36 Burst results for "Organ"

Fresh update on "organ" discussed on The John Phillips Show

The John Phillips Show

00:28 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "organ" discussed on The John Phillips Show

"J A B C A. M. Okay, baby Marketing, Ben. Welcome to real estate today. Thank you for having me. We are delighted you're here. So bad. Anyone who's bought a house. Knows that when you get to the actual closing table The attorney in charge might very well say, Do you have your termite certificate? Tell us why is that so important? When you buy a house the termite pressure and can be a meant in certain areas. I lived in Florida before I moved to Georgia. And you know there's termite that are invasive there that can eat your house down so very important, especially if you're in the southeast or some other warmer, humid areas to make sure that you have turned my protection on your house. And if you're in one of those areas, the lender, the person or company that's writing the mortgage on your house. They're going to insist on that termite certificate because they want to make sure House They're investing in. Stays up. Yeah, it would actually probably depend on state to state what the requirements are for that. But, yeah, I would definitely consider getting some type of termite protection on your house and protect it from potential damages, which could be thousands and thousands of dollars. Well, so a couple of questions about termites that might or might not be. In my own home. Is there any way That a homeowner Can check for them and identify whether or not there's a problem or do you always need a pro? For this type of thing? I would definitely recommend having a trained professional to do the infection. There's a lot of hidden areas that people wouldn't be used to checking. Sometimes it just takes years of experience and training to be able to do this correctly. And so just to try to do it by yourself. The first time would not be easy. And if you miss the termites, you're missing the whole infestation. Possibly Right, And that's the problem is they can be very hidden. The good thing is a lot of the treatment that we offer provide really good protection from your house. If you have it in there, so it's always better to be proactive with termites, then kind of reactive When you're you get the damage. That's a really good point. And if a professional comes to my place, and they do identify that there is a termite problem there. And I want to hire them to go ahead and treat it to get rid of the problem. Is that a very difficult eradication? Or is it not independent house and depend on what the customers are okay with being done to their structure, So you have like, really expensive marble floors. And intricate wood detailing on the walls and stuff. We might have to get a little bit more creative and what type of treatments are offered. But you know, in general, I think most houses are pretty straightforward. I see. And if I do get a termite treatment at my house Do. I have to stay out of it along with my family for several days, or can we move right back in that afternoon? If they do electric treatment, they would want to make sure that everyone is not president while the treatment is being done, But it is not like a fumigation where you can't be there. Kind of like airing out period. I see. And finally if I get termite treatment Are there steps that I should be taking? Also, for instance, I've always heard Keep the big wood pile for your fireplace. Away from the wood of your house. What do you think of that? Yeah, I think that's a good practice in general for not just termites. But other past woodpile can attract carpenter ants. They can attract termites. You can get might start living in the woodpile. So I think it's a pretty good idea to keep untreated wood away from the house. And certainly don't start storing it inside your health either. Well, Ben, I really appreciate you being on the show today and talking about Termites and our homes. Thank you. No problem. Ben Hodel, entomologist and technical services manager for Organ and Rollins, the National Pest Control company coming up on real estate today. We'll continue our list of what you need to have right there in front of you when you settle on a house, and.

Ben Hodel Georgia Florida Thousands BEN J A B C A. M. Today Organ And Rollins Thousands Of Dollars National Pest Control First Time ONE Couple Of Questions
Human Cells Grown in Monkey Embryos Spark Ethical Debate

BBC Newsday

00:22 sec | 2 d ago

Human Cells Grown in Monkey Embryos Spark Ethical Debate

"Over the moral and ethical implications of mixing species of the researchers in the U. S and China Implanted human stem cells in monkey embryos. Some question whether such hybrid embryos are in fact, human. Those involved in the research hope to pave the way for growing new human organs for transplant. A number of

U. China
How Infrastructure as Code Is Accelerating Cloud Adoption

IT Visionaries

01:55 min | 3 d ago

How Infrastructure as Code Is Accelerating Cloud Adoption

"Welcome everyone to another episode of. It visionaries and today we have the vice president of engineering. And has she core pretty small pretty welcome to the show. Thanks matt super excited about chatting today all right. let's get right to it. How she court and its suite of products or some of the most popular products. In that i've ever heard about in Among the developer community. So everyone i know that is a full stack developer or back end. Developer is using a hash core product at some level for those. That don't know what you guys do. What is ashi core. And what are some of the products. And why do you think is become such a standard in the development community. Yeah awesome. Let's start with that. So how she is a company. That is really focused on helping customers on their journey to cloud no digital transformation is top of mind and it really depends the way that applications are being billed is no longer have sort of the traditional data centers in data methods of operating. And so are chronic. Swede is essentially helping customers on that journey when you think of us we were really founded as an open source software company and we have eight organ source projects today and these projects really kind of play different roles in that journey for the cloud operating model the first set of products really around helping developers kind of in their lifetime time environment in building images and those are aikman and packer. Richardson packer almost become household names in any developer community. Now we followed that with the tax reform and tear form is used to essentially provision your infrastructure.

Matt Super Swede Richardson Packer Aikman Packer
"organ" Discussed on V103

V103

05:52 min | Last week

"organ" Discussed on V103

"Organ and Tissue donation Month. This morning, we'll hear from the state's biggest advocate for organ and tissue donation, Secretary of State Jesse White. Next. We'll learn about a new book called Healing Stories of individuals who have overcome opioid addiction and homelessness. While the nation reels from a flood of mass shootings here in Chicago. We've seemed to become immune to the trauma. April is National Youth Violence Prevention Month, We'll talk to emergency room physician Dr Mike Magee about his program to curb you for violence. The music world continues to mourn the death of rapper DMX. We'll look at his life and legacy and get your take on his influence, and we'll close out our discussions talking money smarts with Chicago City treasurer of Melissa Kanye's Irving. So, as is the case every Sunday morning, there's a lot to speak to, and we begin talking about organ and tissue donation. April is national donate Life Month and no better person to join us to talk about the importance of organ and tissue donation than a man who was truly dedicated to making sure that lives are saved through the process. I'm talking about Jesse White, the Illinois secretary of state. It's the secretary. Always a pleasure to have you join us. How are you feeling, sir? I feel fine Deal. Good to be on more producer. Yeah, it is a pleasure to have you on board. And you know, we thank you for all that you do, and one thing that has been very near and dear to your heart. And it comes around every month and not every month. But every year in terms of April being national donate life month through organ and tissue donation is the importance of organ and tissue donation for people who reside in the state of Illinois. You're absolutely correct. We asked every person in the state of Illinois to have become a part of the organ tissue donor program because one light one person could provide life or through the quality of life for 25 individuals. We asked when you'll every well give blood you no longer here. Give organs When you've done this to things with a positive impact upon society, we know that this year, the featured person in your public service announcement. Is Ed farmer who was a White Sox relief pitcher, and I really like the message that was sent out here because what it does it talks about the lasting legacy of organ donation, but also that it works. Here's a man who get Kidney donated if I'm not mistaken from his brother and live 30 years with that kidney, that's unbelievable. Uh, he's get finally was it was a good friend of mine. And he used to bring publish the White Sox here to the tops and center, and they would say in autographs and take pictures and talk about the importance of the organ and tissue donor program. And it farmer wasn't Sonny Well, one day until he indicated that he needed a kidney. His brother stepped up to the plate gave him a second chance at life, and he lived 30 years. As a result of his brother's generosity. I have a similar story with regard to my sister doors. She, too, was in dire need of a kidney, And that was not a match within the family. So she put a name. One argument should don't know list and she received a second chance at life issue was able to live. An additional 28 years. So there's a lot to be said about this wonderful program. Why are you so dedicated to this process have been there done that know that my brother Georgia was a function of the leaks Heavy hospital. And this happened long before I became secretary of state. He wasn't feeling well. We took him to the hospital, and he was diagnosis suffering from an aneurysm. And a member from the region Bank of Illinois. She's being asked if his orders could be used for transplantation purposes, and we were unaware of the program at the time. So we said, Don't bother him. Don't buy that Steve Saloon and then the next day we buried him. I don't think any more than the situation or the organ donor program until Uh, two years later, my sister became ill and she wasn't guaranteed of a kidney. That was not a match within the family. So she put him on the ordinate ishido lists and through the generosity of a gentleman. Who is so long with us? She got a second chance at life. So that's that said before she lived in additional 28 years, And we're all so proud of the fact too that, uh, here in Illinois. There are seven point when me and people have Sam become a part of this meaningful program. We asked when you're living Well, your blood you no longer here give organs who is eligible to sign a donor registry card. Anyone within the sound of my voice. Anyone in the state of Illinois? I'm really proud of the fact that for years we would sign up individuals at age 18. And then we've introduced a piece of legislation general some way and it was passing sand by the governor. And as a result of these 16 and 17 year olds participating in this program, they have been 165,000. These young people have said Yes, I'd like to become an organ donor. If by chance, I'm not able to continue my lifestyle, So we just want all the people with the sound. I was seriously considered becoming a part of the organ tissue donor program. How do they do that? With simple they could go to their phone. Lycos on that calm. Life goes on dot com or call the 1 800 to 1 old to one old six. Or they can visit out local secretary State driver's services facility..

