35 Burst results for "Oren"

"oren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:28 min | Last month

"oren" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Hey time for our friday bonus. And this week we've got a guided meditation from teepee stalwart and favourite. Orrin j. sofer in this practice or in is going to teach you how to use mindfulness of your breath. Your natural breath as it naturally occurs as a way to create relaxation for yourself anytime and in any place as a reminder all these meditations that we post here in the feet are available inside the ten percent happier app as well here we go now with oren. Hi there this is owen. Mindfulness of breathing has many benefits in this. Meditation will explore how to be naturally aware of your breathing in a way that helps relax the mind and body. This can be useful in and of itself and can also be the starting point for developing a range of qualities like concentration wisdom and compassion. So let's get started. Find a comfortable posture. One that feels stable balanced and upright. You can let your eyes close or just look down at the ground in front of you letting your gaze be soft and unfocused if you like you can take a few slow deep breaths breathing in deeply through your nose breathing out through your mouth in a thin stream of air long and slow as we begin. Set an intention to put down any thoughts of the past or future for right now. All you have to do is be here and relax. The rest can wait. Feel your feet on the floor and the contact with the chair or cushion beneath you. Notice what it feels like there. Is it hard or soft. Can you sense pressure weight or heaviness in your own time begin to notice the rhythm of your breathing. What lets you know that your breathing. Where do you feel it as you pre. Then you might notice sensations of swelling lifting or expanding as you breathe out. You may feel a sense of something. Loosening releasing are letting go let your awareness begin to synchronize with your breathing paying a little more attention to that. Feeling of settling and relaxation on the out breath. Explore this on your own for a bit tuning into the ribs. Mix and stations of breathing. How we pay attention to. The breath is very important if we relate to it with a sense of pressure intensity or force. The breath carries those qualities into the body which begins to feel tight if we approach the breath with a sense of spaciousness with a light and easy attention. It carries those qualities into the body which begins to feel light open or spacious breathing in receiving in nurse reading out relaxing. Letting go as the meditation comes to a close. You can bring your attention back to those simple steady sensations of contact your feet on the floor your bottom on the chair or cushion. You can allow your eyes to open. If they've been closed nice work. Thanks for your practice..

this week friday Orrin j. sofer ten percent happier oren
Conte quits as Italy's PM in tactical bid to build new majority

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Conte quits as Italy's PM in tactical bid to build new majority

"Collapse. Italy's prime minister has resigned after a Cabinet meeting. The Italian prime minister Giuseppe Quanta, handed in his resignation to the head of state said Drama Tallulah contest decision came after he lost his absolute majority in the Senate when a junior partner, the Italian Viva party, headed by former Prime Minister Matteo Oren. Si quit complaining about the government's handling of the Corona virus crisis and economic recession in Italy. Sabina Castle Franco CBS

Giuseppe Quanta Drama Tallulah Italian Viva Party Italy Cabinet Prime Minister Matteo Oren Senate Government Sabina Castle Franco CBS
Juror says homicide charges were not presented in Breonna Taylor case

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:49 sec | 7 months ago

Juror says homicide charges were not presented in Breonna Taylor case

"Case says that panel never had a chance to consider homicide charges against the officers involved that after the judge said jurors could speak publicly about the case judge allowing the jurors to speak in part because the attorney general has made public statements about the proceedings. While there are six possible homicide charges under Kentucky law These These charges charges or or not not Apple Apple to to the the facts facts before before us us because because our our investigation investigation show show The The grand grand jury jury agreed agreed that that Mattingly Mattingly and and Cosgrove Cosgrove were justified in the return of deadly fire. But a juror now seemingly refuting the attorney general writing the grand jury didn't agree this Oren actions were justified, nor did it decide the indictment should be the only charges in the Briana Taylor case. Aurora

Mattingly Mattingly Cosgrove Cosgrove Apple Attorney Briana Taylor Oren Kentucky Aurora
"oren" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

05:38 min | 7 months ago

"oren" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Too distant future absolute at the Ellen Institute we've recently. . Written. . A paper that's going to appear in communications of the ACM on something we call green ai and the idea of it is both a to think about the the carbon footprint try to the can we build these more efficient systems but there's another threat here that I want to highlight, , which is <hes> making sure that the research that we're doing is sufficiently inclusive. . So so back in the day used to be that you or I or a talented undergraduate. . In India or some other country with a laptop, , could do something really cool and write a paper about it and get noticed if we reach the point where you have to have so much infrastructure and so much compute to do an experiment that leads the published paper. . That's a real problem. . For the field, , right we don't get to harness all the brilliant ideas creativity of of a broader population, , and so we suggested some some pragmatic ideas of how to fix that not by. . Forbidding or cutting off. . This very exciting high end research but by saying okay, , let's also look at efficiency at <hes> results of okay. . How can weeks run these types of models on a much more limited device but I I'm I'm so glad to hear that you all have written that paper pushing on that because I do think it's one of the. . Fundamental issues that we've got at this particular moment in time with Ai, , research <hes> these models <hes> are. . There not only extremely expensive to train <hes> they are extremely expensive to serve. . You got this cost thing that makes it difficult to make them widely available I mean like we could. . I'll give you an example. I . won't talk about GP three but I'll talk about this model that we build culturing and LG, , which is a seventeen billion parameter transformer model and like the team only seventy seventy. . Like it was extremely I mean we train this on a very large very sophisticated cluster. . GP. . Use It consumed a lot of resources and I like we wrote a bunch of very specialized software to manage the distributed training task <hes> and the model is very, , very powerful. . and. . So one of the things that we're struggling with right now is I would love to get that model into the hands of as many people as humanly possible and. . Like one impediment to get into the hands of as many people as possible is cost <hes> and like I think to your point, , we can bring the cost down. . By making a whole bunch of these investments like the infrastructure could be better you can distill the model. . There's all sorts of like really interesting things you can do to. . Preserve the models power and make it much cheaper to serve. . But the other interesting thing with these models is it's general language model. . It will enable people to put it in use cases that we would find objectionable and like by we I. . Don't mean Microsoft. . I mean we society and so you know it's it's. . And I don't know how you train the model to allow it to do all of the powerful things that it can do, , <hes>, , and exclude the you know the objectionable things that we're not going to want it to do and so that that is another thing that makes access a little bit tricky. . So like do you get that into the hands of responsible people so that they can discover all of the good uses that the tech. . Companies that have the resources to build these models will never be able to imagine on their own <hes> without you know an opening Pandora's box and creating more misery in the world very important questions of the good news. . I do think they were making progress there. . So some of it is you know the old adage, , a garbage in garbage out. . So you have to be careful what you feed this model is kind of like an innocent child. . Rule read anything. . So you have to be careful what you what you feed it <hes> that's typically not not enough because these things consume right you know billions and billions of sentences and documents. . I'm a great believer in <hes> auditing techniques. . So we also. . Need to make moss like this <hes> externally auditable. So . others <hes> bodies can help discover if there's problems in their if it can be tunes <hes> in negative direction. So . I do think that you and Microsoft are very smart to carefully about these issues, , but I do think that. . Help is on the way. . Well and and That I, , think one of the foundational things <hes> I would like to be able to figure out sooner rather than later is just the way to allow the help to happen in an efficient and transparent and open man are <hes> because at least that much <hes> these to be happening it would be very ironic to have a situation where the very, , very necessary. . Public Open work that needs to happen responsibility and safety and ethics, , and all of these other things can't happen because the people who are doing that work outside

chief technology officer Kevin Scott Microsoft
Oren Etzioni, PhD: CEO of Allen Institute for AI

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

05:38 min | 7 months ago

Oren Etzioni, PhD: CEO of Allen Institute for AI

"Too distant future absolute at the Ellen Institute we've recently. Written. A paper that's going to appear in communications of the ACM on something we call green ai and the idea of it is both a to think about the the carbon footprint try to the can we build these more efficient systems but there's another threat here that I want to highlight, which is making sure that the research that we're doing is sufficiently inclusive. So so back in the day used to be that you or I or a talented undergraduate. In India or some other country with a laptop, could do something really cool and write a paper about it and get noticed if we reach the point where you have to have so much infrastructure and so much compute to do an experiment that leads the published paper. That's a real problem. For the field, right we don't get to harness all the brilliant ideas creativity of of a broader population, and so we suggested some some pragmatic ideas of how to fix that not by. Forbidding or cutting off. This very exciting high end research but by saying okay, let's also look at efficiency at results of okay. How can weeks run these types of models on a much more limited device but I I'm I'm so glad to hear that you all have written that paper pushing on that because I do think it's one of the. Fundamental issues that we've got at this particular moment in time with Ai, research these models are. There not only extremely expensive to train they are extremely expensive to serve. You got this cost thing that makes it difficult to make them widely available I mean like we could. I'll give you an example. I won't talk about GP three but I'll talk about this model that we build culturing and LG, which is a seventeen billion parameter transformer model and like the team only seventy seventy. Like it was extremely I mean we train this on a very large very sophisticated cluster. GP. Use It consumed a lot of resources and I like we wrote a bunch of very specialized software to manage the distributed training task and the model is very, very powerful. and. So one of the things that we're struggling with right now is I would love to get that model into the hands of as many people as humanly possible and. Like one impediment to get into the hands of as many people as possible is cost and like I think to your point, we can bring the cost down. By making a whole bunch of these investments like the infrastructure could be better you can distill the model. There's all sorts of like really interesting things you can do to. Preserve the models power and make it much cheaper to serve. But the other interesting thing with these models is it's general language model. It will enable people to put it in use cases that we would find objectionable and like by we I. Don't mean Microsoft. I mean we society and so you know it's it's. And I don't know how you train the model to allow it to do all of the powerful things that it can do, and exclude the you know the objectionable things that we're not going to want it to do and so that that is another thing that makes access a little bit tricky. So like do you get that into the hands of responsible people so that they can discover all of the good uses that the tech. Companies that have the resources to build these models will never be able to imagine on their own without you know an opening Pandora's box and creating more misery in the world very important questions of the good news. I do think they were making progress there. So some of it is you know the old adage, a garbage in garbage out. So you have to be careful what you feed this model is kind of like an innocent child. Rule read anything. So you have to be careful what you what you feed it that's typically not not enough because these things consume right you know billions and billions of sentences and documents. I'm a great believer in auditing techniques. So we also. Need to make moss like this externally auditable. So others bodies can help discover if there's problems in their if it can be tunes in negative direction. So I do think that you and Microsoft are very smart to carefully about these issues, but I do think that. Help is on the way. Well and and That I, think one of the foundational things I would like to be able to figure out sooner rather than later is just the way to allow the help to happen in an efficient and transparent and open man are because at least that much these to be happening it would be very ironic to have a situation where the very, very necessary. Public Open work that needs to happen responsibility and safety and ethics, and all of these other things can't happen because the people who are doing that work outside

AI Microsoft ACM Ellen Institute India LG
"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

