24 Burst results for "Orlean"

"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:50 min | Last month

"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

"The nineteen eighties running for the willamette. Week where she cut her teeth as a journalist since then she's got onto publishing eight books. Contribute to a dozen or so more and become a veteran staff writer at another lesser-known weekly called the new yorker orlean belongs to a great tradition of journalistic generalists. Meaning she's made a career writing about everything from origami artists. Show dogs rare. Orchids a library fire and racing pigeons to name only a few of our topics. Orlean matters because she's insatiably curious. Reading her work. Eat saly caught up in our own joyful desire to know more to see what's around the next bend of curiosity the character she introduces their passions and obsessions and explorations of the fascinating tributaries and side roads of her subjects expand the boundaries of each article and book reaching towards questions about our own very humanness. She opened this talk with a hilarious tale from bend oregon back when she was an unknown writer and goes on to explain how she chooses her subjects and she came to write one of her most famous books about a fire at the los angeles public library. Here we find her signature humor and curiosity her desire to understand the motivations and choices of people both famous and not and her willingness to look at the seemingly ordinary and find the extraordinary..

orlean writer staff writer los angeles oregon
Interview with Kayzo

Back To Back

05:36 min | 4 months ago

Interview with Kayzo

"Time to slow down a little your. Time now. More, than pursue it was it was much I. It's still nice but I'm definitely. At a point now where? Be going, to bed. At like. I'm in like some. Like nine thirty. Every night I've only going to bed. So early every night so very well rested the first time in a long time. So now I'm like h Tina. Traveling, place I'm I'm ready but. All the time. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Man I mean maybe as a way to get into it, I wanted to ask you about this because you're one of the few people I've talked to WHO's actually had this experience you did at least one of those drive in shows, right? Yeah I did one in. It's not technically Charlotte but it's called the fountain. Outside a Shar like. Forty five minutes as a shirt. That I mean walk me through that experience because I'm I'm so curious what it actually felt like to play one of those shows, right? Well, you know it's interesting because. I feel like. Every. Time. They're still I guess every week or so. The climate surrounding. Coronavirus or country or if you wanna Mike. Rugged down to what we do in music. History. Shows and safety every week or every couple of waste seems like there's a different. Tone to. The overall consensus of. Or what's not or what's what's what's considered okay, and what's not considered okay. So at the time of Accepting the drive in at the very beginning of the pandemic but that's Close closer to beginnings. He's ideas started coming on board around and I was like well only if it's safe and. assured was assured it was going to be running with all the precautions. needed. Sauza guy let's do it At least could say I did warn in my lifetime looking back on this and. The entire experience break down it was so. So. Interesting. But it was also really great on the road team. Have that one little sense of normalcy for the back with that family right? Because that's family were disconnected from right now. Yeah. Dude I. I feel like normally I spend majority of my year with these guys in the it's the first time I've seen him since probably February which was pretty wild. You're the show was It was it was interesting was very I know there's been a lot of mixture of us in a lot of controversy and a lot of different viewpoints on the drive in but my experience I can only speak it test mice during read. The people that were vice show of. It was. It was extremely safe I got there and Obviously it's. It's a it's an interesting way out stage is not normal stage, but you look out there near. Plot of land. It's massive view. It's actually in a beautiful area north. Carolina was palm land in your ads they will drive in the middle of nowhere. You know when he started when we got there for the show We had a little green room of whatever you WANNA, call it like the bandages office. Entire thing I'm looking at this? This is insane like hundreds and hundreds of cars, but all all within their confined space. And I was like nervous. We'll see our kids gonNA like. Kids. Tend to break rules Orlean at our bend the rules. Like a follow them until they get into an arcade screw, we're going to go your own thing. What I notice was everyone was actually like. Inner areas tailgating in their own area so We weren't like. Johnny not allowed to drive a students staged way to walk to the stage, which is totally GUAC panacea at all but I walk through these cars everyone like in their own spot hanging out with a small group of people everyone had their masks which I was nervous as. I. Don't want to be one of those things where. Everyone's in their mask and everyone's raging I'm like, please please please everyone is saw. A FROM MY CO engine stage wearing their masks surprisingly a lot of people were. Staying in their cars with all the tour shut listening to the music raging. That's interesting. That's kind of why were they was it on like a like an FM. Station people to so this was this was this was one of those ones amodio station June into classic drive in situation and A. was kind of interesting about the layout was we had a stage in its smaller stage. It wasn't a big festival Susan that. Was Cool. Is Right next to the right of. The movie was the wall movie projector. Only thing is like hundred tall was thing is. The biggest movie screen of. The had alive live streaming camera angle couple of angles of the media Jank from booth cameras hooked up there were projecting like live casting off the big screen and they had that makes in with I brought my vj. So he was able to to display my content. On this really cool large movie screen mixed into my live cam feed and. It was really cool. It was like I've never seen anything like that for a show like scream out large. That pretty interesting show itself. it's it's weird because we had my own borders. So they were like festivals don't monitor so loud for me on like a normal joe for me,

Mike Carolina Charlotte Orlean Johnny Susan A.
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | 4 months ago

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
The Dignity of Work

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:57 min | 4 months ago

The Dignity of Work

"Guest today is Audie pen audience the principal owner of Audie Penn Consulting. He's been working in consulting for thirty years providing different services to several fortune fifty companies in diverse industries and organizations. Is Approach is a lean transformation by applying coaching. Training and project facilitation with local teams securing solid. Foundation. Audie has been most notable as a global consultant where he combines tactical leadership skills with pro processed focused improvements. Some of his clients are Caterpillar John. Deere. Martin Marietta and Han thanks so much for joining me today Audie. Thanks for having me Diane I'm looking forward to our conversation today. I am as well and we're GONNA be talking about culture in in business you know the impact that it has in. Most likely. Spending some significant amount of time talking about the current situation we were in an I had said in the introduction These episodes are evergreen and they are I think no matter when people listen to them. They're gonNA valuable information and We are recording this. I would love to say like toward the end but I'm not quite sure where we are with the whole covid nineteen pandemic and. So while there are things that leaders are going through and employees are going through therefore, companies right now I'm pretty confident that we're going to be talking about. Translates. No matter what the environment is that company finds itself. Absolutely Yep. Okay. So to start if we could. With you providing us with. A description of. Talking about the impact of organizational culture on business performance. The idea that comes to mind there is is a recent discovery of my own and I'll. I'll frame it in this language often I find. Organizations. Are Struggling with their lean or operational excellence deployments and there's a statistic that gets kicked around quite often that seventy to ninety percent of operational excellence. ORLEAN deployments end up in failure. and. My initial response to that was well, they're doing it incorrectly I need to understand why they're doing it incorrectly but I think, I've I've actually adjusted that language to not incorrectly but incompletely in, there's the connection to your question. And for me, the connection is we can do process improvement very well. But. If the rest of the organization is disconnected, the sponsors of the leadership level or the management level of process owners, then we can't sustain or continue to find ways to improve those processes in it seemed like we just continue to solve the same problems over and over again. That is so interesting. Okay. So, if I inherit you right. company decided they want to go through process improvement some area of the business, but they don't necessarily have. Complete buy in from everyone involved. So they go through the process and then everyone walks away. They go back to the way things were. Yes. Okay. So that feels to me like. The in has to start at the very top and then has to be pushed down is that A fair assessment. I would say, yes, there's there's one word though that mutiny short that is pushed because. When those sponsors and it's language that I use to refer to leaders when when leaders actually show up? and. They're clear what their organizations about what's important It's easy for organizations to align to that and questions that I ask often is how many of you came to work today to fail And no one answers the question. Yes. So I always say, well, if that's true of us, don't you think that's true of everyone in our organization we fail them by not being clear about talking about what's important.

