35 Burst results for "Oregon State University"

"oregon state university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:14 min | Last month

"oregon state university" Discussed on KOMO

"Creating their own adult beverages, many head out to the garage and they brew beer. Some even make wine. But what if you wanted to learn the art of making a distilled spirit? Well, that's where associate professor Paul Hughes comes in. Just to give them a hands on experience. Because I might be a wine, you can't make spirits at home, at least not legally. Use his part of Oregon state university's department of food science and technology. It offers classes on making whisky, vodka, and gin. He tells KOI N dot com. And that's four days where they get to listen to me, go on about some of the background to distilled spirit production. Then we come in here and we have a gin making competition and so forth. The OSU program isn't common, while there are a few schools in Washington that offer wine making and brewing certificates, I was hard pressed to find anyone offering a distilling program certificate. The Oregon school will come close soon, though, with something professor Hughes is pretty excited about. And the other thing we're about to launch is what we call an undergraduate certificate. Which covers fear wine and spirits in what we think is in unprecedented detail. Because as these big ones, spirits, as they innovate, they come closer together in Spain. Sherry is brandy plus wine. Just for those that made it Heineken is tequila and beer. So I think someone who has knowledge of all three categories is in a unique position to join the alcohol industry. If you happen to have the distilling itch, the professor offers you in this moment a sneak peek of his masterclass, involving whisky, especially for those just getting to know this spirit. It's actually a multi sensory experience. So you probably start off by sniffing and smelling the spirit and say whisky, it's comfort zone. And then taste. You might think it's too strong you want to dilute it a little bit. Add some water, re taste it. Brian Calvert, northwest used radio. Your stock charts dot com money update on northwest news

department of food science and Oregon state university Paul Hughes professor Hughes Oregon Washington Heineken Sherry Spain Brian Calvert
"oregon state university" Discussed on CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

30:17 min | Last month

"oregon state university" Discussed on CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