30 years 16 Chicago 25 individuals Ed Steve Saloon 165,000 White Sox six 28 years 17 year Mike Magee April Jesse White one second chance Sam Georgia Organ and Tissue donation Mont One argument
Biden's gun control executive orders could cause surge in gun ownership

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | Last week

Biden's gun control executive orders could cause surge in gun ownership

"There be a rush on guns? That's the question after President Biden announced a half dozen executive actions to combat what he calls an epidemic and an international embarrassment of gun violence in America at George Guns that Hood River owner Erica Bell says she seen some business. In response to the president's announcement of executive actions to combat gun violence, including action on Ghost guns, which are also called 80% Guns. I've had a couple people come in, and that was the 80% people that we're looking for those, but it was just more so afraid of what's gonna happen and be available and they want them before. They're not available. One patron telling me that think Biden's one of the best gun sales whenever he says this cell phone is starting to go off about the issue. I've already had. People in my family column is asking questions about what this Biden order is going to do. And if we should go get eight percenters before their outlaw Blake Allen for CBS News Hood River Organ.

President Biden George Guns Erica Bell Hood River America Biden Blake Allen Cbs News
Dermatology for Skin of Color

Short Wave

01:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Dermatology for Skin of Color

"Want to talk about the field of dermatology. That's the one treating hair skin nails Yeah it's an amazing field. So skin is the largest organ of the body. We shed more than pound of dry skin throughout the year. And it's a really visual field. Okay so dermatologists. Like dr jeannette. Acquai- rely on pictures to get a sense of what a disease looks like so they can recognize it in the moment where freely scanning the patient from the minute we walk in the room and many of our diagnoses. We actually know them from the door. Because rote memorization of what things look like as such a big part of our training. Jeanette is chair of the department of dermatology at howard university college of medicine and like a lot of dermatologists paying close attention last spring when covid nineteen was giving some patients. A skin rashes. Do you remember that. yeah i do. There were reports of covid toes. Like people's toes swelling up usually showed up with more mild cases. Yeah it was considered kind of covid red flag but ginette was noticing. The pictures clinical papers about cova. Toes and other skin manifestations were overwhelmingly of light. Skin historically black skin. Brown skin is not represented in literature appropriately. So it wasn't a surprise. It's just that on the heels of all the things that were going on in the country last summer we thought that it was worth calling it out in a way that we hadn't called out our colleagues in the past

Dr Jeannette Acquai Howard University College Of M Department Of Dermatology Ginette Jeanette Cova Brown
How Fat Burning Actually Works

The Model Health Show

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

How Fat Burning Actually Works

"This is the education that i wish i would received in my university nutrition in biology classes in learning truly. How are metabolism actually works. How does the process of fat loss actually work. How does it happen. Where does fat go when you lose it. does it go to another dimension. Is it going to the multi-diverse. Do we need at man to help us figure all this stuff. We're going to dive into that today. And so much more. So we're gonna take you through the process of metabolism a process of fat loss very rudimentary understanding of it. But it's going to put so much power into your hands to truly know how the process works and also we're going to dive into specific nutrients foods that actually assist in the enzymes in the hormones. Involved in a fat loss process the very first thing understand right out of the gate is what are we actually dealing with here when we're talking about burning fat. What are we dealing with here so often in our society today. We're trying to target and to get rid of something that we don't even understand what it is. We don't even know what it is it. We're trying to get rid of in. So the first thing that i want to share with you and this is a very important. Understanding is at body fat itself. Your fat is an oregon. Our body fat is in oregon. We tend to think about it. Like is just scattered droplets of stuff throughout our bodies scattered droplets of unhappiness sometimes scattered throughout our bodies. But it really your fat cells in your fat cell communities which we're gonna talk about. They worked together as an organ much. Like your skin is an organ that really and move throughout your body is a big part of your nervous system. Your body fat is a huge part of your indifferent system right. It works together much. Like in oregon. Your body fat releases and other substances to regulate your body's metabolism by communicating with other organs and tissues. Such as your liver your pancreas muscles and this introduces a critical but overlooked point in how this process actually works in that. Your body fat itself is largely responsible for regulating. your metabolism.

Oregon
Dr. Mehmet Oz Says Waist Size Matters Far More Than Weight

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Mehmet Oz Says Waist Size Matters Far More Than Weight

"Is back and he claims this is what he says. He has the real weapon against fat. Don't we want to know what that and the best way to lose it once and for all he says that the key to achieving the best for you not jennifer aniston's body but for you as less to do with your weight and everything to do with your waistline or the reason we measure weight is because it's easy to do but it's actually misleading in many ways. First of all a lot of muslim people out there who way a lot right yeah. Muscle weighs more than fat. That's why fat floats hearing that as a kid. And that's one of the missing parts about measuring you wait alone. Plus doesn't tell you where the fat is the fats down your thighs. That'll cost you some dates. But it's not gonna cost you your life the fat here here. This is the fact that going to hurt you. And that's what we're gonna talk about today. Okay and why does this hurt you. Because deep inside they're not just beneath the skin. Deep inside is an oregon. That actually is right around all of your bodily organs your liver your stomach and everything else. It's pushes them okay. So what's a healthy waste while woman and then for man the ideal waste for a female under thirty two and a half inches young say that today for a guy what is for guys should be under thirty five inches. There's one yeah really under thirty five. That should be the idea. Waste and as you get more than that that costs you years of life and so these are points that are critically important for folks to get through. Because you're gonna keep a number to focus on. It's not your weight. it's your waist size. Okay so what did you

Jennifer Aniston Oregon
Shot Texas Trooper Remains On Life Support Until Organs Can Be Donated

Joe Pags

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Shot Texas Trooper Remains On Life Support Until Organs Can Be Donated

"Texas DPS officials say a trooper shot Friday night. Costa Muhaya has no viable brain activity in a tweet this afternoon, they announced Trooper Chad Walker would remain a life support until you can share the gift of life as an organ donor. Walker was called to assist a disabled motorist close to my hair Friday night when he came upon the vehicle. A man got out of the car and started shooting into the police car's windshield. Walker was shot in the head and abdomen and a man believed have killed Walker 37 year old Arthur Pinson Junior reportedly killed himself over the

Costa Muhaya Trooper Chad Walker DPS Walker Texas Arthur Pinson
"organ" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

09:27 min | 2 weeks ago

"organ" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"And then my junior attending as a third year was one of the people whose men you know one. The most important influences on my professional career. Who's bob montgomery. Now the head of transplantation at at nyu in a transformative figure in our field over the last couple of decades and partially it was his example. Of what i thought. I could aspire to be as a transplant. Surgeon partially it was realizing that the distance from kind of bench to bedside and transplantation is really short was unlike anything that i had had seen even in an very innovative progressive surgical department. And finally you know. Specifically speaking to my previous i did see liver transplantation specifically as being completely complementary to being a comprehensive about ability surgeon and physician for patients with you know it's interesting in other parts of the world it's pretty commonplace for a pad billiard surgeons and liver transplant surgeons to be the same individuals in the us just training tracks changing over time and such there are there tend to be surgical oncologists. Do bad ability surgery and transplant surgeons. Who may do some of that ability surgery. But i clearly thought it would make me a more complete surgeon and physician to train and both and i've been very lucky. I mean this is something that can happen necessarily every institution. But i've i've straddled that line in my career to about half my clinical is pat billiard surgery surgery of the liver bile duct pancreas for mostly for cancer but other benign diseases and then liver transplantation. So i feel like i won the lottery kind of walking that line to be able to combine those disciplines. Tell folks a little bit. That what you mean by bench to bedside in that that distance being short It's a term. We throw around a lot in medicine but its significance is huge. I wanna make sure people understand it. I mean part of it is just understanding the history right so transplantation as a field is very young so the first kidney transplants were done in the nineteen fifties first liver heart and lung. Transplants attempted in the nineteen sixties. None of which were particularly successful until the nineteen eighties related to all sorts of important changes but particularly the development of effective immunosuppression and then once it became a feasible and successful medical intervention then developing all of the systems around making that a reality for more people and extending that to people with organ failure of various causes so here we are surgical residents in the nineteen nineties and a field. That really is about ten years old in terms of kind of being operationally expanding enough to really be a reality at most major medical centers. And so you would see things. Being discussed have been morning reporter rounds or like. This is a really tricky case of acute rejection. We haven't tried x. Yet and then you'd see try x. And it would work or not work and we just are. There were surgical techniques. Living donor liver transplantation. Basically a major part of my practice now was created in the ninety s and early two thousand so so i think the ability to see innovation become reality in very rapid form was number one inspiring. I mean you felt like you're doing something that was that was new and innovative and just really incredible but also to be honest. It made you feel like you could potentially have some impact in the development of the field. That was the nascent. And i would put myself in. Maybe the second or third generation of transponders in terms of its history. Which is you know. I feel very fortunate to be kind of a witness to that history and participate in some of it moving forward. Let's use kidney as an example to explain to people the challenges today we take kidney transplants almost for granted because the success rate is so high in fact even when i was a resident if you demonstrated that you had enough of the skill and the interest even the transplant fell would let you as the mid level resident or the senior resident general surgery. Kidney transplants have you mentioned bob. Montgomery there is a stretch on transplant. Where bob i did thirteen consecutive kidney transplants together in a period of like four days. So the fact that kind of knuckle draggers like me could have been doing. This speaks to how well it works today but as you said this is a procedure that even in the nineteen sixties carried with it a mortality of more than fifty percent. So let's break down for people the evolution of this from sort of the technical evolution. It was only what maybe a little over one hundred years ago that the anastomosis was even understood to then the complications of acute rejection chronic rejection and even understanding what the immune system is is doing. So and then we'll we're going to get deliver after because of course liver takes it to a whole new level and in all regards kidney transplantation is kind of the best example of all the challenges that you just alluded to. It was also the first solid organ. At least that appealed to the earliest pioneers in the field is something that you know. It seemed feasible to give someone an extra kidney like that. You could kind of imagine a way technically to make that work as opposed to doing what we now do. I say harder liver transplantation where you're doing an ortho topic transmit you're literally taking out the prior oregon and putting the new one. That's a little different than a hetero topic. Kidney transplant where you're giving them an extra oregon and hoping that replaces the function of their failed kidneys. People probably don't understand that but when we do kidney transplants. We don't go into the retro peritoneum. Take out the old kidneys. Were putting the new kidney. Basically in their pelvis attaching it to the blood vessels in the pelvis and taking the little tube that drains urine. And just putting that into the bladder ureter and obviously. That's much easier than if you were going to remove the old kidneys and put the new kidney in their place. Given the location of the kidneys to make kidney transplantation. Feasible was a collision of lots of hard work by multiple individuals. Some of whom thinking about what. You just said literally. What are the technical details of taking an organ out of a either living or deceased donor. Mitigating the injury that goes from cutting off its blood supply until you're able to restore into the recipients bodies their whole concept of kind of the the technique the preservation and then the implantation and then parallel to that was this whole question of well. How do we handle the immunologic consequences of that. And so the series of events that occurred and allowed kidney transplantation to be a reality. Were really that. The technical and preservation elements came to fruition before we figured out the immunologic elements and in fact the first kidney transplant as you know performed in nineteen fifty four at brigham and women's hospital by joseph murray who eventually won the nobel prize was in identical twins right so he had two brothers one brother who had kidney failure. Another brother who was healthy to one of the healthy brothers kidneys and transplanted into the sick brother. And that proof of principle was what created even kind of the possibility the vision that transplantation could work because we understood the technical and preservation challenges of actually taking an org at one person's body and putting into someone else. Murray was a plastic surgeon. Wasn't he yeah just was a plastic surgeon and interestingly although he and his colleagues figured out this technical piece what attracted him to transplant was the concept of tissue transfer and the immunology of that so so a lot of the early work in immunology was done with skin graphs and kind of understanding. Y you could take a skin graft from your own body and put it somewhere and it would live but if you took us in graph from someone else's body and put it on a site it would not it would generally not live and so there was this whole kind of cadre of clinician scientists. Who are interested in that question. Including interestingly plastic surgeons like joseph murray so he became involved in that with a group of other surgeons including some folks who had vascular expertise and others kind of conceived and developed in preclinical models animals. This idea of putting a kidney in the pelvis and attaching it to the blood vessels on ladder and then pulled it off in a in a human and a lot of if you look at the history of kidney transplantation through the nineteen fifties and into the nineteen sixties most of the kidney transplants performed or between twins which there's a limited supply available organs.