Audie Audie Penn Consulting Deere Principal Martin Marietta Consultant Diane HAN
Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:04 min | 5 months ago

Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

"One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, we met bill s Preston and Ted Theodore Logan in the movie bill and Ted's excellent adventure they returned in bill and Ted's bogus journey in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one, and now almost thirty years later they're back in bill and Ted's face the music Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves return as well. Bill and Ted respectively, and this time they'll need not just their triumphant man to save the world but also their daughters I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about bill and Ted face the music on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR here with me and Steven from his home studio is plan Weldon of NPR's arts desk. Linda and also with us from his home in Washington DC, we have JC Howard who is a producer of NPR's Ted Radio Hour and how I built this I. J. C.. Good to have you back good to have you back. So if you are all not familiar, there's not a lot setup that you need or these films except to say that Bill and Ted were introduced to us as teenage bro Friends who had a band and just wanted to have a triumphant band when they were older and eventually they got sucked into time travel and picking up different historical figures, and later we're going to try to save the world and there was. A whole story where they were going to ultimately right a great and triumphant song it's it is a surprisingly complex canonical story of which you need to know practically nothing in order to enjoy I think these films Stephen now that I have thoroughly set the table kind of what is your attachment to bill and Ted these movies. If you have one, well, I've seen bill and Ted's excellent adventure. A BUNCH OF TIMES I've seen bill and Ted's bogus journey a couple times. These are movies that have kind of existed on the wind for the last thirty years. I re watched these movies within the last five years I. Think I talked about the. What's making me happy on this show but still kind of needed to go back to be reminded of what happens in them going into this movie I mean this movie is coasting on goodwill. There is a certain amount of fan service going on here. I mean I'm not sure how many people were clamoring to revisit these characters almost thirty years later but at the same time. Something really really smart happens in this movie and you can tell before you even start watching it, and that is that it is ninety three minutes long all three of these movies are about ninety minutes long and I think they understand that that is the perfect lengthier. There is a certain amount of sequel bloat here. The first two movies are incredibly Chintzy. The stakes in the first one are no greater than maybe Ted we'll get sent to military school and you're there's like the entire fabric of space time can be ripped apart. This is a very shaggy movie. I. Think there are stretches where it sags but. I do appreciate the number of updates. You don't have the gay panic stuff that really dragged down the earlier movies are no gay slurs in this movie. This movie bothers to give its female characters a little bit more agency the women who become their wives barely have any part to play in the other movies, and here you get more of that you get their daughters who are given kind of their own subplot. So I appreciate that it's not just rattling around with these two dudes who are now middle aged, but they're taking an interest in people outside of just bill. Yeah and you do get their daughters. The structure of this one is kind of that they go on one journey through time and their daughters meanwhile who are played by Samara weaving and bridget lending pain go off and tried to get a band together for their DADS to play with on this epoch song that's supposed to save the world. So you kind of have the one journey going on the other journey going on then naturally in the third act it all comes together and I did like those two performances from the daughter's there are also some kind of new faces in this one kristen Schall plays Kelly who is The daughter of Rufus who was the George Carlin character in the original JC it feels to me like you are too young to have a moustache attachment to these movies but I have been assured that that is not the case because television. Yeah. That's exactly right. I was actually super excited to hear this movie was happening and I'm going to show my age a little bit and say that I was born pretty close to the release of the First Bill and Ted Movie of Bill and Ted's excellent adventure. So my first encounter with these guys was as as they say a most impressionable youth. And I was one of what I can only assume are millions of kids who watch bill and Ted's excellent adventure every time it ran on cable TV. The thing about the first movie is the problem that they needed to solve was very simple. Billon Tade just needed a good grade right granted the solution to that problem was a little larger than life and included doctor who like time travel home box and all but the problem itself was simple. The second movie bogus journey was certainly a little nuttier. It had killer robots and aliens and the grim reaper. Didn't feel like it hit quite the right notes for me. No Pun intended. So win a third film was confirmed. The main question I had was like, what are they going to do? Are they going to try to recreate the success of the original and go back to simple run of the mill time travel Orlean into the bizarre and crazy and from just the trailer? It was clear that they weren't going to just lean into the bizarre, but they were diving in head first. But I think what separated this one from the nineteen ninety one sequel is that it has a lot more heart. The original movie was really about the friendship of bill and Ted and saving that they didn't seem to care as much about saving the future as much as they wanted to just make sure that bill and Ted could still just be friends. So it had this kind of surprisingly earnest quality and I think that was what was missing in the second film in this third one for all of its bizarreness in all of its doubling down on death in heaven and hell, and all these kinds of weird things. It really reignites the idea that there are friendships and. Relationships here that are worth saving. Yeah I think you're absolutely right that they go back to the relationship between those two guys being the center of the story and I. Think it's really funny. One of the things that I think is featured in some of the the trailer stuff but they are both married they both have you know lovely wives that you have met before since they got them from the past and they have relationships with their wives that are completely enmeshed with their relationship with each other. So they can't conceive of having individual marriages that aren't some. Like a four person marriage I thought that stuff was sort of funny because I think one of the things that carries over like if you're going to take these guys in age them thirty years you have to either assume that at some point they became more normal, which is a weird thing to assume about bill and Ted. Or you have to assume that they are still very bill and Ted, which would mean that they are still kind of very fixated on this idea that they are a duo and they are always together and they are each other's right hand Glenn you had indicated on twitter that. You perhaps did not have the same nostalgia for these characters that perhaps I have and others may have what is your take care? All right. The ticker about to hear from me Linda Holmes is going to be a subjective it's rigorous. It's clear eyed it is on demand by the gauzy scream nostalgia because unlike all y'all I never saw these movies until this week just to prepare for the show and I didn't see him for very simple reason I didn't have to I. Mean I was a junior in college nineteen, eighty, nine I was studying marine biology. I was dating a string of profoundly unfulfilled women and. Being. On a college campus and eighty nine and not here boobs heinous strange things are afoot at the circle k just over and over and over. So I felt like I got it. And think about the time late eighties early nineties mainstream. American. Comedy was kind of stuck in this catchphrase based mode and I was like, okay. I don't need to see this while I've seen them all now and I'm here to tell you. Sure I guess that's your thing. I like the Guy Listeners of the leads I. think that's the appeal here but left only once an excellent adventure. It's a visual gag that gets tossed off. It's a Freud at a mall holding a corn dog and it's like, okay, fine. You got me I mean it's low hanging fruit, but you got. And in face the music this new film shore on Paper Samara, Weaving Kristen Schaal Holland freaking Taylor they are gunning for me they are coming. But ultimately didn't stick. It's not supposed to. That's not what it's for. It just evaporates on contact with the eyeballs and maybe that's exactly what the world needs. Right now is dumb sweep dumb but I

TED Bill S Preston Ted Movie Ted Theodore Logan Linda Holmes NPR Stephen Thompson Washington Alex Winter Jc Howard Keanu Reeves Kristen Schaal Holland Producer Kristen Schall Samara Weldon Billon Tade Steven Orlean
How to make video meetings more real

Talking Tech

02:46 min | 5 months ago

How to make video meetings more real

"On your first box. Everyone's Jefferson brand. Here you're listening to talking tech spending a Lotta time actually talking to people about video meeting and how we're living with them during this very challenging time and twenty twenty today's topic. How do we make the meetings that are virtual? Feel the same as it for their in person. So I taught allow people for this. What you gotTa do at work a lot harder to make them entertaining to make them fun to reach out to people to game affi- everything's one of the people I spoke to her name is Camille Schmitt she works at a streaming service called Filo. And what they do is they do getting to know your day they basically every day is like kindergarten. Tell us something we didn't know about yourself share something with us. It's a little Corny but Camille tells me that it works also spoke to mark Hohmann who is a small business owner he's got a camera store in L. A. called Paul's photo, which has nonstop classes during the pandemic he had to shift the all online. How do you replicate the experience where students come in really to interact with other students and with the instructor? By starting early. Starts every class a half hour early. So people can just sit there and talk to each other sounds like a pretty good idea. Randy. Lerman he is a DJ. He works the Wedding Bar, Mitzvah and Party circuit in Los Angeles. He's lost a lot of parties. This year as most have because parties have stopped. What does he do? He is moved to do Trivia Games on line four corporations and for anybody else who's interested he gets people involved by playing trivia it's working for him. I talked to a guy who is a classic salesman he works for Schneider Electric going from town to town. Selling his electrical outlets to hotels, and now can't do that. He told me what he really misses the handshake walking side by side the opportunity to finish the meeting grab lunch afterwards that's what he misses. But for Tyler Hake what he can do is have a lot more meetings because he's not traveling. So he can see more people in it's working out. Susan Orlean has been meeting with high school students for years consulting with them on how to best prepare for college? Not, at our office anymore she's got rid of the office. She's having video