"What if there was a practical way to detox your brain? This is now possible with neuropil, the first ever scientifically tested brain detox app shown to help reduce anxiety and depression by up to 81%. Users are guided through a variation of audio and video brain exercises and mind management lessons every day. I'm excited to share some of the latest features in the app, including guides for children and parents, detailed feedback and recommendations written guides through days 22 through 63 of the neural cycle and an easy way to track your progress. There are over 500,000 U.S. cycle users worldwide and the app has helped change thousands of lives, including people trying to find purpose in life, overcoming fear, better sleep, improved relationships, managing intrusive thoughts, depression and anxiety and so much more. Neuropsych is for everybody, no matter who you are, what you've been through, what you do, you have an incredible mind and brain that is always on and needs to be managed so that you can live your best in both mentally and physically. This app is designed for individuals couples families businesses or corporations for everyone everywhere. Join us by committing just a few minutes a day and see how your life is transformed in just 63 days you will have begun rewiring your brain for a happier and healthier life. Download the neural cycle up today and start changing your life one thought at a time. Just look for neural cycle on the iTunes App Store or Google Play or visit new recycle app. The link and more information will be in the show notes. So, a study was done actually very interesting study was done with they put a couples into a lab and they were in separate different rooms and each couple was told to have an argument in the way that they normally talk about something that's contentious and kind of like talk about it in so they were something that they knew they would probably have an argument about. And each couple was in their own little cubicle and that there was the only instruction they were given. And so and they were observed. Just before the experiment, all the couples had little blisters put onto their hands. It's called the blister study and it didn't hurt them and generally it takes about three weeks for a blister to heal just a basic blister. Your body heals and cycles of three weeks. So the bigger the bliss tool, the more bigger the bigger the wound or whatever in your body, you would have multiple cycles of three weeks, but for a basic booster, it would take about three weeks to heal. Anyway, so these couples within instructed and they were observed and the blisters were put on their hands. They were putting the cubicles. They had their little arguments. Some of them were arguing in a very agreeable way, some were not so agreeable, some were downright nasty, some were really awful. They were all different ways that they were arguing from the good to the bad to the ugly, and of three weeks they bought these couples back and they looked at the healing. They looked at the impact of the argument on the blister. So they wanted to see how the state healed. Those that had argued in a reasonable way that it agreed to disagree that kind of resolved the argument or got to point of tying it off. They blisters were healed. The others, the healing reduced by, in some cases, up to 65% less. In other words, the healing was only attacker 35% level instead of a 100% level. So in those couples that really argued in a contentious way and didn't tie off the argument, there healing had reduced by up to 65%. Let us a basic overview of the study you can go and read more about the study. But essentially what that tells us this was in an observed situation. So what is happening in an unobserved situation? The point is that arguments do impact how we function physically and mentally. And we'll have a physical impact on our body. So there was a super interesting study because it was looking at how the body needed to have a whole the immune response and the stem cell response to heal the blister and how that was slowed down. So the physical natural physical functioning the natural healing properties of the body was dramatically reduced by the argument. A recent research coming out of Oregon state university, they found that when people have resolved and argument, so didn't leave it unresolved when they resolved the argument, they found that the emotional response associated with the disagreement is significantly reduced and in some situations can be entirely erased. So if they looked at the emotional response, they didn't look at this as another study now separate from the blister study, they looked at the emotional response and so basically when you think of in the beginning of this podcast I say to just cost your mind back and gather when you most recently had an argument. And how you felt. I mean, I can just recall it. I mean, my heart was flattering, my entire body was like tense. I felt like actually kind of nauseous. I remember my eyes like narrowed, I remember feeling like so emotionally upset so overwhelmed so and then as soon as the argument was resolved it was like completely different feeling. But while the argument was happening and was unresolved, it was awful. So now also think of an argument, but think of an argument that you didn't resolve on the spot that you had an argument and you walked away in the midst of the argument with out of being resolved and then how you felt in that time period which may have been a few hours or days or even weeks and how in your mind you were building up all these narratives and how every time you thought about that situation it was affecting you. I mean, this has happened to me. I found myself on the trademark thinking I said this and I'm going to say that and they said this and that narrative and that's what that means and I'm going to listen that and feeling so awful that I'd stop myself because I'm so good not so regulating a neuro cycling that I caught myself and thought well this is going to miss up my workout because your mind controls your body and I'm on the trade we're trying to get a good workout and here I am thinking about this unresolved argument. So quickly did a neuro cycle and made sure that my active reach was I am going to make a plan to go resolve this argument. I mean that is how important it is that we manage our mind. Otherwise I would have may as well just got off that train more because I was losing 60 70, 80% of the benefit because my mind was not in a good place and my body was starting to respond. You see, wherever your mind goes, your brain and body follow. And as an example of the blister, the healing ability of the body reduced by up to 65%. I mean, this is quite phenomenal when you think about it. Okay, so coming back to the Oregon state university study, which was just released in March of this year, but it was actually very, very interesting because they did a whole thing looking at the emotional response and they looked at reactivity and residue and reactivity is the level of negative emotions around the actual argument and then residue is the effect over the next day or the next couple of days. So what they found is they've been people resolved to augment even if you didn't solve it, even if you didn't completely fix the whole thing with me. If you came to a level of resolution so that even if it was a green to disagree, that is a resolution when people resolved an argument. The emotional response for the disagreement was significantly reduced. In some cases by up to 50%, and in some situations it was completely erased, the emotionally fit. Now when we talk about emotional effect, that argument is an experience a toxic experience what you are arguing about is the root of the thought tree you see me talk about thought trees before. So the experience of their argument is what you processing through your mind into your brain as a protein thought tree. The actual argument that what you are talking about over here and in your interpretation of how you think feel and choose about that argument are the branch, the branches here. So those are the root memories and those are the branch members. So each person you and the person you're arguing with, each will have these toxic trees inside of their brain. Okay, so now our mind is how we think feel and choose have filthy emotions, so we think feel and choose and we build distinct feeling choosing source into our into the roots and how we think feel and choose about that source is built into here. So the emotions are in here and now this is toxic, so these are toxic emotions. This is generating neurochemical chaos in the brain and the body. It's upsetting the electromagnetic balance in the brain and the body. These proteins are not folded correctly so the vibrations are inquiry. So these a direct impact on the neurophysiology of the brain and the body. This also impacts the cells of the body so therefore the DNA is affected and immediately you would have an impact on, for example, the telomeres which are the ends of chromosomes which are responding to how you're managing your mind and are responsible for cellular health. So in that state, your cellular health starts dropping off. So coming back to the blister study, those couples that didn't resolve the argument had the toxic thought was they in the brain and now they've got this blister and their toxic thought which is a real thing made of proteins and all these abnormally formed proteins and all these toxic root and unresolved and all this stuff and generating the wrong energy. Then impacted and had a negative impact on the immune system ability to heal and the stem cells and the ability of the body to heal itself. And so that's actually what happened. It actually had a long-term over carried over. So this thought the emotions that are in this thought are very have a real physical structure. So feeling frustrated or angry or irritated or building this narrative and you hit all these branches that you keep adding to this is generating all those toxic energy which then affecting the physical function of the body. So the emotions and how you think feel in the choices you are making around this narrative that you creating of that argument that's unresolved is a lie that's living, it's dynamic, it's generating this toxic energy and that is going through the body and affecting the body's ability to heal itself or function like it should. And if they could translate into any different thing, it could be that your GI symptoms get worse or that you suddenly have this incredible heart pain. I mean, I've experienced that where I have an unresolved issue and I know when I have unresolved issues because my heart physically gets so I'll wake up in the morning and it feels like I'm at my heart is actually physically so I can feel the pain in my heart and then I resolve it and it goes away and so for me I know that that is a very strong physical warning signal that I haven't that I have an unresolved issue going on in my life. And that's not good because that's affecting my cardiovascular health so I recognize that and I manage it and so I'll recognize that pain and I'll go and do the worker on one of the emotional emotional impact and what are my behaviors and what are my narrative what's going on with coming from what am I going to do about it? How am I going to reconceptualize that so I use the neural cycle to go through that process so that I've been in my active reach would be go to that person and work through a process of solving this problem and you can cycle together to solve the problem. If I asked you what is the number one health problem people from all over the world are facing? Would you know what it is? If you can sleep you'd be right. Many people like energy throughout the day, but this lack of energy is a symptom of a bigger problem that is very often difficult to gain control over sleep deprivation, a lack of good quality sleep can affect your mood hormones with gain and many other factors including your mental health. If you find yourself steering it receiving for hours trying to fall asleep, or if you wake up in the morning feeling like you don't get enough sleep, I invite you to try a simple beta routine that helps me sleep like a baby, but all it takes is a glass of water and two safe natural magnesium breaks through capsules 30 minutes before hitting the pillow. The 7 essential forms of magnesium in this force victim supplement help you relax unwind and turn off your active brain after a long stressful day so you can see peacefully and wake up feeling refreshed, vibrant and alert. Magnesium breakthrough has become a household name of the years because of its reputation, just recently the company released a fourth upgraded formulation that works even better than before. And for a limited time, bio optimizes the makers of bit magnesium breakthrough are offering additional bonus gives for the next 1000 customers or while supplies lost. They are including free bottles of their full line of digestive health products, including a powerful digestive enzyme, mess Zions, their patent of probiotic Peter OM, and the HCL product to alleviate heartburn and acid reflux. These free products will support for digestive systems so you experience less flirting and guests throughout the day, which means less energy spent trying to Dodge foods while you absorb more nutrients from the foods you eat to support optimal brain and body health. Just visit mag breaks through dot com slash doctor leven into the code doctor leaf tend to activate this exclusive limited time offer as offers only available at med breakthrough dot com slash doctor leaf. The link in details will be in the show notes. Okay, so why is this important bottom line is that the extent in the sub reading from the study from its Oregon study, the extent to which you can resolve an argument entire them off and I love that tie them off is important for maintaining well-being in life. So if you've got a bone with someone, if you've got a bone to because some of you got an argument, if you've got a disagreement, whether it's the little one that you just kind of never resolve every day and they just keep accumulating cumulatively over time if you haven't tied them off that is building in your brain. So it may not be like a major blower, but maybe this is little things that you're not resolving, and those are very dangerous too, and this is what this organ state university studies talking about is that these little arguments that you just don't deal with that seem they're not so important, but they actually are because there's a little things that cumulatively over time bold and become a problem. I refer you back to the blister study that was one experiment in a lab where they discussed for 20 minutes or whatever it is that people had this contentious discussions and three weeks later they came in and the blister added healed very well in a lot of the people that didn't have the argument tied off so they kept that narrative in their head and one of the questions they did asked them when they came back because they did resolve this and the ones who had the worst healing so in other words the least amount of healing happening so hardly any healing in of the blister for the ones that had the most unresolved arguments so they had still carried that with them for three weeks. The longer you carry this the more you think about it, the bigger it is, this is toxic, the