Murray third joseph murray one brother four days more than fifty percent bob montgomery two brothers both second third year nineteen eighties one ninety s Montgomery last couple of decades first solid organ first kidney nineteen fifty four first
Last-second miss leaves No. 15 Oral Roberts inches from March Madness history

News, Traffic and Weather

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Last-second miss leaves No. 15 Oral Roberts inches from March Madness history

"Thrilling finish in the south. As Arkansas comes roaring back from 12 points down, hang on to be oral Roberts 70 to 70. The Golden Eagles had a shot to win it, missing a three pointer at the buzzer that would have sent them to the final aid. Oregon State in the regional final for the first time since 1982. The team pick 12 in the Pac 12 is here takes care of loyal of Chicago, 65 to 58 holding the Ramblers too. 16 points in the first half organs that has made the final four since 1963 number one Baylor in the South. Rallies to be number five. Villanova 60 to

Golden Eagles Arkansas Roberts Oregon PAC Ramblers Chicago Baylor Villanova
Mysterious Seattle Light Show Likely Debris From SpaceX Rocket

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Mysterious Seattle Light Show Likely Debris From SpaceX Rocket

"24 7 News Center. Those guys were Clear last night, and that's why people could see that light show in the sky about nine p.m.. I saw something I I thought it was a coordinated But it was a trail behind it, so we kept looking at it. And it got farther, and it looked like it almost like exploded in the air. That teen and several others actually may have witnessed what was left of a space X Falcon nine rocket, according to Jim Todd, with the organ Museum of Science and Industry long it took to burn out. Because that classic or man made so far no

News Center Jim Todd Organ Museum Of Science And In
Interview With Dr. Megan Hosey On Finding Peace Of Mind IN The ICU

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Dr. Megan Hosey On Finding Peace Of Mind IN The ICU

"Welcome megan it's nice to have you here. It's great to be here. thanks so much making. Do you mind if we get attack some of the unique situations that covert has brought us. Because i'd be interested in some of the new challenges that covert has brought your work. Yeah sure so. Just to give you a framework for what i usually get to do. I usually get to work in our medical intensive care unit where are patients are mechanically. Ventilated may be on medications. Keeping them alive things like visa oppressors. And of course they need life support. That might help other and organ function league kidneys etcetera. I get called into work with the team when we have patients who are coping with anxiety delirium hospital demoralization. Any of these things that might get in the way of their participation with the medical team or with their rehab engagements and in the wake of covid. Things have been different in a few ways. So of course we have everyone taking on and off this p. and that can be quite scary for patients. I know in some of your previous podcasts. You might have been talking with my colleagues about icu delirium just as a refresher. This is these changes in attention increases in hallucinations and delusions. That patients might have as a result of infection medications just being in a bizarre hospital environment so anytime we're walking in for these patients in this bizarre p. p. e. We've been finding that a really important tweak is to remind people what it is along with the general reorientation that were doing so for example. We'll tell people where they are there and we'll say i'm wearing these masks. And that's to protect us from infection for example because patients having collusive nations and delusions Really understand what that is

Megan
Equal Pay Day: The Gender Pay Gap Persists

Tim Conway Jr.

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Equal Pay Day: The Gender Pay Gap Persists

"Look like it's well equal for everybody. That's because women still make significantly less money than then new statistics show women made an average of 82 cents for every dollar a man made last year. Black women and Latinos fared even worse, with black women making just 63 cents for every dollar A man made and Latinas making just 55 cents for every man made dollar. New research from Lean in dot organ surveymonkey shows the pandemic has hit Lotina's and black women particularly hard, pointing out that nearly half of them surveyed say they have less than $300 to fall back on. Jennifer Jones Li ke

Lotina Jennifer Jones Li Ke
Not rusty: Oregon soars past Iowa 95-80 into Sweet 16

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Not rusty: Oregon soars past Iowa 95-80 into Sweet 16

"Chris do Artes scored twenty three points and seven seed Oregon showed no signs of rust after a long layoff beating number two seed Iowa ninety five eighty LJ Figueroa hit five threes while scoring twenty one points for the ducks who advanced to the second round win their game with VCU was canceled due to covet nineteen concerns will Richardson added nineteen points for an organ attacked and shot fifty six percent and hit eleven three pointers hawk eye center Luka Garza delivered thirty six points and nine rebounds in his final college game I'm Dave Ferrie

Chris Do Artes Lj Figueroa Oregon Iowa VCU Ducks Richardson Luka Garza Dave Ferrie
Oregon-VCU declared no-contest; Ducks advance

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:28 sec | Last month

Oregon-VCU declared no-contest; Ducks advance

"And vcu was kicked out of the nc double a. tournament shortly before its first round game. Because of multiple positive covid nineteen tests the development throws into question whether the nineteen day event will be able to be held all the way through amid a pandemic. The nc double a. ruled that tenth seated. Vcu's first round game. Saturday against organ was a no contest. That means the seventh-seeded ducks will advance face. Iwa in the second round of the west region. The announcement came a little more than three hours before. Vcu in oregon were supposed to

VCU NC Ducks Oregon
No Washington DC White House Easter Egg Roll for second straight year due to pandemic

WBAP Morning News

00:45 sec | Last month

No Washington DC White House Easter Egg Roll for second straight year due to pandemic

"Easter egg roll at the White House has been canceled by the pandemic usually draws thousands of kids to 1600, Pennsylvania Avenue. But the White House Historical Association says The annual White House. Easter Egg roll has been canceled over Covic concerns, but they've set up some virtual egg roll related activities have White House history that organ There's a digital jigsaw puzzle coloring pages and a virtual scavenger hunt, which will take you on a tour of the executive mansion, and the association says it's still selling traditional souvenir wooden eggs. This year. They feature the likenesses of President Biden's dogs champion Major in Washington. Jill NATO Fox News.