03:27 min | 9 months ago

"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"So, Jimmy written <Speech_Male> this piece for <Speech_Male> The New York Times, <Speech_Male> magazine <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> work the <Speech_Male> future of work. <Speech_Male> What did you <Speech_Male> learn from that? That <Speech_Male> surprised you <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> traveled to <Speech_Male> a place <Speech_Male> in. <Speech_Male> Eastern Mississippi <Speech_Male> called the Golden <Speech_Male> Triangle. <Speech_Male> It's one of <Speech_Male> the regions we discussed <Speech_Male> with James Palo's <Speech_Male> on our <Speech_Male> podcast with him about <Speech_Male> the book that he wrote <Speech_Male> with his wife Deborah <Speech_Male> <hes> about the <Speech_Male> revival <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Male> of small <Speech_Male> towns and <Speech_Male> cities <Speech_Male> across America <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the key thing <Speech_Male> that really struck <Speech_Male> me was <Speech_Male> these people <Speech_Male> are really <Speech_Male> proud of their jobs. This <Speech_Male> is an area that was on <Speech_Male> the way down <Speech_Male> meat packing plant <Speech_Male> close <Speech_Male> a textile factories <Speech_Male> closed. It was <Speech_Male> low income and low <Speech_Male> education to begin <Speech_Male> with, but <Speech_Male> they've got this thriving <Speech_Male> community college. <Speech_Male> Their kids <Speech_Male> in high school start <Speech_Male> getting their hands <Speech_Male> in different trades <Speech_Male> and try <Speech_Male> out different kinds of <Speech_Male> work and guess what <Speech_Male> while they're doing their internships <Speech_Male> that can you <Speech_Male> pay fifteen <SpeakerChange> dollars <Speech_Male> an hour <Speech_Male> <hes> so <Speech_Male> how old <Speech_Male> are these kids? Oh, I'm talking <Speech_Male> to you know as young as <Speech_Male> junior in high school, <Speech_Male> and then that <Speech_Male> through the <Speech_Male> two year community <Speech_Male> degrees called an associate's <Speech_Male> degree and that's <Speech_Male> your typical kind of <Speech_Male> community. College degree <Speech_Male> usually <Speech_Male> involves some kind of certification <Speech_Male> in a technical <Speech_Male> field it <Speech_Male> might be something in the <Speech_Male> medical? Field. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> what kind of jobs? Well. <Speech_Male> So this is an area <Speech_Male> where they manage <Speech_Male> your track. All <Speech_Male> these manufacturers <Speech_Male> got a pie <Speech_Male> tech modern steel <Speech_Male> mill, <Speech_Male> tire, factory, <Speech_Male> diesel, engine <Speech_Male> factory, and then this really <Speech_Male> high tech stuff <Speech_Male> a branch <Speech_Male> of Boeing that builds <Speech_Male> unmanned <Speech_Male> aerial vehicles <Speech_Male> and a <Speech_Male> branch of Airbus <Speech_Male> builds helicopters. <Speech_Male> So they're <Speech_Male> taking people who literally <Speech_Male> lost their job <Speech_Male> making <Speech_Male> hot dogs and teaching <Speech_Male> them to make <Speech_Male> carbon-fiber <Speech_Male> helicopter <Speech_Male> parts so. <Speech_Male> Having <Speech_Male> a job is <Speech_Male> more important than <Speech_Male> how much money you make <Speech_Male> more money helps people <Speech_Male> be happier <Speech_Male> but you can make another <Speech_Male> ten thousand dollars <Speech_Male> and it makes you <Speech_Male> a little bit happier <Speech_Male> but you can have the same <Speech_Male> income with <Speech_Male> job or without <Speech_Male> the person who has <Speech_Male> that income without a job <Speech_Male> their <Speech_Male> life is just a <Speech_Male> laundry list of <Speech_Male> pathologies. <Speech_Male> These are the people <Speech_Male> much more likely to get <Speech_Male> divorced commit suicide, <Speech_Male> develop <Speech_Male> an opioid <Speech_Male> addiction. <Speech_Male> If we're going to subsidize <Speech_Male> something. Let's subsidize <Speech_Male> helping <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> work and <Speech_Male> especially in good <Speech_Male> jobs that give them that <Speech_Male> chance to move up into <Speech_Male> higher up <Silence> skill levels. <Speech_Male> The cultural <Speech_Male> shift we <Speech_Male> were looking for <Speech_Male> is to emphasize <Speech_Male> the importance <Speech_Male> of work <Speech_Male> and not just <Speech_Male> certain <SpeakerChange> kinds <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> work. It's <Speech_Male> not just because <Speech_Male> having been workers good <Silence> for society, <Speech_Male> but our <Speech_Male> civilization also <Speech_Male> needs <Speech_Male> good people in <Speech_Male> these jobs. Think about <Speech_Male> your day. Did <Speech_Male> you drive a car? <Speech_Male> Did you drive on a highway? <Speech_Male> Did you go over <Speech_Male> bridge? Did you <Speech_Male> did you turn <Speech_Male> on the shower flush <Speech_Male> toilet an <Speech_Male> electric light? <Speech_Male> We need <Speech_Male> skilled workers <Speech_Male> doing <Speech_Male> keeping <Speech_Male> all those systems running. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The power <Speech_Male> grid and everything else our society would <Speech_Male> collapse without <Speech_Male> skill. <Speech_Male> People in those jobs <Speech_Male> and yet <Speech_Music_Male> we've

Jimmy Boeing Airbus Deborah Mississippi The New York Times James Palo America
"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

03:05 min | 9 months ago

"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"So so I think instead of asking who benefits we should be asking you know what we're trying to accomplish, which is more people coming into the workforce earning more money more jobs being available for them, and if we're able to do that their policies that will help us do that I, think that's worth celebrating where would the money come from? Well I would I would like to to use the money we already have in our safety net. You know we spend more than a trillion dollars a year transferring resources to low income households, and with the exception of that earned income tax credit that I mentioned virtually none of it pays any attention to work or rewards work. In fact, most of it penalizes work because support gets taken away if you start working. and. So I think saying most of our safety net is still going to be a true safety net of healthcare and food stamps and so forth for folks who can't support themselves. But if we took twenty percent of that so about two hundred, billion a year and said actually part of this is going to be about promoting work and helping support people who are working. We could fund it that way and and I think we'd have a much better safety net and approach to helping low income households than what we have today. You're also a big fan of getting kids to work sooner summer and weekend jobs. How would that work? Well. The thing about getting kids working, it turns out that actually being in the workforce learning how to have a job is in a sense, a skill in itself the so-called skills gap that that everyone likes to talk about. People assume it means like we need more people who can program robots. But but when you actually talk to employers who are lamenting the skills gap, what I've found is they're talking about people who? Can show up on time every day and understand that having a job means being there from nine to five and. A lot of times the folks that I've been talking about just now who otherwise might not have much exposure to the world of work, and if we end up also subsidizing some kids from high income households who otherwise wouldn't have taken a summer job but now they do frankly I'm okay with that too I think getting more socioeconomic diversity and and kids. From all backgrounds working again is is going to be good for our society in the long run. You say that our emphasis on trying to get everybody into college is well intentioned but it reflects wishful thinking and we should recognize it. It's just not gonNA work for most people, and instead we need to revive vocational education in our high schools and colleges. Well we can look at what the rest of the world does. For one thing I mean the the rest of the world thinks we're crazy frankly with our attempt to get everyone to go to college and there's a wonderful study that the OECD. The Organization of all the developed economies did a few years back their first big. Shows what share of the students in high school in each country are on a college track versus vocational track almost every country it's forty to seventy percent on vocational track..

OECD
"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

02:57 min | 9 months ago

"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"But let's start with your biggest. You say the federal government should subsidize low wage jobs. That's a that's a big concept. How would that work? Well technically, we do a little bit of today we have what's called the earned income tax credit. and low income households when they file their taxes and especially if they have kids. Can. Get back a really big credit upwards of five thousand dollars in some cases even if they haven't paid any taxes and that's intended to try to make that wage work, they've done more remunerative and to get more resources to them at the end of the day. But there are a lot of things wrong with doing it that way as a big lump sum check once a year, it really doesn't reach a lot of folks without kids and younger people starting out, and so I think what we need to do is essentially think of it as the opposite of a payroll tax I mean when you get your paycheck, it's got that Fico Line for the money that we took out and we need to put a line under that. That says work credit if you're earning a low wage less than. Fifteen dollars an hour especially, if you're down at eight or ten dollars an hour, we should get him out in and boost that up so that it's more attractive to take the job also actually becomes more attractive for the employer to create an offer that kind of job, and then also you do have you do have more to bring home to your family at the end of the day. Why not just tell employers you've got to pay your workers a better wage you gotta have fifteen dollars an hour minimum as the national minimum wage. This wage subsidy idea lines up nicely next to the minimum wage idea because what you see is they're talking about in a sense the same thing how do we make? Those paychecks higher for low wage workers. And then the question is who should put the money in. you know at the end of the day if you say all the minimum wage, fifteen dollars an hour, technically it's free to propose that it doesn't show up in the federal budget anywhere. But somebody still putting that extra money in the paycheck you might think it's the big corporation as they say, but a lot of times, it's a small business owner it's a Franchisee, and so I think first of all, that's just not the right source of the money. So it's an interesting economic question how much of the benefit goes to the worker versus the employer? And I think the important thing to recognize about some of the benefit going into the employer is that the reason the benefit goes to the employer is because you have more people coming into the workforce. Anything that you do that brings more or less skilled workers into the workforce is going to benefit the employers that employ less skilled workers. So to complain, well, we don't WANNA benefit a walmart or McDonald's I think is a little bit silly I mean any you pick your your preferred ideal policy that's going to get folks off the sidelines coming into the workforce and that's GonNa Benefit, Walmart or McDonalds to..

walmart federal government McDonald business owner
"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

02:45 min | 9 months ago

"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"The. Things that we take for granted in this country and that seemed to work are are actually built on pillars, things like stable healthy families, things like vibrant communities and you take those things for granted when everything's going fine. But they're not necessarily self replicating and what we've seen is that actually they're degrading really seriously and the existence instability of two parent families which are so critical outcomes for for children. has become a real problem and as those things go away they they become that much harder to recreate. Once they're gone. You don't just sort of ask them to come back and so I think it's really important to ask what makes the things we like about society sustainable. One thing that is very counterintuitive in your book is your critique of what you call the college for all pipeline. What's wrong with that pipeline? Well I think it's a great thing that we try to everybody that opportunity the problem is that right now we don't have anything else and most people don't succeed in completing college most Americans still don't earn even a community college degree and so while you can look at our education system and and it looks good at each moment, you know most people graduate from high school most high school graduates go to college most people who go to college finish college most people who Finish College get a job that requires a degree that all sounds great. But the reality is that most people actually fell out along the way there and yet our technology is changing very rapidly. Intelligence, for instance, likely to knock a lot of factory workers or at least unskilled workers in the food services industry and and other occupations out of work. So is one of the answers more widespread training opportunities as opposed to insisting that the goal is that everyone should go to college and get a degree. While I think that's exactly right. The alternative to college isn't just well nothing. The alternative has to be connecting young people to the workforce while they're still in highschool getting them some real skills, maybe subsidizing their job initially. So the employer wants to happen there and he's investing in them as well. And getting somebody to age twenty with some actual job experience industry credential some earnings in the bank That's a perfectly achievable thing to to focus on if if we actually want to..

"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

04:14 min | 9 months ago

"oren" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"Richard did you ever have to really change your mind about something? I mean? Really, admit that something you've believed longtime just isn't. So yeah, I've done it a bunch of times partially because I spent so much time living in Britain. So I've lived overseas and it's not just what I think about things. It's actually my identity change. So yeah, it's it's it's happened a bunch of times. So that's kind of what this podcast is about. I mean when we started it, the idea was the help us and help our listeners. Confront ideas that challenged some of our ingrained beliefs and that's something that I hope this episode will do. Work Versus College. In casts. And I think something we've seen happen in recent years. We've been encountering situations where free markets aren't necessarily delivering the outcomes we want especially in in the labor market for people as workers they're delivering growth maybe, but they're not giving us the labor market result we want..