straightens your survival. This is putting everything at risk and making you feel awful. And it will spill over into all areas of your relationship and working life and I mean, these things are pervasive. You convinced they can become so big that you can't even see the wood for the trees. I mean, this is how you view life. You just maybe this is how you view everything with that person. It can get to the point where they can't even say hello and you think that they are arguing with you because you're looking at them through this. So that's not good for you, nor is it good for their person. So these things need to be resolved, okay? So these much research, including my book and my book, I talk about this research of showing how unmanaged minds lead to unmanaged toxic stress which can affect health from mental health problems such as depression and anxiety to physical problems such as heart disease and GI diseases we could immune system reproductive difficulties, all kinds of stuff. In the first part of my book, I talk about how I looked very different biomarkers with my team of neuroscientists and how we had two groups of control group and an experimental group and the control group they didn't get any mind management, but an experimental group got my management and they were working on the issues. It wasn't an argument, but they were showing the link between mind and brain and those that didn't embrace them anxiety and depression et cetera that they've experiencing and be a sort of detective and manager through the neural cycle, it affected their health. They got increased inflammation that increased biomarkers showing the increased inflammation increased problems with these stress system increased problems with risk to cardiovascular system to the brain to the neurological system and so on and even down to the level of the telomeres, which was affecting cellular health and cellular health is effective to cells make up everything. It means all your systems get affected. And for those ones that did get the mind managed, they did work through their issues. They health improved the medically significantly. So we saw inflammation decreasing and cellular health improving. So these are a lot of research showing that our mind does impact our body and arguments all toxic things in our mind that we experience. And that we everything that we experience processes into our brain and becomes thoughts and those thoughts are real and they impact every cell of our body because if it's in your brain, it's also goes into every cell of your body and in your mind which is this gravitational field all around you and through you. So it's all over the place all through and in you and out you so we can go to resolve thing because it's real and it's like messy and that's why we go to clean up our mental maze. Okay, so we all get this with major streets. I mean we all it's very easy to understand if you poverty or if you walk or like the pandemic it's like really it's easy to understand that those very adverse circumstances can have effect on our physical health and our mind. It's easy to remember mental health is not a disease. Okay, it's a response to adverse circumstances. But we don't always think about those daily chronic little stresses. You know there's little things that I mentioned a few moments ago, like minor inconveniences that happen that can happen throughout the day with money and convenience as little arguments, little things that go wrong, little bad habits that form between work relationships or family relationships, those bold, if they not managed, and they are also affecting your system, your entire brain and body and all the systems of your brain and your body, and it has an impact on mortality. So the big stuff can reduce mortality and the unmarried daily lifestyle issues also decrease mortality. In fact, in this book I show, however the last 40 years where we've moved away from my management over the last 40 years, there has been a shift from people living longer to people dying younger. So if we don't manage our mind, we are people we are in an age where scientifically we are showing that without mind management without resolving issues, we are shortening our lifespan. Wouldn't it be nice to have something you can carry with you that helps you manage your stress levels? Apollo is a new, wearable device that improves the way your body deals with stress that we faced daily as human beings. It should help you sleep better, stay calm, focus more, be more present and feel less overwhelmed. The Apollo wearable was developed by neuroscientists and physicians, it delivers gentle soothing vibrations their condition your nervous system to recover and rebalance after stress. It's like wearing a wearable hug for the nervous system using touch therapy to help you feel safe and in control. I love it the Apollo is a safe, natural way to feel your best without drugs or any unwanted side effects. It has been studied in multiple clinical trials and real world studies and has been shown to support up to 40% less stress and feelings of anxiety up to 19% more time in deep sleep and up to 25% increase in focus and concentration. A portal trains the nervous system to cope with stress beta over time, which is why I apologize on my wrist for a few sessions a day even when I'm traveling at super easy to travel with if you are always on the go like me. Indeed I love that my Apollo device helps me manage and improve my sleeping patterns especially during the times when I'm extra busy traveling for conferences and trying to get stuff done. Do you want to improve your sleep, relaxation focus recovering mindfulness habits, try a product today, get $40 off your Apollo wearable at Apollo, neuro dot com forward slash doctor Lee at $40 off at Apollo neuro dot com slash doctor leaf, the link in details will be in the show notes. So when it comes to arguments, which is what we really focusing on today, avoidance and lack of closure, increase anxiety. Okay, so if you just, if you don't deal with stuff so you know that there's an issue between you and you just keep avoiding it not dealing with it. That's when you're going to build up this thing in your head like I described earlier on. Or if you have a huge backlash and you do have an argument but you don't resolve it and you walk away angry. Both of those situations, the one you just kind of suppressing and the one is a big catch that you don't resolve. Both of those are going to are going to affect your health, mental and physical health. So what the study in the Oregon study says is that when it comes to arguments avoidance and lack of closure increased anxiety to anxiety, so this is so interesting because if you avoid and you don't deal with it, this thing is growing bigger. This thing is straightening your survival. What does our body and brain do if it's threatening if our survival is threatened? Signals are synced from the non conscious mind and from the body in the form of emotional warning signals like depression and anxiety and physical warning signals like so hearts, okay? To end what are those telling us, hey, pay attention, the anxiety is saying, hey, pay attention, something needs resolving so hard. Hey, pay attention, something needs resolving. So when you avoid your body looks after you, your mind looks after you, your wise mind says, hey, anxiety anxiety warning signal alarm pay attention to not run from the anxiety. You don't suppress the anxiety, you embrace the anxiety, what is this anxiety telling me? What is the so hot tailing me? What is this rumination telling me? What do I need to fix? I need to be a thought detective. When we avoid things, then it increases your reactivity. Now you often hear me talking about being a responder, not a reactor. When you mind manage when you get into self regulated mind management, which is what I teach you in this podcast and all my work and in this book, self regulated mind management, you become a responder. So in that person says something that triggers you instead of you firing off in a whole argument starting, you catch yourself and you become a responder, you quicken your cycle in your head and you respond instead of reacting. So instead of building up toxic thought and getting into an argument, you respond, and that's what the neurosci was teaching you, okay? So when you resolve when you make the decision to do that, you then, when you listen to the anxiety, you listen to the so hard and you actually try and control and tie off. You may even launch into an argument and then stop yourself and say, okay, we need to agree to disagree. How are we going to resolve this and you start trying to tie it off? I love that tying it off how are we going to agree to disagree with how we're going to agree to agree with it wherever it goes? When you do that, you start reducing reactivity train yourself to self regulated mind management to be less reactive and more responsive. Okay, and that leads to a decrease in negative emotions because you basically get rid of these and turning them into healthy emotions and an increase in positive emotions, energy is never lost energy is always transferred, so when we are decreasing reactivity and becoming a responder, we decreasing negative emotions and we've turned them into positive emotions. We reconstructing them realistically. We're not going to deny them. We're just going to say, well, that's not going to help. This is going to help. We're going to reconstruct it. Okay? If you haven't heard about anchor, it's the easiest way to make a podcast. This is how I make my podcasts, let me explain. It's free, these creation tools that allow you to record and edit your podcast right from your phone or computer, ankle will distribute your podcast for you so it can be heard on Spotify, Apple podcast and many more. You can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor FM to get started. The link to the anchor app will be in the show notes. So what they found was that when people did what I've described, if the argument was resolved, people reported half the reactivity on that day, so they instead of feeling like when the result instead of feeling like this huge reactivity, the so hard, lots of anxiety, it was half the anxiety, half that physical pain, which is not completely gone, but at least it was a path to activity. And the next day there was no reason you. How many times have you had an argument that you haven't resolved? And the next day you wake up and there's this reason you, this is after effect. There's a still feeling like I said on the treadmills affecting me kind of saying you just horrible feelings hoping anxiety is the reason you just hang over and that is all this toxicity is still causing all this problem in your brain and your body in this vulnerability. Okay, so when we train ourselves through regulated self mind management, which is what I'm teaching you in this book, you can then turn yourself tie off those loose ends of that argument, get it resolved and reduce the reactivity, reduce those negative emotions, reduce that residue effect, and you can actually now move forward into a healthy way in that relationship. And once you've done it in one relationship, once you can apply many more times in that same relationship, but also then you get the practice to apply to other relationships so you become good at this in so many different instances. So if you keep arguing you practicing arguing, but if you keep training yourself to resolve the argument and you practice that, you practice becoming an argument resolver versus an argument activator. Okay, so we can't always control the events and circumstances the stresses and they're coming to our life and the people around us. We can't control that. We can control how we respond. You're in control of your mind. You have agency. You don't have to you can put up their boundary. I don't want that my body in that state with that Bristol when my healing ability of my body is reduced by 65%. I don't want to hold this toxicity in me. I don't want to be affecting someone else. I would much rather product that boundary and resolve that argument. Okay, so that's a decision we need to recognize that we kind of control the events and circumstances and other people, but we can control our own self regulated mind management and therefore become responders versus reactors. So the extent with arguments, the extent to which you can tie off the stress. So it's not having this gnawing impact. That's what this unresolved arguments have at such a great explanation. Knowing impact on knowing it's a G in AWI and G that gnawing impact. So the extent to which you can tie off the stress so that's not having this knowing impact at you over the course of the day or a few days will help minimize the potential long-term impact. You can do this and you can use the neural cycle to help you do that. So very quickly, how would you do the neural cycle? 5 steps you gather weirdness of in as you feeling yourself moving into this argument where you're in the argument, gather awareness of one of my emotional physical behavioral perspective warning signals quickly reflect why am I doing this ask answer discuss if you've got time write it down in the middle cog, explain to you how to make amid a Coke here and then reach in order to look at what you've written to find what are the patterns that are going on here, what can you do, how can you stop this? What could be an antidote? How could you resolve this and in the act of reach and do it? Actually step in and say, okay, let's now resolve. So you can do those four steps in your head and the 5th step, you can literally, that would be your action. Okay. Argued enough, let's tie this off blitz agree to disagree. Let's try to resolve this. And calm down, speak with kindness, et cetera, et cetera. So I hope this has helped you. Remember, arguments decrease arguments that are not tied off that note as decrease our longevity and decrease our healing. So, resolve your arguments and let the you can use the neuropsych to help you. I hope this has helped you. Thanks for joining me today and I look forward to seeing you next week. I hope you found today's podcast interesting and helpful. If you want more tips and help with managing anxiety, depression and mental health be sure to visit my website at doctor leaf dot com. And to sign up for my weekly newsletter, we are also include a schedule of my speaking events and so much more. And follow me on social media. I'm on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Just look for doctor Caroline leaf. Also, I love seeing all your posts on social media about this podcast. I love seeing what resonates with you and what you've learned. So be sure to continue posting and tagging me and listening to know what you think and how these tips worked out for you. And don't forget, leave a review and keep spreading the word about this podcast. Thank you for joining me today. I really hope you learned something new and helpful till then I'm doctor Caroline leaf. This podcast represents the opinions of myself and my guests. The content here should not be taken as medical advice. The content here is for educational and informational purposes only. Please consult your healthcare professional for any individual medical questions you may have. While we make every effort to ensure that the information we are sharing is accurate, we welcome any comments suggestions or corrections of errors.