White House Historical Associa White House Covic President Biden Jill Nato Washington Fox News
Jodi Cohen Using Essential Oils To Heal Brain Fog and Body

Thinking Like A Genius Podcast

05:51 min | Last month

Jodi Cohen Using Essential Oils To Heal Brain Fog and Body

"Another podcast that i actually spoke to his electrical beverly coon. That's done quads. Lots of work on emotional maps in similar type work with russian technology. That's actually found ways of measuring these wise in the reaction so it there's an interesting but of correlation between the two. I'd be interested to see what you think of hill works all to put you in contact with maybe have a discussion with nc. How much the the information college what you can actually find out that could be. You could say correlating between the the two areas. Nothing it'll be an interesting discussion few camera. I am sure it's one of those. Things is a strange thing to pull him. But michael jackson used to say that you know when he got a download of a song he'd read it so the princeton. It's this idea that there are certain information that's accessible to everyone but we forget to look at it. We get so tuned into our five senses that we forget we also very intuitive beings. The other thing. I wanted to explore with. You is that yet. How much decent Plays a role in that or vassal. You could say system within the body because this a overreliance on nerve signaling which will discuss the little bit light run with But i'd like to hear your inputs about fassino. And how much muscle testing actually are the connection that uses that signaling mechanism because of this some researchers reading up about that fast yet at can actually act as a signaling mechanism. It's a lot faster than denotes. Because it's mostly relying on water in this. Signaling is obviously la forces for water than through physical media. So how much of that have you looked into have you. That's one hundred percent sure that actually gets to the fourth phase of water. Jerry pollock is a researcher at the university of washington. Part of the problem of our health. Is that our water is signaling as well at our. Our water is dead. Water like ideally Metal pipes the problem. Is you know the water's going through the pipes in the water. That's flowing at the outside of the pipe. Slows down into the water in the middle is flowing faster so kind of splits. The water like living water water in streams or brooks anything. That's moving and flowing is really healthy and that kind of plays into the show. Yeah you're absolutely right. It's deeper than i. Don't actually think. I think essentials are really good for certain things and i think other things are better. I think structured waters actually Better for the last year. I think oils are so. I haven't done a deep dive in my own research. But you're one hundred percent right. It's an interesting area. Might do some more reading up on that site. They believe glyphosate interrupts fascist signaling. There's a woman. A researcher named stephanie sent off. Who's done a lot of good research on that. I would start with her and then my friend. Dr christine softener also talks a lot about fashion and the role. It plays just in kind of healthy cellular communication well. That'll be an interesting area that i'll look into as well coming back to the essential oils. So you started testing on. Obviously a gift and you started testing. you'll need was to regulate to basically get to a balanced system. So how did you start looking into the link between the essential oils and the vagus nerve had known about the vegas nerve. I'm i'm a yoga girl and i Pretty much talk about the vegas nerve. In all of yoga and the paris of the fedex st and how would just for the listeners. That don't know the vegas nerve. A start with the autonomic nervous system which is basically controlling all of your automatic functions on namic automatic. You know breathing. Your heart beating your digestion. Your toxic occasion your immune system. You don't have to consciously think immune system turn on you know it doesn't automatically and your autonomic nervous system has chew gears it has kind of the accelerator which is if there's danger it shifts resources to keep you alive. That is called years sympathetic. Kreider flight nervous system and the resources it shifts. Is you know your energy. So your blood flow your oxygen your heartbeat faster your breathing intensifies and your blood pumps to your muscles in your arms and your legs so that you can either fighter fleet and it pumps away from your organs of digestion and detoxification and then ideally the danger passes and you switch lanes in to the parasitic pathetic break rest digestion hill lane. It is your vegas nerve cranial nerve number ten. That is a toggle between these two systems. And it's not that one turns often one turns on. It's more that one is prioritized right. Like if you're driving in a car and you're on the gas you can still break. The break isn't not working. You're just focusing on the gas at the time. And so the vegas nerve can help you shift gears. And it starts to the back of the had kind of goes behind the ears on both sides and then winds through every organ digestion and nervous them it sends signals between those oregon's and your brain. It's kind of the information highway between your gut and your brain your gut brain access. And what's fascinating. Is that activating any point. You know that the vegas nerve touches like the breathing breathing is a really easy way to on if you make your ex hair longer than you're in hell you activate your vegas nerve but people for whatever reason is easy as breathing as it was very hard to get compliance most people in order to heal. You have to be in the right

Fassino Jerry Pollock Vegas Dr Christine Softener Michael Jackson Princeton University Of Washington Brooks LA Stephanie Kreider Paris Oregon
UK universities’ closeness to China poses risks, says Jo Johnson

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

06:41 min | Last month

UK universities’ closeness to China poses risks, says Jo Johnson

"Report led by former. Universities managed to joe johnson warns of the poorly understood risks of increasingly close collaboration between uk. Universities china i tell us more well yes so awfully. Liam johnson's kicking off busy. After his various stints in half universities minister but a really interesting. I'm pretty comprehensive report looking at the relationship that uk her education house china And a couple of areas. It focuses on the role that that china is playing globally in research and development. Showing that it's set to overtake the us or Focusing that sets it will take the us. The world's biggest spender on research and development As well as the case may significant research partner and interesting Comparison looking at the fact that in two thousand nineteen. The uk collaborated with china and about sixteen thousand sixteen thousand Papers which is from about one hundred papers in the early nineteen nineties. But it's pretty. It's pretty punchy. Report and It it's pretty critical. I think it is pretty critical about the current approach is it sort of gives the impression that the view view those writing report is that the u k really needs to up his game when it in terms of understanding. The policy needs to start to be more robust against trump this transit authoritative authoritarian dictatorship. That showed little desire to transform itself into western style democracy whilst understanding the sort of reality of the situation that the relationship between China is fairly intertwined so interesting policy recommendations. They're proposing to increase the funding. I'm so there's not reliant. On international students focusing on the fact there are lots of international students from china as well and really Saying that the loss of requests. For you or i to be more robust in this do auditing to do more checking existing research partnerships and. Yeah i mean one kind of take away from me is that i think it needs to be a bit more primary research this but a very interesting report selena the line amitai pulls out about the authoritarian dictatorship that shows little desire to transfer into western style. Liberal democracy kind of wanted these joe. Johnson says that requires a catholic. Calibrated policy makes Is your sense that what's in here. Would address the concern. Or what's your view on the solutions that have been proposed there. I think the there's obviously a certain amount of posturing that behind the scenes in the kind of premise. Around china is what china is trying to do in terms of its links with uk higher education which have been built up over a long period of time but also built a time where it has been extending its into international links across the states australia various other countries and i think that the solutions are proposed in hair probably aren't going to unwind what what has already been laid extensively in terms of relationships between uk universities and chinese universities and indeed a sense of appetite from chinese students to study overseas and increasingly for uk students to take up the opportunity for some experience of transnational education in china. So i think it's helpful to point and two as the report says i to be aware of the extensive nece links the debt of the links on the volume of activity. But i would think where we are right now and certain from into individual institutions perspective. It solutions that are proposed. Here are not going to be effective at. Rolling back yeah. I'm sorry. I mean one of the things i was talking to someone about the even. What rolling back. Look i mean even if universities needed to the money less. What is it that they would do to discourage students from china coming. I mean we have people. Discriminating against st some china charlene will all supposed to be officially in theory in our kind of standards for admission that i'll just slightly adapted for each country. There's sort of things that the the first thing which i read the report in most detail to to to the potential this but i the overall impression i get from the initial i've done is that there isn't enough. Focus on the role of the us foreign policy. Plays in all of this either so going back to what you highlights about. That carefully calibrated police response. If the ratcheting up of us. Foreign policy towards china as china's influence in the world grows. Are we going to end up. In a situation affects the organ. Have to start picking sides and in that case it feels like yours. Foreign policy is going to drive a lot of what we end up. Take that first. Instance particularly given that. We're outside of the eu now and that focus on our lives is even more important but interestingly the report doesn't really say that talks about diversifying international student recruitment. But it says that it from a point of view. Saying because we don't become too reliant and because we actually think it's going to drop off over time potentially of the rise of universities in china. Say they really very much in there which is saying. We need to stop chinese students from coming to the k. But it's there's there's something around it is as chinese institutions grow and and as the government potentially starts incentivize more students to stay and study domestically that at risk for uk universities less exposed like places like australia but still the reports are saying uk university of need to prepare for that

China UK Liam Johnson Amitai Joe Johnson United States Selena Johnson JOE Charlene Australia EU Uk University Of Need
Why Dogs Kick Dirt in the Air After Pooping

Does This Happen to You

05:39 min | Last month

Why Dogs Kick Dirt in the Air After Pooping

"Our story. This week is from david. Be clear who you'll find on medium dot com and here is why dogs kick dirt in the air after pooping. It's not just because they get a kick out of it. I have a dog. And he does this. Weird thing he takes a dump and then scrapes the ground with his hind legs throwing dirt in my face. If i was a farmer. I might appreciate this behavior. I could plant some of the smaller root vegetables in the furrowed ground and would even have a steaming pile of manure right at hand. But since i don't grow potatoes i don't appreciate the dirt in my mouth. It's a nuisance. And i don't see any purpose behind it and yet there must be one. He can't be fleeing cords of dirt into the air and leaving behind huge scratch marks just for the heck of it so why why is my dog scratching the ground. Well it turns out it has to do with his smelly feet. Dogs have smelly feet. The scientists who study animal behaviour are called is all adjusts and beside sitting in a mosquito infested. Jungle observing the grooming and copulation habits of chimpanzees allah. Jane goodall ethos colleges also studied dogs since dogs are even worse at filling out questionnaires than chimpanzees. These studies are observational in practice. This means that to uncover the mystery of ground scratching. And if i had to follow dogs around and record the frequency time and surrounding circumstances of the curious behavior from records like these the theologists then spends a hypothesis an explanation that makes sense and matches the observed data one such brave all logistic who presumably got his face. Repeatedly sandblasted is bekov. Phd professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at the university of colorado boulder. He studied ground scratching by mail domestic dogs back in the nineteen seventies and years later in an article for psychology today summarized his findings like this dogs have scent glands in their paws and when they scratch they might be trying to send in olfactory message to other dogs by spreading the sent from their paws or by sharing the odor of the pee or poop. They deposited so yes. Dogs feet have ascent they smell. They don't smell like cheese since they don't wear moist socks but they do smell at least according to bekov who i presume must have buried his nose in dog pause to check what a brave man the source of the odour as bekov snow. Certainly uncovered are so-called inter digital glance tiny organs between a dog's toes that produce fair ramon infused secretions side note. Many hoofed animals have such glands in their feet as well. But i pity the theologist who verified this by sniffing the hoofs of cooking donkey. So when my dog is scratching the ground some of the inter digital secretions moos into the soil and are subsequently propelled into the air. For better dispersal moreover. If i understood bekov correctly the dust in the air also helps spread the poop smell. Which reminds me. I should really dust off my bathroom as to the stretch marks. This is what bekov has to say. Scratching also leaves a visual mark on the ground ground scratching could be yet another former social communication and taken together peeing. Pooping and ground scratching are a good example of how dogs may use what he called composite signals to enhance their messages to other dogs by using both olfactory and visual components. Now of course. I don't communicate through smells just as my dog doesn't communicate in english and i can't decipher the scratch marks. My dog leaves on the ground. Just as i can't decipher that chicken scratches. My doctor leaves on medical prescriptions. But i guess as long as i keep speaking english with my dog. It's only fair that he keeps speaking dog with me wrapping up as beck off rights. Ground scratching by dogs serves different functions depending on who is doing the ground scratching. Who else is around. And what. They're trying to communicate. I suspect my dog is just sharing memes either way. There are a form of composite signals that involve visual olfactory and possibly auditory components in other words there multimedia messages now not all dogs threw dirt in your face only about nine percent of dogs. Do i'm in the dirt eating position of having one who does but now that i understand why he does it that simply a way for him to send messages to other canines in the neighborhood. I'm more tolerant of it.