Work Versus College Richard Britain
"oren" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:33 min | 9 months ago

"oren" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Dr Michael Oren joins me from Israel. Former Deputy Minister of Israel, Former Israeli Ambassador to the United States. Good morning, Dr Oren, How are you? I'm good. You could be with you. I have in front of me. A Wall Street Journal story. US prepares sanctions against Hezbollah's allies in Lebanon The American government hoping to shape the new Lebanese government, as it takes form after the disaster, What's your understanding of what's going on in in in Beirut right now and what the future of 11 on near term looks like to you? Well, People are waking up. Finally last week under show people weren't connecting the dots that Hezbollah had hid entire warehouses full of the same explosive material, ammonium nitrate in London and in Germany. And anybody thinks that his bullet didn't know about 3000 tons of this stuff in downtown Beirut, next to some of its major arsenals, is joking himself. So the Lebanese air finally waking up. And they are confronting his bowl. Especially interesting enough women in Lebanon are leading the charge against Hezbollah, and even Iran is beginning to take a feel maybe steps back Emily from his collection, Everybody realizes Hezbollah broke it and Hezbollah, you know, owns it own Lebanon. Israel has been saying the United States government for years now that the distinction between 11 on his Ebola was an artificial distinction. So nice to give military aid the Lebanese army, saying the Lebanese army was different than his bollocks. We said every rifle every bullet. Certainly every piece of intelligence information that went to the Lebanese army went directly to his fellow we had in Israeli officers shot by a sniper on northern border by a rifle given to by the United States. To the Lebanese army and then passed on Hezbollah. So I think that the future of Lebanon is very much hanging in the balance was always hung in the balance. But the question is now what Levitt on long term relationship. With Hezbollah and I'll say one more thing is going to surprise you. I wouldn't rule out the possibility that his bowler precipitate some type of military action against Israel this time. No, because because the crisis internally is so great that they have to divert attention from it. And what could we do to it? We've long said now we would not If you attack this movie career war in Lebanon, you know what we want to do. But they went back to the Stone Age authority in the stone age. He actually offered aid to 11 on and it's a shame. The news in Israel today that there are 100 kids who can't get, you know cancer treatment in Lebanese hostiles. The hostiles don't exist anymore. We could treat those kids. So what? We're willing to do that and raise your hands. It kind of ties our hands, So we have to respond to Hezbollah attack if they attack that That means not the replay of the summer war of a few years ago, but a full scale ground invasion. It was not. Benjamin Netanyahu presided over the last Lebanon war. This would be a different operation. Michael Oren, is that correct? Yeah, I was in that war is a reserve officer. And it was It was not pleasant to watch. No, be much different. And I thought even then this was back in 2006. I thought that we should have declared war against Lebanon. Now that's official Israeli policy. Hizbollah attacks us. We will declare war because again the distinction between his bond Lebanon is artificial distinction. But again as I caution just a few years ago would be. What are we supposed to do against Lebanon was to take out its power generators. They're out the bomb. It supported their field. They're out their bomb by themselves. So our hands could be tied. And so our forces remained on significant alert in the northern sector. I remember in World War two and the allies were marching towards Germany, though. Michael Oren. They had the swing north to get the V twos and you have to go wherever the Rockets are right. Because Hezbollah has rockets that make Hamas rockets look like firecrackers. They've got the big ones. They got the big ones, and we have to assume that they also have cruise missiles that could be directed by a Joyce to our essential utilities to our airports to our oil fields. They may have 100. They may have 200 apiece. We know their arsenals underground in Beirut that are upgrading standoff rockets to cruise missiles. Altogether. About 150,000 rockets and missiles you and they're buried under 200 Lebanese villages. Most of the southern part of country and Israeli army has been training how to go from village to village house. The house and I guarantee of those houses will be occupied. His fellow will not let The civilians run away because they want us. Kill their civilian. So what they can't do with Milly Taylor. They will do with that, legally, diplomatically branded his work Mike or in 10 seconds. What's the probability of this happening 10% 20 higher. That's intelligent people will tell you that we have to assume that it's that it's 98% of our force is ready, Doctor Michael Oren. Always good to talk to you again next week. Don't go anywhere Americans for your show. You're in the middle of a nonstop action packed information Blitz. Thie Hugh Hewitt Show is coming right back in life. It's easy to get away with good enough when it comes to stuff like trimming hedges folding towels, But with identity theft protection..

Hezbollah Lebanon Doctor Michael Oren Israel Lebanese army United States Beirut Rockets Wall Street Journal Germany Hugh Hewitt Benjamin Netanyahu Milly Taylor Levitt Ebola Mike officer London
Scientists, health officials not in agreement on whether coronavirus spreads by aerosols or droplets

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

Scientists, health officials not in agreement on whether coronavirus spreads by aerosols or droplets

"Researchers, They're learning learning Maura about one of the ways covert, Khun spread droplets or aerosols. That's the big debate going on among health experts tracking covert 19 Droplets that might come from a sneeze or cough or fairly heavy and fall quickly to the ground. But aerosols are much smaller and float. Daniel Oren with scripts research says transmission of the Corona virus Inara Souls could explain super spreader cases, especially indoors too far apart, Really, to be in range of these regular drunk was to come out of people's mouths. Nearly 300 experts called in the World Health Organization to look more closely at a results. That's

Daniel Oren World Health Organization Khun Maura
"oren" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

12:14 min | 1 year ago

"oren" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

"Right. another entertaining guests here on the rain dregs hockey. Podcast weren't coolest definitely fits into that category. And when when you think of the bigger picture of this right I mean so. You're starring in the Western Hockey League and clearly on the path to do what you did and become a an exceptional. Nhl Player but back in that day or coolest was a above average western hockey league talent. Offensively he was. He could not have pictured in his mind Beth that he was going to get into the movies. He was going to help develop a crushing entertaining TV series in two and a half men and also be the majority owner of an NHL team the Tampa Bay. Lightning talk about a life that he's lead and enjoyed. I'm sure every second of the thing that strikes me is like how little of it could have been planned. You know like the. He was playing hockey so he probably thought he was going to be a hockey player. When I was five years old I thought I was going to be an NHL player. Because I didn't know any different. I've just a little kid but then I didn't do anything. Different drags I played hockey my whole life. I retired and now we broadcast so he's playing hockey and then he's almost a commodities trader and then because he noticed as a bunch of beautiful women are going to Hollywood. He's like well. I'm going to go to Hollywood. And then he ends up in the movie business. There's probably all kinds of people that want to be in the movie business. The tried to develop a little program and or a movie a TV show something and the first movie they decide to produce on their own is saw like it's not like it was a died and then they had to go scramble for money they they hit with the first thing and then that leads him back to his first love which is hockey where he can purchase Tampa Bay. I mean like what a crazy time line to draw. There's a great saying Plans or something that made wildlife is happening and so he's making all these plans and then all of a sudden life took him fourteen directions. I I think it's amazing story. And he talked a little bit about it in the podcast. You know how close he came to getting back in buying. Who's blues and I mean he certainly didn't commit to wanting to jump back in the NHL ownership anytime soon. But I mean I wouldn't be surprised with you. I mean he's got a great relationship. It sounds like with the commissioner and doesn't sound like money's a problem so who knows He didn't say no now. It didn't jump right away and go. No I'm not interested anymore at passed in like he's young enough. He's what fifty nine years also more I think it kind of struck me drake's just even in the way that the right thing came along. He's not uninterested. Earn off and thanks coolest joining us on the podcast every week on the podcast. We ask ask you to send your questions. Via email or terrain briggs dot com or an instagram. You can find us ran dribs and will answer as many as we can here on the podcasts on a weekly basis. We call it. Ask Ray and Greg's anything question. Wandering comes from Jane's and James Says Assuming the NHL will be back in the summer. And I think we all assume that but maybe unfair to assume that. Do we think that it's going to be harder for goaltenders to get their game? Back or skaters and Jamie McLennan talked about this on the podcast. Few weeks back. He says I think goalies since they might take a while to get their heads back into that unique mental state and the instinctual. Part of the game are what they're going to have to get on top of and might struggle with you agree with James I think it's harder for a goal goalie to get his timing back on the bank place. That will happen One thing goal is always talk about. Is that the The it's one thing to face a shot and practice words of predictable shot from you know. It's a drill predictable. Shot from a predictable place and in the game. Of course. That's just that just doesn't happen I I think it would be harder for the To to Kinda square up their game aright from Nicholas for your rate during the off season. How long of a break normally take from eating each summer? And how long did it take you to get your scaling back to one hundred percent game shape Whenever you resume the point is from Nicholas. He's wondering out real difficult is going to be for guys who haven't been able to skate. Since this pause in an probably generation speaking this will be the first time that these players aside from injury haven't been able to skate for two or three months. So how long did it take you to get back into game shape up top of this going be To get back into game shape. I'd say week by week you would get better. I've start right after the August long weekend until that would give me about a month till camp. I probably could squeeze that up if we're under time restraints or something Like these guys will be I would say within within two to three weeks. They should be in pretty decent position to play. Ra question from ordinances Seattle and you may have some inside information on this so just go accordingly whether you can answer not arden. Says I can't name the NHL Seattle team until things are back to normal. What we think is the best name of what's been speculated the Kraken the totems the metropolitans the rainiers the emeralds Sakai's the whales the sea lions the eagles any others and an ardent as fingers crossed for the Sakai's any inside information on this given cameras connection. Decio it okay. If if Cami knows he hasn't told me and I will tell you. The Granados should work for the because there was a time. I'll get back to this answer. There was a time I'm sitting in a Cami and I were in a hotel somewhere. We're on a little vacation. Jon Butcher Gras sends me a taxed and he says hey I hear. Tony is going to coach. The University of Wisconsin Kelly's brother. Tony and I said my cinnamon back. I had no idea so I yelled tour. Cami was Kinda lounging and I'm with the kids and I go. Hey It's Tony to coach Wisconsin. He came up with this terrible line. I'm like are you kidding me? And she's like well. I wasn't supposed to say anything. And so in that. Talk Bucci text back and said I hear Bonnie's going to there are other and I said is Danni going to I go. What is wrong with you. People Cami new for a week and never told me anything so if she knows the name I got no idea my two preferences if I were to pick in order would be the totems and the cracking okay. Do you know what talking is. It's a sea monster thing. A mythical sea monster seemed it for you. I was surprised you knew that I think what you're saying there. Is you think I'm an idiot? A little no. No no no no. So here's the thing drinks. The told him as a historical main. There's a connection to You know to former professional hockey in Seattle I think there is a respectful connection to the the native American population up and down the West Coast first nations in Canada I think that could be done. I hope it can cause I think it would be fantastic the crack and all I can think of is they would have the best mask on. What was the movie and again? That's a cool movie. Based on a mythical creature a where Zeus screams all released crock and it was lutely of Nissan was use. It was it was an animated movie. Lousy now no not. An animated movie was another one released the crack. Kim Comes from the Lego movie. Okay but in this particular movie. What's what what what. What's the Angry lady with the snakes growing out of her head Medusa so that so this dude and his pals had to go into her layer cutter head off and that was the only way that you could kill. The cracking was by holding the head up and the cracking turn into stone and it wasn't an animated movie. We're both going to get absolutely hammered for this. Yes roasted what you described is never seen what I described. You've never seen well. At least we both know what the crack. So we're we're covered on that front. So what would you pick I'm okay with the totems I like that because embraces culture and the history of the area so I'm probably more in favor of that but I agree with you in the top two picks. I like the crack. And just because it's you know there's a mythical connection to it and you're right you could have some fun with it it. It reminds me a little bit of Vegas right when you go with you. Go to a game in Vegas. There's so much theater and ceremony happening before the game during the intermissions post game and all that there's probably an opportunity there that Seattle can learn from. Yeah I I agree. I I think there's a real easy market or marketing to crack out. Okay Ricky gets our final question and ask Ray and rigs anything A bit more serious a lot more serious if the color nineteen projections in the news. Turn out to be true in the United States seeing thousands of deaths a day and June July peak ricky says I don't know how any of the big four sports leagues can be getting back to playing at that time so he's talking June July and he appreciates that sports is Is a distraction. We all want that. But what's wrong with waiting another month or two until things are back to normal or closer to normal the finisher currencies in and start the two thousand and twenty one h l. and NBA seasons in January of necessary? So really what Ricky is talking about here is wiping out the remainder of nineteen twenty starting twenty twenty one in January. I don't know that I'm willing to go that far wiping out the season. I don't think that you have to but I know ray there's at least one team in the NHL. That would like the pause to drift into August so the players don't even think about coming back to training camp until you play whatever you can play in terms of the Stanley Cup postseason and then you start next year in December and that's workable and that takes some of the stress off the players. Their families The health authorities in the provinces and the states to get this thing back running the more. This goes on the more that were reading. And you know The numbers from the United States. Right now the the number of people dying per day and the number of people being in fact it is. It's hard to get your head around If this didn't.

