19 Burst results for "Organizations Innovations"

Grant Baldwin on How to Find & Book Speaking Gigs

The $100 MBA Show

09:25 min | 1 year ago

Grant Baldwin on How to Find & Book Speaking Gigs

"Graham Baldwin is the founder of the Speaker Lamp Dot Com. I've known grand for about about seven years now and not only. Is He an incredible public speaker in public speaking coach. But he's a fantastic teacher. This is why I'm so excited. Have Him as as against teacher on today's show he's GonNa give you so punch values going to give you what you need to make sure you're successful as a speaker now. If if you want to get the most out of today's lesson take some notes. He's going to be dropping a lot of value a quick story about grand before I handed over to him. I know grant personally as a friend. And I've seen him on stage keynote events in front of thousands and even though he's a dynamic speaker on stage. He's hilarious. No he's he's really funny. Actually an incredibly valuable to the event on a personal level grant is sort of an introvert. He's not extroverted by nature. So it goes to show so you can be a great public speaker even if you're not extroverted gray embraces his introverted self and he doesn't change and this is what I love about him is. He's a skillful speaker. He's entertaining but he doesn't feel compelled to be this bombastic character in real life so without further ado. I'm GONNA pass it onto the Grand Baldwin to teach you the five steps to find and book speaking gigs taken away grant. Hey what's up everybody. This is Graham Baldwin founder of the speaker lab host of Collab- PODCAST and author of the new book. The successful speaker five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. So today I will be teaching you through the speaker success. Assess roadmap all right. So let's get down to business so the speaker success roadmap is going to make the acronym speak S. P. A. K.. This is a five step process S. for finding and booking gigs so the first one s is select a problem to solve select a problem to solve. This is where you need to answer a couple of key questions number one is who it is that you want to speak to who it is that you WANNA speak to. You cannot try to speak to everyone. This is a mistake that a lot of speakers and entrepreneurs make is that we think we can just speak to anybody. That just doesn't work so if I were to ask you who do you speak to. You don't want to say who do you want me to speak to or I speak to humans or speak to people like that doesn't work. You have to be very specific specific and clear about who it is that you want to speak to now even if you said well grant I speak to women okay. That's awesome but that's still like half of the world's population so you really want to be narrow and clear about who it is that you speak to the second part of the equation is. What is the problem that you solve for that audience? What's the problem that you saw for that audience? One of the things you have to remember is that as a speaker you are in the problem solving business just because you care about a problem just because you think it should matter to other people doesn't necessarily make it so so just because you're interested in it doesn't mean organizations are group's actually hire speakers to talk about that so there has to be this overlap between what you're interested in what you're passionate about and what organizations innovations actually book speakers to come in and speak about. What's the problem that they can solve for that audience so again remember you are in the problem solving business now? One of the things we tell our speakers or students all the time is that you want to be positioned as a steakhouse and not a buffet steakhouse and Nada. Here's what I mean by that. So imagine if you you and I we're going to go grab lunch later. Grab dinner by the heat and we're looking for a really good steak. We have a choice we could go to a buffet where steak is one of one hundred different things that they offer or we could go to a steakhouse where steak is all that they do and they are the best at it right. They don't do LASAGNA. They don't do pizza. They don't do Tacos they don't do anything else there but steak and they are really really good at stake. That's the type of place that we want to go to. That's the type of place that you want to be as speaker. Here's another way to think about this. Let's imagine that God forbid that you had to have brain surgery okay. Let's hope that you don't blessed that you did. You got a choice you can go to your local family doctor. Where they you're a doctor? They went to medical school. They probably took a class on surgery. They probably know a little bit more about the brain than you and I do. There are smart person or an educated person. But I don't know that they've done brain surgery or or you could go to the person that is a brain surgeon. That's all they do day in and day out. All I do is brain surgery if you break your arm. I'm not your person if you have a cough. I'm not your doctor. If you have asthma attack not the person to go to but if you have brain issue I am the best now. It's counterintuitive because we feel like in order to get the most possible gigs. We need to spread the net as far and wide as possible. More people I could speak to audiences I can talk to the more problems. I can solve the more topics I can speak about the more potential opera -tunities that I have but the opposite is actually the case the more narrow the more specific more clear the more focused. You are the easier it it is to find and book gigs. So remember here. You want to be the steakhouse and not to the buffet. You want to be the steakhouse the buffet. You WanNA solve a specific problem for a specific audience audience and not try to do all things for all people if I ask you who do you speak to you and you say well I speak to humans as Okay what do you speak about. Well what do you want me to talk about. I can talk about anything thing like that doesn't work remember. The first step here is select a problem to solve all right. The second part of the process is you need to prepare your talk doc. Prepare your talk. You know what the problem is now. Let's talk about the solution. What's the Louis Solution that you're going to bring to the table as speaker for this for this problem now? This could be in. The form of a keynote could be a workshop. It could be a seminar. Could be a breakout but you need to begin to think through what the talk is going to be about. And how you're going to solve this. It's now one of the the best tips I can give you whenever you're working on. Your presentation is US stories. Lots and lots and lots of stories if I said right now. Okay I want to tell you a quick story a you immediately as a human are drawn in. You have no idea where the story is GonNa go. Is this going to be funny. Is this going to be sad is going to be entertaining. Is this going to be interesting. It's going to be boring. No clue but we are drawn to story. We WanNa know where a story is going to go so one of your best weapons one of the simplest things that you can do is to tell a lot of stories. I'll I'll tell you a story I'd leave you hanging. I've noticed that whenever I pick up my daughter take her every Wednesday night to our local church youth group and so whenever I pick her up after church and we're driving home and as a good data. I'm trying to ask her like. Hey what did you guys talk about tonight with the youth pastor. Talk about what you learn and oftentimes even though she just laughed. She just heard him speak it shows. I think you talked about you. Know Friendship or docked about forgiveness or something like that you'll talk about these like one word kind of which part of it may be just a teenage girl. Nothing but the other thing that I've noticed issue saying Oh he told the story Oh he told the story about Da Da da and she can recite the whole story but she can't remember all the the other little the things that may have been discussed so people also remember stories. We remember what they talk about. Because again humans relate to stories so we have selected problem solve. We have prepare hair your talk. The E is establish yourself as the expert. Establish yourself as the expert now to do this need to key marketing tools number. One is you need a website. Now you know if you're listening to this podcast if you don't have a website you don't exist people won't take you seriously. You have to have a website a website also as a personal brand. I recommend that you use your name as the domain so I have grant Baldwin Dot Com. People are interested in hiring grant they come to grant ball dot com in fact having your name as domain is so important that actually purchased the domain for my wife and all three of my daughters and now I'm squatting on those until they need them someday and then I'm GonNa Sela Ah back to them at an exorbitant rate. Some pretty excited about that so you have to have a website. The second thing you need to have. Is You need a demo video. You need a demo video now. What exactly is a demo video so think of this like a movie trailer a movie is you know? Let's say ninety minutes long two hours long. They take that they boil it down to two or three minutes and within those two or three minutes you have an idea the plot the theme the characters all of that and the point of the demo video and the point of the movie trailer is to make you want to see more. Make you want to see more so you need to have that demo video because if you want someone to take you seriously if you want someone to put their name on the line and put their reputation on the line and hire you that they need to see something. They don't need to see the entire talk but they need to see something that gives them comfort and confidence when booking you that they've done their due diligence that they know that you are a good fit for their event. She need a website so you need a demo video fourth step. A acquire paid speaking gig acquire paid speaking gig. Now you may be listening. Grant Omar. I thought wait a minute This is the whole point like I want a book speaking gigs right but again I want. Let's go all the way back here. You need to do these sequentially. Do you understand now why you need to do these orders if you say. Hey I just just want to book gigs awesome. Who Do you speak to just talked to anybody and everybody okay? What do you speak about? I can speak about anything. That's not gonNA work. That's not going to work as a speaker. That's not going to work as an entrepreneur manure so once you're clear on who you speak to and then once you're clear on what you speak about was the problem that you saw. Have you have your talk ready. You've prepared your message Once you have your marketing materials awesome place your website your demo video then as the part where you start marketing now again. This is the part where you're just getting started. You're starting to take some action here because what the the mistake is that. A lot of speakers make is our website. I got my video and now I just sit back and wait for the phone to ring. That doesn't work. Don't make that mistake. You want to continue to moved the ball