University Of Colorado Jane Goodall David Boulder Ramon Beck
Anti-Oedipus 2021 Chapter 1, Section 1 - Desiring Production - burst 02

Deleuze and Guattari Quarantine Collective

02:17 min | 2 months ago

Anti-Oedipus 2021 Chapter 1, Section 1 - Desiring Production - burst 02

"It is at work everywhere functioning smoothly at times at other times in fits and start it breathes. It eats it heats it shits and fucks what a mistake to have ever said the ad everywhere it is machines real ones out figured of one's machines driving other machines machines being driven by other machines with all the necessary couplings and connections. An oregon machine is plugged into an energy source machine. The one produces flow that the other interrupts the breast is a machine that produces milk in the mouth is machine coupled to it. The mouth of the anorexic wavers between several functions its possessor is uncertain as to whether it is an eating machine and anal machina talking machine or a breathing machine. Asthma attacks since we are all handyman. Each with his own little machines for every organ machine and energy machine all time lows in interruption doug schreiber has sunbeam's into that a solar anus rest assured that it works judge strieber feels something produces something and is capable of explaining the process theoretically something is produced the effects of a machine not mere metaphors. It is so fun to reread this after reading the entire book. Yeah and then you know there's little things that we can actually notice that we probably didn't notice before for example when they start in they say what a mistake to ever said to it everywhere it is machine. There's like three levels into fruit in Analysis the the. I'd it'd be it. The s you know person there like the ego and the superego is the it and then there's the it which is unconscious So you know what a mistake to ever said it. so basically. It's what they're arguing for is a passage from the superego to the understanding of the as the pre individual Machine that produces a subject so even in the first sentence. We miss this. I thought we read it. But i you know it becomes pleaded pretty clear because it's it's just not a play on words.

Doug Schreiber Judge Strieber Sunbeam Oregon Asthma
"organ" Discussed on Should This Exist?

Should This Exist?

02:59 min | 4 months ago

"organ" Discussed on Should This Exist?

"Just render <Speech_Music_Male> us a an <Speech_Music_Male> odd <SpeakerChange> historical <Music> footnote <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> look. <Speech_Female> I don't get to decide. <Speech_Female> Should this exist <Speech_Female> and neither <Silence> does this show. <Speech_Female> Our <Speech_Female> goal is to inspire <Speech_Music_Female> you to ask that question <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and the intriguing <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> questions <Silence> that grow from. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> What i say <Speech_Music_Female> is <Speech_Music_Female> all the rich <Speech_Music_Female> people can buy <Speech_Music_Female> their <Speech_Music_Female> kidneys <Speech_Music_Female> to leave more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> kidneys for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> people. That can't afford <Speech_Music_Female> it <SpeakerChange> and then <Speech_Music_Male> everybody wins. <Speech_Music_Male> My dad is on dialysis. <Speech_Music_Male> This <Speech_Music_Male> could change people's lives. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> it could <Speech_Music_Female> change my life. I <Speech_Music_Female> am not afraid <Speech_Music_Female> of bionic <Speech_Music_Female> organs. We already <Speech_Music_Female> have them. I don't <Speech_Music_Female> see why the kidneys <SpeakerChange> should <Speech_Music_Male> feel left <Speech_Male> out. What are the trials. <Speech_Male> Is the testing <Speech_Music_Male> safe for the long <Speech_Music_Male> term side <SpeakerChange> effects. <Speech_Music_Male> How do you even know. <Speech_Music_Male> The dialysis <Speech_Music_Male> industry's huge. <Speech_Music_Male> If this really <Speech_Music_Male> solves dialysis. <Speech_Music_Male> I wonder if the <SpeakerChange> dallas is <Speech_Music_Male> industry is gonna get in the way <Speech_Music_Female> of the <Speech_Music_Female> first step of <Speech_Music_Female> creating <Speech_Music_Male> an artificial <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> human being out. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Could we improve upon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the human organs. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We already have. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Is there way to make a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> kidney. More efficient by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> making it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is their way to make a liver <Speech_Music_Male> better by making <Music> bionic <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female>

"organ" Discussed on Should This Exist?

Should This Exist?

05:21 min | 4 months ago

"organ" Discussed on Should This Exist?

"Option this is should this exist. We'll start the show in a moment after a word from.

"organ" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

Trivia With Budds

05:36 min | 9 months ago

"organ" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

"Number two by specification what is the largest organ in the human body number two? What is the largest organ of the human body number two number two?.

"organ" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"organ" Discussed on Post Reports

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> That is <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that is <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> what I was <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> able to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> find out about organ <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> transplants. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Speech_Female> I still. I still <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on a kind of dark note <Speech_Female> even events. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> But thank you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so much for a really <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> smart question <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that I think <Speech_Female> helped find <Speech_Female> some really interesting <Speech_Female> facets <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Female> what's going on right now <Speech_Female> this is well answered. <Speech_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Female> good. It <Speech_Female> makes me feel <SpeakerChange> good. If I had <Speech_Female> all of your time, I <Speech_Female> would just give you so many. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> My mind <SpeakerChange> never stops. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's good to be that way. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> That question <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was from Listener <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Charlotte cut of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Jacksonville Florida. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Our interview with Barbeque <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> took place earlier <Speech_Music_Female> in the summer and <Speech_Music_Female> last week. I. <Speech_Female> Check back in with her <Speech_Male> to see how she's <Speech_Male> been doing. <Speech_Male> She told me that her recovery <Speech_Female> has been going <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> really well, and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> she's been taking lots <Speech_Female> of long walks, which <Speech_Female> is the thing <SpeakerChange> that she <Speech_Female> was definitely not able <Speech_Female> to do before. <Speech_Female> Also, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Dr Breath, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> her lung surgeon made <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> some pretty <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> major news this summer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> successfully performed <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the first double <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> lung transplant <Speech_Female> to save the life <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of a Kobe victim <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in the US. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> He's hoping that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> organ transplants will <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> be a new source <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of hope for people suffering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> the effects <Music>