Lerman Camille Schmitt Susan Orlean Jefferson Los Angeles Filo Schneider Electric Mark Hohmann Tyler Hake Randy Instructor Salesman Business Owner Paul L. A.
"orlean" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:03 min | 6 months ago

"orlean" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Humorous. And I think for some people cathartic. I mean, when you've had too much to drink, Can you write? He has tasted life's infinite tragedy. Oh, that's a good one. Susan. I don't know if you're going to use that again, but that's pretty good. I think I have to save that for for you somewhere, but I can't figure out yet where it's gonna fit. But I was struck What? I was reading these tweets the next day. And they did feel as if they had come from someone else. They I didn't quite remember them. But I read that and thought that's pretty good. Yeah. Hey, listen, The Beatles wrote stuff while they were stoned. Maybe you can write stuff, although I don't know, I think writing a novel or a New Yorker piece requires a little more focused than I would say so, and I don't intend to make this a regular practice and knock on wood. But it was interesting. To be utterly uninhibited and see what came out on and you know, among other things, lots and lots of typos. But some amount of writerly effort was in there, and I'm kind of proud of that. So then what did the kids say? I mean, You know you were cursing. It's your family. And that streamed Where you mad at them where they mattered. You. Was anybody upset as a result of all of this Happily? No. I think it was understood by all parties to be Goofy. Ah, inebriated put C ranch and they would have happily had me join them watching the movie It was. It wasn't that they were literally shunning me. I was sort of self pitying for a moment there. Susan Orlean is always an interesting interview. She is The New York Times best selling author of the Orchid Thief. And the library book will be keeping on the look out for her upcoming memoir that she just mentioned.

Susan Orlean Beatles
Lester Morales, CEO at Next Impact

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | 7 months ago

Lester Morales, CEO at Next Impact

"Marquez Marquez's here and today I. Have the privilege of Hosting Lester Morales. He is a true consultant in the human capital and employee benefits arena, and currently serves as CEO of next impact. LLC focused on innovation and changing the status quo. Next impact is a full service employee benefits and Human Resources Marketing and consulting company committed to helping other companies grow and add value to their clients before he. He founded next impact. He Co founded in Selah, a benefits administration company focused on helping advisors support their clients with ACA compliance prior to becoming an entrepreneur, lester serve nearly three years as executive vice president and chief growth officer for Willis's human capital practice, one of the largest insurance brokerages in the world in this role Lester lead over two hundred producers consultants in forty plus offices as part of a three, hundred and fifty. Fifty Million Dollar Practice Willis. A single largest practice in North America during a previous eight year stint at Willis Lester, was consistently among the top five consultants nationally between those assignments Lester served as national vice president of sales for Health Stat orlean provider of worksite clinics and disease management services. Leicester's thought later in the benefit space, and I had just the opportunity to connect with them before this and his passion for making healthcare. Healthcare more equitable employers and the employees is palpable He's he's. He's all in and I'm privileged to have them here on the podcast today, Lester, really looking forward to our discussion, they have. We should have nothing to be here -absolutely so lester before we dive into what you guys do at next impact and the quote here on the front of your site. starbucks spends more on healthcare than they do on coffee wow. Right we're going to dive into that and what your you and your team is doing to help. Prevent that or turn it around to something more sustainable. Tell us a little bit about what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah, yeah, you know most people that end up in the insurance advisory space. While into it's the Mine is I'm doing this on purpose. I have a very stinks. Why unfortunately I have been a product health care insurance employee benefits when I was sixteen years old. My Dad was diagnosed with multiple myeloma for you. Listeners that don't know what that is. That's cute of your bone marrow. So I was sixteen got diagnosed found out San France Limo radiation several years back baffled. That's. Unfortunately ends up being that me. Combat statistics so sixty two's. Depending on which report you live, read out personal bankruptcy puzzle medical reasons while unfortunately we were part of that statistics are my parents had to file bankruptcy? In order to make ends meet the rent in worse yet. It's interesting about that is they've got health insurance? both employer based insurance, but you know we're in an out of pocket mass along as Hand Fifteen, twenty, two thousand a year for family. You know you do that. Do three years in a row. How many families have extra thirty forty fifty thousand dollars sitting? There Bang you. You know when you're trying to send your kid baseball camp. You get on the new pair of Jordan. Then all the thing that wonderful parents which I had you know to water? Parents did Zach I mean down the road of of Yao, interest in and understanding vow health insurance, but it also makes you understand how they're using the system is and and that although you got insurance, although theoretically that insurance is supposed to be there to supporting how it was, it was really more of a hoop jumper, and you know an obstacle alone commerce so. Back, down the field, and then the last part of really what what drives me and my? Why unfortunately I'm a big I'm a big. Momma's boy is most Latin. Men Are. A BIG MOMMA's boy. Unfortunately in two thousand fourteen moms diagnose pancreatic cancer and she passed away August. Eleven thousand seventeen, so man I'll tell you I get up every day fired up to fights for changing because I have seen that you most important. Pete in my life away from cancer the amount of money we spent the amount of confusion. The amount of just uncertainty and Hoots Jeff Junk mail system just makes sense air, and so that's that's what we get. Get up every morning

Willis Lester Lester Morales Marquez Marquez Human Resources Marketing Multiple Myeloma Starbucks North America Vice President Of Sales CEO Executive Vice President ACA Leicester Momma YAO Pete San France Baseball
"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

07:22 min | 11 months ago

"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Now you understand why when everyone kept saying to me. Have you ever been to bend before there was something unsettling so i WanNa talk to you a little bit? Generally about the kind of work that means so much to me and then tucks a little specifically about the library book and how it came to fall into my my hands. There are two kinds of stories that really ignite my interest. One is the discovery and usually that means the discovery of a world an obsession a subculture an event. Something that I had no idea existed and those kinds of stories are exhilarating. And that's a chance for the writer to see the world for the reader and to go places that the reader might never go or to experience. Subcultures that the reader might never see. And that's what the writers mission is to show the world in a new way and to discover these things that come as a surprise as a refreshing way of looking at the universe. The other kind of story that I love is the story that I think of as hiding in plain sight that is. There's something familiar a place in environmental situation. A person who the situation is so familiar that you've never stopped to really look at it and really think about it. How does this work? What are the components here? What's what is this all about. How can I bring a sort of inquisitive? Look to something that feels very familiar and very well-known the effort that is involved in that is to see what is extraordinary in something that's very ordinary and it's very challenging kind of story. I have to admit the story where you're finding a discovery feels easier to attract a reader than a story where you look at something very familiar and say. I know this seems familiar but heavy overlooked at it really closely. And I have a bit of a contrarian streak I kind of love those stories. I think the first time that I did a big story like that was some years ago when I was in a supermarket one day and I looked around the supermarket and for the first time I suddenly thought supermarkets are amazing. And how do they work? What how how do you know what to and what I mean? It just seemed like the most complicated thing I'd ever thought about and it was kind of a hard pitch to my editor admittedly said to him. Oh my God I have. An amazing story idea supermarkets. You know it's a lot easier to say. I have an amazing story idea Tom. Cruise so but I find the challenge so interesting because the reality is though I spent about six weeks in a supermarket and it was fascinating. It's just a harder story to sell to a reader because of course the reader feels like how could I find a supermarket interesting? So those kinds of stories are extremely challenging. The story of something new is a little easier to attract a reader so what was particularly interesting about the library. Book is that it really combined. Both of those qualities. So let me tell you a little bit about how I came to write it because it was not something that I expected that I be doing as a matter of fact when I had finished my last book which was about Rin Tin Tin I. I just decided I was done writing books. I wasn't done being a writer but I felt that the commitment of writing a book and the energy it took and the time it took was maybe not so necessary. And maybe I didn't need to do it anymore and I made me a little wistful but then I thought you know. I'm going to continue writing magazine stories. And that's fine and I've made my piece. So that was that one day it was in the library doing some sort of research on a story and I have the experience that I had that day in the grocery store where I looked around the library and I thought how do libraries work. How do they function like what goes on? Every they pick the books. And what do they do with all those overdue fines and I suddenly found myself fascinated by the idea like wow? I've been in libraries millions of times in my life and I've never really stopped and thought about what they're like. I thought wow. Wouldn't it be a great book to spend a year in a big city library and just sort of document what the life of a library it's like and then I thought well but I'm not writing any more books so it's a great book but not for me to put in my mind and not long after that my husband and I moved to La? My son was going into first grade and this was early in the school year. Had just begun. He was given a homework assignment to interview someone who worked for the city. He came home and he told me about this assignment and I thought well let me think your five year old boy how but if you interview a garbage collector and he size me up and said how about if I interview a librarian and I thought I'm such a good mother.