Graham Baldwin Founder Grand Baldwin Baldwin Dot Com Gray Cough Grant Omar United States Asthma S. P. A. K
"organizations innovations" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the data engineering. podcast the show about modern data management. When you're ready to build your next pipeline or want to test out the project you hear about on the show you'll need somewhere to deploy them so check out our friends at Leonard? The two hundred gigabit private now working scalable shared block storage forty gigabit public network fast. Object storage storage in a brand new managed coupon platform. You've got everything you need to run a fast reliable and bulletproof data platform and for your machine learning workloads. They've got dedicated. CPU ended ended GPU. Instances good data engineering podcast dot com slash. leonod that's L. I. N. OD Today to get a twenty dollar credit and launch a new server over and under a minute and don't forget to thank them for their continued support of this show and setting up and managing a data warehouse for Your Business. Analytics is a huge task integrating real time. I'm day to makes it even more challenging but the insights obtained can make or break your business growth. You deserve a data warehouse engine that outperforms the demands of your customers and simplifies is your operations at a fraction of the time and cost. You might expect you deserve. Click House the open source analytical database that deploys and scales wherever and whenever you want it a two interns data into actionable insights and altimonte. The leading software service provider for click. House is on a mission to help. Data engineers and devops managers tame their operational analytics. Good data engineering podcast dot com slash L.. TIMOTI THAT'S A L T I N I T Y for a free consultation nation to find out how they can help you today. New Listen to this show to learn. Stay up to date with what's happening in databases streaming platforms big data and everything else. So you need to know about modern data management for even more opportunities to meet. Listen and learn from your peers. You don't want to miss out on this year's conference season. We have partnered with organizations innovations such as oreilly media rhenium global intelligence od SC and data council..

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the data engineering. podcast the show about modern data management. When you're ready to build your next pipeline or want to test out the project you hear about on the show you'll need somewhere to deploy them so check out our friends at Leonard? The two hundred gigabit private now working scalable shared block storage forty gigabit public network fast. Object storage storage in a brand new managed coupon platform. You've got everything you need to run a fast reliable and bulletproof data platform and for your machine learning workloads. They've got dedicated. CPU ended ended GPU. Instances good data engineering podcast dot com slash. leonod that's L. I. N. OD Today to get a twenty dollar credit and launch a new server over and under a minute and don't forget to thank them for their continued support of this show and setting up and managing a data warehouse for Your Business. Analytics is a huge task integrating real time. I'm day to makes it even more challenging but the insights obtained can make or break your business growth. You deserve a data warehouse engine that outperforms the demands of your customers and simplifies is your operations at a fraction of the time and cost. You might expect you deserve. Click House the open source analytical database that deploys and scales wherever and whenever you want it a two interns data into actionable insights and altimonte. The leading software service provider for click. House is on a mission to help. Data engineers and devops managers tame their operational analytics. Good data engineering podcast dot com slash L.. TIMOTI THAT'S A L T I N I T Y for a free consultation nation to find out how they can help you today. New Listen to this show to learn. Stay up to date with what's happening in databases streaming platforms big data and everything else. So you need to know about modern data management for even more opportunities to meet. Listen and learn from your peers. You don't want to miss out on this year's conference season. We have partnered with organizations innovations such as O'Reilly media rhenium global intelligence od SC and data council..

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Snarf Talk

Snarf Talk

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Snarf Talk

"This and I just don't think that's right. I mean that's expensive of for just a table and we really don't need anything super fancy. That's our problem. We just need like shitty table right which I found tables tables that are Kinda like shitty but they just aren't the right size as the problem. Six six four would be perfect for us but I agree. So there's Vincent News and this is a this has happened a few weeks ago now Sad news of Kobe. Bryant's death Oh yeah I didn't I didn't really want to talk about just his death. I wanted to talk about like how it's been reported and discussed in the news. Okay because I feel like this. This has been Talked about differently than any other celebrities death and the reason I say that is because I've seen so much in heard so much like because I listened to sixth seventh score. It's a a talk radio station out of Chicago in our area and they've been doing it Other news organizations innovations like big like the big three news organizations and online appeal. People I know on facebook have been posting things about quit talking about Kobe and pay attention to the other people that were in the helicopter. Yeah I find that kind of annoying me. Yeah I wanted to get your take on this because I felt like like so so many people do talk about coby and I understand that you don't want to overshadow someone else's death especially his daughter the other young lady that was in the a Helicopter her parents another coach like there were the pilot himself. I think we all understand that there are other people that that died in this and did you know it was the pre. The helicopter was the state of Illinois is owned by State of Illinois. Yeah Yeah But here's the the thing that I wanted to talk about that like. We know that those people died. We obviously that's a very tragic event for all of them. But what I I had commented on. A guy was in the military with on his post on.

Kobe Vincent News Illinois facebook coby Bryant Chicago
"organizations innovations" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"And some Canadian organizations also weighed in. which is you set or Commerce of American Indians. Yeah absolutely so National Congress American Indians is one of the partners along with Nicaragua and the native American Rights Fund and the Association on American Indian Affairs Affairs Better part of the protect equal campaign So we certainly have taken strong positions A number of intertribal organizations innovations have passed resolutions. individual tribes have passed resolutions and I would say you know just Last month in December There were briefs. Do that supported this rehearing. So in advance of the judges hearing this case hearing oral arguments inch There was an opportunity for Filing briefs in support of Equa- and in opposition to Equa and and on our side on the pro aside we had some amazing results so four hundred eighty six tribes signed onto a brief and supportive. Igwe twenty six states signed onto a brief in support of igwe thirty one yeah thirty one national advocacy organizations for kids and families places like the Children's Defense Fund and Child Welfare League of America. They signed onto a brief thing. It was really the gold standard of child welfare practice. We wish Equa applied to other kids and families because we know that it produces better outcomes and reduces the trauma of being involved in the Child Welfare System for the child. Both experts are on board and seventy seven members of Congress Signed onto a brief sending me support. So there's really been overwhelming support quart and widespread understanding that really the protections of Equa. Allow us to do what's best for native kitchen families. Excellent I certainly hope that The.

Equa National Congress American Ind Child Welfare League of Americ Association on American Indian American Indians American Rights Fund Nicaragua Children's Defense Fund Congress
"organizations innovations" Discussed on CCC Talks

CCC Talks

16:21 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on CCC Talks

"That did you have right now and the only way to actually run that is to externalize it and once you have one hundred times your current. It then you. You're pretty easily understand. Dan that has no way that you can run back in your data center again. It's basic and and the fact that we're industrializing. It an impressive it ended scale is is what a lot of people fail to understand. And and that's I guess one of the more fundamental Things that people don't know no. It's like stand bag eve. I don't know big. This is going to be. It's it's it's on president at scale. That's that's totally impossible. Impossible to ruin in in your own data center however big it is yes. I love that phrase industrializing it. I think that's where we are. You've got this idea of commodity to declare that kind of stuff which is great. We've moved on but it's it's not just cloud now. It's all the technologies and services that are built on top of the industrialization of it. A massive exchange I see this beyond the it. Of course. Am I mean. I is researched for for many many years. Already it's about. The adult technology comes in to make this ferry good one line or indices AC- courses like even within the it we we don't know and there was this phrase like If if cloud is an instrument that devops engineers musician underplays it but it's it's valid even within it. We still are surprised by all the promises that it holds and Tokyo is needs to learn to play the new instruments and new cloud as an entire. I like that you're Malaika. devops is the musician. So who's going to look to be the conductor. Will that be the service management folks. Are Somebody else was the business yeah. It's the world's roles in place which is also working. You wait of acting. I point because Sir I think it also talks to one really common misunderstanding. That that cloud is about a about putting your stuff and somebody else's computer de Folks you can do on your own but you have to adopt a cloud frame of mind so actually run devops and you'll find out that you have a choice rather thrown out on your own though somewhat awesome where else but devops really fundamentally requires cloud characteristics. And then we're not necessarily talking about Tammuz owner or Google ruined that on although if you scale it up then it will but that's a different story. Yeah and finish. I think what you're saying to your point appear that yeah yeah. I think you're quite right. The business should be the conductor of this This new music my personal view is the IT Department or function should be part of that business groups. That's condoning not be the way round. I am I think that that's a missed points at the moment that Rit leading in this this conversation in their organizations are the are they not I see is that they still don't understand these technologies from a business perspective from service perspective from all chains that we're talking about they're still looking at is technology which I think isn't the right way to go about it today. Peter are you said we're industrializing. It like the car. I have no idea how my car works but I know how to drive it and it gets me to places value. That means something to me a nice car four because one of the metaphors that I use for cloud is the car manufacturing industry where are like like even a large car manufacturer doesn't even know the details of some of the technical components that are in there because they've outsourced it you some other or company that does the engineering production of that. Eighty percent of devalue of car is not produced by the car manufacturers. But it's outsourced and this is the way we develop or we will be developing. It any it department. If they're lucky will be twenty percent and definitely not the eighty percent but maybe they're the unlucky. Then somebody else in the company will be percent and they will be yes I into maintaining old legacy stuff and then sort of girl than indic- off and let's not metaphors but there are organizations who kind of using Uber's rather than the carpools and there are all focused springing up in the sales department that will blissfully unaware of I forgot undercover. I take that call it. Don't they were you know. The cells often deployed some marketing. The solution that's cloud based they don't think of it as cloud. I think of it as the thing that they used to manage their customers. Cloud base solution an IT. I hopefully. They're on top of that. But they can be Leslie Word or a phrase for recall disintermediation bypassing functional to bring Sas then saying your case Gary The science people go down to it and say make that work with single sign on security on this other stuff. Maybe if you're lucky okay. Yeah we'll be better for the function to say to sales we have these six offerings at work with our systems that you can use. which would you like? We've agreed to contracts contracts and the terms and conditions. We know how it all works. We can integrate that kind of stuff on. Here's the volume may cost more. But we're not worried about costs. Were worried about failure. What we get back from from this or how it drives and Saul's a sales problem but it goes full circle to what you said which was quite site? We should write it down. Eight a t shirt with you. Don't know what you don't know you have a conversation with my wife driving home from work. All the targets are with. It company because we need we need access to the F. drive and we can't open the excel spreadsheet. She can four people working on it on the same time why. It department not talking about even teams where he can all be working on the Excel documented. Exactly the same time so if business needs to know that it wants to change the service providers need to know what those changes are and those changes because new technologies been released on on a daily basis. Nobody can never know there is to know. It's the radar change. Today is faster than any time in the history of people on the planet it. It's it's amazing leaders. Lead on to second finding similar book on to hear your views on this second finding critical finding we have is that Organizations Innovations now require people on staff to have the ability to acquire new skills. Not Too early have scales. They need them to have the ability. What's the word hair to acquire new skills? Be Interested in your comments on that. An interesting thing is that it people will potentially have those skills if they are not sidetracked by our management into a couple of years ago. I was at a university hospital working around here. Like like ten thousand people work there. They had they. They talked me about a report that they had on the change willingness of the staff. And we're talking about the entire university population nation year working relation as expected. You know when when people get older their willingness to change decreases except except for the it people and for the people that they're willing this change kind of remained constant. The exact numbers here and said well you to me. That's obvious if you if you're fifty fifty five and you're in it and you've survived flack. Six generations of change you can handle number seven eight easily easily. And that's the the new that is the new normal and it's only getting getting worse and or not trying to do is is at the university is to to change our our. There's some parts of the university is doing that. The education that is changed out into. Let's let's teach people how to acquire skills rather than Graham the current generation of of the current version of windows into them or whatever it is and of course you still need to work with current technology but these people should be more aware of the fact of how they learn and in particular how they learn in teams. Because that's not a pet peeve I have hell. Hey would probably be Brian Brian from what I enough clearly apprenticeship grabbed entry level only about so Qa company now is so we have Qa apprenticeship so we take people from school from university and we trained On friendship so we'll find a lot of digital courses lobby but then cloud causes also with very little on hardware structure now so from that point of view. But what we do try to do with your friendship cited things they try to get together as teams so because unfolds folks young people coming in. It industry seem to think that nobody he's GONNA communication skills in scale the require as will look at the phone the audience. That industry's changing. Yeah well it's curious we also have. Qa High Education so we run University Northumbria for example in London. So we also do most as degrees in cloud computing on cyber security on so I get management as well of mass distraction action. Isn't it social media. Yeah yeah they are. Though with the young people try to teach them not just about the technologies that are GonNa utilize what technologies will be using. Business is missing. It's it's not so much. Here's there's technology here's how to use it. It's here's technology. What used to be the business? That's that's very interesting Approach to take because. Because that's where this is all going. We've industrialized technology. We don't need to learn the way we did years ago as Gary says nobody's coming in looking for server certifications uh-huh all kinds of stuff but we do need to refocus. I think looking at. How does this technology help the business? At how do we understand that you know typically an IT departments for the last twenty years. There's been lots of KPI's and measures and all sorts of things based on tickets Nestle as the business couldn't care less supposed to be honest at the end today or the law carrying about it now what they do care risk. How do I use this technology for the business Looking at revenue time to market maintaining market share competitive advantage or even just keeping up with a challenger that's using technology acknowledgee better than them to solve the smaller problem. I think that's that's going to be an interesting one going forward. Brian thank him teaching. Not Not not even just a younger the apprentices but even as you're saying the older cohort who have to change that to think about it from a value Elliot Perspective as opposed to some bolts of of of it delivery Combat Apprenticeship citing things now as well apprentices can idiot really sixty eight which is retirement age in the UK with the apprenticeship Levy. Really tell.

IT Department Brian Brian Gary president Dan Malaika. devops Google Nestle UK Saul sales department Tokyo Peter Organizations Innovations Leslie Word
"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Like to go on an Alaskan cruise now with our two hundred fifty dollar per person instant rebate is the perfect time called right now for details and if Alaska is in on your bucket list we've got over fifty guided tours to different locations worldwide calls right now for your free brochure if you're looking for the perfect cruise door to Alaska for the perfect guided vacation package you need to call Y. M. T. vacations to book right now or for a free brochure eight hundred two nine six one five five three eight hundred two nine six one five five three eight hundred two nine six one five five three that's eight hundred two nine six fifteen fifty three back in the early days of the show I would sure what I call the killer question in each episode these questions were designed to be using your personal team or organization's innovation efforts not based on feedback from listeners just like you we've decided to bring it back with some improvements each episode of the killer.

"organizations innovations" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Fear like literally the possibilities are endless? It's not just the SCIENC- things that people think of You can literally do anything with data and you can help quantify decision making and really bring value to an organization in a way that a lot of other fields. Just don't have that flexibility lady and so I really just loved it and just kept going and started working with data while I was getting my masters as well and my doctorate and just got deeper and deeper down the rabbit hole of data and I will definitely say that the real world expertise that I got was probably a little bit more valuable than the classroom classroom. But I do appreciate all of the Amazing Faculty that I had along the way for sure. It's so because on the political side I mean whether again who cares what side side you're on you can. One hundred percent attribute the winner to extremely wise use of data. Like the last two presidencies. Yes exactly exactly again whether you agree or not. Whether you're last president. He data away and I love talking about that too about how data can be amazing if it's seized while and it can be terrifying if it's used in a way that a little scary because there's so much power that comes with data ownership in the ability to manipulate data that so you can definitely skew it in a way that behooves you and makes you. You know you choose to focus on what you want to choose to focus on data which is the scary part. Because I've worked for organizations innovations in the past where they've chose to focus on things that I really didn't stand behind because I didn't feel There were ethically correct so I feel like ethics is a part of data that people talk about enough and working in politics. I learned very much of front. That ethics is probably one of the most important parts of data. Because if you're.

president
"organizations innovations" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Of recode. You may know me as a person secretly running. Elon Musk's twitter account but in my my spare time I'm just a reporter and you're listening to Rico decode a podcast about power change and the people you need to know around. The tech industry were part of the VOX media podcast network today in the Red Chair is Robert Jackson a commissioner on the US Securities and Exchange Commission. He was appointed by President Trump in two thousand eighteen in January to fill a slot. What and he was most recently a professor of law at Nyu and one of the big tech issues? He's had to contend with is dual class stock which gives founders the ability to insulate themselves even when they're company goes public. We'll talk about that. And the state of Tech. IPO's and much more commissioner Jackson. Welcome to Rico. Thanks so much for having me care. So let's say at the State of where are you came from and how you're here because you're commission runs out in June. Is that correct. That's right this past June. You took the place of someone. That's right all right. Explain it. So people don't understand how Commissioners Jenner's are we just had the FTC Chairwoman Ellen Weintraub in and she explain how it works. I'm trying to get people a sense of how this works. There are how many commissioners total five five and there's a chairman. That's right all right and today is independent chairman right now is that correct. The president but independent right and then there's two Republicans lukens in to Democrats but there can't be more than three of any party. Is that correct. That's correct can't be any more than three commissioners of a single party and it's typically the the chairman is independent. Is that no. That's not the case necessarily well. It depends on the chairman Historically they've become political independence but they often have have had a political history or set of us. All right. Explain how you got to the commission. So it's funny my background. I'm a politically independent. And I was selected for for this role by Senator Schumer recommended me to the to the White House I previously been a law professor and I actually had written about. NYU That's right and before that at Columbia And I've written about corporate governance for a long time and wasn't at all on my agenda to be an SEC. Commissioner for that had been a corporate lawyer and investment banker occur and I actually had just been writing about the SEC. Because I saw things that surprised me in terms of market failures in the way the market wasn't really working right so When I got the call asking if I'd be interested I mean look my view has always been? It's an honor to serve your country. I thought it'd be a fun job to pursue But this was not something I had on my radar. Right you're teaching. What were you teaching it at? NYU and Columbia Corporate Law and corporate finance. All right it's a funny. My Courses Columbia. I've of course called investment banking where I try to teach lawyers how to think like doc finance professionals right because one of the things that shocked now. He has started out at bear stearns afford to law school. It shocked me how little lawyers knew about the way anchors thought about their job. uh-huh something I tried to do was let law students know that they could Definitely want it to be good servants that our clients they had to learn how they thought and that was what that course was about all right and so you you came in here in a mid tour in taking someone else's slot left and you got through the Senate right now your term runs out and there's nobody in in line at our can't pass the center. What is the or you could be renewed for another few years correct I could Or the Senate right now I think is working on finding my successor right. Then they'll make a recommendation to the White House will send it over to the Senate and I'm I'm hopeful that they'll that they'll get somebody through soon but you had point in the sec just like with the SEC where there weren't enough commissioners correct. It's the most in the in the two key roles in government which usually are nonpartisan. That's right so my colleague. Kyra Stein who preceded me ran ran out of time. Last January Took a little while to get her replaced and in that six month time my colleagues at the SEC. Pass a number of rules And I was the sole dissenter from those rules. Right the rules having to do with accounting oversight rules having to do with protecting investors from brokers who engage in predatory practices and those were votes that I lost three one all right talk a little bit about those because again these are supposedly not. Nothing's nonpartisan anymore but the FCC in the center is supposed to work SEC are supposed to work this sway talk about where we are. Now you have a full sec and you guys are wrangling over. What issues so just last week? Just last week. And he had a big open meeting on a subject. Abject near and dear to my heart which is the power of shareholders to hold CEOS to account which is act typically activist shareholders. Who is what it got into? But its general shareholders. That's right but both. Oh I think this covers both so my colleagues to rule changes. I just couldn't agree with the first is there are certain. Firms called proxy advisers who tell shareholders how to vote out there shares. Right there well known and they're famous. There's some famous ones do that. Proxy approximate hasn't been around for a long time and the chain the sort of big. CEO Organizations Innovations. This is their number one enemy. They hate proxy advisers because they sometimes had the temerity to recommend shareholders. Vote against the right so my colleagues passed a series of changes that basically would tax any proxy advisor that gives advice against the CEO's interest. Because if you do give advice that's against management you have to you through a series of hoops that my colleagues proposing to impose And I couldn't join that because I don't know what they're talking about this smart audience so explain what they so people who have. I've been involved in. Say the Yahoo Fight Lot. There's lots of proxy fights Dan Loeb and the vice but there's a lot of them in tech. There's not as many as there are places but there's been quite a few and what happens there. There was one Microsoft. There was much proxy advisers when certain purples are update stay tell a vast amount of shareholders are paying attention. Really what way to vote and they pull they do a lot of investigation they have. They tend to go with me. They don't typically vote against the sea or they tend to like give people decent independent vice. That's that's the way it's supposed to set up. That's the idea and what my colleagues would require. Now is proxy advisers have to check with the management of the company before they give investors advice. It's about how to vote. And then and then if the management disagrees the proxy advisor has to include management's own opinion in their own report. Doesn't matter already. Have the right to do that. Not to make in those proxy things they they will disagree they can disagree and do it publicly right now. What they get is I look So they can prepare themselves for the arguments is that the proxy advisers and the reason for doing these is to strengthen the role of the CEO or rank thing that management entrenched management. Also care. Put yourself in this situation. Your proxy the adviser You have to choose to recommend against or for the CEO recommend for the CEO nothing happens recommend against the CEO. You gotta check with them first. You GotTa talk to his lawyers you gotta let including his objections makes it a lot easier to just recommend with the CEO. Right which will be the result from these rules. I think right all right. So that was one. And that sort of hinders activist shareholders shareholders and. There's lots of them with is fighting against if you're on that side is that there's a lot of activist shareholders that come in and drive. CEO's crazy to me. Good as far ars. I can tell you so for about thirty years. The academic literature has suggested that activist add value because they hold management's feet to the fire and it's not like we have too much. CEO Joe Accountability in Corporate America. Today right so they provide a valuable service. The second set of rule changes that my colleagues would impose would take proposals off the ballot. That don't get a certain amount of shareholder support. It used to be a smaller number. What three percent or two percent or the over the over a number of years? That's right if you didn't get three percent or six percent after two years they would take your proposal about right now if you don't hit twenty five percent by the third year right you're gone. which is I mean? You can't put that proposal in about that's right. Could the same proposal put on by someone else depends it. Rule has a definition about whether it's substantially similar but the short answer is no right. So here's the problem with this. It would be one thing if we were just targeting proposals that we could see in the data. Were annoying or value destroying this argument for that. Yes I've been to many meetings. Yeah exactly I think you've probably heard that before Allen. Y Davis remember hello very useful in a lot of ways because the discussion stirred some of it was gadfly. Some of it was useful. Yes so if you're the SEC. The way to go about this is to separate the proposals into what's useful and what's not and then develop a rule that addresses. What's not instead what we did? Was We just raise them across the board. So in my descent I point out that important. Things like proxy the access that would let investors run their own proxy fight or share retention plans that make the CEO keeps getting a game Those would get bounced right by this proposal. I don't know why anybody would want about those unless we're trying to do is help. CEO's right right which is the point so talk about that the rise the gadfly is especially in the Internet age. And and these. He's had like the Dan Loeb's the world and the others has become They have new tools to drive you. Crazy typically make a side deal off to the side that's what usually happens might experience but their role has changed the idea of of an activist shareholder. I mean they had a terrible reputation for awhile and then a better one and then again a terrible bowl on Can you talk a little bit about that. Because I think increasingly they're going to be attacking tech companies. I think I think that's absolutely right. There's the reason they don't has a little it to do with the dual class share structure. Many we'll get to in a second. Yeah but I think you're right Look activists can play socially constructive role. But they're like anybody else else. They have costs. Their goal is to make money and they're gonNA do what they can to maximize the money they can make if that means improving the firm. That's what they'll do. If there's another way in and out of the company Anita shorter-term they'll do that to what's so frustrating for me is we should be thinking about things that encourage active to add value. Let me give you an example. If you're worried about about short termism AC activists. We should have rules that encourage activists to hold their shares for longer periods of time that make it a little harder to get a quick bump out of the Stock Price and exit your position but in that case that people. That don't know you make trouble you call a reporter. You find something out. Sometimes it's right sometimes. It's just creates in this environment. Social me environment it can get quicker. Traction rather quickly absolutely and so there are real problems with activists who are talking their book publicly and then you know taking a financial position. That's not disclosed. I'm happy to engage those problems. But what these rule changes would do is just tilt the playing field away from activists and towards the IOS and I don't know why yeah that'd be a good thing and I'll tell you something else that's frustrating about it. I feel like there's a clear path forward that would really address the problem like with a scalpel. But instead we kinda you just read them across the board sledgehammer style. Yeah and unfortunately. That's why couldn't join my colleagues with these rules. So why. Why is that mentality now there? It's pro Oh business mentality right now throughout government. I think that's fair but I have to tell you. This one is strange to me because pro-business didn't always mean pro. CEO The guys. I worked with on Wall Street. We're not pro. CEO They were pro investor value right. They liked activists because activists tend to add value Something's happened here where we've moved away from whatever pro business used to be just pro management and. I think that's a big mistake. We'll talk about that because I and I do want to get to the the the dual class shareholders drives me nuts than class. You talk a little bit about that concept of of verse. co-management versus pro. CEO Sure so one thing that I company right you know. I've been studying this for a long time. This is everyone treats his brand new. This is an old debate start in the nineteen eighteen eighties between a guy who used to work for Marty Lipton and hedge funds the debate there was what's the right balance between management who want to manage the company for the long term and end hedge funds who want to intervene and make short-term profit we were debating that in the nineties and early two thousands and it was thought to be a balance investors. Add value. So do manager's. We're going to balance between these two. What's happened lately? Is that the view of my colleagues tends to be. Let's just side with managers in that debate and I be honest with you. My own view view. This is something. I advocate a lot about one reason. Why is that? CEO's are very very powerful in terms of their ability to send a message in Washington and the irony of that. That is the organizations. They use to do that are funded by shareholder money The Chamber of Commerce Business Roundtable. Their money comes from public company investors and is now being used. WHO's to advocate to limit?.

CEO US Securities and Exchange Com commissioner Nyu Dan Loeb CEO Organizations Innovations chairman CEO Joe Accountability reporter advisor Elon Musk Senate VOX media President Trump Ellen Weintraub professor of law twitter Robert Jackson Jenner bear stearns
How not to be a data hoarder

Insureblocks

07:33 min | 1 year ago

How not to be a data hoarder

"Got to a point where it used to be dido hoarding much like in our in our lives where we wanted the big house with all the bling all is stephan and now we've moved into era in our lives. We're talking about marie honda in getting rid of stuff in tiny homes. We're going going through the same transformation data. You don't need to hoard it because when you don't need it to you it creates more liability than you probably really wanna. Take on in in three. You only want the piece of information. That's going to help you make the best decision for your for your customer to deliver the good or service. They are paying you four. That's what you want and that's what z. KP provides and i guess also this knowledge prove will also enable organizations funds to be able to exchange information between themselves across jurisdiction and whilst remaining legal legally and regulatory compliant. I'm <music>. I'm assuming is gonna be the case. <hes> in nearly united for zero knowledge proof it has in order to be usable the verifier cross to believe that the statements true and the the result of the proof is accurate and they have to know that the holder hasn't altered information because sometimes in the real world. I think maybe some college kids may alter their driver's license in words by adult beverages. What sovereign removes the ability to make that alteration. Why it's the blockchain yes immutable ledger so so it does allow organizations to accept credentials to verify information now that they are absolutely accurate because of blockchain letcher effectively we're becoming custodian of our own ide- we hold all these forms of ideas but we cannot temporal them just like when i was applying for a loan you know i can't lie to the financial institution how much earning right on the fan you know i went through last year buying a home. <hes> <hes> which is always a challenging experience in here i am giving papers and documents tax records and the fact is the mortgage orange lender only needed a couple pieces information. They did not need to know all of my deductions. They did not need to know what organization nonprofit organizations innovations that gave donations to last year but you know what i handed them all of that information lily only strategically wanted certain bids so what c- KP it does in this case is in creates more efficient streamlined system exactly not let let let's talk about enterprises because they haven't tendency of collecting acting in hoarding a lot of personal data not in a cell suffering world. How will those accusations ability to hold onto that data will be determined by the the users themselves for example. What does it mean to their ability to build their business models if they can't enter data says because because they don't start him anymore because from what i understand in self-serving idea i can give you access to my data but only for a limited time basis so we can store it. How organizations be able to design new models if they don't have access to that data questions. Why do you want to store data that may not be accurate and i think we'll off to look into an inventory assessment of the data you need in what the shelf life is of it because you don't want to get data just to have data you want to to make sure you have accurate data to allow you to conduct a transaction in which your client or customer is going to provide you money or our information about themselves so the first thing is if anything a self sovereign identity provide you accurate information at the time of the transaction. I want to know information about my customer. Have they moved. Have they moved. Let's say on trying to provide hi to healthcare policy but i may not <hes> i mean to go to a different provider or a different network of physicians. How do i know that that client hasn't moved to another interstate worth car insurance. Do i know that they haven't moved to a state where car insurance costs more but they're hanging onto their old address to pay the lower premium and so is it that you want to have information or is it that you want to have accurate collect information to save it or is it that you want to have accurate information the time that you need it so you're getting you're charging them the right amount of money you're making the best decision based on where they are based on the information formation at hand so that's my talk about data. We have to get beyond this mindset of. I just need all the data to make the right decision. You need the accurate data at the timing need to make the decision announce where something like sovereign seamer knowledge proofs self sovereign identity allows you to the blockchain to make sure it is accurate at the time that you need it in any extra information. You don't need to hoard it because that just creates a security issue for you. Yeah i mean i completely agree and i think is going to be a challenge which some industries are now to face for example in the insurance industry. They have tens of your pricing. Ah risk using historical data last year's data instead of using real time data but i guess the positive trade off as you said you know you get real time information that gives you a better understanding of the risk but also it provides us an opportunity to to have a conversation with the end customer. Well the other part of this when you look at sovereign. It's not just about saying okay. You can't have old data you can in fact what's really great about out. Sovereign is i would be able to have access to show a new ensure that i have held auto policy. Since the time i was eighteen right you think about all different policies in the companies we've been through in. Why would i be able to share that because i would be able to ship crew of all those news coverage is over time in my own digital wallet in be able to provide that information or i may have bought a house sold it in ten years later. I'm going to buy another house. I would be able in my digital wallet to show proof that i bought a house in also. I had this particular homeowners. Coverage sit allows me and to provide information in the past in be able to actually keep that right now if you were to come to me and say acacia proof that you owned a house ten years ago. Oh my gosh i'd have to go through emails and go down my storage unit and buying none information. Where would something like sovereign in sl over time name. I start collecting. My digital wallet is right. There and i have the ability to do that now. Let's see the mortgage company. I bought the house from his gone away. I would still be able to pull that old credential out in show it but it would be listed the revocation registry so they would know kay. It's no longer current committed existed in so that's kind of way that companies need to look at old data is allowing individuals to have a inability ludi to better manage their data history and be able to present it quickly

Blockchain Letcher Marie Honda Stephan KAY Ten Years
"organizations innovations" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

Radical Personal Finance

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

"Live. There may or may not be children in your neighborhood. If you're living in downtown san francisco. There's no children. If you're living in other neighborhoods there might be some but they're just not nearly the number of playmates that children traditionally had on their block and across the street etc as <hes> a few people are having children and families that are having children are having fewer children so it takes work church groups youth groups that are certainly worthwhile and then home school organizations innovations and clubs and interest groups. There are opportunities out there. The other model that i think will really bro in the future is the hybrid model all this reverse where it's school. It's a private school but where the parents are still very involved and i think there's a lot of stuff that could grow their now. I'm going to close this episode. Episode with a brief discussion on classical education listener writes in and says joshua. What are your thoughts on the classical christian education approach. My wife and i have two boys and like like every parent. We want to give them the best possible education possible i have learned through some research that i have done the best education they can get us through home schooling however my wife and i both with work and we can't accommodate homeschooling at this stage of our lives the closest approach that we have found to a christian and home school education is the classical christian model just wondering what your thoughts on it because i thought this was interesting because it is one of the biggest growing and most popular trends especially in home schooling world especially in the christian religious just homeschooling world for example there the probably the most popular homeschool model would be an organization a company called classical conversations <hes> that's kind of one of these hybrid approaches. The child goes to meet with other children of their peer group once or twice a week and then the rest of the work is done at home but there's a comprehensive offensive model put through a comprehensive curriculum. Most of that is at home. There's also large grow and growing thankfully movement of classical christian schools so specifically the traditional private christian schools classrooms bells teachers all desks all that stuff the traditional model but done in the classical a a model with distinct christian christian distinctive. I would guess that there are plenty of classical schools out there at some of the elite schools especially in the northeastern united states the elite the private schools but not wishing to live in that part of the country. It's not been an interest of mine to research. So what do i personally think about the classical goal princeton model so the first thing is to understand what is meant by the word classical and there could be a number of different things that are meant by that depending on who talk to perhaps the most common understanding would come from those who have read dorothy sayers essay called the loss tools of learning. If if you have not read that essay just scroll way way back in your r._s._s. feed for the podcast to october twenty eight two thousand fourteen and you'll find an audio recording according of me reading her essay the lost tools of learning <hes> and i think it's an excellent essay that everybody should listen to dorothy sayers popularized east for many modern people the concept of the trivial which is traditionally what people point to when they talk about a classical education in traditional medieval education you had the trivial which is logic gr- sorry grammar logic and rhetoric taught and that would be followed by the the quadrivalent which traditionally was arithmetic geometry music and astronomy and that was the traditional.

dorothy sayers san francisco joshua
"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Available on policies of five hundred thousand dollars or more with professional service don't waste your valuable time get the real rate you want on term life insurance policies of five hundred thousand dollars or more from the term lifeline call now eight hundred four three oh one eight nine one eight hundred four three oh one eight nine one eight hundred four three oh one eight nine one that's eight hundred four three oh eighteen ninety one killer innovation a show about ideas creativity and how you can welcome to the where you learn to create your next game changing innovation back in the early days of the show I would sure what I called a killer question the need to up the so these questions were designed to be used in your personal team organization innovation efforts not based on feedback from listeners like you we've decided to bring it back with some improvements each episode with the killer of Asians has a segment that I'm now calling five minutes to new ideas they are designed for the creative mind looking for that next great idea each episode will challenge you to think differently about your business your products or services and yourself by asking unique funny and sometimes crazy questions these questions are designed to force you to look beyond the obvious and to uncover those ideas and opportunities you never before considered so get out your notebook and be ready to uncover that game changing idea here is five minutes to new ideas have you ever.

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"I feel like millennials. Goals are so used to just working from home as long as they get their work done. They're fine with it whereas my mom's generation and other generations before her were so used to showing up at the job bob working nine to five and going home punching a time clock right. There's a big you know there's a big emphasis now placed on flexibility. It's one of the main things that organizations positions are focused on and flexibility is not just you know often we think of it as only as remote work which is a piece to that but you know it can be you know kind of much more related to flexibility ready to define kind of what someone's working on the hours that they're working how they're working these types of things globally two-thirds this is data from deloitte deloitte doesn't annual millennial survey the two thirds of millennials that their employer the dotted some sort of a flexible arrangement so that could be the time the type of role recruitment recruitment whether it's part time full time contract work or location which is what we think of mostly flexibility in terms of remote work and at the data shows that the flexibility is linked to increase his performance and retention so that the more flexibility a worker has the more likely they are to vote do better work day at a company longer so you're seeing a lot of organizations innovations adopted. The thing that i think is interesting is that you're also seeing increased rates of isolation and loneliness and disconnection in in the workplace because people don't go to work anymore because they were just interacting over you know slack or ah you know video shot you know or an online you just online you know and everyone says oh remote work wanna work in my sweatpants i want. I want to stay at home. I don't need to you go to an office. You know there was this whole push to get rid of of cubicles and offices and moved to the open office and now they had to get rid of offices all together. Okay someone had the last topic in work from a cat buried anywhere but now you're seeing i think the backlash of that where people say oh actually miss having co workers i missed having friends at work work and i think now you're seeing god is actually a major generational clash okay there. Was this whole big push millennials to move to flexibility and remote work. Maybe we're missing something and maybe the increasing rate of loneliness or saying okay. Maybe the answer is the answer is not to go back to the old way of we're all in the cubicle. We don't oh you know work like this kind of your o'clock. In the machine. You know this type of thing offices or these kind of really lame places to somewhere in the middle aware yes depending on your role one day or two days a week or a few days a month. You can work from home if that you know if that's what your job is but that there is this place that you can go to where people are working. It's an exciting place to be. There's interesting events happening. There's the culture of the office is from an experience standpoint a place that you wanna be and a place where actually creativity and innovation and and and learning happens. I think that's the big thing that i like to talk about it that you get. The synergy. Pete happens when you get the younger and the older folks in a room together right now the people that are have a diverse background or from different backgrounds different different skills that we're learning happened. It's not likely to happen as much overshot right or owner okay. We're all working on this google doc together. You're in you know. You're halfway the across the country. You're halfway around the world. Yeah you can share the knowledge but you don't get that base base interaction that face that mentorship that says whoa this person person that's twice. My age is really cool. I want and conversely you. Don't get this well. I thought this twenty four year old didn't know what the hell they were talking about it. It turns out they've got some really interesting ideas and they're the future of our you know of our workforce and our consumers. I should probably spend a little bit more time with them and get to know what they're all about and what they're doing with their life because if i don't my company i don't know you know we're going to be true so i think it's in the middle there. I think that there is allies is somewhere on the on the balance thing as millennials change and agent amore senior positions. How do you think the workplace in the notion of working will change. That's it's a great question. I think that you know the typically. I think we're moving to a much more employee focused type of work paradigm where used to be kind of that accompany that okay were the bat have loyalty. Stay with us for fifteen twenty twenty-five years. We'll give give you a pension. We'll take care of all the you're gonna retire and it's going to be great and now i think that that is no longer that it's kind of an obsolete model and it's much more what is best for the employees in terms of their lifestyle what they care about. Maybe they have one role for full-time for a little while with the company walt works and then they moved to a part time role because they're raising a child or they wanna have more flexibility and it's kind of about maybe they're working for one company for a little bit and then into companies at the same time so much more going to be about if you want to attract the top talent. What is the top talent one right. Not what's best for the company. It used to be oh. This is what we're looking for. Our organization need this and all about us. You know all about the company. Now it's okay. This person is really great. We want them. We're going to work within within the needs if they have the criteria. They have to make it work and i think you're gonna see a lot more organization showing talent so left again. Oh all you have to work at google. You have to work at apple or you have to work for us. The competitor is the worst. If you ever go there will never talk to you again and now understanding that that's not realistic in the current them and the people the average millennials now going to have twenty twenty five jobs in their lifetime so if you just think about that from standpoint of applying for jobs jobs and cover letter we have to prepare young people for an increasingly flexible adaptive constantly changing approach to work right because that's the reality technology is changing so quickly making certain jobs to lead and then we have the impacted and kind of a new global workforce and the only way we're going to do that if we come to an understanding that you know one person staying in a job forever is is completely no longer. That might be the exception but it's not the oh all right. It's not the norm. Millennials are really going to really are really kind of already. Having a huge impact the tenure the job tenure is very much going to be shorter and shorter yeah completely you devote a chapter in your book to exploring. The question is graduate school worth it. What's the answer yeah. I think the key thing much of my book is that i don't like to prescribe the answers i for any millennial for any wanted much more about asking the right questions and i. I really believe this with grad school. I think that the answer that i come up with with in the book is it depends if grad school was truly necessary for your career goal for example. If you wanna be a practicing practicing attorney you need to go to law school. You want to be an m._d. Doctor you gotta go to medical school right for certain professions and business is certainly helps to have an n._b._a. Yea but i think that there are a lot of people and you all probably know them or <hes> millennials. We know that go to grad school with what i call going to grad school without in this kind of sense in your late twenties or early thirties. Maybe you've had a job. It's going that great. You wanna level up in your career. You don't really know what what you're doing. You're sitting around dinner with your parents and they're like well. You got to go to grad school like you. Gotta use something like go to grad school. When are you gonna get your life together. Go to grad grad school and i just think that that is problematic because we currently are still in a higher ed. This dim where grad schools incredibly expensive offensive so we're asking people to leave a volatile job market go to school for two or three years then hundreds of thousands of dollars or to get into to that to go right and thousands of dollars. Sometimes people graduate grad school with one hundred kids that and then they're not. They don't even have a job when they leave right eight and then the grad schools aren't very good at actually placing people in job in two thousand nineteen right back to grad schools haven't caught up with where the job market is so we're kind of in this old paradigm where people are going to grad school expecting there to be job and the job shifted and changed so quickly that they're different and you need another degree or you need to completely different skill elsa or you need to take a program or go to a workshop or do an online class to be qualified for that job so i think it really depends is my answer to the question. I think that there are definitely people who have thought about it. Who have that okay. I'm going to be a social worker. This is what i wanna do. I've had lunches and coffees with with social workers. I read the book. It's not just like something i thought about for ten minutes and i've really researched the programs. I found a program that fits with what i'm looking for and i talk to people that have done the program. I'm gonna go to the social work. I'm going to get an m._s._w. Rate awesome that's great. I'm totally in favor of that. What i think is problematic attic when people go just because they don't know what they're doing with their life and they feel this pressure from society or from their parents or from kind of career landscape whatever whatever it is to go to grad school and then they graduate and they're in debt and they still don't have a job and they still don't know what the hell they're doing. What are your thoughts <unk> on job hopping and its impact on companies so yeah millennial turnover cost u._s. Companies alone thirty billion dollars a year. It's one of the highest s. cost and many organizations face. I believe the average turnover now from about eighteen to twenty five year. Olds is one point two years. It's very yeah. It's not not long at all. It's something that organizations really struggle with because you know you want. Pop palette and organizations are investing in the hiring process and then of course the training process and on boarding and then they have these folks that are like yeah. I want to work for you and then they leave that huge issue go. I highly advocate against job hopping. I think it's something that your your employer will never forgive you for and it's actually not good for your career..

google deloitte deloitte bob apple Pete walt Olds attorney fifteen twenty twenty-five yea twenty five year twenty four year ten minutes three years two years two days one day
"organizations innovations" Discussed on The Successful Encore Career Podcast

The Successful Encore Career Podcast

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on The Successful Encore Career Podcast

"Welcome to the successful encore career podcast. This is a special edition of the encore career podcast where we talk about an upcoming hiring event that we will be hosting in here at employment for seniors <hes> i'm brad johnson longtime volunteer and producer of the podcast with me as always for these special hiring event podcasts barb barb stoltze from imply for seniors barb welcome to the podcast again. Hello everybody thank you today. We are very excited to have with us. Jenna joseph the area recruiter recruiter with national church residences. We are hosting a hiring event with them. On wednesday september eighteenth here at the employment for seniors offices in in whitehall <hes> we'll get jenny introduced and then we'll talk further about the kinds of job opportunities for which they will be talking with people at that event so jenner. Thank you want to introduce yourself a little bit and get a little bit about your background and what you do with special church. Yes so thank you for having me as barb said my name is jenna. Joseph jeff and i am a recruiter with national church residences. We are a not for profit organization that specializes in long term health care for seniors seniors and low income housing for seniors and families. We will be hosting the job fair for the healthcare side of our organization. Our organization innovation basically has a mission to help seniors age gracefully and place so we have were headquartered here in columbus and we have have several different locations that include independent living assisted living and skilled nursing facilities in long term care facilities.

jenner Jenna joseph barb brad johnson Joseph jeff producer columbus jenny
"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"One zero seven that's. Eight hundred two one seven fifty one seven. This is killer innovations the show about ideas, creativity and how you can innovate. Welcome to the innovators garage where you learn to create your next game changing killer innovation back in the early days of this show. I would share what I called a killer question in each episode. These questions were designed to be used in your personal team organizations. Innovation efforts now based on feedback from listeners just like you we've decided to bring it back with seven minutes each episode of the kilovolt has a segment that I'm now calling five minutes to new ideas. It's designed for the parade of mind. Looking for that next? Great idea each episode will challenge you to think differently about yourself, your business and your product and services by asking unique funny, and sometimes crazy questions these questions. Are designed to force you to look beyond the obvious and to uncover ideas and opportunities you never before considered. So get out your notebook. If you ready to uncover that game changing idea here is five minutes to new ideas..

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Each episode. These questions are designed to be used in your personal team organizations. Innovation efforts now based on feedback from listeners just like you. We decided to bring it back with seven minutes each episode of the killing of Asians has a segment that I'm now calling five minutes to new ideas. It's designed for the creative mind looking for that next. Great idea each episode will challenge you to think differently about yourself, your business and your product and services by ask you, unique funny, and sometimes crazy questions these questions are designed to force you to look beyond the obvious and to uncover ideas and opportunities you've never before considered. So get out your notebook. Have you ready to uncover that game changing idea? Here is five minutes to new ideas. The inspiration for innovation takes all forms for some. It's music for other. It's art and for others. It's data when I was E T O marker the CEO at HP at the time. Head of quote that was ingrained in everything the executive team did quote, if you stare at the numbers long enough, they will eventually confess in quote, the expectation was that as an executive Hugh new your numbers, it was not unusual to have Mark stop me in the hall and ask me about my RND investment levels last quarter for the top three competitors or what the customer net promoter score was for our.

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Wave or go to great healthy, water dot com. Hydrocare will eliminate limescale that causes hundreds of dollars in damage to pipes and appliances without using salt. Well water will no longer smell or stain your fixtures. City water will be purified of harmful chlorine, lead, arsenic, and chemicals. Wave Home Solutions provides the cleanest, healthiest water at every faucet. Satisfaction. Guaranteed for more information. Call one eight eight eight nine eight nine wave one eight eight nine eight nine W A V E or go to great healthy, water dot com. That's great healthy, water dot com. killer innovations the show about ideas, creativity and how you can innovate. Welcome to the dangerous garage where you learned to create your next game changing innovation. Back in the early days of this show. I would share what I called a killer question in each episode. These questions were designed to be used in your personal team organization. Innovation efforts now based on feedback from listeners like you. We've decided to bring it back with some improvements. Each episode. With a killer vacations has.

"organizations innovations" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"This design is like the part design but also review because you have to review assumptions and then plus decision making so which priority is something that i and when we're going to do tomorrow so that whole combination that's what makes invasion does not an innovation that have been done by a single function in an organization innovation necessitates collaboration across function especially if we're talking about innovation being creative ideas sustainable business models in business that to touch sales marketing operations channels logistics and so there's no person doing all that work by themselves in thinking about it right from the beginning in collaborating right from the beginning just means you go faster yet so mark von check explain this to me brilliantly where he said many companies will try to replicate a company's business model it so you could use the airline as an easy right it's low cost airline like i'm just gonna copy you know southwest airlines in the united states and i'm gonna make it you know in do it a low cost airline in europe and some if some in europe have have done it and some others haven't right have failed and others in the united states is well both ways he said but what's really difficult to replicate beyond the business model is the mental model is the way that they do it how they do it and so when innovating i'm guessing that it isn't just about a process or a product it's also in the people side of it.

united states europe
"organizations innovations" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"organizations innovations" Discussed on WJR 760

"Very dramatic scene but uh but wells fargo and were actually going to celebrate one hundred sixty six birthday uh this month but we've been through a lot of economic challenges that the country faced and through the great recession we performed quite well and and didn't need a a bail out that got one and paid back as quickly as we could with interest to what taxpayers did for you i that always drove me crazy here you are doing things so well you didn't need the backing but the government said no no you have to do this you have to take it glad you got past all of that and what a great story uh you you have tim considering that you started as a bank teller and now you that the the main guy well that's right in fact i started as a tower and we're quite a way through college at standard federal failings along which is a local uh savings and loan that since spin uh acquired by one of the banks in michigan but that's how i worked my way through school so i started uh at the bottom and and uh which is one of the most important jobs candidly in our company today and uh and it's just an honor to be leading wells fargo today well now's the the ceo doing the great work is as president as well in all the things that you do their you've also brought in significant change in in uh in in the transformation across your organization innovation a big part of it technology a big part of a tell me how you using that to not isolate yourselves from your customers but to build stronger relationships with your customers sometimes it's difficult with.

ceo president tim michigan