"organ" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"organ" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Out of these factory farms and so this is a really important subject because your products come from New Zealand. And they're all a grass-fed and grasp finish. And that's really what differentiates Really good from bad me right correct. I mean you know it's I guess the you know anecdote is you know you're not just what you eat your meal eight And how your meal you know? Animal animal husbandry is really a focal point of Of Our company with respect to any Animal based products that we that we produce you know in New Zealand again. There are you know grass-fed grasp finished operations here within the US But I think New Zealand is is a Is a country that is adopted. Animal Husbandry at a very core level With how they produce Produce animal products and speaking of factory farms. I'm right there with you. I used to live out in California and there was a long stretch of highway between The La area in San Francisco and drive back and forth back and forth there for college. you know many years ago and and you. WanNa talk about a giant feed lot. There was probably one of the biggest feedlots I've ever seen in between those In between Los Angeles and San Francisco and you. Can you feel it coming coming from a good forty fifty miles away? It's pretty awful. Yeah I mean I'm thinking I'm breathing this stuff. Then I can only imagine you know what these animals have been exposed to. And that's once they've been put in these Feeding lots and taken out of confinement and so it was very disruptive to my brain at this really hurt my heart and you know and I asked myself you know how the modern American diet get to this point. What do you think happened? Well I think again you know. It's I think that that it's A number of things Primarily it's it's really irresponsible capitalism. You know it's a. It's a need of these of these animals and animal products to extract. Everybody's lasts any. They can out of every square foot and every Every head of cattle that they can produce you know so But but I do. I do think there's a really large misunderstanding with Within those communities and industries that regenerative agriculture can actually be very profitable And I think that there's you know there's starting to be a shift and and understanding definitely not at the scale that we needed to be but but there is a shift in consciousness with with people that do consume animal products And and so. Hopefully it continues on that direction But again it's really the route you know. The root cause of this is irresponsible capitalism and and the Place you know basically prioritizing Profits over over health. You know and as long as that as long as that continues. That's GONNA continue to be an overriding theme. Well Yeah and health and respect for the animal. You know it's just wrong. One hundred percent agree with you about it. Just being irresponsible capitalism. I love that term. I actually wrote it down Because that's really where we got to where we are. And so you know it's so important though. Some of the nutrients said that we've become accustomed to and vitamin deficiencies. Things like that from eating good quality. Whatever it is so you know. How does our Diet today? Compare to our ancestors and can you run through what a typical daily diet might have looked like hundreds of years ago. Well hundreds of years ago I would say that the Diet was probably Worst than what it is today and and I mean that in the sense that you know I I you know there. There has been some positive developments in in You know modern food production versus they hunt. You know hundreds of years ago right The agricultural revolution was you know The agriculture became more of a thing about ten thousand years ago. Plus minus right and the introduction the introduction of grains and grain based products being a staple food and most The diets of most I think was Was really a turning point And you know. I think you're familiar with the work of Dr Weston Price He was a A dentist That traveled around and basically looked at indigenous cultures. And you know what you know. His his viewpoint was coming from Kind of dental health right and so with the introduction of modern foods modern agriculture grain based foods and a departure from more traditional foods fermented foods animal based products Dairy was also A staple in a lot of Ancestral diets But the quality of the dairy was was of course very different Than what we're seeing now but through that introduction of these more These these agricultural based foods they. He showed US shift in in health was quite substantial. Yeah I'm very familiar with the western price Foundations they had a symposium here in Dallas. I just a few months ago and and there were so many incredible speakers there Some of them that have been on the show multiple times like Dr Natio- winters. And just a lot of really cool people talking about so many things that we need to know and just trying to get the education out there but you know so. Let's go to this because I really want people to to get this information most people when they think of liver they hear organ meat and what are some other meats in this category. You know besides liver that are healthy with a lot of nutrient value. Sure so I mean organ meats are you know. They're affectively known as awful right. Oh awesome so heart liver tongue. Brain Pancreas Kidney Gall. Bladder Spleen Effectively it's you know All of the other various internal tissues of Of the animal. Well you know it's funny And it's so funny. I always this always Kerr me. Why do we think any differently about on an organ meat than we do like a fi or you know a muscle or bone broth? All these things. If you're GONNA eat the animal I say you utilize every single piece of that animal out of respective nothing else And I think of when I was in Europe there was a thing called head cheese That I was exposed to and I was like what do you know what I'm talking about? I know I know exactly what you're talking about. I can't I can't even I can't even look at that and be appetizer by so I know what you're referring to. Yeah it's a cold cut and when I when I lived in Europe and it's basically they call it head cheese although it's not dairy it's basically brain eyes and ears all put into this gelatin and sliced up and but you know you have to respect the fact that at least they're using the whole animal and you know. I think that we need to open our minds that if we are going to eat meat that we definitely should be you know eating organs along with it and that's what you know but. I could never do that and so I just can't. I can't even put a piece of meat in my mouth at this point. But you know these two products that you've developed Oregon complex and bone marrow which come from grasp that New Zealand pasture raised. Animals is something I could entertain. You know in my in my In my supplement regime for something to give me extra nutrients and and the same here. You know I'm I'm really you know as much as I practicing in sessile lifestyle myself and for my family you know I mean I think that you know I'm I'm not I'm also in that camp right like I'm not out eating head cheese. I can guarantee you that so I I think you know as far as I go on in the On the culinary side and the kitchen is really you know using Beef liver chicken livers You know making bone broth Things like that but you know I am. I GONNA eat brains and and Actually I take that back. I love bone marrow. That's a definite win for me. But yes we you know. I think that you know part of Part of you know moving. Our mission forward is really. How do we create products that Can can have a a wider audience and help a broader range of people right because not everybody is open to consuming organ meats so So you know. Basically the desiccated Freeze DRIED FREEZE. Dried forms That preserve all the nutrients and their Natural physiological state and campus so it's a tasteless warm. Yeah it's kind of like a win win. I know that we're GONNA break here. Can you say what does what I ask? You? Just a few questions after the break. Because I wanted to talk about Dr. Oh good good I wanNA talk to you about Dr Alvin Dannenberg. Who is fighting cancer successfully? Who's incorporated your product. Oregon Complex vote marrow and to his regime. So we'll talk more about it. Everyone we're going to go to a quick break for station identification. And we'll be right back with Jared Ramirez.

New Zealand US Los Angeles Europe San Francisco Oregon California Dr Alvin Dannenberg Dr Weston Price Dr Natio Dairy Jared Ramirez Dallas Kerr
"organ" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"organ" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"In southern California on ABC News Talk. How you doing today although doing mice beautiful day out here in Dallas are you. I'm good well I don't know if you saw it on social yet but I picked up dog this morning. Just about an hour ago Actually it's been probably about an hour and a half now but not that it really matters but I ran out of coffee filters and so and I forgot to get them. I didn't really leave my house yesterday. And so anyway I got up this morning and I'm like dammit Jim. I forgot to get coffee filters and I really need a cup of coffee so I went to the starbucks And when I which is nearby my house which is nearby Walmart so as I was driving down. I bought this dog okay. And it's like a big hound dog. He's beautiful by the way like a big yellow dog and he's even got yellow is anyway. I'm like Oh my God look when I was thinking. What does this job and I was thinking? Maybe 'cause he was a hound dog you know and a lot of times like that will stick by close by their owner and he looked like he had a collar while having that look like he did have a caller and it looks like he had identification on it too. But it wasn't. It was just a reflective light. Make a long story short. I locked eyes with an owner. And keep this in mind. I've got Charlie in the car with me. Losing my mind cause Charlie loves to go to the starbucks drive through so I you know I look at them. I'm like Oh my gosh so we kinda like lock eyes and I'm talking to him through the window and I think it's okay. It's okay boy. Hold on and so. Put the car in Park 'cause I was in Dr Getting Ready to swing over to starbucks and got how am I gonNA. How am I gonNA quarterback this thing and so I get out with my phone and I actually cracked the windows and took my keys? Just in case put my flashers on and he came right over to me and I was like. Oh my God this sweet boy and Rinaldo. When I looked down and just pause they were. They were nearly bleeding. They were so far down to the quick. I mean they were short as they could possibly be without starting to bleed. So I'm like Oh my God so then this guy comes around the corner and he said Oh. Are you going to help him and I said Yeah Yeah. He was a a Walmart employee. They were Stephen and he. He's such a sweetheart. He was coming with bull and water and food to feed the dog because he said that he's been trying to get inside the Walmart for days. And so I don't know if it looks like because of his nails. He's probably probably been on the street. I'M GONNA say for a good month based on the experience. I had with picking up stray dogs. But he's here now at my home in Charlie's Fan And I gotta go to lows after the show and go get another Kennels put nearby so until I figure out what I'm GonNa do with them but can you believe it so now I've got eleven dogs. It's just there's so many of them on the street right now right to you know with all this going on and people don't WanNa take care of the dog so feel like they can't take care of the dog because they can't afford to so they probably just let him loose instead of taking shelter. Yeah and you know what He told me to this guy. He told me that a couple of weeks ago he saw somebody of a big shepard Over on the other side of the Walmart heard like screech and then just like somebody taking off and then he looked and someone had dumped a like a shepherd dog outside of their their pickup and he said it was just heartbreaking. The dog took off running. And it's just. I hate hearing stories like that. It's absolutely heartbreaking but I don't know what I'm GonNa do with this boy because again. He's a boy. Oh and he's on neutered. That was a whole funny. Funny react to them. Oh God Charlie wanted to kill him if I Good Question Yeah Charlie was like no. I don't think so. But now until I have. Charlie tethered outside of where he normally inside. You know the Kennel. And the two of them are just filling side-by-side getting used to one another. Because you know I just don't know what to do overwhelmed. There's just so many pets out there that need our help. But there's no way I was gonNA walk away from that dog that in a million years I would have figured out something no matter what and and and I did so I text a friend of mine Who was nearby and said. Hey can you come help me I gotta get this boy home And I've got Charlie in the car. She was there in ten minutes in ten minutes My friend came and helped me with the dog. And so you know so many good people out there like Steven like my pal That are that are animal lovers. That truly WANNA do the right thing. So you guys know anyone that is looking for a good hound dog. He's beautiful by the way and I put one Video just before I went live out on our social media and of course of course I'm GonNa Capture War throughout the day so But thanks for listening to my latest dog dilemma. If you didn't need coffee fields you probably would have never met that dog exactly and so the universe you know sent me. I mean we were in the same spot at the same time and so you know and I and I have to believe that that I you know it was put there for a reason today and it feels so good in my heart. My heart is so full right now. Seriously there's no better feeling in the world than than rescuing animals. That's lost scared you know and I and I'm going to make reference to a book that I pulled a couple of days ago and I can't even remember why now but it was something that we were talking about on the air but temple Grandin Is An incredible author and she's autistic and she wrote this wonderful book called Animals in Translation. It was a national bestseller And it was co written as well with Katherine Johnson. But I was reading on it and let me just. Let me just read this little bit. And then we'll go to break here in a minute. I said I don't know whether it's easier to traumatize an animal's than a human being overall. I think it probably is. I do know that once. An animal has become traumatized. It's impossible to UN traumatize him. Animals never unlearn a bad fear. Then she goes on to talk about. There's no reasoning with an animal. Who's been scared half out of his wits? Here's a classic example. She says When she was little a friend of hers had a Collie who became deathly afraid of of the basement. Apparently the dog had gotten really sick when she was a puppy. And my friends. Parents put her in the basement so she wouldn't mess up the house so afterward. The Dog Associated Basement was being horribly sick and she goes on to say that dog never or that particular dog never got over it sphere of the basement and so the reason. I'm waiting that is because I think it's an important message to get out there today. That kindness and compassion for all living creatures all other human beings Oliver all other animals species insects. Everything we have a. We have an opportunity every day to be kind and loving and the reward that we get for it is. It's amount of incredible joy and compassion. That feels our hearts so. That's my message for today. We've got a great show coming up. Jared Ramirez is back on loved. This guy he's so smart he is the CEO Enviro Medica Bakers of tariff flora and the sponsor of life radio. We're GONNA be talking about the benefits Excuse me the benefits of organ meats. And then cody violators back. I love this to going to be talking about static versus dynamic stretch stretching and And we get enough time. We're GONNA be talking about compound versus isolation workout so we've got a great show for you. Everyone stay tuned. And WE'LL BE RIGHT BACK. You're listening to one life. Radio long brought Butler..