writer La Tom editor
"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

02:48 min | 11 months ago

"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

"The house next door with the wail of an RV parked in the driveway. In a swing set that gave the kitties good view of our comings and goings. Furthermore the weather was turning grim sky dropping lower the cloud starting to spit a chilly rain. All of which are moldy mud brown dream vacation home seem moldy and Browner and more bathroom lists by the minute town was a couple miles away. There was a gas in need or a stopping fuel or whatever it was called at the end of the main drag. It had bathrooms but it was one of those joints to go into the cashier and ask for key and then go back outside to the bathroom. A cold dimly lit concrete-block cubicle. That a truck stop. Prostitute might have found homey and familiar. We were of course not in a position to fuss we made use of the bathroom had dinner in town and then stopped and again just to be safe in the morning. We through jacket on over our pajamas and made a beeline for the gas station. The rain intermittent the day. Before had apocalyptic we hold up in the House for the afternoon limiting are liquids. We had counted on the changing shifts of cashiers. To keep are very frequent visits from being totted up but the cashiers evidently chatted among themselves by the third day racing in at seven for our morning Constitutional Wet Coats. Akimbo over our nightclothes. We felt how to put this exactly not welcome. Even the House had turned against US beating up with wetness a nearly every surface little rivulets of rain threading their way across window. Panes in walls so much water and none of it running but we were with one more day coming to us. We finally gave in. We packed. Her belongings stopped in for one last visit at the gas station and headed home. Now you understand why when everyone kept saying to me. Have you ever been to bend before there was something unsettling.

Browner
"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

02:34 min | 11 months ago

"orlean" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Yorker aurelien belongs to a great tradition of journalistic generalists. Meaning she's made a career writing about everything from Origami artists. Show dogs rare orchids taxidermy. Tonya harding and a library. Fire to name only a few of our topics ORLEAN matters. Because she's insatiably curious. Reading her work you are easily caught up in her own joyful. Desire to know more to see what's around the next bend of her curiosity the characters she introduces their passions and obsessions and our explorations. The fascinating tributaries and side roads of her subjects expand the boundaries of each article and book reaching toward questions about her own very humanness. She opens this talk with a hilarious tale from Bend Oregon back when she was an unknown writer and she goes on to explain how she chooses her subjects and actually came to write one of her most famous books about a fire at the Los Angeles Public Library here. We find her signature humor and curiosity her desire to understand the motivations and choices of people both famous and not and her willingness to look at the seemingly ordinary and find the extraordinary. Here's Orleans thank you so much and welcome to the tenth Democratic Debate. I don't know if I'm going to be as entertaining as that was. Thank you all so much for being here tonight. You know this is of course really meaningful to me because this is where I started my writing career. I had barely published anything when I moved out here. And through the luck and coincidence and timing and circumstances I ended up being hired as a writer which actually suggests that. They had very few writers here at the time. This is a true story by the way. And I'm actually going off script but when I went to my first interview for this little tiny magazine that was a startup that lasted just one year. I brought my high school yearbook to the interview because I had been the editor and that was about as much as I had published not.

writer Tonya harding Bend Oregon Los Angeles Public Library tiny magazine editor
"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Stacks that basically functioned like a like a charcoal chimney for your barbecue or grill and the the fire was absolutely catastrophic. Wh what was the proportion of books that were destroyed droid and or damaged by fire. There were a million books either destroyed or damaged and that was about The little more than fifty percent of the entire collection four hundred thousand were they were vaporized. Basically I mean this was a fire that burn for seven and a half hours it reached temperatures of twenty five hundred degrees. And as you say the stacks which were the the area where the books that aren't out in the open shelves are stored in these stacks and that's typical for a library but the division between the different tiers within in the stack Rather than being a ceiling which would keep a fire contained. They were open grading so the fire. Basically just these are seven tears tall and the fire simply just blasted through all seven tears. It couldn't have been a better set up for a fire. I mean this was a fire where these spaces had grown so hot that firefighters were having having to leave after like five and ten minutes simply because they couldn't physically be there just because he got so hot inside the building. Yeah I mean that's an amazing. Using they had these oxygen canisters that would normally lasts an hour and they were breathing so heavily because they were so hot that the canisters were lasting lasting about ten minutes and they went through more than a thousand of these oxygen canisters and they had to keep swapping the teams out because nobody It was just too hot to be in their twenty. Five hundred degrees. Doesn't matter if you're in a of fire suit it's just unbearable unbearable at one point over half of the entire city of Los Angeles Fire Department. It was working to try to put this fire out and they ended up relying on the county to staff the fire. A your houses around the city because nobody was around they were all at the library trying to put the fire out and they needed somebody to be there. In case someone else someone tells caught on fire. I mean it was very really difficult fire and almost every firefighter. I spoke to said they never fought a fire that was as challenging Alan Djing and as fierce as this fire was I think for many of them the the the sort sort of I don't want to say the highlight of their career because obviously wasn't something they were joyful about but it was the most intense experience of their careers in the arson. Investigators event eventually decided that arson had been the cause of the fire. Who who was the person who was accused of having started at a young man in his twenty's named Harry peak who was was I guess predictably wannabe actor Aaron. Boy You know did odd jobs park cars. That kind of thing was well what what happened was he had told a number of friends that he had started the fire. So very quickly Once there was a reward associated with if anyone having providing a tip for solving the fire one of his friends good to have friends like that came forward and Basically connected the fire department to him and they began following them around and ended up interviewing him to figure out whether his boasts of having started the fire were in fact true because because he was a charming liar he was from every description I had from anybody. He was an immensely likable guy. Charming charming and just a crazy fibber. Own would just fifth about stupid things not just FIB. You'd say where. Where have you been? I was having drinks with share. You know he just couldn't tell a straight story and he his friends would. It were exasperated by I am and at the same time. Also said he's a really good guy who would give you the shirt off his back and that was interesting to me. They all use that exact expression he would give view the shirt off his back. He was beloved and also drove them crazy. So in in a way this is what might be called a true crime narrative. I guess and I wonder if you felt pressured by the fact that you were telling a crime story to have a narrative the resolved comfortably to provide an answer to the question. I I did I first of all I thought AWW GONNA solve this which is utterly vain. I mean the. There's no way that as civilian with no oh access to the evidence and no knowledge of how to investigate an arson would be able to crack the case case but that was my first thought is. I'm going to solve this and maybe if you had a ragtag band of friends it right special. Yeah yes come on guys and a big dog right. Isn't that the the Scooby Doo premises but I'm fairly comfortable with the idea that I don't have to come to a final conclusion and it may be out of the reality of so many of the things I write about. Don't have a tidy conclusion or don't resolve in the way that I might have expected them to resolve. In this case I think following the different possible outcomes. It's a bit of a choose your own adventure and and you come to your own conclusion. Essentially because there's no way to reexamine the evidence at this point. What I tried to do is lay out all of those different paths of thought that could lead you to a conclusion it may be that when I wrote the orchid thief and I was determined to see a ghost orchid and as time was growing short and I thought Oh my God the book is ruined? I'm never going to see a ghost orchid and finally had a deadline that I had to make and I didn't see one and suddenly it seemed like well of course I'm not going to see one. That's that's the point. It's it doesn't matter that I'm not GonNa it it. It would never match the anticipation of seeing it so it was the first experience. I had of a non-conclusion conclusion. Then and in its own way it felt I mean it is the reality it. The fact is without giving anything away. Hey it's it's not possible to come to a conclusion. I mean my my notion that I would solve it being something. That very quickly Lee. I realize well that's nuts but it isn't possible to ultimately know what happened and I was is comfortable finally thinking that's okay. I'm giving you the different paths of thought and and Maybe you see the One of them being the persuasive one. Well Susan Orlean. I really loved your book and now I love having you on the show. Thank you so much for coming over and taking the time. Oh thank you. It's it's a pleasure. Susan Orlean her book. The library book is an absolute delight. I can't recommend it highly enough. It's out in paperback. Now is not just for her Angelino. So if you're if you live in Los Angeles great but if you've ever been to orange enjoyed a library Susan's book is for you. It is really. It's a real winter. That's the end of another episode of Bulls Eye. Bulls is produced at maximum fund or World Headquarters Overlooking Macarthur Park in Beautiful Full Los Angeles California where the birds have discovered the barge the raft. The kind of floats around the link. I think it was once a boat-landing anyway. They've covered it in what birds cover things in the show is produced by. Speaking to microphones are producers Kevin Ferguson. Hey Soussan Barosio Jio is our associate producer. We get help from Casey O'Brien and his giant electric piano our production fellows Jordan cowling and Melissa. Dwayne yes are interstitial. Interstitial Music is by Dan Wally also known as Dj w our theme song is by the go team thanks to them and their label Memphis Industries for letting US use it and one last last thing we have done. Many interviews are shows nearly two decades starting with the time that my friend Jordan went to Dick Dale Dot net on the web and called the King of the Surf Guitar at his trailer in the desert. All of those interviews are available on our website at maximum fund dot Org. We're on facebook facebook twitter and youtube just search for Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn you can keep up with the show there and I think that's about it. Just remember all great. Radio have a signature. Sign off Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn is a production of maximum fun dot Org and is distributed by N._p._R...