depression iTunes App Store Oregon state university anxiety Zions Oregon Google U.S. Dodge heart disease
"oregon state university" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

03:25 min | 10 months ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Near the southern tip of this planet, the world's widest glacier is on the verge of collapse. The thwaites glacier is an ice shelf the size of Florida. It sits on the western edge of Antarctica, and it's responsible for 4% of the world's sea level rise. That's earned it the nickname the doomsday glacier. Scientists have been observing it for decades, because it's become a case study in how human driven climate change is felt most on the earth's poles. This week, a group of scientists announced findings that it could collapse within 5 years. That would accelerate global sea rise. Aaron petted is part of that group called the international thwaites glacier collaboration. She's a glaciologist at Oregon state university, and she's been studying this particular glacier for decades. Pettit says the thwaites glacier is like a huge river of ice draining into the ocean and it's happening at a troubling rate. She explains why. Temperatures are rising in the atmosphere, that's creating different winds and those winds are causing different currents in the ocean, that is bringing up this warm deep water that normally doesn't have access to the ice. But it's bringing that warm deep water up to the ice and it's causing it to melt from the underside and then it's fracturing in places. And the lower part of this glacier looks like it might do over the next few years is shatter into hundreds of icebergs. For you as someone who studies this, what's your sense of alarm as you watch this? My sense of alarm is it's unsettling. This is not going to cause instant sea level rise. So what this is doing is taking away a bit of resistance, a stabilizing feature of the lower part of the glacier. Sort of like a dam that's holding back water, we're taking away this resistive force that's holding it back and allowing it to accelerate. So you say it's unsettling, if not alarming, then for people who are concerned about climate change, what should their level of concern be about this happening? So a couple of things. The instability within the glacier is hard for us to slow and stop right away. But by thinking about what we're doing in the atmosphere, we can have an impact over the next few decades. The other thing, the thing that we really need to be careful about, I feel like is thinking about how do we really want to treat our coastlines and our coastal communities in terms of the real impact of sea level rise over the next couple of years because we are not going to be able to stop at least some of that civil rights. We can slow it in the long term. But there's going to be some measurable sea level rise that we won't be able to stop..