Charlie Walmart starbucks Dog Associated Basement California ABC News Dallas CEO Enviro Medica Bakers Jim Stephen UN Katherine Johnson Rinaldo Jared Ramirez cody Butler temple Grandin
"organ" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"organ" Discussed on American Innovations

"Innovations can go to ziprecruiter dot com slash. Ai. That's ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash. Ai One more time ziprecruiter dot com slash AI. Ziprecruiter THE SMARTEST WAY TO HIRE. You've heard the stories of Ted Bundy and Charles Manson. But what about Rodney Alcala? The dating game killer. He may have been even more deadly. How was it that a cold blooded serial killer made it onto a TV show that millions of people watched and no one could see what he really was. This is the story of the most famous serial killer that you've never heard of subscribed today to the dating game killer and other great shows from on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you're listening right now. Brigham Hospital December Twenty Third Nineteen fifty four in a brightly lit operating room. A team of surgeons in blue scrubs and masks surround Richard Herrick who lies unconscious on the operating table tubes taped to his nose provide a steady stream of anesthetic gas bags of blood ceiling and more anesthesia dangle from metal racks suspended over his head through. An incision inherits lower abdomen. Dr Joseph Murray carefully isolates the blood vessels it will be connected to the donor. Kidney other surgeons hover on either side of him ready with additional instruments. Sponge. Please sponge okay. Tell him already. One of the support surgeons quickly leaves through the. Or swinging doors. He's heading to a second operating room just down the hall where another surgical team stands ready to remove a kidney from richards twin brother. Ronald until that kidney is ready all Murray and his team can do is wait. Ellen says a word so quiet they can hear the IV drip each minute that passes feels like an eternity. Finally Nine Fifty. Three am just three minutes later. The support surgeon returns along with Dr Francis more in a stainless steel basin wrapped in a sterile. Wet cloth more carries their prize. A healthy kidney freshly taken from Ronald Herrick gently sets the fist sized Oregon down on a tray next to Richard's motionless body Murray nod suppor then glances around team through his wire rimmed glasses bouquet. Everyone let's get to work. Their first order of business is to get blood flowing to the new kidney to do that. Murray must take the main artery and vein of Ronald Kidney and carefully. Stitched them to the artery and vein. He's isolated in richards abdomen. It's the most challenging step in the entire transplant procedure and it has to be done quickly the longer. The new kidney goes without blood supply the greater the chance. It will fail clamps. Please Murray cuts off the blood flow in the two vessels than snips them as delicately as a man defusing a bomb. Then just as delicately he begins the laborious process suturing them to the severed blood vessels on the donor. Kidney Sponge as Murray works other surgeons occasionally reach into sponge up access blood or carefully reposition in Oregon. It's a delicate dance on false move and Murray could irreparably damaged blood vessel which would spell disaster finally after more than an hour. Murray lifts his weary hands out of Richard's Abdomen. Ready remove the clamps. This is the moment of truth. Once blood flow to the kidney is restored they should be able to tell right away if it's working to assistant surgeons gently removed the clamps. The kidney puffs up slightly as it fills with fresh blood its color turns from dull-grey too rosy pink. It's looking good. They still haven't completed the final step in the surgery. Attaching the kidneys. Ureter to the bladder her. Now the ureter runs into a catheter. Tube drains into a catch basin next to the operating table as blood flow returns. To the kidney the catheter jerks to life urine. Splashes out of it into the basin its Pale yellow and clear. It's working doctor. Murray you've done it. It's not get too excited yet. We still got work to do. As a ureter. Continues to splash urine. Nouri removes it from the Catheter and attach it to Herrick splatter then after one last check of the kidney and it's blood vessels he steps back. Okay let's close them up under his surgical mask. Murray is grinning from ear to ear U TURNS AND SEES HIS BOSS. Dr More been watching from the corner of the. Or excellent surgery. Joe Congratulations thanks. Here's hoping it works. It's January twenty ninth nineteen fifty five big day for Richard Herrick and for the surgeons who saved.

Dr Joseph Murray Richard Herrick Ronald Kidney Rodney Alcala Ronald Herrick Ted Bundy richards abdomen Oregon Charles Manson Brigham Hospital Ronald Apple swinging Dr Francis Joe Congratulations Nouri Ellen
"organ" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"organ" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"We are are one eight three three t d._W._i.. Leave a message. You get three minutes if you can't fit it in that amount of time just to call back and as always let us know if you do not want this to be on air if this is just for US emission mission control <hes> that's fine just be very clear about that so we are talking about surgery. Today we are talking about one of the most controversial types of surgery which is the replacement or transplant transplant of organs. The organ trade the Oregon trail. I think is the worst joke we made in a previous episode about this. The here's the problem until lease species learn how to reliably grow Murugan's ends from scratch millions of people across the planet are dying and are going to die as they wait for viable replacement organs and donors at least that is according to the official story in today's show. We're exploring a dark corner of an already very murky trade the semi legal or completely illegal industry known to some as the red market and we we have some previous stuff on this the red market <hes> we got title from this this fantastic book that looks at the semi legal and illegal organ trade the Red Market is not is not related to legitimate organ transplant or donation processes. The way legit stuff works in most countries is is the following process somebody ops in to donate an organ usually upon their death if you're in the U._S.. And you get a driver's license you get that question. Do you agree to be an organ donor. In some states states you get a discount if you agree to be an organ donor right <hes> but after let's say something tragic happens when dies in a car accident right or they have a they have a heart attack. Oh we should mention that too. Many people have the misconception that if you sign I up to be an organ donor on your driver's license it only applies to auto accidents it does not you go down for any reason <hes> you've got viable Oregon's boom boom boom out because you didn't explode or die of poison or terrible disease you saw yeah. I don't know why people would think that that's interesting <hes> yeah I always assumed it was for all intents and purposes. These organs belong to the people. It's very strange with the idea that someone someone would say well. My kidneys are still going to be mine because 'cause I tripped and fell or something like that. Yeah it's strange but maybe it's a comforting thing because our organs are very personal parts of ourselves and our identities but this also is an important point. Today's topic is about a system some of government that does not have such safeguards. We get to check a box on a card that says we choose to donate their organs that is not the case with today's episode and certainly more complicated than that yeah in some cases just just for a full context here in some cases there are countries that will require you to opt out of being an organ donor was some European countries recently did that I have no problem with that well. It's it's a psychological move because it massively increases the number of people who you become organ donors not because of informed consent it's because they didn't read the entire thing yeah which is weird. You can't think of any reason why you wouldn't want to be an organ donor for most people. It's religious for most people. It's religious this or <hes> you know it goes into the method of burial or <hes>. You know what's cremation perhaps commission. Perhaps <hes> burial at sea or you know. You can't be embalmed things like that. It's it's along the same list Outta the red market. However is in news much more recently now you can even you? You've probably seen this popping up in your news feed. Whatever your news feed of choices today while we're recording this yes yes yes? It was on the front page of Reddit today as we go in. This story takes us to the red market in the People's Republic of China so here are the facts about China's official organ organ donation system yeah they certainly have one of the largest transplant programs in the entire world and a lot of that is just a factor of the number of human beings that exist within China but we do have some numbers about estimates that come officially from the Chinese..

China official US Oregon Oregon trail Reddit three minutes
"organ" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"organ" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Oh, but that you can see through with a microscope, or is it going to be made out something else that is not so optically clear. So you might not be able to see what the sales are doing in real time. Instead, so they're always trade-offs related to the design of your chip based on what questions you want to ask you might have to think about how you'll going to connect multiple different organ systems. So we might not see bubbles as a potentially big problem. If you're talking about bubbles in cubes will piping, but if you're. Talking about micro fluid. Bubbles death bubbles will kill your system because the micro fluids come pump and your cells will die. If you're talking about how to link different systems you have to start thinking about how you going to maintain sterility. So your cell culture in each of your systems can be quite different. So how you going to link them to make sure that when you plug that next little pipe in you, don't pick up all the dirt. And all the the crud. That's on the desktop surrounding you that you're plugging it into. So there's all these issues of stability. If you're talking about populating your chips on the biological challenges. Sell sourcing is a huge issue in the field right now, you can buy commercially available cell sources for numbers of many, many different kinds of cells, but you might get differences in the batches you might get differences in the media that you need to get them to grow. It might take you nine months to actually be able to get the kinds of mature cells that you need before you can even start using them. So you've got issues with that. If you're looking at as I referred to earlier in juiced, pluripotent stem cells or APS derived cells that in itself is a whole massive field of research in biology. That's only really been around for the less than a decade is it's a huge exciting. Massively interesting field with so much potential, but it's very early days. So right now, if depending on the tissue that you're looking at if you take skin cells or punch biopsy or any other kinds of cells from a human donor, and you try and make them into a different kind of cell through different kinds of cell differentiation protocols. Then there's not necessarily any guarantee that what you're going to get is what you're actually looking for. So there's all different kinds of issues with the protocols. There's different kinds of issues with how mature the cells we talked about cardio Myocytes earlier on if you take or if you try and derive IP derived cardiomyopathy sites from human donors from skin cells, or whatever you get a very, young FINA. Type and phenotype is the word we use for basically how it looks. So you have your Gina type, which is what the genes are incited and the phenotype which is how it's how it comes out with the end. And so you can get a very immature phenotype that might be equival. I want to almost a fetus or two month old baby. Which when you're trying to compare that to how that is relevant to the fifty year old cardiovascular patient, they came from then there's clearly a disconnect. Yes. So there's a lot of work that's going on in that field to look sell sourcing looking at the immune response every single part of your body every single organ in your system has different kinds of cells that will have a different kind of immune response very much within their system, and is based on your experience. I talked about immunized senescence is based on whether or not you had chicken pox as a child or whether or not you.