NHL hockey Seattle Tampa Bay Tony Ray Western Hockey League Cami Ricky Hollywood United States Beth Jamie McLennan Vegas Nicholas NBA eagles Wisconsin commissioner Jon Butcher Gras
"oren" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

10:51 min | 1 year ago

"oren" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

"Wikipedia pig Always entertaining to me. I've got multiple cousins by the way around the National Hockey League. If you haven't heard it described you as an entrepreneur. A film producer pro sports executive amateur barbecuer average beer league hockey player. So which one of those best describes the life that you're living right now? Barbecuer okay good bye. What's your go to my go tos ribs. Actually if I'm in Toronto just reheat what is the market. Whatever that summer summerhill ribs and the world ribs ribs or beef steak well best known for the nine saw movies. Obviously or maybe not tuna. Half man was a pretty big series. globally. I would say so. Which do you prefer to about? And the follow-up is can you text Charlie Sheen today and expect a response from him within an hour or a week A couple of things I it used to really bother me because I've always somehow and I guess it's just way too many buses in the West but I always it bothered me when they would say Hollywood guy. When I was Volvo tap of because I always consider myself a hockey I would never I to me. Hollywood was amazing and it still is but it's it's I don't know it's great but it's it's it's I you know I'd Rather Watch hockey game than a movie and now I can get Charlie by ten minutes. We needed to. How did you? How did you end up in the movies truthfully girls during a show? It's the longest story in the quick stories. I lived in Chicago back in the seventies and Eighties Commodity Traders. The open markets for the guys yelled and screamed. I someone got me to Elsie Courts Girlfriend at the Times Dad got me. A job is run on the floor and I did it for years every summer. Work my way up and then the last strike got sent down to the coast. And I'm like I was really close to becoming a trainer. I thought this is insane and I laughed and went back to the floor and worked my way up by January. Got A seat on the exchange in started hanging out and doing what and started chasing girls realized half the time you meet a girl. She was cute. She was lived in. La Thought I'm going to give this shop okay. So you're a girl or euro. There was no girl it was just. So how do you go from there to a movie? Not just a movie. But a franchise we had done a bunch of a bunch but I think ten twelve movies before saw two and a half men going we TV series going and what had happened isn't in the movie business. The back end you get is awful and it's just it's it's there's so many layers and distribution fees and so we've made a movie called John Q. With Denzel did really well. We never saw dive salary so my partner to be when dates we gotta start owning stuff contents to be the key. Let's put her own money up little million dollar movies. Let's do one or two year and in ten years will have fifteen twenty movies and we'll sell that and it'll be our our our it and the first one turned out to be so. We got a script when a university project by these two college kids from Australia. We they designed it to do it for like forty thousand and they opened it up. We did it and here. I am okay so so these kids right. I'm like I have no concept that any of this so they come with a script right. And what do you know about a horror movie like? How do you no good and you know what this is in its waited? Make it as a horror film. We've felt we were making seven. Remember Brad Pitt movie. Yeah we thought we were making a thriller and we made it and we did exactly what we thought in Guy Knew Tim Palen. That lionsgate was so smart. Came to us and said thrillers. Good if you have. You know Morgan Freeman in Gwyneth. Paltrow Kevin Spacey and Brad Pitt. We have those actors and he said I think horrors influx. We're GONNA make this new four and Tim. Palen absolutely gets the credit for the filmmakers made a great film or all route of everything but Tim Palen decided to label this core when after the horror crowd and helped a ton. What's harder? What's harder project movie or a TV show? I think TV. I I mean ECZEMA is. It's it's a confined time. That's beginning a middle and end in the order. Tv It's it's you have to basically tell them a whole year of stories at this point even if you're David Kelly who I don't know if you guys now it's insects you Kelly from Chicago's Brother but David's doing a show. He is such a name that he could probably give them six or eight ideas and they believe in him but for most people it's it's hard to sell TV show and it's really hard to execute so once you start you've got to have faith that it can go from year to if they say we want to renew you can't be in a scramble to Holy Hell no the state you literally show them at. Aboard with an arc of like sixteen stories. Eighteen stories are going to have every year. And then what's going to happen? That character is GonNa die that characters. It's if you're good at it you're really GonNa guy like Dick Wolf. That has all the law and orders and now has the Chicago whatever they are. I mean he's incredible. David Kelly's jinx. It's it's a real real skill set. So if you're at the top you know as you own the show. How is that similar to owning hockey team? That you know your food or is someone like. I was really lucky enough to work I guess four. We're way was Chuck Laurie. Who is Big Bang? Two and a half men in he. He's so smart he did. He didn't delegate well and that's why he's but I mean it's just a complete cash cow for him. I mean there's money coming in every show and he you don't got David Kelly. He oversees every part he ever sees what. The girl looks like overseas. What somebody looks like an episode ten that he had mind in everything from there down? He's not like that. No Okay so how do you get into the Tampa Bay? Lightning Joey scullery. Joey came to be Doug. Maclean is looking for some money and it was a small amount of money. Him Guy from Florida who I'm not even going to name and they They have all the money raised. They need a little bit of money. And they're GONNA by the Tampa Bay lightning someone other about two months later. They were out. They were trying to sue me. Because I didn't put the money up to put the money out and then Gary got rid of them and I ended up with money in and kept going. Wow so I mean you enjoyed your time as an owner natural hakkinen correct. I mean there moment where it wasn't great but you enjoyed it overall. I absolutely loved. It might be listen. I'm not making economy but I mean if anyone looks at our world now everything falling always talk about the compared to await in Florida was probably the hardest hit states owning any fists field. Taco stands you car washes eight nine. Ten in Florida was a losing bet even no matter if we did a perfect job or we did a horrible job that really you know. I would do every once in a while. We'd have like twenty or thirty old season ticket holders. That didn't renew come in for a quick dinner. Quick Bite beautiful dinner and I got to talk for a few minutes and somebody might not like me. They might not like the nave talk but it was ninety five percents. Hey We managed twenty condos. We had a little business. All Twenty condos are gone and as soon as our business gets up. We can't wait to be season tickets again. And you can't fight that it's nothing to do with what place your teams that you sold the team in two thousand ten year your majority share. You didn't want US though did you. At that point on I I listen I loved it and I knew that we had a good. I mean this is Marty who is a great leader. Got Drafted what I feel anyways to hall of fame players and Stammer and Headman and I mean I think I saw Polish your headman that I think that the players again thought he was the best defense in the league standards. You know these these incredible and so I I. Brian was doing an incredible job of getting rid of all the mass in believing in a term in adding piece. So I didn't want to sell guys like Stan in headman and was like wait. Why you know in there was a lot of pieces there to start building. Would you ever want to get back? I don't know what the I've talked to Gary about a few times I might whole size from Chicago and I had the deal to buy Saint Louis years and years ago and then Gary came to us and said One hundred percent rightly so I have a local group. Which is Mr Stillman and Blake? He's very connected politically businesswise in Saint Louis and he had like twenty local guys. I'M GONNA make up the number wrong but it was absolute right thing. I think should go with them and walked us through his process and matinee completely agreed in Gary. One hundred percent right. They've done a great job down there and they have you know. WanNa cop and done a great job on top of winning the Cup when when you watch the game today. What do you focus on you? Focus on the played. You're you're more focused on the business side and how they put the teams together. What drives you just the skill. Just the skill right look at stuff and go holy Shit. I never would've tried not to raise your ray. You're eight million goals in. This is doing stuff that you wouldn't even think you never even tried it and practice like couple when you watch your son miles skate and do things you're like. We couldn't do what they do. And then you you go and look at like a top of the crosby or Ovechkin and what they can do so even the whole chain of players from our sons who have played against each other to the top of the work. It's like it's amazing to watch so you like that. I love it gets me. It's not the ovechkin because there's always generational player would catch me as an average and I don't WanNa say somebody's average but a good second line forward third-line forward that can do things you wouldn't dream up pulls the puck through his legs back or you know picking the all this picking the puck up. There's certain things I remember Mark Hampshire. When he was in Saskatoon. I've played against him and he pulled it through his legs. I'd never seen but he pulled through the.

David Kelly Chicago hockey Gary Tim Palen Florida Charlie Sheen National Hockey League Hollywood Tampa Bay Toronto Brad Pitt Volvo Australia Tim Joey scullery lionsgate ovechkin Dick Wolf producer
"oren" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"oren" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

"I do. Say as you say about you know not sitting right next to somebody you hear a lot of nonsense in the crowd denied. I'd like that. I don't know well two things come to mind here and I want to get some thoughts. Leandro silent who I add in drager cafe this week okay. Are they going to allow the Columbus blue jackets to fire off that Canon MTTI venue? That would be awful. No you have to the players labs. We jump right off the bench. No Remember in Chicago Stadium. The old stadium. They used to have that for. I guess they have the civil our but it was in that little building. It's my first game there. I think we lost nine to might've been eight two or something or other. The first time that Horn went off. I just about Joe. It sounded like a truck side of the building. I just jumped off the bench by the time. The thing went off the seventh time. You're down whatever but that that Canon. Oh yeah you got a fire it in their the Canon the siren and Carolina. I mean there's so many of those things that Lou Fun all right Leon. Dry seidel happened to be the first visitor to the home edition of the drager cafe. Ray Heat he talked about studying the play of of Pavel Datsyuk and watching as many games you can get his hands on through youtube and various means not much to like about Leon Rice Seidel but I gotTa tell you is. He's explaining this to me. It makes me appreciate unlikely. Andrea settled that much more because he's in all world type of talent. We can see that on a game in and game out basis yet man. He's just continues to work at his craft. And yes you pretty much have to to be a star. Today's NHL when Leon draft by the Prince Albert Raiders of the Western Hockey League The head coach and general manager was a guy by the name of Brunel camp. Cassie and Bruno's from Nelson Bbc I'm from trail BC. It's about thirty kilometer fifty kilometers apart. I played each Bruno. My you know my whole life. Basically no and we played together in Portland in the Western Hockey League The only reason that's relevant is that when the first year I was doing the world juniors that Leon was going to be in I called Bruno and I said Hey we got this. This German kid is dry seidel. He's you know your star telling me about him and he he painted a picture drake's of an incredibly hard working kid that came from Germany site seen into Prince Albert had to learn English on a conversational level. You know he knew words and stuff be the learning he. When these the have a practice after practice they called it and it was basically skill sessions. Ronald talked about how Leon would just drive himself to be the very best. Not just to be the best guy on the team. He wanted to be the very best. Now when you brought up Pavel Datsyuk when when I retired and became a broadcaster my favorite player to watch by Far Barn on was fouled that suit and I always have to check myself when he was playing that. I wasn't the the head of the Powell that suit fan club while I was broadcasting. Mac and I love the way the guy played love everything about them. When you bring up that suit As a as an A goal of dry sidled to learn and watch from I can see dry seidel and some of the things that that sue pit now. That's never went fast. Grind. You didn't run all over the place because it's wasted effort and dry. Seidel doesn't ever race himself all over the ice what I see in the similarities. How would come up behind a player from behind any patient till he could lift it? Stick and Steal. Make a picture. You can see dry seidel doing that. Yeah we'll do that all the time in Edmonton I see DRI- seidel stay out of the play and then jump into the plane. That's what that's who used to do like it's a. It's a tremendous image to make from one player to the other now. They're not the same of course but I can see why dry cycles game would make him want to watch that soup and credit to Leon Rice. I mean every player in the NHL wants to get better willing most of them willing to work at it to get better but in the interview that the defensive side is something that he knows that he needs to work on and is is very focused on improving. He's a likable guy. He's A. He's an interesting character occupied with lots of funds so as nice to catch up Leandra remember when he came over to the world championships and we were it was like the king was coming back front page of the paper. They had a walking down. The street and mad building was jumping for his return. Well I mean he's such a fixture now of of what's coming out of German hockey. We talked a little bit about Tim. Stuttle who You know he could be a top three pick side was drafted third overall by the Edmonton oilers. Of course so he doesn't know a whole lot about Tim's slowly admitted he hasn't met him yet but man is he excited to see how this young man. I where he gets drafted then then to watch his career take off so we're GONNA forward here rate By the way if you're interested in.