thwaites glacier international thwaites glacier Antarctica Oregon state university Pettit Aaron Florida
"oregon state university" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

Doug Miles Media

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Doug Miles Media

"Beer. Viner right you still do that. I do yeah. Yeah with my friends who the oregon state university economics professor well. That's right and again Just about everything. You wanna know about beer where to go. Visit pictures in there as well but All the different types of beer and I guess you have an interesting life. Chevy and go round. Do la taste testing. It sounds like a lot of fun. It is the bear bible. Second edition is the name of the book and jeff cavallo website again. If you will people get more information on the book thank you. Yeah it's you're on our blog dot com and every all my writing my book stuff. Is there so check. It out. Great and i guess as beer continues to change I would imagine they'll be third edition somewhere down the line right all right about love to have you back at that time. But in the meantime we invite people to get the second edition of the beer bible and jeff great attack the again and we'll do.

Viner jeff cavallo oregon state university la jeff
"oregon state university" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Online unless you're vaccinated so i'm a finance and financial planning major over my years. I have had to take native american flute. Peace studies and many other garbage classes. Wait you have to take what. I had to take three credit native american flute class. I had to take peace studies. Where at one point idaho. Kids scream every single pipe. Studies or peace stutters peace study. Okay and i. I kid screaming at me the entire class because i stood for what i believed in and i've had teachers Tell me to sit down. Because i'm not a woman and i'm not allowed to speak in the classroom at which i sent that video which i recorded to fox. News and tucker. What are your advice for helping systems to get rid of these garbage classes like digital pornography which is also offered and registered with over one hundred seventy five students and lesbian dance theory which has over forty five. What is your advice to get rid of these darvish classes in college which we are taking debt out for so when i used to joke around and i say you send your kid to college study north african lesbian poetry. It sounds pretty close. Actually you could do peace studies and what was the native. American flutes made american food. I had to pay one hundred and seventy dollars and at the end of the course i had to paint my flute so i couldn't resell it so much. It pains me to give advice to someone that goes to oregon state university. Look what can you do about it. You gotta keep exposing it and just you being here talking about. It's important and honestly for the adults watching this video and hearing this right now reconsider whether or not you should send your kids to college and actually put them through this nonsense. Did you find value in the native american flute. Course i did. I learned how to play smoke weed everyday by.

idaho darvish tucker fox oregon state university
"oregon state university" Discussed on Civil Engineering Vibes

Civil Engineering Vibes

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Civil Engineering Vibes

"Of one percents. That's gonna go get discouraged so started from the third year to work even harder to improve the gp and do we applied at these scholarships. Were six people competing. And fortunately i got the seats. And i graduated in june ninety eight in january ninety nine. I was in oregon state university to do my master's and then In a year and a half completed went to a north carolina state For my phd and in two thousand six graduated with my phd joined great university as a professor. Never felt sorry for for that fast. I actually enjoyed every single moment in a tad. It's strides targets tough moments. but they were all lesson learnt. I believe that every lesson anybody goes through it's not thrown their for for nothing. It's thrown day because there are some skills that we have to master because those skills are skills that will be needing in the next stage of our life. So i i feel so good are i am happy or rate of all the experiences. All the people. I have met with a good people are back. People were that would excuse about exceeds a bit or an addition to my life. And then i joined quaking versus doesn't six two thousand thirteen. I got offered to to join construction program and it was a tough one. It was tough one. Because i've been through school all my life from great one all my numbers. How much of it working experience. I had a ahead zero so suddenly you get offered at two heads. Construction of a six million meter square lands With the worth of one point five lead. Gd which is more than four point. Five four point five billion dollar. Yeah yeah and you have never ever ever worked in the construction. You have only learned that. I watched a to have never actually mine so it was about to objects than consulting with my husband and my family all my friends and everybody told me what it said. A lifetime exceeds. If you wanna check your skin you have the qualification. You just need to find your way out. So doing. And i always had the sense of.

oregon state university north carolina
"oregon state university" Discussed on Healthcare360

Healthcare360

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Healthcare360

"Donates his time in his mind now to find out why it works so he became the science behind operation and was the visionary so this whole story this whole thing but riyadh is. She heals herself with long grass later on. She's like. I wonder what grass's better so she gets week. Grass ryegrass lawn grassy puts a whole bunch of barley grass down. She opens up the door. This how and does stuff she lets. The dog in the dog sniffs grasses and it goes needs the press as she takes the dog out of there. That's called a lab experiment. Milk kinship then. She opens up the door and lets the cat in. I'm not say this is a true story. The cat sniffs all the grasses and goes needs to wait grass that is called a cat scan. Okay this is high tech staff here now. Think about this. This becomes the mainstay. That's why they went to wheat. Grass was because literally because the dog cat win to it right. That's how she did things if you go to oregon state university one of the top phytochemicals researchers in the world. Now what are. They researching wheat grass. Why because they found out that we grass all the grasses has more minerals barley grass has about fifty or so but we grasses like ninety two hundred whatever trace minerals right and it has. we're final chemicals in tastes the best so for taste and potency. It had the most and didn't need oregon state university to tell her that she used a dog and a cat she was very she didn't get caught up in all the b. s. all the science and all this stuff she went with nature. And that's it and that's how hypocrisy has got started in the in. The hypocrisies logo is a bundle of league. Rest coming up so when you go there. There's a thing called week grass hut and they keep it full of fresh cut grass. and you're gonna juice two ounces twice a day and you're also going to be putting up your directly after doing infamous..

riyadh oregon state university
"oregon state university" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