arson Susan Orlean Los Angeles Fire Department Jesse Thorn facebook Wh Bullseye Jordan cowling Los Angeles Alan Djing US Kevin Ferguson Harry peak Dwayne Memphis Industries Dan Wally Soussan Barosio Jio Surf Guitar Angelino Aaron
"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Old old California character of this this amalgam of Spanish culture and native American culture and and the new culture of people moving being in and identifying at and really preserving it and celebrating it like most of the the most of the important books of the early Los Angeles Library at least as you describe it and I believe you are about citrus for right and sheep she pershing and yeah I mean the the initial I mean gives you a real sense of the difference in what was going on in La at the turn the century versus New York City which had a well established library. That was already Building a collection of you've important literary works the among the initial purchases of the L. A. Library when it was an association was formed to have a library happen were books about citrus about beekeeping 'em this was a country mm tree town it was a couple thousand people was not a significant city and then one of the other themes that continued. which was interesting? Is that the library existed in rented space for very long time people. Obviously obviously you can just imagine what the New York Public Library. The main branch and the New York Public Library looks like that was the giant libraries of New York and Boston. And all these cities. Yeah been cities since the Eighteenth Century and in the meantime Los Angeles at that point had a library that was on. The upper floor are of a department store and you would ride the elevator along with people were going shopping for brassieres. And you know they they would get off on the brassiere floor or the floor with children's clothing and you would ride on up go to the library and one of the it was a cause for much embarrassment in the city. This feeling that will L. A. couldn't possibly be an intellectual center if it it didn't have a library more with Susan Orlean after a quick break. They never convicted anyone. Starting the nineteen eighty six library fire. Susan will tell me why when she. She started her library book. She thought she could solve the case. It's bulls eye for maximum fun dot org and NPR. who was cost him soleil the money and what exactly was his role Iran this week on through line of the assassinated Iranian general and the organization he represented have shaped the relationship attention between the US and Iran for decades? That's this week on through line from NPR. The podcast where we go back in time to understand the present I also reading glasses because brea and mallory have great tips your comics reader and you WANNA use a library connected APP. You can try out HOOPLA. I listen for the author interviews news that I waited as long as I did to start reading Joan did they give me reading advice. I didn't even know needed. If you go in person to an event then go up to an author or a filmmaker. Anybody tell them what they like about their work. Eurotrash baby look I understand. You didn't like heroes season three. That's fine I don't actually need to know that information. I'm brea grant and I'm Mallory o'mara we're reading glasses and we solve all your problems every Thursday on maximum fund. Welcome back to bulls. Hi I'm Jesse. Thorn were replaying my twenty eighteen conversation with the writer Susan Orlean she writes for The New Yorker among and many other publications her books include the orchid thief Rin Tin Tin and Saturday night. Her newest tells the story of the Los Angeles Public Library and and the world of Los Angeles Public Library so much more. It's called the library puck. It's out now in paperback. Let's talk about the fire. Fire that destroyed a substantial portion of the central library and particularly a substantial portion of the collection It was driven.

New York Public Library Los Angeles Public Library Susan Orlean Los Angeles Library New York City Los Angeles L. A. California NPR Mallory o'mara brea Iran Rin Tin Tin Boston Joan The New Yorker US NPR. Thorn writer
Tesla CEO says will build Gigafactory 4 in 'Berlin area'

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Tesla CEO says will build Gigafactory 4 in 'Berlin area'

"Perhaps it should be good and Morgan because the US electric car maker Tesla has announced that Berlin will be the site of its first European factory the BBC's Damien McGuinness reports from the German capital. The sudden announcement awesome and that's an awards ceremony in Berlin cheese. Steak came as a complete surprise to most in Germany. Other European countries under the parts of Germany had been in the running traditionally Berlin. ORLEAN is not a big center of industry but the region does have space and Disney attractive place for high skilled workers. Tesla has already started advertising. Jobs here yeah. On German ministers say. The news is proof of the health of Germany's car industry which is trying to shake off the taint of the VW diesel scandal and move into the future with electric actress vehicles. The will though be challenges for Tesla in Germany where regulations and workers rights and environmental protection of tougher than elsewhere in Berlin. I'm the BBC's Damien McGuinness for marketplace.

Berlin Germany Tesla Damien Mcguinness BBC Orlean United States Morgan Disney VW
"orlean" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"Magazine ever since Susan's pieces of covered wide range of topics though, she has shown a certain fondness for animal stories along the way, she's earned a reputation as a very gifted reporter and writer with a sharp eye for detail ability to pull seemingly disparate threads together and contagious sympathy. For her subjects these same talents have been on display also in her books, which have included Saturday night her first book in one thousand nine. Ninety which documents the experience of Saturday night in about two dozen communities across the country, the orchid fief and nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight about it a Centric plant dealer named John LaRoche and the odd passionate world of orchid fanatics and written in two thousand eleven about that, I think German shepherd who became an American entertainment. Start her latest work the library book. His our is our eighth book and chronicles the life and times in the near death experience of the Los Angeles public library, which suffered a devastating fire in nineteen Eighty-six. The book is at once and extensively research mystery, a cultural history and a love letter to reading in it. Susan, not only profiles the library's staff and patrons. She tells the broader history of libraries and expounds on the value to you Mandy of these public places the reviews of this. Book have been well beyond enthusiastic is more. Like enraptured Ron Charles of the Washington Post, for example, declared the library book a great gift to give or get in, you know, for the upcoming holidays and Ron said reading it. You can't quote feel grateful that you can't help. But feel grateful that these marvelous places belong to us. So lazy gentlemen, please join me in welcoming Susan orlean..

Susan orlean Ron Charles John LaRoche Los Angeles reporter Washington Post writer Mandy
"orlean" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on KCRW

"Attacked. Now, many protesters blocking women here our fellow women who do not want to enter this temple one older woman. I met Sarah Osama Sushila Nyerere says she waited until she stops getting her periods at age fifty three before visiting. Yeah. You gotta come block younger women with my own body. If I have to she says police are in a sticky situation, they're tasked with maintaining public order and guaranteeing women safe passage, but most of the officers here are locals, and there's a lot of pressure on them. So we're inside the control room where already hopeless. Is in various places new command center. A wall of TV screens live streams video from all the roads leading to the temple. But even with five thousand extra police to escort them, not one single woman age ten to fifty has been able to reach the submarine Malla temple in the months since the supreme court ruled they could the protesters devoted and even politicians who've come out to block them say this is their freedom of religion Cyriac Joseph is a retired supreme court Justice who disagrees with his old colleagues decision, for example in the early church. Orlean the men not allowed to be a priest with the say, this is equality. That is ridiculous Joseph thinks the court is trying to be too progressive to western with a spate of recent rulings. Protecting the rights of homosexuals women and minorities late last month, India's Supreme Court against it would review its decision on submarine Malla, which has been so unpopular here. A hearing is set for mid January Lauren fryer NPR news Carola India. There was a cry of grief in the bookish Twitter. Verse recently when it was an ounce that literary magazine. Tin house will cease publishing print editions next June that coincides with the twentieth anniversary of the publication that set set out to shake up the often stodgy world of literary magazines and by all accounts, Tin, Hau, succeeded as NPR's Lynn neary reports. People don't go into the business of publishing literary magazines for the money freelance writer Lincoln, Michelle should know. He wants started one with a group of like minded friends. We published a purely out of our own pocket. And you know, every time we put on the issue. We would throw a party and sell beer to pay for the issue, but we never made any money from it, even the most prestigious literary magazines such as the Paris review or grant have a limited circulation, but says Michelle among the most dedicated readers are some crucial players in publishing agents and editors looking for new talent. And that makes literary magazines a vital lifeline for writers. When writers right? We sit alone in a room. And we spend all our time on something that no one else sees maybe a friend or two and literary magazines. Are normally the first way that people get something published and actually have strangers read it, we are a gatekeeper we find the work and then agents latch onto that foyers. So we've made careers that way rob Spillman and his wife. Eliza Chapelle are two of the co founders of tin house Chapelle says they always knew they wanted to do something different with the magazine when we first started talking about this rob said, if you really wanna change publishing, then you have to get inside the machine and blow it up at the time Spillman says literary magazines didn't have a very appealing reputation, there were conflict castor oil. There were supposed to be good for you. So take your medicine. So they didn't have a lot of art design. They didn't have a lot of humor. So we wanted to interject both of those things. One of the most striking things about ten house is it's beautifully illustrated. Covers. Fulla fantastic, images, and vivid colors. But Chapelle says the changes they wanted to make went well beyond the cover. They set out to publish new writers in every issue, and they wanted to find the kind of writers who were often overlooked by publishers because historically women and people of color any other targeted communities. Literary publishing hasn't been that welcoming. So we really did have to go out and say, we want to offer you a home we want to publish you. And tin house was also open to writing that blurred the lines between literary fiction and genres like science fiction and fantasy. So my feeling has always been the tin house magazine is a place where writers are encouraged to let their freak flags fly writer. Karen, Russell, perhaps best known for her novel swamp land, Russell says she was rejected several times before finally getting a story published by tin house. Eventually she taught in one of their workshops where she also met her husband. Russell says you never knew what you would get when you. Opened a copy of ten house and she felt a kinship with contributors like Kelly link and Amy bender. Tin house was so inviting so beautiful, and so playful, you know, there there was a different different feeling when you picked up an issue. I think they sort of felt like readers all are welcome here. And and these are your people these are the the levers of language, the super weirdos, the poets and the wizards that you wanna be with ten house will continue its workshops and book publishing business, and there will be a digital version of the magazine. But for a lot of people both readers and writers, it just won't be the same. Lynn neary, NPR news, Washington. Some of us can't wait for this. Most wonderful time of the year in which it's permissible to hear songs about reindeer Santa Claus. Jack frost nipping at your nose one right after another, and there's some people.

literary magazine Tin house writer tin house magazine Supreme Court Lynn neary tin house Chapelle Eliza Chapelle NPR Cyriac Joseph Michelle Sarah Osama Sushila Nyerere rob Spillman submarine Malla India Russell Twitter Paris review Orlean
"orlean" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nineteen Eighty-six fire orlean tells us started in the fiction area spread through the building burning for seven hours reaching temperatures of more than two thousand degrees before firefighters could put it out the rare books room where orlean and I met look like this thirty two years later, some of the books back on the shelves are still scarred. So you can see the soot the soot and. They smell. But a lot of the books. Were as badly damaged by the water being used to put out the fire as they were by the fire at self for orlean longtime staff writer for the New Yorker an acclaimed author of eight books, including the orchid defend Rinchen ten. This was also a personal story of childhood visits with her mother to her local library in the Cleveland suburbs. And for mothers growing dementia, and then death is your lean was writing this book. This was an irony that, of course, I couldn't have anticipated. And certainly was a painful irony just as I began thinking about those trips that we'd spend together. And remembering how precious they were how much they marked my childhood. My mother was diagnosed with dementia to point where she actually stopped recognizing me. And she passed away before. Finish the book. Totally embedded herself on and off for more than two years to study the inner workings of the library and bring a day in the life field. This is the library as you've never seen it as here in the shipping department what she calls the bloodstream that passes books throughout library branches. It's a little life prying the back.

orlean Cleveland staff writer two thousand degrees thirty two years seven hours two years
"orlean" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