Leon Rice Seidel Leon Pavel Datsyuk Bruno drager cafe Canon Tim seidel Prince Albert Raiders Leon Rice NHL Western Hockey League Edmonton oilers Prince Albert Chicago Stadium Andrea Leandro old stadium Edmonton Leandra
"oren" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"oren" Discussed on The Editors

"Although I guess the role would be very upset if someone lived next to him in the point across the lake. I suppose So it's certainly the case that material living standards are important. I think the problem is that if we were kind of you know any of us thinking about our own lives And this goes for people at all points in the income distribution. Think about kind of the things that are most important to their ultimate wellbeing and ability to flourish or life satisfaction or You know the the health instability of their own family and the opportunity for their kids however however we wanted to define the full set of of things and people have their own definitions of the good life material living standard is a component of it. But it it's not an especially large one. It's it's not a large when compared to other non market things that we in a sense consume so if you think about kind of having a good family as something in a sense by experiencing the individuals consuming. That's that that if you were to try to put a dollar value on it is is going to take up an awful lot of the pie chart if you think about kind of being able to live particularly for people who are rooted in in in a place you know being able to live near extended family or in the community where where you're established in grew up and so forth. That's another huge chunk If if you think about kind of Particularly for for families with young kids Being able to Have a parent who staying home with the kids when they're young. That's something that that that has a tremendous amount of value. Both in itself and in kind of how the rest of life feels and so while at the margin yes having the flat screen. Tv is better than than not having the flat screen TV The number of there's no number of flat screen. Tv's you could install in your house to make up for for the loss of a lot of those other things and and then in addition to kind of the point in time Snapshot There's an incredibly important question of Of of sort of where you WANNA call it stability or confidence. You know if you if you ask Americans whether it's more important to them to have financial stability or move up the income ladder They will choose financial stability by more than ten to one and so our economic analyses don't measure or count for any of this now obviously in some cases they're not intention the exact same things that gives you access to more cheap goods also allow you more freedom and flexibility on those other dimensions but in some cases they are intention in some cases the exact same policies And whether this is in terms of trade policy or or Labor policy and and you know thinking about how much power we want workers to have in the labor market and in negotiating with management. There are things you can do that. Make it much cheaper to consumers to get stuff but that come at real costs to To stability and And in a sense tradition and community and I think we just have to be a lot more attuned to those and recognize that by contrast the market is not and that just whatever is best for market efficiency will look best if we if we measure well being in terms of market efficiency but life is in fact more complicated than that. So I can see people listening to this Making objection. Well this. This is all well and good. But your prior to the onset of the Krahn virus crisis we had stork lay low levels of unemployment under an administration that yes has pursued some protectionist measures but the steel tariffs. Don't seem to relieve come to anything for making it Inputs more expensive for manufacturer's not clear what we got out of pulling out of T. P. Another major protectionist initiative of this administration. Otherwise you got a ton of deregulation and he got a ten ton of tax cuts and you got a a bunch of job creation with wages growing at the the lower end. What's not to like of the this kind of aversion not pure but a version of republic. Well I think things tend to look very good at the very of a business cycle regardless of the of the administration. You're in or the or the agenda. You're pursuing I mean. One could have said the exact same thing about the late. Nineteen Ninety S at at the end of of the Clinton administration. The problems I think are twofold one is while obviously the specific corona virus pandemic is not foreseeable while obviously that was going to happen. Crises of various sorts always happen bright. But before this we it was the great financial crisis Before that it was nine eleven and if if you actually look back over the period from two thousand two twenty twenty And we were excuse me sort of twenty years from the end of this year to twenty years ago and we can assume what the unemployment rate will be for the rest of this year. I believe the the unemployment rate will have been above five percent for for two thirds of the time so so advertising that at a particular moment. You know at the end of expansion. When you're running extraordinarily irresponsible expansionary policy. Both fiscally and monetarily at the top of a business cycle Yeah things look good but I think if you zoom out and ask on on balance over the last period of ten twenty thirty years take your pick Are Are we kind of delivering the stability and prosperity and upward trajectory. That we want for this country I don't think the answer is yes. I don't think you can try to answer the question. Yes on the basis of one year of data The and then just the second point is that we. We have to look at the kind of secular trajectory as opposed to the Cyclical one by which I mean. Yes every boom looks good but over the past thirty years or so each boom has looked less good than the previous one and each bust has looked worse and almost certainly and again you can say this is unfair because this is unique but but that seems to be the answer every time Almost certainly the the bottom of of this pandemic bust is going to be much worse still and so if if you kind of step back the trend you see is what I describe as bumps on a downward slope that we are. We are sledding downhill. And every time we hit an economic boom wheat. Pa- jump and yell we and then we land even lower and going off the jump and yelling. We is enough to release the political pressure But if you step back and look at where our general approach to policy is taking us it is it is not the direction we Wanna go all right. Well this this has been fascinating a lot to chew on and really appreciate you taking the time with me today and good luck with American compass. Oh thank you so much. It was great talking with you and hoping against some time. That's it for us. You've been listening to a national. You podcasts rebroadcast. Re transmission or cow. This game without the express written permission of National Review magazine is strictly pro. Hibbert at this podcast has been produced by the incomparable Sarah Shitty. Who makes a sound better than we deserve? Thanks again to Orange. Thanks especially to all of you for listening we are the editors and we'll see you next..

Clinton administration National Review Orange Hibbert Sarah Shitty Pa
"oren" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

14:34 min | 1 year ago

"oren" Discussed on The Editors

"Banks and National Bank a paper money terrorist to foster industry the Common thread through all of it was that they wanted to create a national market and market. Dynamism they just believe that you needed an element of state support for for certain important things that were going to happen without it. But Lincoln's that the first town he went to when he was a a a young man left families new Salem Bill Annoy which is a promising. A little little town that that people hoped would would grow much larger than it. Didn't it just sort of blinked out of existence and I can see Lincoln He didn't care about that really. He knew certain areas of the country wouldn't thrive certain areas of the country for instance that we're spending on subsistence agriculture needed to change and needed to put starkly to kind of be wiped away to create This this new America where were you had a dominant national market economy? So yes there. There's state support but the vision is one of a dynamism. I think that's right and and I I would fully support that vision of Dynamism I. I don't think that the answer to our problems. Who's to try to freeze everything in place or to to try to prevent markets from working the thread that. I see running through it and and that I would extend to today. Though is that that vision that they had was a was a positive vision. It was a description of what they believed a prosperous society would look like And the elements of that were not just with the largest possible GDP and we will redistribute to anybody who gets left behind. They they were trying to think about. How do we build a powerful prosperous country That has widely spread prosperity Both across people across regions that considers the strength of the national economy has a nation in relationship to other nations and therefore what the set of policies that we need to pursue to ensure that those things happen and today we may have a different vision. I think one real failure of American politics is it's just taken for granted that everybody's vision is the biggest flat screen. Tv possible it's kind of a chicken in every pot To the extreme. And but that's the only thing were trying to optimize and Certainly on the right of center that the way to do that is to just have as little policy as possible to to just get out of the way and obviously if if that is how they had thought in the nineteenth century They probably wouldn't have gotten very far. I mean I think most economic historians would say the policies they pursued. Were a success that the dishes a story of a vision and a set of policies successfully moving together to advance the common good strengthen the national economy and so I fully am am open to and expect a tremendous amount of debate. About what exactly is that vision today. And what is the set of public policies? That would best advance it and you know. A key premise. For American compass is that we don't have a specific policy agenda we we welcomed the participation of people who on on every point when it comes to specifics but that we actually need a a forum where these discussions believe in happen because what we have otherwise on the right of center and and this is described in the essay. Is We have people working on with people working with blinders. On we have a blinder over the left eye that says Don't don't think about how the market works. It's just people tradings. You don't need to do anything and a blinder over the right eye saying. Don't think about what we want to accomplish. It's either inherently invalid. Even ask that question or we can't figure it out anyway so let's just stick with material living standards and we sort of just plod along down this track saying People trading to maximize living standards. That's what we've got. And that's that is not the right way to think about our country's challenges or the role that public policy can play in in addressing them in in advancing things From a conservative perspective so just to stick with nineteenth century for second. So it'd be your contention that the the American system is advanced by claim Lincoln. That was a plan that was an economic plan and constituted a sort of planning yes defined broadly and and that is kind of the central argument that the Julius crying makes his essay is that we've sort of conflated what we mean by planning to be kind of God's plan Soviet style. How many screws should we send every factory And obviously that planning is is not a good idea It does not work. It leads to very bad social and political outcomes as well. And that's not what what Americans were doing in the in the Nineteenth Century. But if by planning we need it really more in the colloquial sense of having things you want to achieve and trying to think about how to get from here to there Particularly in a context where for all the good things that markets do getting from here to there is not going to be one of them Vignettes in in that sense. You absolutely need to plan. And it is in fact the core of of the role of a public leader to offer plans in that sense and now another phrase that sets conservative on teeth on planning and Plans in this context is industrial policy. Which you favor or at least a version of it. So how'd you find industrial policy? And what what is your version of it so in my mind an industrial policy come straight out of that sort of second conception of planning that. I was just describing. Which is that. It's a matter of thinking about the economy at the at the industry or sectoral level and asking are there industries or sectors or activities that we think are particularly valuable. They are valuable economically. They're valuable socially in ways that the market will not recognize or incentivize compensate. And if there are than just saying will the market will take care of it is is nonsense ICAL. The the markets are good at and carrying about which sectors or industries are thriving is not one of them so In that sense industrial policy would mean for instance at we were discussing earlier in the context of manufacturing. Saying you know actually being able to make things here And and having domestic supply chains is really important to the overall health of the economy in ways that an individual firm thinking about. Where should I locate? My factory will not take into account and by the way the the the market fundamentalists are inadvertently in the lead of acknowledging this because while they said we shouldn't care as all of the supply chains moved to Asia. Now when you ask well. Why CAN'T WE MAKE X. Here why can't we make y? Here they sort of shorted confidently and say well. Of course you can't make X. here all over the supply chains and expertise is in Asia. Why would you ever make it here and it just makes me want to kind of Slam my head on the desk? That's that's that's exactly why this was important in the first place and so if those things matter and you make political determination that it is something that should be important Whether to the economic welfare specifically or for other reasons Then you have to ask what are the public policies that are going to bring more of that about and I think the wrong way to think about answering that question which is the direction. Progressives tend to go which is to say. We don't like market outcome. We will just command a different one if we don't like that firms are building factories elsewhere. Let's just make a law saying they have to build their factories here and in my view just just as an empirical matter that that tends not to work especially well that it is kind of working against the green of of the market and market forces to try to just order them in different directions. What what I think is much more useful and conservative and aligns more with what we were describing in the context of the nineteenth century. is is to think about the conditions that market operates in that when we were talking about you. All of those transactions are freely entered into transactions occur against a backdrop of laws and institutions and publicly made investments and public spending. And if if if those things were different you would get a different set of transactions as well and so we should actually ask. Well why is it that people are preferring to manufacture elsewhere? People believe say cheaper Labor. But it's it's really not cheaper Labor when when you dig into it either. Theoretically or or from actually talking to business leaders it tends to be either kind of aggressive incentives that other countries are providing because they do have industrial policy It it could be kind of investments that they are making in their own skills of of their workers could be different regulatory environments And and so whatever it is. I think you have to say okay. What are the conditions that make the? Us Not where people choose to manufacture and under what different conditions would this be the place where they choose to manufacture and how does public policy play a role imagine that and therefore where should we be choosing different public policies than we do today. Yeah I wrote a column recently about why we don't make generic drugs in this country anymore and A big element of it was leased a manufacturer a lot of drugs in Puerto Rico because there is a an enormous corporate tax incentives to do it and Puerto Rico and was limited in nineteen ninety six on grounds that it was corporate welfare. I don't know whether I said anything about this at the time. I imagine on the raiders groups Screen National Review. We would have supported this repeal but then a lot of manufacturing just goes to China this enormous corporate welfare state So I I think that those point that These are pure conditions necessarily Abroad and Fleet Patton Sheer. You're choosing insert To have good manufactured overseas manufactured in China in particular and that's an important element of China issue although it it certainly broader than just China. Is We have this idea that free trade and free markets are synonymous. But if you're free. Trade is with a market that is unfree and his wildly distorted and is is managed by a authoritarian communist state than saying well. Let's just combine that market with ours does not enhance the freedom of your market it. It imports all of those distortions and and problems into your market and so there's actually a sense in which there are real trade-offs and conflict between free markets and free trade and especially to the extent that we want to be committed to less government intervention and more freedom within our own market. We need to think very critically about who else gets to participate Because if if you're going to have China there then you are going to have to ask. Well what policies are we going to have to counteract the policies that they have so now on the other side of the Ledger? How do you understand? The the nineteen seventies read a couple years ago excellent book that came out like any mark. Levinson called an extraordinary time which is basically a history of western from postwar period to today and the seventies just in this country and other countries have a welter of regulations. Subsidies protectionism Attempting to say favored industries and the overall picture was a debacle and one reason that Reagan has such a huge stamp on a conservative thinking on the economy. Is he undid a lot of this and it. It seemed at least according to received wisdom maybe disagree with it to be an enormous success. I think there are elements of what would that were an enormous success and I think in a sense. It goes to this point. There is no single agenda is right for all times if you are in an era of.