SharkFarmer Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

"Time went on those nice. Czechoslovakian ladies found an irishman and a couple of generations later. I came along. My grandfather started here before world. War two working on farms and a son of immigrants. They didn't have much. They were poor but he started working worked. Hard ended up going to serve in world war two and came back here to be with his family. He was one of several children. After the war he met a local girl from falls in came back and started a family. He was not fortunate. I guess enough to win. A homestead here is. This base was largely divided after the reclamation project and awarded to veterans of world war one and world war two to come home or come to and farm and to feed a hungry nation. On some of the most fertile soils in the world. My grandfather did win. A homestead can washington state and. He declined that. I wish he would no. I don't think they have the sucker problems that we do. At any rate he chose to stay here and began farming with a brother in law and then became a manager of a fresh baked potato. Shed here my dad loved the farming life. He went to college for a couple of minutes and then decided to come back and farm. I did the same. I went to cal. Poly san luis for a year and into oregon state university graduated from there and came home. And i actually chose after college to go into the fresh baked potato business. I did that for several years all kinds of things happening. I ended up over on the farming side of things and here. We are now awesome. Czechoslovakian an irish at some angry drinking. That's what your girl in doing the potatoes. You know i after two and a half generations. I kicked potato habits. We're we're looking at a few new venture there but no i primarily grow onions. Those are onions for processing dehydration. Severe onions powder. Onion salt granulated onion all those kinds of things..

Poly san luis oregon state university washington
Wet Notes - 4-9-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Wet Notes - 4-9-21

"This is wet notes here scuba shock radio for april ninth two thousand and twenty one first up today. I'd like to give you an update on new netflix. Documentary see spiracy. You might recall that. I introduced you to this film in a previous segment of wet notes. Well it did premiere on netflix's advertised. And i had a chance to watch. She spiracy a couple of weeks ago. The film is eighty nine minutes long and it can be captivating and controversial. Like i said this is certainly raising a great deal controversy especially as it relates to sustainable seafood and fishing. There's a couple of organizations that they called out into spiracy earth island institute and the marine stewardship council actually marine stewardship council issued a response on their website within days of the premier and every day. I see something more coming out related to the controversy. But i encourage you to watch the film and then decide for yourself about what it is saying like. I said lots of controversy. That's spiracy on net flicks now. Here's something that. I found really interesting. I came across an article that talked about how scientists are using thin wales to map out what lies beneath the sea floor. Now according to to seismologists vaclav kina from the czech academy in prague and john nab elec of oregon state university in corvallis oregon the song of the fin. Whales are loud enough to penetrate the earth's crust and revealed deep structures. I guess they have a network of fifty four bottomed size meter seismometers that the tech sound waves traveling through the ground and they picked up the of whales as they were passing by. Now they have a one hundred and eighty nine decibels song and that song can last from two and a half to five hours as they did more analysis they were able to map the underlying rock structures. According to these guys this is just as effective as those air cannons that are polluting the ocean with all that noise how practical this is yet to be seen. But you've gotta admit it is interesting. Now here's an update on the lectured aluminum tanks situation. You might recall back at the end of february. I told you about luxembourg Decision to exit the aluminum tank business and that they were looking to sell their plants in the us and the uk more. Here's some good news. Metal impact out of elk grove village in illinois is acquiring the graham north carolina luxembourg cylinder plant metal impact is no stranger to scuba tank business. They've been around since nineteen fifty nine and in two thousand fourteen. They purchase worthington. Aluminum cylinders has been providing aluminum scuba tanks to excess scuba and see pearls for a number of years. We've got quite a few from excess scuba over the past couple of years and so we're pretty familiar with metal impacts. This is some good news for the. Us aluminum Scuba tank supply chain. There's absolutely no doubt that. The pandemic has had a dramatic impact on the scuba industry. But i guess it's not all bad news if you happen to be in the right place and it seems that hawaii is those right places especially for new diver certifications. There's a recent article in scuba diving magazine. Titled more hawaiians getting certified than before the pandemic turns out that even though the travel has been restricted to and from the islands more locals are turning to scuba aloha scuba on awad who had reported a one hundred and twenty percent increase in new diver certifications. In two thousand and twenty. They went from twenty seven in two thousand and nineteen to eighty three in two thousand and twenty spurred by whole families going for they're open water certification with some great diving. It certainly makes sense to mask up and dive in our aloha state. Last week i was trying to see if the ocean based climate solutions act of two thousand and twenty was being introduced in this session of congress. Well no update on that yet but i did come across something very interesting. There is a house select committee on the climate crisis now. This committee was created during the one hundred sixteenth congress. That was the last one so it hasn't been around long. But they did produce a climate action plan of two thousand twenty. And that's called the congressional action plan for a clean energy economy and a healthy resilient and just america committee is chaired by representative. Kathy castor from florida and the ranking chair is representative garrett graves from louisiana now. I watched their organizing meeting from march nineteenth. Let's say there's just a little bit of difference on the ideas of how to approach In the approaches in making the us carbon zero by two thousand fifty but as representative castor stated. It's time to turn recommendations into policy. Now i'll be tracking our actions and keep you updated here and finally you might recall. Last year the uss bonham rashard an eight hundred forty four foot long and fibia assault ship burned out of control for five days. Now that was in san diego california. But now senator. Marco rubio from florida is proposing that the ship be used to create an artificial reef down in florida little bit of background. The navy did some cost analysis On what it would take to restore the ship to operational status an estimated that that would be somewhere between two point. Five and three point five billion dollars but the cost to decommission and scrap the bonham rashard would be about thirty million dollars. Senator rubio didn't provide any details on where the ship might be sunk and be become an artificial reef but he did say that it could be done for less than thirty million dollars to scrap the ship. This word Happened it would be. We'll keep an eye on it and see where it goes. Fingers crossed that will have another artificial reef down in florida. Something that big to dive on. Well that's it for this installment of wet notes for april ninth. Two thousand and twenty

Scuba Equipment Ocean Sustainability Ocean Health Scuba Scuba Diving Marine Stewardship Council Act Netflix Vaclav Kina Czech Academy John Nab Earth Island Institute Graham North Carolina Luxembourg Scuba Diving Magazine Oregon State University Corvallis Prague Wales Worthington Oregon America Committee Bonham Rashard Kathy Castor
"oregon state university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Are bankrupt. If you don't have your health. This is a place where people gather like many people gather each week to discuss this very issue. So if you're having trouble If there's issues that are going on with your own health, and you would like to discuss it, I'm here for you. Call in right now and ask that vitally important question. That's on your mind about your health of the health of somebody you care about. Our number into the show is 6022775827602277 K t. A R. 6022775827 of thinking about multi vitamins, which I just talked about. Did you know that people taking vitamins recovered quicker than people who don't People taking a multi vitamin at high doses and zinc and vitamin C are healthier and recover from illness. Far quicker, New research study has discovered the their immune markers air higher. That's what the researchers found. And they're more likely to produce white blood cells at healthy levels that kill invading viruses than people who don't take vitamins. Why is that? Well, these air This is research by the way out of Oregon State University, talking about how vitamin supplement takers are healthier generally and heal faster. Particularly You know. Across the board, the researchers gave supplements to a group of healthy people between the ages of 55 75. And discovered that in addition to immune system improvement, which they were measuring, they had fewer days of sickness. Their symptoms were less severe and their recovery time was much faster. The difference is between taking Nutritional supplements compared to those not taking any nutrients was striking, according to the lead researcher, Dr Adrian Gum, Bart. The need for supplementation becomes greater as we get older. And around a third of older adults in the U. S are deficient in nutrients. This deficiency leads to the decline. In the healthy, functioning immune system, which is often accompanied with higher rates of inflammation. We call it inflammation, Jing In other words, the higher your inflammation level, the lower the quality of your life. The shorter your life span because inflammation ladies and gentlemen is is involved with way way over 100 different diseases. In fact, most high cholesterol is involved with inflammation. And unfortunately That's not even being addressed. They just start giving you drugs that block a pathway of you making a very important substance. You must make And that's cholesterol. So and that's not even addressed. So there you have it. This is why I harp on people all the time about the need. To take, you know to eat. Well, you need to do that. You need exercise. You need to have a healthy lifestyle. But at the same time we can't always do that. I mean, some of the restaurants I'd like to go to are still closed. And so I have to take supplementation two. And you should really seek out Supplementation from a multi vitamin multi mineral as like, almost like eating a life insurance policy. And that's why I tell people on the show that they should be taking, like see Veg so that they get the full complement of what they need. What your body needs. See Veg s e A V E G. The one that's the one we talked about here on the program, the one.

Veg Oregon State University Dr Adrian Gum researcher
"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"He also made comments on the nextdoor APP following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis that many residents found inappropriate. Oregon legislators could be asked to change Oregon's 50 year old bottle bill next year. Katie's Keeton Thomas says A report from the secretary of state's office makes several suggestions additional incentives to get people to return bottles and cans, even increasing the return to 15. Cents. If redemption rates fall. One major suggested change is allowing for wine and liquor bottles to be redeemed. They would also discuss with Washington state whether a regional bottle bill could be considered. That would prevent people from buying drinks in Washington without the deposit than making a profit by returning the cans or bottles in Oregon. Oregon State University has the largest enrollment of the state for the seventh year in a row. Despite the pandemic OS you added 585 students, an increase of 1.8% 33,359 students are enrolled to know issue this fall. Enrollment of veterans increased 11% number of students of coloring 37% and make up a record 27% of the school's overall enrollment bearing in humane society is offering virtual kitten yoga. It's a fundraiser and you could take part on I'm a yoga instructor watch you through the poses as kittens run around the room, doing their own version of a downward facing dog. The classes cost $15 in the proceeds will benefit animal shelter. The kittens are also up for adoption. You'll find details on the Oregon You ain't society's website on Wall Street. The Dow currently down 76 NASDAQ's up 188, the S and P is up 18 the people's Choice. Awards air coming November, 15. But will it have all our favorite celebrities? You bet we will. Okay, but well, it's still have all the Twists and surprises. Surprise..

Oregon Oregon State University George Floyd Washington Minneapolis Keeton Thomas Katie instructor NASDAQ
'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

All Things Considered

02:21 min | 2 years ago

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

"Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented a lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the largest and now second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning. Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep

Jonah Pots Mike Morgan Erica Fleischman Colorado Colorado Division Of Fire Prev Lauren Summer Pacific Northwest NPR Oregon State University Merced University Of California Director Professor
"oregon state university" Discussed on The Bad Boys

The Bad Boys

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on The Bad Boys

"Just. Hell a you wearing. Look good a Colin Dunn. Not Seriously if I have to wear this, you've got to wear a colon but y you've gotta you've literally got a pasta call into on your head Gig do. To, protect myself from what we'll look. I've actually already sorted. Story. And I thought, I, need to join a religion. A one of these people who? Haven't really. Attach myself to a certain religion. So what I wanted to find one that's that's really suitable to me. So have you found God? I haven't found meatballs and Spaghetti. found. The flying, SPAGHETTI So I found this one because I'm a fan of Spaghetti. Bowl as in Pasta. So. Called the Pasta. Yes it's the the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. That's correct. Now, the reason I do this found a guy who actually unfortunately went to court. This man and he's a story to actually real a man who blood into a ski resort manager with a snowboard while wearing I. Chew Beckett outfit. dunaway's wearing tobacco after he was wearing his indoor, any ted and. To be sped JAL out of fear of being targeted for wearing a pasta to on his head the District Court judge scolded Mr. and his religious beliefs and said, this is absurd and it's very bizarre. His lawyer on Thursday asked him to be served intake intensive corrections order right hanging on this ahead. Gel because he's to a satirical Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster I didn't think it was real thing but then there's actually a photo of him. Walk into court. With a colander now, he actually sat in the. Boarding the kitchen utensil on his head. So I thought to myself. This is really interesting. It's an. So I looked it up and here I am I thought no. If I'M GONNA get into a religion what one that's going to? Invites. That actually was started in two thousand and five also. Very. Religious. They apparently, this guy by the name of Bobby Henderson actually sent a letter to the Oregon State University and talking all about I mean like if I go if always sitting on the board of the Oregon State University and one of my students sent an open letter talking about the flying. Spaghetti Monster I'll be like okay. Where's he buying it from and Hal had heroin tenses because like you know holy crap we need to get like we've got a psychological treatment he we need to get him some some little to help spur but in after that. Would got out and it spread right across the Internet became an Internet. Phenomenon even to the point where I've actually you know that Michael Angelo's picture of you know. Reaching out and touching God. Yeah. Well, every place God with a with this big spaghetti octopus tentacle thing rushing at and touching tentacles and people are actually really taking this seriously this toy obviously. He's GonNa. He's gone to court now he's GonNa go to jail yet. He I mean like I. Think he's GonNa get bashed every way of saw glaze but is he led to talk. With him now. Can. You imagine that the gods are GonNa look at human guy might. Corrections officers tight that off him when he goes into jail because we know get. But you're allowed to keep your Atlantic Cape religious items, crosses, Brian Oh, baubles, things that you show. Yes. So but how else how is he going to actually say that this is I religious art it's my it's my it's been blessed by the flying. Spaghetti. Monster by the Pasta. airings so so he's yeah he will serve time but imagine sitting in jail cell and then you knew you sell my walks in and he's wearing a colander on his head on. Wouldn't you sit back and go I am never sleeping again. You would not..