FINA cardiomyopathy Gina nine months fifty year two month
"organ" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"organ" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Oh, but that you can see through with a microscope, or is it going to be made out something else that is not so optically clear. So you might not be able to see what the sales are doing in real time. Instead, so they're always trade-offs related to the design of your chip based on what questions you want to ask you might have to think about how you'll going to connect multiple different organ systems. So we might not see bubbles as a potentially big problem. If you're talking about bubbles in cubes will piping, but if you're. Talking about micro fluid. Bubbles death bubbles will kill your system because the micro fluids come pump and your cells will die. If you're talking about how to link different systems you have to start thinking about how you going to maintain sterility. So your cell culture in each of your systems can be quite different. So how you going to link them to make sure that when you plug that next little pipe in you, don't pick up all the dirt. And all the the crud. That's on the desktop surrounding you that you're plugging it into. So there's all these issues of stability. If you're talking about populating your chips on the biological challenges. Sell sourcing is a huge issue in the field right now, you can buy commercially available cell sources for numbers of many, many different kinds of cells, but you might get differences in the batches you might get differences in the media that you need to get them to grow. It might take you nine months to actually be able to get the kinds of mature cells that you need before you can even start using them. So you've got issues with that. If you're looking at as I referred to earlier in juiced, pluripotent stem cells or APS derived cells that in itself is a whole massive field of research in biology. That's only really been around for the less than a decade is it's a huge exciting. Massively interesting field with so much potential, but it's very early days. So right now, if depending on the tissue that you're looking at if you take skin cells or punch biopsy or any other kinds of cells from a human donor, and you try and make them into a different kind of cell through different kinds of cell differentiation protocols. Then there's not necessarily any guarantee that what you're going to get is what you're actually looking for. So there's all different kinds of issues with the protocols. There's different kinds of issues with how mature the cells we talked about cardio Myocytes earlier on if you take or if you try and derive IP derived cardiomyopathy sites from human donors from skin cells, or whatever you get a very, young FINA. Type and phenotype is the word we use for basically how it looks. So you have your Gina type, which is what the genes are incited and the phenotype which is how it's how it comes out with the end. And so you can get a very immature phenotype that might be equival. I want to almost a fetus or two month old baby. Which when you're trying to compare that to how that is relevant to the fifty year old cardiovascular patient, they came from then there's clearly a disconnect. Yes. So there's a lot of work that's going on in that field to look sell sourcing looking at the immune response every single part of your body every single organ in your system has different kinds of cells that will have a different kind of immune response very much within their system, and is based on your experience. I talked about immunized senescence is based on whether or not you had chicken pox as a child or whether or not you.

FINA cardiomyopathy Gina nine months fifty year two month
"organ" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"organ" Discussed on The Show About Science

Oregon Princeton Carter Cain Morris
"organ" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"organ" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Organ music the wedding theme i'm gonna rep into this royal wedding later just because we've we fought a war so we'd have to care about these people we won that war by the way a lot of people seem to have forgotten that all right talking about the deep state and again i'm not a big conspiracy theorist i'm not one of these guys who sees a russian under every bush but the idea that all of this just occurred naturally is ridiculous is insane there had to have been some deliberate action it's not just the fbi just discussed popadopoulos twenty nine year old tangentially connected to the campaign allegedly drunk and brags through something's coming i got some emails coming from the somewhere from wikileaks on hillary clinton and that is used as justification for launching an investigation into a political campaign to campaign for that just so happens to be the opposite party of the current administration at the time and nobody thought this is pretty bad this week this looks if this ever comes out and you can tell they did not expect this to come out you wouldn't take the word of a twenty nine year old drunk bragging to somebody much more accomplished than than that's that's how washington d that's that's all washington dc is is young people bragging to older people about themselves in the hopes of mostly getting a better job to use that as a reason to launch an investigation is insane especially when as kimberley strassel the wash or the wall street journal noted this is the fbi store we started we didn't use the dossier the steele dossier to launch the investigation or to get a warrant to spy on americans or is even worse we'll get to that after the news but we we did it because of george popadopoulos he basically confessed in a pub in london to an australian guy so you've got a tangentially connected campaign guy talking to an australian guy who then goes and tells australian intelligence who then goes and tells american intelligence you've got four degrees of kevin bacon right there that would be laughed out of court except they didn't bother going to court explain that coming up but it is it's fourth hand hearsay it is a load of garbage lack of not wanting to violate fcc regulations so that's what you have and we're supposed to believe that that.

bush fbi wikileaks hillary clinton kimberley strassel wall street journal george popadopoulos london kevin bacon washington steele fcc twenty nine year four degrees
"organ" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"organ" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"You think this is going to help a lot with sort of the logistical problems of shed julie trump on surgeries 'cause i know that's a big difficulty and cold change and all that kind of stuff yeah it's going to help enormously from kind of really tangible things such as you can keep live falungong and live that might have been rejected all that look a bit dodgy because they can kept on ice for a long time can be actually put onto the device in test at you can take an organ like liver that's been on ice and if no idea whether it works or not you can plug it into the matra and then you can find out how well its functioning and you can help it to recover but they're also really in tangible benefits to this and and you know there's a lot of stress on surgeons who don't really know whether these organs event function so if you're listening to this is this good news if you're waiting for a look at an organ trump enter liver trump out natasha yeah it's really great news i mean at the moment people who waiting for a liver transplant in countries that have these mattress when no whether they can enter gasser a warm donated liver or cold water and fat they'll probably get a called one because that is how most transplants of done at the moment but you know as these vices come on line you can imagine they're going to be more organs available just because the logistics of the whole thing and because we can recover many organs that we just can't use at the moment because we don't know what condition therein so good news or rent okay my thanks to the economists healthcare correspondent natasha load thank you.

julie trump natasha load
"organ" Discussed on Know Them From Adam

Know Them From Adam

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"organ" Discussed on Know Them From Adam

"Uh that's what he does get back to kill more in a moment because he was the other bill former bill that i wanted to ask you about him going through my own well let's practice for td right here but was your reaction when you sound that's the patriots signed chris organ offer sheet uh what real happy horse here's what happened this is this is how uninformed i was at that time um i'm thinking okay well we get a second round pick oh well it's disappointing but i'm like i did we always get a second round pick so that's pretty cool uh no the tender wasn't hide so did that's when i think uh i think i left the office uh yeah i was not happy let's just put it that way and then the fact that you got to go against the guide yeah uh that was you know but that's it and and that's what he does he'll he'll make it team worse and make his own team better and that's just brilliant you know that that's a guy that runs a whole host show you know he runs the entire program uh whether it's the draft handling the draft trades free agents whatever and obviously the guidelines football better than anybody out there and then that's why i think you take for granted just uh you know of running is alshobaki he made a mistake he east side kony ealy or whatever his name from carolina second third round pick wherever he gives up they didn't care just got some that was eight spots in the draft traded a second pick at the end of the round very easily in a third round picks they really traded eight spots in the draft he didn't lose it makes the daily and it didn't work and they moved on.

patriots chris organ carolina
"organ" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"organ" Discussed on EconTalk

"Well i commodification is one of them in his argues yeah arguably the doctors right who do the surgery of commodified their their service and the us the of procurement service which is uh they're caught a performed by opon organ procurement organizations and are paid by i i believe medicare medicaid uh or they're paid from the federal government imiko be through the united network for organ sharing but in any case fifty thousand dollars to take an oregon a trance transfer it you know from a deceased person of emergency room to an operating room in a similar also yeah there's a lot of money floating around but exploitation for example is worried you will hear and fat accents in the black market where these poor folks are offered a pittance now granted even in their worlds two thousand dollars is means a could meet a hell of a lot but they don't get that two thousand dollars it's rare that they get with their promise there's no contracts of course they can't uh gone they're not informed consent those people are exploited then you hear about coercion and that is a word in fat um allen wertheimer who's a what was a wonderful um philosopher i believe political for less for he is fortunately he passed away recently but he actually did a survey of bioethicists and and asked them but the definitions of words like coercion exploitation and actually most of them got a coercion wrong uh it can mean to means two things basically i kidnap you the most physical sense i've i've i've thought it imposed on my physical will you not gonna let you leave my house a kidnapped you whenever you strongarm someone in the most literal sense or you present a choice ed were either option leaves you were saw like your money your a liar if i have a if i am given the opportunity so my kidney that's not.

oregon two thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars