that really heavy dick scaly scan is it pain water did you still use evaporative cooling some so you really heat up a desert dwelling uh lizard as it starts to get toward that temperatures that are potentially dangerous will open up their mouth to allow the membranes of the mouth which are very wet too uh have of operation rausim which particularly cools the head down allows the interesting so dr kimber of why did we develop the ability to sweat instead of pan what what was the advantage asserted the million dollar question so we actually can't pant um because of a sort of change structural changes in the human body in for example we don't have that big snapped at a horse is going to have radar faces very reduced snow um so there a couple of hypothesis that hypothesis that exist as to why humans develop such a unique way to dissipate heat um it set one possibility is that um we eat it enabled us to basically explore um a niche uh that was free predators um so you know if you were if you cool off the way human does um you basically um can uh go out during the hottest periods of the day.

Rubin tom mitch dr kimber million dollar
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"And so it stands to reason that you know our ancestors um you know our last communist esther with a with the chimpanzee would also have panted but something changed over the course of human evolution um perhaps having to do with the fact that we became striding bipeds and later evolved endurance running capabilities which altered how we is a species thermal regulate and and sentenced on a very unique path but so the ideas that yeah we probably very similar to a chimpanzee panting is a main mechanism to cool off is probably what our human ancestors you were talking about a horse's panting but dole you'll see horses sweating over time they do so right exactly so horses lather up but so what's distinguishing about humans are not the only species that sweats but it's the kind of sweat that we have rate as so as you said we have a sweat glands that crete water onto the surface of the skin horses have a different type of gland m a lot of course auriol animals actually running animals have this um the are called african glance and their associated with the hairs on the horse's body and what they secrete is not water but it's actually rather um a mixture of some water some lipids some fat some protein so it's not the the same it's it's it basically two different substance that spla secreted but the horses main mechanisms going to be panting off i did knew that we focus persuasion whether it's a.

dole
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Thank you are are you you find how are you i'm good and rory telomere go as opposed to actual scholar in the department of biological sciences at ordering university welcome to science friday thank you uh yeah analysts hug about why furry animals have to pant to stay school a to stay cool wet what does that do for them uh so panting a as you said is something that furry animals do um and basically um you know all kind of cooling wet in mammals involves to a large extent the heat that's needed to convert water from a liquid to a gas and the energy that's lost in doing that and so furry animal's pant basically in order to take care in um and uh basically uh use that to uh dissipate body heat they do it in their upper respiratory tract uh in a dog this happens at sorry this was in a horse you know the big snout that a horse has you're getting evaporative cooling you're inside that big snout um in it's basically uh again just an animal using convection essentially to evaporate water off of the surface it's like when you come out of a shower you you fuel colleagues outer is evaporating or exactly that's exactly right so what about our our primate answers of is that what they did also well so if we look at our closest primate relatives chimpanzees guerrillas um if we even look beyond that in into outside of the great apes and we look at tom macaques for example old world monkeys we see that panting is is the main mechanism by which they thermal regulate by which they dumped their body heat.

rory upper respiratory tract
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Um but certainly retail shops are already using facial recognition software to safe find repeat customers identify shoppers you know perhaps even more qripoli we're seeing a mobile phones now using i gazed tracking for uh for add metrics so they can see where your eyes actually land on the on the screen and then uh try to court your propensity to buy that product and and and that could be seen as extremely manipulative uh and you know we've seen a billboards that change when someone drives past them right sourcing ads increasingly tailored to people as he walked through the world um and part of that does have to do with visual recognition and in verse by metrics but a lot of it has to do with the fact that we're just carrying computers with us everywhere and computers can talk to each other is there any way to opt out of all of it can you were you you talk about having a trip under your scheme could you have a trip i'm opting out all you have no permission to do any of this stuff with me is that possible there is no universal opt out right now later that you know so even if you're not on facebook and uh people puts you know your your pitcher on their than your your your pictures on there and someone might be able to one day use that information i'm i'm not sure how but to to to link that to you right uh you know that like like we were saying earlier in the program when you're faces out there it's out there and if you have a driver's license than your name is connected to your face and there are thousands and thousands of security cameras in any city and any of those cameras might be equipped with facial recognition technology so unless you wear a massive all the time i i wish you luck were would only have a couple of minutes left to talk about it but what what let me ask you what you see is the mixed biometric technology coming online let's just around the corner.

retail shops mobile phones facebook one day
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Hello now there are your yeah i wanted to ask a question richer all talking about you know passwords there are uh unscrewed or not able to be what about gina because she that's something which that nobody would know shift you and your technical devices good question when and why not as something you plug into your smartphone a little chip reid a bio chipping you put piece of dna on there yes i don't think we're quite there yet with dna dna takes uh fortyfive minutes to an hour to process uh right now so um you might have to wait a while to get to your phone now that said there are efforts right now to make smaller and more affordable ways to synthesize dna and more portable ways but yeah we're just not there yet a no no april you've written about an alternative to all of this and that is instead of using your thumbprint or an iris scan to unlike adore some companies just ask their employees to implant chips blue chips underneath or skinny he's that were winward we're all going with this uh well it's one direction that's that some companies have been exploring upper to go the outside of the united states more although us companies are dealing more into that but the idea there is that a chip about the size of a grain of rice is usually inserted between the thumb in the index finger and then that can be used to say on lock a door or turn on a coffee pot right and and they use various types of wireless communication to do that uh the issue there though is that like any device eight can be potentially hacked and a chip that's inside of you could read a lot of sensitive information like where you are where you're not uh perhaps with devices you have around you or others and therefore who your with things like that lots are your doctor's workers from one steals a a phone all put a politicians maimana no real name but it's a politician could be somehow get the raw biometric data off me or or is it secured on the phone in such way that it's really hard to access.

gina united states wireless communication biometric data reid fortyfive fortyfive minutes
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"A doctor shuckers let's talk a little bit about let's get into the weeds we like to get into the weeds here of about how the biometric data about me on my phone is kept secret and kept safe visit go out oh over wi fi or my cell phone every time i authenticate my fingerprint let's say in a banking at for example or any other way that's a great question because this does get back to your comments related to privacy on of the trend right now is to store your biometric data locally on the device and in most of the major mobile device companies have at this capability in there um and so what happens is is not really biometrics that's doing um the authentication with your bank it's really a twostep process it's the combination of biometric for local use affair for catien and uh asymmetric key crypt hoggar fee for the verification with your bank and a lot of this is um being done under what's called the fido alliance stands for fast identity online show sir web is the is the password them dying a slow death here we always going to have baths well i think that's a good question i think we will have passwords for quite a while because we need a way to be able to reset um new devices but i also think there's a lot of people working creatively to move beyond the password the fido alliance is the first step which means now you're not storing your password at you're relying party in using it for every single transaction which you know beyond security risks also as a convenience issue freight having to remember all these different passwords let's go to the phones to wane in their georgia highway welcome besides friday.

biometric data mobile device georgia
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Uh they are different the physiological uh is more the the concrete aspects like a fingerprint right it has a physical characteristic um were behavioral can change depending on your behaviour like how you walk how you talk um how you hold something for example how you type how you swipe on your phone those are all your behaviors that than can be utilize to create a signature of yourself and utilize for biometric recognition what about it being used as both of you went about it being used without my permission emily if there's facial recognition on my cell phone for example on i'm stopped by a police officer a could he just not take my phone and pointed back in my face and in open unlike my phone that way yes certainly and i think that's where we're still in a national conversation about what are the limits what what is okay and what is not okay and i think um the public certainly as expressing their opinions on this and it's really up to technology and government to listen in terms of in a what's the right balance between security um of of your own devices security of the country and of course a your own privacy repeal yes and you know uh there are a couple of states that have consent laws when it comes to facial recognition in particular uh in those are a illinois in texas so uh in in those states or in illinois particular you're supposed to consent to uh get your face being you know matched to your name with you know using facial recognition technology but none of places they don't need to your consent at all um and that uh opened the door for such a wide range of uses right from advertisers to law enforcement and we know that law enforcement in the afghan particular has a massive facial recognition database uh that uh has mugshots driver's license photos passport photos all kinds of things and so certainly we're at a place now whether or not you consent to it in most states where if they do take a picture of you they can use that to match to all kinds of records that they may have on you whether or not those records are correct.