Nineteenth Century China Lincoln National Bank Salem Puerto Rico America Asia raiders Julius Levinson Reagan Screen National Review
Racial Slurs And Swastikas Fuel Civil Rights Pressure On Zoom

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Racial Slurs And Swastikas Fuel Civil Rights Pressure On Zoom

"In Zoom meetings racists slurs and hate speech. Keep showing up today. A civil rights group is meeting with the company to demand. Do something about that. Npr Tech correspondent Shannon. Bond has the reporting but first let me know. Zoom is an NPR sponsor Rashad Robinson I encountered the term zoom bombing on social media. We started seeing people posting things and Particularly knee and others aren't at color of change in what they were. Experiencing Color of change is a nonprofit that advocates for racial equality and Robinson is its president. People were tagging him in reports of Zuma tax because so many of them involve racist slurs and harassment. Black Lemay having a church gathering and have people come in drawing You Know Genitalia and calling them. The Edward Robinson's group and others found evidence of organized campaigns out in the open on twitter and Instagram as well as message boards popular with the far right there people shared links and passwords to coordinate attacks on unsuspecting zoom users. This all comes as zoom is being increasingly used for online school Passover Seder town halls. Now Color of change says zoom must take more responsibility. You know we want them to release a specific plan to combat. Racial harassment on the platform among Robinson's list of demands. A chief diversity officer who would focus on how technology impacts bowl normal people also better security and he wants a formal apology to victims in a statement. Npr Zoom says it takes security extremely seriously and it looks forward to the discussion with color of change but other groups are renewing alarms to the anti-defamation League has traced to attacks to a known white nationalist both involved virtual events held by Jewish groups. As more and more people are spending time at home. So are the extremists who are looking to find ways to leverage the technology to harass people. Oren Segal runs the anti-defamation League's Center on extremism. He spoke during a presentation. The group gave Zoom bombing. These are moments where people are trying to find community trying to find opportunities to create normal discussion with colleagues with friends with family. And that's why this is particularly disturbing law enforcement is watching Michigan. Prosecutors worn hacking videoconferences is a crime and there could be jail time in recent weeks. Zoom has taken steps to make it harder for intruders to get into meetings the company blocks Ip addresses of attackers when people report harassment. But critics say it should be more proactive given these are problems that plague so many tech platforms zoom CEO Eric. Yuen appeared on. All things considered where he was asked whether he should have anticipated such attacks by harassers. I never thought about this seriously. That answer reflects how you en envision zoom in the first place it was designed for business meetings but now it's having to grapple with what happens when society at large logs on even more troubling this new form. Virtual harassment doesn't end with zoom meetings themselves. Joan Donovan Studies Online extremism at the Harvard Kennedy School's Shorenstein Center. A lot of these folks are taking video or taking screen shots and then sharing them in other places. So we're seeing the artifacts of Zimbabwe. Show up on Youtube and on takeoff and another video sharing platforms and that happens. It's hard for zoom or any single company to end the vicious

Rashad Robinson Harassment NPR Oren Segal Anti-Defamation League Passover Seder Town Zimbabwe Bond Black Lemay Youtube Yuen Harvard Kennedy School President Trump Shannon Joan Donovan Twitter Shorenstein Center Officer
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 1 year ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
4 Low-Cost Ways to Gather Customer Feedback

The $100 MBA Show

08:32 min | 1 year ago

4 Low-Cost Ways to Gather Customer Feedback

"Customer feedback is so important to gather a lot of we think we could just build an isolation. That's only going to get you. So far. At some point your business going to plateau and you're going to need to know how to move forward how can I improve and of course how can I stopped doing the things that is causing my customers. Leave me or not by for me again. So here are four. Low cost ways together customer feedback. The first one is a pre pre- customer survey now. This is a survey. You're going to send to people that are not your customer yet. They're on your email list. They're shopping around. They still haven't made the commitment commitment to become a customer wise a survey so important. Well you WANNA learn a little bit more about your buyer your customer. What they're looking for so you know how to market to them Minoa to offer so you can close the deal? This will help you improve your product or service your whole experience for your customer now. These are not super super easy to get because they're not happy customers yet so I encourage you to incentivize your potential customers and this could be something as simple as a coupon code or or free shipping or something that they can get in exchange for their time. It could be as simple email saying hey. Can you give us feedback. It'll take five minutes in exchange. Take ten dollars off your next order. Well how do you go. This is pretty simple. All you gotta do is create a Google form Google forms of absolutely free. All you need is a Jamila count and allows you to create all kinds of surveys all kinds of forms. The later review export to a spreadsheet. It's brilliant and you can literally just send an email out from your newsletter asking. Your potential customers have felt the survey learning more about how they shop. What are the important features? We're looking for you can ask them to Peru ties things. Like what their preferences in terms of colors or sizes or features or you know special options Mike Vice though is to keep the survey short ten to twenty questions Max keep them shorter if there are open ended questions because that takes a bit more time time to fill out an eulogise sent out the link to the Google form via your email newsletter nice and easy and absolutely free. The next way to gather author customer feedback that I feel is super important is a cancellation feedback. Some people call a cancellation feedback or exit feedback and this happens during a customer leaving or canceling your subscription or product or something like that or asking for a refund. preferrably you do this before or you process the refund or cancel their account. You want to get some information while you have their attention while fresh in their brain why they canceling learn a little a bit more about. What's the main reason this can be easily done with a woo? Form Wafa forms are absolutely brilliant. There's a free plan and paid plans that let's start fifteen dollars a month and you can embed these forms right on your APP or on your website and it could be just the step before they cancel so I I felt the form. They submit the form they do. You can have them go to that cancellation page where they cancel. This is really important and we believe whether it's the number one thing that helps it's US improve our product. We learned very quickly from our customers. That are leaving us. Why they're leaving us? What's going on what they love with the product that they don't? I love the product and that basically built out our roadmap for years. We know exactly what to build because you know the top reason why people are leaving is because of this reason reason the next reasons this reason and this is what we're going to build in that order this is how we're gonNA prove our product the whole experience all that stuff getting them to provide feedback when they're canceling. Housing is a pivotal time. It's fresh in their mind and they're gonNA give you the feedback because they are incentivized. They want to cancel their count or get a refund. So it's kind of like a little hoop. They have go through to make it happen. It may be a little bit inconvenient for them. But it's worth it for you to get the information that you can improve at the you know a small price to pay for you improve and you can see that in the form. Hey we want to improve the product. We want to learn more about why you're canceling or while you're asking for a refund. Can you please fill this out before we move on with the cancellation illness. Spectrum of inconveniences. It's pretty low. Many companies require you to call in and get permission from a manager and send a you a particular email or fill out a form. It's really hard to kind of cancel for example. Try cancelling your cell phone plan right so a simple survey you know and I would would keep the superstore three or four Questions gather feedback. Next is a survey you can send out to your current customers customers that are not cancelled. Old they're not leaving you. They're buying your products their members or whatever it is and they're paying you money they're happy right content and I encourage you sending a a annual survey to your customers. This is a great snapshot to learn more about what your customers love about your product where you can improve hiking. Prove who've their experience again it's different perspective from a different cohort different group of people. This is a little bit of a longer in-depth survey something like twenty to thirty questions. It's GonNa take them a bit of time. Maybe fifteen to twenty minutes the complete again. I encouraged incentivize them. Say Hey this information super vital for us it helps us grow helps improve the soffer four. You our customers. Give him an Amazon Gift Card. Jim starbucks card whatever but the information is important Oren. You don't have to incentivize them. Many people will guess responses if they have a great culture and their business in there have raving fans are going to get people responding to the survey but if you want massive results you want like the majority of the people to answer the survey incentives work. This is just something that we've tried and really you know the the proof is right there when we incentivize it's exponentially a big response to the survey and make it clear. This is just a gift to you to thank you for taking the time But please answer the survey as honestly as possible to your current custom says a third way to gather feedback. Low cost again. You can use Google form. It's an annual in-depth survey survey to your customers number four one on one calls with your customers. These are priceless. And I covered this in-depth in a previous episode on one hundred on. Hbo Oh and you don't need to do to many. You can do about a dozen every six months as a minimum and this is basically sending out an email to your customers maybe your best best customers or your most active customers. I would say people that frequent your business and say here's my calendar link you can use county. It's a free plan and you can use a cutie schedule and the free trial years. My candle link schedule time on my calendar and get on a call me phone call video call. I like video calls select expressions on their face body language. And it's basically a fifteen minute call to learn more about them as a customer who they are what they do for a living why they chose your product how they use your product. How do you describe your product to other people? What would they do if the product wasn't available anymore? What their interfere features? What is one thing? They wish they had. These calls are great. Because you honest answers you'll learn more by customers. You know who to target customers liked them. You can find out there. You have a real customer Avatar. You're speaking to real people. And it's the best market research you could do understanding your actual avatar understanding actual customer but you also learn about their relationship with your business with your product. What they love about what they wish was better? How the actually describe riber product? You might be surprised how they perceive your product much differently than you. Perceive it as and you've been describing on your sales pitch completely wrong you've got to use the same language anguish as our customers because you're trying to track more like them right people that are happy and are paying you. We'd like to record these calls and we tell you know the the customer on the call. We were recording. Bring it so that we can review it later. We transcribe it. We saved these videos so we know the language that they're using again. We use it in all our sales copier. Emails are website site. A marketing materials are adds. Customer calls are great and again low low cost. It's an email us a counter crap. That's free you can run a free video meeting using Google meat so it's not going to cost anything so simple. It's just the time you need to invest

Google United States Minoa Jamila Wafa Peru Mike Vice Jim Starbucks Amazon Oren
U.S. to send 3,000 troops to Middle East after Soleimani killing

Laura Ingraham

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. to send 3,000 troops to Middle East after Soleimani killing

"More American troops are heading out after U. S. drone strike killed Iran's top military commander correspondent Ryan Braun several thousand US soldiers will be deployed to the Middle East were being told by defense officials this is a step that will help bolster the US military's presence in the region Israel is on high alert correspondent Oren Liebermann Iran may not respond against the U. S. instead it may respond against it the U. S. strongest ally in the region which would be Israel and could use its strongest proxy in the region Hezbollah who is based right next to us in Lebanon to carry out that response or it could be running proxies and serial or even a running influence with Islamic Jihad in

Iran Ryan Braun Middle East Israel Oren Liebermann Iran Lebanon Commander United States Hezbollah
Likud announces final results, giving Netanyahu landslide victory in primary battle

Mark Levin

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Likud announces final results, giving Netanyahu landslide victory in primary battle

"Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu is declaring victory tonight in his primary election battle for leadership of the Likud party correspondent Oren Liebermann is says the victory will cement yeah on Yahoo as the front runner going into Israel's third election in less than a year prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu is cleaning what he's calling a huge victory in this race as we wait for official results huge victory what might that look like something like an eighty twenty a seventy thirty an indication that he's not only charge was only could party but he remains the leader of Israel's

Benjamin Netanyahu Oren Liebermann Yahoo Israel Prime Minister Likud Party Official
US says Israeli settlements no longer considered illegal in dramatic shift

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

US says Israeli settlements no longer considered illegal in dramatic shift

"A major change in policy the trump administration says it no longer considers Israeli settlements in the west bank to be a violation of international law that reverses four decades of American policy it also could undermine Palestinian efforts to gain stated correspondent Oren Liebermann is in Israel it was immediately hailed by prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu would fact just visited settlements in the west bank a short time ago and that Israel has been working on this for years and it was slammed by Palestinian leaders who say that no matter what the administration decides US administration that is the settlements are still a violation of international law and that the U. S. is replacing international law with the law of the jungle secretary of state Mike Pompeii made the announcement yesterday the trump administration does feel that any decision about settlements should be resolved by Israeli

Oren Liebermann Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu United States Mike Pompeii Four Decades
Tear Down This Wall: Life behind the Iron Curtain

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Tear Down This Wall: Life behind the Iron Curtain

"The fall of the Berlin Wall in November nine thousand nine hundred nine was reported almost universally as a good news story. This was fair enough. If the the ending of the imprisonment of half of Europe wasn't good news it's hard to imagine won't ease however for Eastern Europeans it marked the end of life As they knew it and all of the world as they understood it. This was doubtless a relief in many respects the iron curtain had after all been built to stop eastern Europeans from fleeing the system of dismal incompetent and oppressive police states which had been imposed upon them in this episode of the Foreign Oren disc series looking at Eastern Europe. Thirty years on we recall life behind the Iron Curtain. The personality cults of the leaders the snooping of the secret police and the rebellious subculture which deafened the neighbors and baffled. The style see this is the foreign desk. Schoolteacher would say did the the news reader have a red jacket on or blue decorate on last night in our house and that was the way of checking whether the parents in that household had been watching Western television which was illegally. Everybody was being turned by fear. Inform on other people. Many many people were very scared of saying anything in public. Were doing anything public. This is why when my father protested on ten March one thousand nine hundred eighty three most of the people in the village that he was absolutely saying that he had the courage but they thought it must have been something wrong with his head to do that because it was so dangerous they couldn't record do couldn't play live except in churches. The male wasn't secure. She couldn't send the fliers. The phones want security. Couldn't call say do the GIG so all had to be done through what they call the whisper network person to person we're doing a GIG and he told deferent- and Ephron told another friend but by eighty-three they were getting concerts in the thousands and that's really crackdown Even by the standards of Eastern Europe behind the Iron Curtain Romania under the long dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu was was a remarkably paranoid police. State our first guest. Common beauge grew up in Romania in the nineteen seventies in one thousand nine hundred eighty s a period she recalls Kohl's in her memoir burying the typewriter the title refers to the nightly ritual performed by her dissident father trying to keep his writing secret. Kurt from the security. I grew up in a very small village which was quite it is located from Eucharist. In general was actually quite isolated from the political situation. Most people lived in small houses. They were raising animals. They were growing their own gardens. So things were quiet self sufficient for the memo what people were self sufficient Shen in the small towns. We saw that there were big lines. Four bread for sugar or flour and things got worse worse. I think at the end that seventies and in the early eighties when I was very young. Of course I didn't notice much of the hardship because I was very young child. Doc who grew up on a farm with the grandparents life was very idyllic and very beautiful but by the time I started going to school and we started noticing the lines signs and started hearing people talk about the lack of food and then we also started experiencing longer electricity cuts. You need the The electricity would just go off so we would have to do. Homework by candlelight in the kitchen and the whole family will sort of heavily in one place where we had the candles and then candles were becoming harder to get so people would go to church on Sundays and come back with their candles rather than leaving them there. For The for the data dad the altar but nineteen eighty S. Things began to be very tough. I mean they're even for us

Iron Curtain Romania Eastern Europe Iron Curtain Shen Europe Berlin Wall Nicolae Ceausescu Kurt Kohl Deferent Ephron Thirty Years
Apple's Plan To Help with The California Housing Crisis

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Apple's Plan To Help with The California Housing Crisis

"Having changed the way we communicate hate each other apple has said it wants to sell the housing crisis in its home state of California. It's two and a half billion dollars to help do this. So what's going to happen to all the money. Well let's hear from acting. La Bureau chief. Collateral Bela who joins us on the line. Now it's a lot of money what's been announced. Yes this plan. That wasn't fueled by apple earlier this week. specifically targets the state's affordable housing crisis. Now the plan includes several different initiatives Apple will offer a one billion line of credit to organizations that are building housing for low income people. Oh and another one billion dollars will be used to help first time homebuyers. And here's what's interesting because they specifically mention A first time home buyers that are essential service personnel school employees and veterans. Now this is due mainly to the fact that in communities such such as Cupertino where apple is based schoolteachers for example and Members of law enforcement offense struggled to find affordable housing near their jobs apple will also donate land worth to an estimate of up to three hundred million dollars in the area of San Jose. And it's for a project to build. Thousands of new affordable housing units and another one hundred fifty million dollars will go to support various affordable. Housing projects objects are wrong the Silicon Valley region and they're still a final fifty million Dot are going for a nonprofit focusing focusing on homelessness in Silicon Valley to Apple is not the first company to try to do this. Is it that there are other companies. Which you've you've addressed? What is clearly quite difficult housing crisis? No it isn't in in January this year for example Microsoft announced that it would provide wide up to five hundred million dollars in grants and loans to promote affordable housing in the area of Seattle where they are based and and then later in the year in June at Google announced their own initiative opt to a value of one billion. US dollars which included a big chunk of that money that was of Google owns land That was going to be used to support the development of at least twenty thousand new units in what they described -cribe at all income levels. This isn't the San Francisco Bay area but we don't even need to look that earlier in the year just last month Facebook made public its own initiative to offer one billion in grants and loans to support the construction of twenty thousand housing units in the region and unjust. Now this week you have now apple entering the fold with a similar initiative now all these plans are coming after many years of complaints lanes by the local communities where these companies have their offices and HQ basically. They've been the communities have been complaining would would affect that. These tech giants giants simply are not good corporate neighbors and you have to put on top of that. The facts that whenever they have a presence via the new officer a brand new HQ The housing that already exists around it around the area will go up in price and whatever land is available salable will become too expensive for the people that live there to actually be able to afford it in fact it was Senator Bernie Sanders. Democratic presidential candidate who laid into APPALOOSAS. Listens in. That room was made saying that the company helped to create the housing crisis. Not just by basing itself in California but also by not paying special taxes. Yes it is interesting to fuck. That's already sender so far has been the only Democratic candidate that has Weighed in in on apple's a new initiative because his criticism of big tax hasn't been asked central to his campaign as said for example Senator Elizabeth Warren Oren Now Sanders basically was very blunt. And saying this is hypocrisy at play and broaden it out to all tech giant's not Just apple All of these that I just mentioned that have similar initiatives saying that basically this is just putting a bandaid in gushing wound That's day it created You know it's an all in all it just seems like a spectacular PR exercise for these companies To get people to talk about how much much to GONNA help But if you add up the numbers of the housing that's GonNa be created by these funds with the housing that was lost By their presence. We don't really. I know exactly who wins. When you tell you the numbers what are the Californians? Think of this I mean no they. Happy that the You know such tech giant is now trying to says says it's time to address the housing problem. The overall consensus is that there's a deep misunderstanding By these tech companies of how how deep and how severe this housing crisis actually is in recent years. The San Francisco Bay area has become the most expensive housing market in the United States of America and Los Angeles County Suffers from housing. Costs are far above the national average. In of course you you have a state that is battling

Apple San Francisco Bay California Senator Elizabeth Warren Oren Google United States La Bureau Chief Senator Bernie Sanders DOT Bela Cupertino San Jose Silicon Valley Microsoft Facebook Seattle Los Angeles County Officer America
What Bill Taylor's impeachment inquiry testimony tells us

Here & Now

05:51 min | 1 year ago

What Bill Taylor's impeachment inquiry testimony tells us

"The impeachment inquiry got even more contentious today with some house. Republicans Walking in on a closed door hearing that's part of the investigation this after damning testimony yesterday from the top US diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor Taylor said that president trump may Obama and joins us now welcome thanks for having me and I of a what did you think of Taylor's testimony at least the part that we've seen the opening statement what stood out to you well I I wanna say in full disclosure that I've known Bill Taylor for twenty five years I found him to be an amazing diplomat in all the different jobs that he had that we enter acted with so I don't pretend to be a neutral observer when repeating is testimony but I founded devastating mostly because it was so Oh incredibly detailed and he just tied together all the little dots and is and Cross T.'s that you'd want to connect the quid pro quo the Holding of military aid and the holding of Oval Office visit in return for the investigation of this company Barista which hunter Biden Vice President sunsets and the investigation of alleged meddling of Ukrainian individuals in the two thousand sixteen election now the White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham released a statement after Taylor's testimony saying today was triple hearsay and there was no quid pro quo what do you make of that well I'm sorry I you know I can say I am six foot eight and that doesn't mean that I am six foot eight I mean I I just I find this defense just alarming to the intelligence of the people reading those statements I it's just clear as day to me whether or not the quid pro quo is an peachable offense that's another matter but the notion that they keep going back to there was no trade when the the evidence I think is just overwhelming and by the way that statement also I found to be really revolting triple hearsay number one but then to call ambassador Taylor as I recall and a radical unelected bureaucrat this is a person who served our country for Fifty Years Democrats and Republicans by the way was appointed US ambassador Ukraine by President Bush. I just find this attacking the Messenger Strategy also indicative that they don't have the facts on the side as you know the acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney was asked last week about a quid pro quo and he seemed to say that yes there was a quid pro quo and then he ended up walking that back but one of the things that he said in that press conference was we do that all the time with foreign policy as a former ambassador yourself did you ever see Oren policy as he said become political in any way so When I was in the government is her five years in the Obama Administration we did set up quid pro quos in fact even with Ukraine I was involved in some of those where we said there will not be a a meeting with President Obama for instance we did this in two thousand then I believe with President Yanukovych unless you do something to more secure your nuclear way straight that's called diplomacy t Tat's leverage that part is true what is not true is that I never remember a time when we did a quid pro quo to advance President Obama's personal interest or his reelection efforts that is the part that's radically at to my knowledge has never been done before okay when I ask you about the other big reason we wanted to talk to you which is what's going on in Syria and Russia has started patrolling parts of the Syrian border her in a deal reached with Turkey yesterday those two countries now working together in northeast Syria after the US pull out what do you make of that deal and the idea that Russia now has more control in that region is a great it's a giant victory for Vladimir Putin he's been working at the for years he wants to be the the king maker in the Middle East he wanted to support his dictator ally Mr Assad now he's achieved the results he wanted especially with our complete capitulation so now he's negotiating with Iran the Americans are not even at the table ask you one more thing as you look at Russia right now how is it possible that a country that has an economy that is less than one tenth the size of the United States having so many successes all over the world achieving its goals what Putin has you know small cards in his hands but he's not afraid to play them so I think part of it is due to the way that he is not afraid to break the rules of the game but if part Lee is also you know the trump administration president trump himself this is a capitulation knees pulling out of our of Syria and giving Putina a win Dan and getting nothing in return you know we were earlier talking about tit for tat sin quid pro quo there's none of that kind of set up with respect to Syria and I would say the same is true in Ukraine the big loser in all this scandal the trump involvement there and the privatization of our foreign policy there for his person donald gain is a weakening of our relationship with presidents Alinsky in the new government there that's all a win for Putin that his former US ambassador to Russia Michael mcfaul now director of the freemen spoke Lee Institute for International Studies at Stanford thank you so much for joining

William Taylor Taylor President Bush United States President Trump Vice President Ukraine Barack Obama Donald Trump Hunter Biden White House Press Democrats Oval Office Stephanie Grisham Secretary Cross T. Six Foot Twenty Five Years Fifty Years Five Years
Israel’s Election Too Close To Call

Guy Gordon

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Israel’s Election Too Close To Call

"Israel's election was too close to call exemplos polls indicated with prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's right wing Luke kid party virtually level with Benny Gantz centrist blue and white correspondent Oren Liebermann has the exit poll results for Khan news the public broadcaster the projection is that you could and blue and white tied at thirty two seats once again a tie like in April election channel twelve projects a slight lead for blue and white thirty four to thirty three for Netanyahu's Likud party that is within the margin of error so we need to see those actual results and channel thirteen news the other commercial station also suggests blue and white has it out a small lead of thirty three seats to the courts thirty one

Israel Benjamin Netanyahu Oren Liebermann Prime Minister Benny Gantz Khan
Benjamin Netanyahu in close election fight for power in Israel

Larry Kudlow

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Benjamin Netanyahu in close election fight for power in Israel

"On Tuesday voters in Israel will choose their next prime minister correspondent Oren Liebermann reports incumbent PM Benjamin Netanyahu is urging his supporters not to stay home on election day Netanyahu's troubles have led to a tight race let's be I mean because I got another home of City but people right wing voters right now we are losing the elections in the final polls before election night all five polls show race too close to call and neither Netanyahu nor his opponent former Israeli military chief of staff any guns has a clear path

Israel Oren Liebermann Benjamin Netanyahu Prime Minister Chief Of Staff
Netanyahu fights for political life a week before Israel votes

Carey Brothers

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Netanyahu fights for political life a week before Israel votes

"Voters in Israel will choose a prime minister on Tuesday from Jerusalem correspondent Oren Liebermann says the incumbent Benjamin Netanyahu is in the fight of his political life Netanyahu's troubles have led to a tight race with the I mean because I've got another home of City looking for right wing voters right now we are losing the elections in the final polls before election night all five polls show race too close to call neither Netanyahu nor his opponent former Israeli military chief of staff any guns has a clear path to

Israel Prime Minister Oren Liebermann Benjamin Netanyahu Jerusalem Chief Of Staff
Yeshiva Student Found Stabbed to Death in West Bank

Hugh Hewitt

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Yeshiva Student Found Stabbed to Death in West Bank

"Join from Israel by Dr Michael Oren former master of Israel the United States former deputy minister for diplomacy good morning doctor and how are you I'm great you thanks I am sorry to have to say a lot of Americans do not know the new Disraeli student was stabbed to death on the west bank in a terror attack this week because we're so focused on our own violence that this one has rocked Israel I believe the prime minister has said on yesterday that Israeli sovereignty will be guaranteed in all parts of the west bank am I right about that and that could to do he did say that yes said nineteen year old the select was brutally murdered outside his school yes like a five minute drive from Jerusalem that tough on the west bank is in Samaria and and tempers are running very high in this very understandably understand in it and it's one of those a long string of murders and then in a long held philosophy through will ideology design this movement is that the best response to Palestinian murders of Jews is by reasserting the Israeli and Jewish presence in the land of Israel and building better actually conquering death with wife so with that in mind and given the trauma the United States has been through and that the situation in Israel is this impacting the election season in Israel which I think is a month away from voting now maybe a five weeks or six weeks away from voting what's the impact of that event on those elections definitely it will tend to shift the Israeli electric light work that happens all ways although in this case it this is terrible tragedies occurring many weeks before the elections and it's too difficult to do early to tell what they'll have an impact in mid September quite a way away yeah now in terms of how it's shaping up I've seen a lot of consolidation of parties a lot of different and I'm I'm looking to you to be my election analysts that we were six weeks out from November of next year all I would be doing twenty four seven election is Israeli media doing election twenty four seven it is it is but there's a tremendous amount of electoral safely he in Israel you because this is the only time in our history had back to back elections and is a strong Israel that there will not be a higher order turnout traditionally had one of the highest will turn out of any democracy in the world sometimes twice as high as the American electoral turnout but this time is a deep fear that this fatigue will will somehow discourage people from going out to vote and that the main beneficiaries of that he will be on one hand the ultra orthodox parties on the other the Arab parties both those two buildings hello folks on block they both act as I'm not in the way that the computers welcome to both and so they stand to gain the most from voter fatigue now even with the Iranian threat looming and that I know you can't comment on this but there are reports that the Israeli up thirty five struck in Iraq on on Iranian missiles being moved through Iraq to Hezbollah even with the Iranian threat growing people have fatigue I mean I just can't imagine in in existentialism and stand at home from the polls well be right threat remains largely abstract as opposed to say a nineteen year old student getting stabbed to death in Judea and Samaria but the media threat is Hamas and it's interesting that the main opposition party the rector of blue and white party under many guns which is more of a centrist party then it's a now was the court party come out and play but the next round the clock Israel if blue and white were in government they would immediately go into Gaza destroyed on that and rebuild a different type of god so that party was trying to write the record on issues relating to Gaza Hamas and back out thirty billion dollars from Iraq I believe the glowing white is to the right of Netanyahu's government well they believe he be right on a specific issue like Gaza because now has the problem that Jack consecutively over the years how much has fired thousands of rock in fact matter is that Israel under Nixon now has not gone into dot has not Dr I talked to you once in a tank on the border of Gaza I don't remember that I interviewed you you're in a tank do you think Israel ought to go back into Gaza I think it was going about it only very specific terms one of the circumstances one full agreement when you're not through the United States agreement with the Sunni Arab world the Gulf countries I was going to be the day after because Israel goes into Gaza we're going to need ammunition we're gonna keep with I cold diplomatic and legal on your bill registration to cast vetoes the security court of justice but the most important thing America coordinate with regional Arab powers about what's going to happen the day after the Israel of course and Hamas out of Gaza along with that operation J. T. how long would that take it could take a matter of days it could take a matter of hours he was intent how many casualties a while you're willing to sustain and be happy civilian Palestinian casualties were willing to pay the cost and the the price for both so it could take longer because the IDF will proceed more

Israel United States Dr Michael Oren Nineteen Year Six Weeks Thirty Billion Dollars Five Minute Five Weeks One Hand
Sara Netanyahu cuts plea deal over claims of lavish overspending

Red Eye Radio

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Sara Netanyahu cuts plea deal over claims of lavish overspending

"The wife of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has agreed to plead guilty in a case concerning illegally ordered meals that the prime minister's residence, just one of several corruption probes facing the Netanyahu family, correspondent, Oren Liebermann reports Israel leader, faces charges of bribery breach of trust in three separate cases with a pre engagement hearing scheduled for early October. Those cases are far bigger in terms of their scope and the amount of money involved Netanyahu has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing as his high powered legal team has worked to delay and slow down the legal process. He faces given enough time Netanyahu may try to pass an immunity law after the next election to shield himself from

Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Prime Minister Oren Liebermann Bribery Israel
"oren" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"oren" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"I'm good and stop rolling your eyes about that way. When you were digging a grave down there instead of a storage being. Yes for my only. Was that? Oren stop seeing. Yes. I think my dear. I've said it for the last time. The. Mine it was so positive the for the holidays. Hoarding t roof your friends will come into save has been farewells. You kept reiterating by by you, don't get those Americans. Do all your husband with one of the fact, university jobs. We must have you with us for the holidays. He will be back. I promise not absolutely. What do you mean? It's not certain. Of course, it, sir. After all. Oh, boy contracted through victory for only two months. Then of course, we'll bring the doors being unpredictable now what other men would decide the very day mind, you'll be leaving Medica to dig a hole in the floor of the cellar. Yes, he's going to put some unclassified wild orchids down there. Devil's garden if you please John so mysterious do it's really quite simple. Once you find out what he's up to now. Take that telephone call you put through to you a few minutes before you arrive Brady threw me. Of course, we've been wanted to surprise me about your plan to meet us in New York next month wasn't that why he called to ask you not to mention her Miami. We'll put couldn't possibly telephone me within the past star. I've been walking in the park seems three he didn't telephone you. How could he answer my going to a medic? No, no, no, come blown up. Her mind is found me out again up Fidel champ. I really don't you? See Lord Lisle will predicts he's as registered on Jewish. Shamed of yourself professor screaming along like that. It is for you, Freddie. I'm furious. You said nothing to us about going to hero. I've been trying to tell everyone else nonsense the games gone on long enough. Besides we must start getting ready. It was marvelous of all of you to come in to say goodbye and don't worry about well presidential jokes. I will bring him back for the holidays. You may rely on it. Yes, you've been promising.

John Brady Freddie Oren Lord Lisle professor Miami New York two months
"oren" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"oren" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Oren cloth in studio today. He's the author of pitch anything which Johnny and I had the joy to read. Absolutely. And a lot of parallels between what we teach from the social skill standpoint to what's going on in the boardroom, which was pretty exciting. 'cause I know, yeah, for a lot of our listeners and also our clients who come through the program, they think it's really two different playing fields. You gotta be a certain way in the boardroom in a certain way socially and you kind of breakthrough that in understanding some of these frames that work in both settings, we're going to delve even deeper into that. You have a new book coming out the user's guide to power. You're an investor Aventure capitalists who's raised more than two billion with your novel approach to understanding the prehistoric part of our brain the crock brain. As you call it. We'll delve into that a little bit as well, and we're gonna talk about how it applies to your sales pitch raising money over two million dollars a week, getting a raise and your ability to crack the code. As a deal closer, you are a power frame guy. We're going to define what we mean by that, and we had an episode think it was about almost three months, Dow about mental models and frameworks, and how frame comes into play with our understanding of the world and also how we present ourselves to others. So we're going to break down frames for those of you who are listening, who maybe are unfamiliar with that concept entirely, and then we're gonna talk a little bit about what's changed since pitch anything came out. We had a great little back and forth here about some trends you're noticing in terms of pitches, you're really tapped into the VC world. So everyone who has great ideas, you're pitching, you're gonna wanna tune into this episode. So thank you for joining us. We have a few questions, be careful, thanking because I got fifty minutes here. You might be. That you might not be so appreciative by the time I leave, we heard we have three hours, right? There's no out we're going going. Well, let's delve I into this understanding of the brain because I think for a lot of us, especially when we're thinking about having to impress other people when a deal we go right into analysis, right? We got to come up with all the facts, all the data, all the figures, the PowerPoint slides to to make that deal work and you have a totally different approach to it. I do. I do. And it's funny other people are starting to think this way as well. So I read this book sapiens. Right, good guys read that, and he makes the point which I ran into quite a few years ago. How do you access the mind of a human? Right, and and how do you touch someone soul? Well, when they see people over open, there's no mind. They can't find a mind like you dig in their brain, there's blood vessels and there's all these systems. And when the cut people over the open, there's no soul. They can't find it. No matter where they look. So I met a cognitive psychologist. I hired him and, and he said, look, you don't understand how the brain works and I go, I sorta psychology. My mom's a clinical psychologist. My dad's a sociologist. I read every book. I've got the hundred million dollars of sales in my past. He was union understand how the mind works, how the brain works. I go, I understand it. You know, you have psychology and people want what they can't have and there's time constraints and they're all these things that persuade people goes. You don't understand how the brain works. So then I stopped talking start listening, which is hard to do as you all know. He's low information. I'm a cognitive psychologist who I only care about how information I don't care about emotions and feelings, and with you, love somebody or hate somebody like cognitive psychologists, just care about how information moves through the brain, what it does when it's in there and how piece of impression of broken up reassembled come out, the confusion..

Oren Johnny Dow hundred million dollars two million dollars fifty minutes three months three hours
"oren" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"oren" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"My friend David Right away tape involves Karen McDougal a former playboy model who says she had a fling with Trump, after they met. In two thousand six on the tape Trump and Cohen talk about buying the rights to McDougal story which he had sold to a month earlier. To the National Enquirer for one hundred fifty thousand. Dollars the tabloid never published the story during the campaign the Trump team denied. Any knowledge of the deal between McDougal and American media the Trump administration says it will provide twelve billion dollars in emergency relief to ease the pain of farmer slammed by. President Trump's escalating trade disputes with China and other countries but some farm state Republicans quickly dismissed the plan declaring farmers markets where. Their crops not payoffs for lost sales and lower prices Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska spoke with CBS what the administration is offering. Them instead is twelve billion. Dollars a gold plated crutches that's not what anybody wants the agriculture department says it would tap an existing program to provide billions in direct payments to farmers and ranchers hurt. By Oren retaliation to Trump's tariffs a Pakistan hospital official says an explosion outside crowded polling station in south. Western city of keto has killed at least twenty. Five people today's attack comes as Pakistanis vote in general elections for members of. The national assembly and seats and four provincial assemblies rescue crews are searching through charred homes and cars for those still missing after the deadliest wildfires to hit Greece in decades. Decimated seaside areas near Athens killing at least seventy nine people and sending thousands fleeing there was no official indication.

President Trump Trump administration Trump Karen McDougal David Right National Enquirer playboy Ben Sasse official Cohen keto Athens Nebraska agriculture department Greece China Oren Senator CBS Pakistan
"oren" Discussed on DirtCast

DirtCast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"oren" Discussed on DirtCast

"A ruined them we'll there and is disgusting coat that she taught like so this is from india wire and it's about how at the end of the day this agenda general oren saying this would be on tour together i'd come back to the hotel in the last thing i'd want to talk about our think about was the movie and he comes back and that's all he wants to talk about i was doing double duty of trying to be a supporter partner will also being like can i please for the love of god nothing about mother for one second was this one was like a fun anecdote while they were sewn together uh i don't know it's it housed a vibe of lake something she would say on like the tonight yeah like be pre break up yeah but also cause of break oh yeah i was like a dark under current of like help me i mean i guess this is common with olbermann who day younger women but like imagine being however many years older than your partner twelve years older i don't know how old he has no his 48 she's 27 okay so kedo dobbins high white a decades older than your partner right and your the needy one hole again i think that that happens alaya but it's also dislike god that is deplorable saying sucks tough and i i mean i believe that general lawrence is probably mature for her age a little bit winner it's like yeah i think she grew up in hollywood you grow fast on but he does seems like such a weaning seems just as he in fact maybe she's in weaning i don't know but she at least seems like she has a sense of humor yeah i i don't think she's as much of a leaney as he is obviously appears to take himself very seriously leaves which is why this relationship never made sense to me nannies that's like her whole thing is not taking ourselves seriously and it you would think he she would like pay someone like that the image she portrays right the lake mrs like missed like poop vert beer.

oren partner dobbins lawrence hollywood india break up olbermann twelve years one second