14:30 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on KCRW

"Bookworm. My guest is Susan orlean. The book is called the library book. It's a great title. I don't know. How many of you had the same feeling I had from library books. There were some many ceremonies and rituals surrounding going to the library bringing books back on time. Getting the next book in whatever the series was more those laborat- times when you could ask the library to get a book. It didn't have from another library. Here was this place. You could get anything and Susan writes in her first chapter that Lynn, she. Was bringing her son to the library for the first time. She remembered going to the library with her mother for the first time remember that for me. I had a moment when I was my son was assigned a school project when he was in first grade to talk to a civil servant and to my surprise. He wanted to talk to a librarian I took him to the branch library here in Los Angeles. We had just moved here when I walked into the room with him. There was something about the quality of the air in the room. The sounds of a library the feeling of a library the light coming into the library that immediately reminded me of all of those trips that I always took with my mom, my mom used to take me to the library to the branch library near our house in Cleveland. Several times a week because I loved it so much and there was this feeling of excitement and anticipation, and then we'd walk in together. And it was a place that was unlike any other place, it wasn't like going into a store. It was bounty. I could have anything. I mean, there probably was some limit to how many books you could take out. But that wasn't the sensation. That feeling was everything in the world. You could dream of is here, and you can have it all was something that I hadn't thought about in many, many, many years and going with my son. Brought that memory back so powerfully, and I began to think boy this meant so much to me. What is it about libraries that is so special, and it stuck in my mind? And I kept thinking God, I like to write a book about libraries what what will that book be? But it it was percolating in my head ever since that visit and you had moved to Los Angeles where we were the unhappy that comes of the largest library fire ever in the United States. How many volumes amazing tally four hundred thousand books were destroyed completely destroyed. Not to mention those that were damaged seven hundred thousand damage. Say four hundred thousand books are destroyed you have to somehow get seven hundred thousand books out of this burned building pack them up fine cold storage for seven hundred thousand bucks. And that's because mold will bloom in a book within forty eight hours. If it gets wet and the concern was these would all get moldy. And there's no recovery from mold and remind me how hot did it alternately get it reached over two thousand degrees Fahrenheit. In the in the stacks, which are really like chimneys the way the books were were stored. These less frequently circulated books there in these narrow compartments that really served like chimneys. So the fire got started. And then just went to town, in fact, or the fire burned for over seven hours, so seven hours raging Inci these these chimney stacks, basically, and they had endless amounts of fuel to just keep getting hotter and hotter and hotter is in the library book. What a great title zooms in orlean manages to take us through that fire. The opening chapter online is like a pastorale the. Extraordinary thing. Here's an department store. We you can take anything home for free then a chapter in which we're as if we're naughty children were warned that for years. They've been told that the downtown library is a fire hazard is a fire hazard is a fire hazard. What are you going to do? No, one knew what to do because the building was so beautiful was considered to be so beautiful. There would always be a huge debate between replacing the building and repairing the building, and they would eventually repair which was this was a debate that went on for more than twenty years in the city because the building is absolutely beautiful was built in the nineteen twenties. It was very quickly inadequate in size. I mean, Los Angeles grew so exponentially that what had been a very comfortably sized library in nineteen twenty was very quickly too small for a city that exploded in the forties and fifties. A great chapter. You know, really better than anything in under the volcano. And I mean, it describing book burning and the history of book burnings, the young man thought to have been the prime suspect comes from not forty miles away. And he comes from one of those towns that are right in the middle of Los Angeles. What is it called? It was called Santa Fe spring a face sprint. And it's one of these towns that was. It looks a little bit like it had been assembled off site and then flown in and deposited in the middle of desert. Susan orlean the author of the library book. It's published by Simon and Schuster water. The. Of the boredom of the small town and the need to escape it and the weirdness of being the odd man out in your family. He seems to have been quite a case lawyer, I PECH warrior obsessive lawyer, but many of us have that problem when we're young I did, and is parents just assume that most of the stories he told were false which was nothing compared to his sisters and brothers. They knew they didn't assume they knew his stories were false. And it seems as if he just liked the idea of having been in the fire and having had a handsome firemen. He used the phrase again and again. Yeah, he'd recently kind of come out sort of come out to the extent that you can come out in a small small small town. And and the and at that time. Time which was you know, late seventies early eighties. It wasn't an easy thing to to come out and to come out of a fire in the arms of a handsome fireman. This for a young man who just applied and failed to become a member of the Santa Monica flat fire department. So he had a certain thing for firemen, and well, you know, before long he gets cast in the role of chief suspect, he added an incredible desire for attention. And I think most of his fibs and fabrications were designed to make it seem like his life was much more exciting than it was most of us. I think would understand even if we wanted attention that you don't want attention for committing a massive. Destructive felony like an arson fire. And yet he confessed not only to his friends, but to the fire department as well that he had done it. And and then only when the seriousness of what he was saying. I think really dawned on him when he got arrested. Yes. And taken to jail. He had no idea that you could be arrested for just lying. Right. Exactly. I think that it was it shocked him, and you know, you would think somebody with a bit more sensible would say, you know, you don't it's like you don't joke around about bombs when you're at the airport. When there's been a huge fire in the city, you live in you, don't boast to people that you started it when I was a boy, my mom's favorite book was a tree grows in Brooklyn. And in that book, the heroine Francey wants to read all the books in her branch library, and she reads them in alphabetical order. Well, I tried that too. Because we had a very small branch library was just a small storefront a person could conceivably read the books in alphabetical order. So this book the library book by Susan orlean, full, so many things that are so close to my heart that I read it really overnight. It's a wonderful book on top of it. You know, the way they talk about a mystery wrapped in 'nigma. It's a mystery story to now I'm not going to tell. Tell you whether or not the mystery get solved, but everything that can be done Susan Orleans. Does she finds the young men, Harry is his name? He she finds the sisters. She talks to them, you know, this if she were to solve this mystery of the probably the biggest catastrophe LA has ever known. She would be world famous. I ended up learning a lot about arson which is in itself a fascinating topic. And it is an incredibly difficult thing to investigate arson. It's the least successfully prosecuted felony. It destroys its evidence. It's an ways I mean, not that I'm recommending it. But it is a perfect crime. It's one of those things where you the weapon it self can be destroyed in the conflagration. So there is often no evidence at all. And in the case of a fire that burned for seven hours at temperatures over two thousand degrees. You can imagine how difficult it was to investigate the librarians vacated and stood outside many of them in tears. The firemen could only spend ten minutes in rotation before they had. Had to leave in the terrible heat. And what an extraordinary scene, it is to imagine. Because downtown Los Angeles comes and goes and comes and goes geographically, it's now we know in one of its high periods right people are living there again. But then I would say in the mid eighties. It was really in a low point and the businesses a lot of businesses had oldest. There were a lot of vacancy down there. And there was even a question of whether there was any point in having a library downtown. There weren't a lot of people living downtown there really was a feeling that LA had hollowed out in the middle. And there wasn't much life in the center. Of the city. I'm Michael, silver, blah. You're listening to bookworm from the studios of KCRW. I'm talking with Susan orlean about her fabulous. Book the library. Book will continue after this short break. Every thursday. It is to fifteen at KCRW when Republicans took back the house for the first time. In decades, the wedge issue became a proven political tactic..

Susan orlean Los Angeles arson KCRW United States Lynn Santa Monica Cleveland Susan Orleans Simon Michael Francey Brooklyn Harry seven hours two thousand degrees Fahrenhei two thousand degrees forty eight hours
"orlean" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on KCRW

"This is NPR news. And you are listening to KCRW. Well, if you follow Wall Street, you know, it's been a bumpy ride on the stock market recently in the financial markets were hit by another round of selling yesterday. The Dow Jones industrial average has now given up all the gains. It had racked up for the year. But one expert says don't panic that story coming out then later today at two o'clock here on KCRW, Susan orlean talks about cultural and emotional connections possible with libraries in her nonfiction book the library book. And this is why I think this was so evocative for me, the idea of our investment are emotional connection to libraries the fact that they are the repository of our stories of who we are as a culture who we are as individuals, and the fact that we make it available for everybody and anyone. Tis share makes it really unlike any place else that exists today at two pm. Susan orlean is with us on bookworm. That's right here on KCRW. If you're just now headed out to the freeways, you could be seeing.

KCRW Susan orlean NPR
"orlean" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"And in case this happens in and these fabled collections aren't lost. I, it's interesting because the fire occurred right at the moment when technology was first entering library management, the LA library at that point switch to an electronic catalog because even losing the card catalogue was devastating. Yeah. I mean, they had to recant along new, but we had two million bucks they they didn't even know. And that was actually one of those odd pieces of timing that electron ick cataloging was just becoming widely available. So LA had to recap, log all of its books. Anyway, it was purchasing all of these new books to replace the ones that were lost, but the books themselves, all new books, digital copy exists, but of old books, they Google has a huge project where they are digitally scanning. Old books don't exist on a file that book, is it? Yeah. And they're gonna make a file. I mean for an individual library to do that. It's probably only welcome. Google. Yeah. And so we are putting more safeguards in place so that if you had a devastating fire and you lost these rare Beckham in many cases now I think there is a backup. On the other hand, the LA public library has the largest or one of the very largest collections of maps and atlases of any library in the country. They have over two hundred thousand. It would take a very long time and a lot of money for them to digitize all of them. That's the goal because that would be fantastic to have all those maps, digital copy of all of them. But it's it's an enormous amount of work for a library to do for me what I find interesting with a book like this, you don't make it into a detective story. You don't build this book in that way. This book is a lot of history. How does the book. Begin to emerge, how do you piece together? I guess what I'm asking is had a Susan orlean write a book when you do. I'm still trying to answer that question actually for myself. But what I do, I have a by approach is to throw my net as wide as possible in the beginning to have no preconceived idea of what the book is. Show me everything. Just I wanna learn everything. The way I look at it is in the beginning, I'm a student. I'm I'm doing a graduate course in the library library history, the history of this particular incident with the fire, the people who work there, the people who work there. Now what the day to day life is of a library and in the course of it, you know, and the history of arson and the history burning books in the course of world events, which sadly has been a a theme since the beginning of time. As I'm doing all of this in gathering so much material themes begin emerging to me and what this was about was storytelling. We are creatures who tell stories, we preserve stories, and we make stories up about yourselves. And I feel like this was about the story of the library and the library is the repository of stories. The people who became very interesting to me in the book like Harry peak, the person who is accused of starting the fire of Charles Llamas. One of the really fascinating characters who ran the library. These were people who were who made up stories about themselves who created stories around the who they were in the world even more than the average person. So as that theme. Began to emerge. It helped me organize this material and begin pruning away at what was important for me to know, but wasn't important to put in the book. I chose to start the book with Harry peak because I think people are more interested in people than they are in places or events that a book that invites you win through a character is often one that you're willing to keep reading and he as a person who was a compulsive storyteller otherwise known as a liar. He symbolized so much of what the book was. He's a kind of classic creature of LA a wannabe actor, a dreamer, a drifter. How old at the time of the event is in his twenties. And he also kind of intersected with LA history in a very interesting way and. I won't necessarily tell you the day new mall of his story, so that will leave a little bit of mystery..

LA Google Harry peak Susan orlean Beckham arson Charles Llamas
"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Back to bullseye. Jesse thorn here with me. Now, Susan orlean she writes for the New Yorker has done for about thirty years, a bunch of other publications as well. Her books include the orchid thief Rin tin, tin and Saturday night. Her newest tells the story of the Los Angeles public library and so much more. It's called the library book hits bookstores this week. The arson investigators event eventually decided that arson had been the cause of the fire. Who was the person who was accused of having started. A young man in his twenties named Harry peak who was, I guess, predictably a wannabe actor, Aaron, boy, you know, did odd jobs, parked cars, that kind of thing was well what what happened was he had told a number of friends that he had started the fire. So very quickly once there was a reward associated with anyone having providing a tip for solving the fire, one of his friends, good to have friends like that came forward end basically connected the fire department to him and they began following them around and ended up interviewing him to figure out whether. His boasts of having sort of the fire were were in fact true because he was a charming liar. He was from every description I had from anybody. He was in a mentally likable guy, charming and just a crazy fibber own would just fifth about stupid things. Not just fifth, you'd say where where have you been say? I was having drinks with share, you know, he just couldn't tell a straight story and his friends would were exasperated by him. And at the same time also said he's a really good guy would give you the shirt off his back. And that was interesting to me. They all use that exact expression. He would give you the shirt off his back. He was beloved and also drove them crazy. So in a way, this is what might be called a true crime narrative, I guess. And I wonder if you felt pressured by the fact that you were telling a crime story too. Have narrative that resolved comfortably to provide an answer to the question. I did. I, first of all, I thought I'm gonna solve this, which is. Utterly vain. I mean the, there's no way that as civilian with no access to the evidence and no knowledge of how to investigate an arson would be able to crack the case..

arson Jesse thorn Susan orlean Los Angeles Harry peak Aaron thirty years
"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Yeah, I mean, that's an amazing. They had these oxygen canisters that would normally lasts an hour and they were breathing so heavily because they were so hot that the canisters were lasting about ten minutes and they went through more than the thousand of these oxygen canisters and they had to keep swapping the teams out because nobody it, it was just too hot to be in their twenty five hundred degrees doesn't matter if you're in a of fire suit. It's just unbearable at one point. Over half of the entire city of Los Angeles fire department was working to try to put this fire out and they ended up relying on the county to staff the fire houses around the city because nobody was around. They were all at the library trying to put the fire out and they needed somebody to be there in case someone else someone tells caught on fire. I mean, it was very, really difficult fire and almost every firefighter I spoke to said. They never fought a fire that was as challenging and as fierce as this fire was. I think for many of them the the, the sort of I, I don't wanna say the highlight of their career because obviously it wasn't something they were joyful about, but it was the most intense experience of their careers more with Susan orlean after. Quick break. They never convicted anyone starting the nineteen Eighty-six library fire Susan will tell me why. When she started.

Susan orlean Los Angeles twenty five hundred degrees ten minutes
"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye. I'm Jesse thorn. I'm so excited to welcome. Susan orlean back to our show. Susan is a staff writer at the New Yorker. She's also appeared in vogue and Esquire on this American life. She's the author of eight books covering topics like New England Saturday night in America, an orchid fanatics. The last one the orchid thief ended up being the basis of the Academy Award nominated film adaptation. Susan is disarming interviewer a meticulous researcher and a beautiful writer. These days she lives here in Los Angeles where we make our show and being an author and reader, she has visited the beautiful historic central library here. Dozens and dozens of times. Her latest book is about that library and its history and particularly about the devastating fire that almost demolished the library nineteen Eighty-six. The book is also kind of a pay on to libraries everywhere, or they mean to her with us. And why? Every library is a vital institution. The book is called the library book. It's one of my favorites. I've read this year, Susan, orlean. Welcome back to bullseye. Always happy to see you. It's great to be with you, Susan. What is your relationship with libraries personally, other than you're obviously financial relationship. One would hope. Well, I grew up going to the library that was very much a part of my childhood. My parents were great library goers they didn't really believe in buying books. They've, I think they felt like, why would you buy a book? You go to the library and borrow the book and if it's not in you, put your name on a hold list and you get it when it's available and they were born on the depression, and I'm sure that's a lot of it, which is that buying books seemed a bit of an indulgence that wasn't necessary. I grew up going to the library a couple times a week with my mom, and I found it absolutely magical. It was not like going to a bookstore or twice store. It would partly because there was no money, there was no financial relationship. And when your kid, the idea that you can have anything you want is really intoxicating at a library is on a real short list of places that welcome everyone including kids who are hassle right. Well, and I do think that in the last twenty years, we've as a society become more and more conscious kind of call it. The Starbucks affect. We've become conscious of how there's home and there's your workplace, and there's kind of a desire for another place somewhere to go somewhere. To see other humans and just sort of share the space with them. It's, I think it's why people go to co working spaces. I think it's why people go to public parks, even if they've got a backyard. There's something very special about being somewhere around other people in your, not there to interact with them. You're just sharing the space with them. And that's definitely some equality of libraries. I mean, they're, they're closest analogue is probably a public park. You know, there's serve their things to do in a park, and there's, you know, God knows what that the city offers, but sometimes it's just kind of nice to be there and there are other people there. It's also a space that we share with a variety of people. It's not a mediated group of people. It's an chance that you're going to encounter a huge range of people, which for some it's kind of discomfiting. But for. For other people. You could make the argument that it's kind of an opportunity to really see your community you ever for the New Yorker for thirty some years. And you're a New Yorker for a long time. How did your experience of living in Los Angeles compared.

Susan orlean Los Angeles Jesse thorn Academy Award Starbucks staff writer Susan Esquire New England America researcher writer twenty years
"orlean" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"orlean" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Life stories so Susan let's talk a little bit about when somebody inherits property when do they. Actually become the owner okay I mean, I think this is something that a lot of people aren't aware if they think oh well someone died I guess I guess. I'm the owner now well I think, in more ways than one there right but you really need to Think about when you become the, owner right because here's a supreme court case out of Minnesota. Where property transfers at the moment of death and people don't realize that and and let's I'll give you the facts I'll give you the solution and then I want to just talk through, it a. Little bit about what the ramifications are of being property owner. You don't think about it if. You have an owned it but let's let's run through this so in this case I guess it was Lyman was his. Name excuse me and he passed away and Wells Fargo bought the property. From the, estate of Wyman Lyman rather at a sheriff's sale okay. So first analyse that for a minute? He. Sold the property or he died and this things being sold at a sheriff's sale which leads, me to believe that. There was probably some fire sale that needed. To, happen kinda dead on the property or something, right. Mortgage or something like that I'm thinking there. Had, to, be. Some, kind. Of a mortgage or in a state. Tax? Lien orlean yeah that's right so I think more, than anything is probably in a state tax lien and they're saying that you, know with within nine months the data. Death you need to come up with x number of dollars to pay this Bill or you're going to have interest and penalties you're gonna have. Failure to file penalties failure to pay penalties and that's going. To generate interest as well and. You're gonna owe a, lot more so you want to pay don't, have the money the state's illiquid. The state excuse me is illiquid what do we do we sell Yep and we sell in. A. Hurry and I can tell you folks, whenever you drive around your neighborhood and you see a little sign that says estate sale, you know to ask how long ago did this individual die and if it's eight months, ago then I think maybe you low ball yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah Also desperate I, know so I'm. Just trying, to put some meat. On the bones of? These facts. But. That's probably what happened and they, bought the property however lyman's son was a one third devise e under the will what does that mean meaning this property, was given upon the death of Lyman one third of the? Property was allocated to the sun, that he would inherit that says it. Right. In, the. Will. Okay And under the wheel so. He then sold his one third interest to this premier properties k. whatever it is premier properties for whatever dollars he. Got Of course here comes? The problem sure who owns this thing? Yeah is it his to sell? To, does premier have an interest does Wells Fargo not get all the property because what did Wells Fargo actually by what did what did, he sell well the supreme court ended up. Agreeing what the appellate court that John did have an interest in the property because and here's the rule the, property transfers on the moment of death so that means even though this Wells Fargo purchase out of fire. Sale, may not have, occurred for nine months right happened nine months from now, from the date of death when we're trying to. Pay a tax Bill well in the interim the sun immediately owns one third and he sells well he sold to premier properties Only what he had okay which was a one third interest so that sale, is valid. Okay to come for sure and you know, what folks if you have your assets in. A, trust you can avoid the. Fire sales you can avoid pro there's? So many, things you can accomplish. When. You have an estate? Plan. But you need to have that plan in place folks and? Maybe you've put off doing your planning because? You had some misconceptions and misunderstandings about how these Medicaid irrevocable trust work?.

Wyman Lyman Wells Fargo Lien orlean Minnesota Susan Bill John nine months eight months