officer illinois texas law enforcement emily
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"They you april uh you're welcome a april glaser is a technology staff writer at slate look up to science friday thanks for having me aprila start off with a fingerprint scanning facial recognition they're all pretty widely used but there are some less conventional plant metrics on the horizon ones people may not have heard so much about right what are they go through a little issa forest will you mentioned at the beginning the ears scan uh there is a company in the pacific northwest that uh can scanned for the unique shape of an ear low is uh apparently a unique identifier that uh that none of us share is the shape of her ear low been and and that is the apparently according to some reporting that i did last year was being tested by some up police forces us and police departments in washington state uh and they put the tech say in a in a body mounted camera so that way um when uh the the the police came up to the person's window they could they could see some months iran than match that to a database a mastercard has been experimenting with with cell feet recognition so you you take a picture of yourself and so that's more facial recognition uh we also have seen heartbeat monitoring so these are bracelets that you wear microsoft also experimented with this and 2015 where you actually check out and pay uh with your financial information linked to your unique heartbeat there is i i veins scanning great so it goes way at well beyond the finger road dr shuckers as anything you want to add to wear warren.

staff writer microsoft washington iran
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"You're welcome and i guess if you want more information you could screen chinatown nail from vicky uh during the break we're going to take a break in at what if you could hold your smartphone up to year and unlock it with unique shape of your earprint that is possible biometrics away way behind the way beyond the finger fingerprint and talk about all different ways that we're thinking about using body parts to a keep your privacy intact stay with us we'll be right back after the break this is science friday i am i replayed oh your fingerprints are all over your phone right if you if you're like me that unique physical marker can be used to unlock your smartphone too but if it you know it's not foolproof technology because security researchers have already shown that you can unlock devices with a replica of someone's fingerprint they see that they can even swipe fingerprint data from a photo of someone flashing the peacein while so cocaine what when not use then an iris scan consider the case where a hacker used a poster of german chancellor angela merkel to extract iris information from her eye which the hacker said he could print on a contact lanes to spook an iris skinner you get the point here as more biometric tech comes on line like three d face scanning in near next iphone perhaps how can we make our machines savvy enough to know to know the real thing from a spoof stephanie shuckers director of the center for identification technology research and a professor at clarkson university in potsdam new york is here she joins us from will in illinois welcome to science friday.

cocaine angela merkel iphone director professor clarkson university chancellor stephanie shuckers potsdam new york illinois
"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"oroville dam" Discussed on Science Friday

"Yadav they told ruined still works is what i think is most exciting now that's that's the good news either there's speaking of news these news this week about a a a big salmon going on sale tell us about that yes so i wouldn't say it's big as much they would say it's fast it's kia first genetically engineered sam and hit the market in canada from a company called aqua bounty technologies now's taken of 25 years to get this to the market and really what's happening is that they've found a way to make salmon grow to be the same size as nongenetically modified salmon in about half the time um yeah it costs about five point three us dollars per pound and they didn't say who bought it but it is apparently on sale now in canada so there is it getting any pushback because of gmo sudan monroe i think that the place where it's got in the most push back has been here in the united states i mean you might wonder why we didn't get the first genetically engineered salmon i love salmon but what's happened is that the fda actually approved the salmon back in 2015 uh but an alaskan senator basically said that there should be some program to tell customers at their buying these genetically engineered salmon and people really been pushing back here in the united states throat switzer has has it been approved yet privacy who needs to approve it said the fda did uprooted prove it but there's just been a lot of regulatory hurdles that have sort of prevented it from come into market here let's move onto some news this week that you have about colon cancer rates in the us.

Yadav canada united states senator switzer fda sudan 25 years