Mr. Brian Oh District Court Colin Dunn Oregon State University Hal Bobby Henderson dunaway Atlantic Cape Bowl Chew Beckett Spaghetti. Michael Angelo ted heroin
"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Of Detroit, including the marina buildings, the Marion County Sheriff's Office escorted groups of boat owners to the lake so they could bring their boats home. Firefighters on the river side firing Clackamas County are working to strengthen containment lines, really getting in the lines that are protecting the communities of Malala Colton. And on up to S Decatur Incident Commander Alan Sinclair says the fire is 25% contained. Firefighters are checking containment lines to make sure there are no hot spots of buying flare up during windy conditions. The fire is burned 137,000 acres and the cause remains under investigation. Oregon's public utility commission continues to talk to power providers about wildfire plans. PUC Commissioner Lee the Thani says some of those plans could include reviewing their systems for vulnerabilities. I'm stepping at vegetation management along there right the way, Tony says. The PUC is awaiting the results of investigations into the causes of the many wildfires before finalizing recommendations for utility wildfire plans. Oregon State University has increased its research funding by $10 million to a record of nearly 450. In dollars if you're O. S U has been selected to do a variety of research projects based on the covert 19 pandemic. They include research on treatments and a study on the spread of covert 19 and several Oregon communities. Other research involves ocean wave energy marine studies and would identification which is used to help stop crime involving timber. I'm brand Ford NewsRadio. 11 I k e X. The American Foundation for suicide Prevention is mission is to save lives and bring hope to those affected by suicide. This year, the FSB National Capital area chapter is hosting activities for you to safely connect.

PUC Oregon Clackamas County Marion County Sheriff's Office Oregon State University Malala Colton Ford NewsRadio. FSB National Capital Detroit Alan Sinclair Commissioner Lee Decatur Commander Tony American Foundation
"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

08:12 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Pleasure once again to have with us a man who's guided us through this pandemic from quite literally Day one. That's Dr Chun Wei CI, who is the professor of the global health program and professor of the health system and Policy program director of the Center for Global Health. And College of public Health and human Services at Oregon State University in Corvallis. It's good to have you here, sir, We're going to get two of so much today. I hope we cover everything. Schools and vaccines are going to be something we will definitely discuss. But before we get there, let me ask how you how you feel how we're faring here in Oregon. Ah, Are we doing better and have masks made a significant difference in our taming of the virus? Yes, A specially when we compare with our neighboring states like California, Washington, Idaho. I think Oregon is faring better. And also I have review the train of our baby new cases that officially I pay special attention. And scenes about a week ago. We steadily but slowly decline. There's still a bit down, but I look at the longer train so that longer trance shows we are steady study too kind. So who are the people that are getting this virus? Dr. CI, are you Are you following that as well? Are you just following the run numbers? Who are these people? This is not just in Oregon and not just in United States all over the world. Minimum age group, The top one H group Getting This virus is aged 22 29. I'll follow by 32 39. That makes sense. Because particular age 20 to 39. These are the most socially active people. Okay? Yeah, when you're over over the world, not just Oregon or, you know, Okay, but we're following that trend. When you say socially active. They're the ones that are going out there. The ones that are at the park's over the week and they're playing soccer and Frisbee, doing everything else and then and then, and then not necessarily social distance. Yes. And it's tough for that age group to do Everybody understands. Yes, yes, And that's also happened to be the lot of a college kid too. Yes, and so they become, they become people who carry the virus to others, unknowingly correct. Yeah. Yeah, So while how do you aside from educating? What's the next step? You Khun Dio it just Ah, I'm at a loss here. Recently I've seen a public education message from University of Kyoto in Japan. And that they tried to turn the the attitude. From the original re. How do I prevent from getting the virus into how do I prevent me from spreading the virus to others? Because roughly certified to 40% of the people who are infected have absolutely no symptoms and never develop symptoms. And therefore we don't know when we are. In fact, In fact, they were one of those certified 40%. So I think that attitude is also important. We're not just kidding for our own cell, but also for people around us. In Italy. The phrase Don't be a killer was being used for a long time. That was pretty boy. That's pretty stark. But I tell you what it cuts to the chase, doesn't it right to the quick, But when you have when you have our federal leadership, very indecisive about what they want to do now we're hearing about herd immunity that they're trying to float this idea that You know what everybody should just get it. Let's see how it works out. What is herd immunity and what are the consequences of it? Her community. It's an epic technological concept. It means usually at least 50% of the people who have immunity and there to wait. We get immunity one is through infection. As a wife, the other vaccine, and for now, we don't have effective action yet. So for now, the only way to get her immunity if only to get more people infected. However, there are two important issue. I think that the obvious need to know one is given this steel relative meal viruses. Research Scientists are still finding out how long is the His immunity, for example, including U. S and European Country and Asia. We have discovered a few people who got reinfected, meaning people who infected back in February or much and then got being affected again in May or June oil even into light. So even though it's a small number, but that that's that's a warning. So we such as uncertain? Uh, earlier we found the meat. He lasted about 3 to 4 months, and we're hoping it will be longer than that. And obviously there's a huge variation across individual because Individuals owned by the immune system of quite very and this also explain. I think recently that there's a steady about a group of fishermen on the big fishing ship. There. I forgot the exact number. There were roughly 50 60 people, people. And all of them except sweet were infected. And so we such a curious how come his three given the leaving walking closer together in a ship? How come people wasn't infected infected so it has to do with immunity? So the hurt in me and he is still a great unknown in terms of how long that image immunity can last for people with stronger immunity, they might last longer. For people with with average or we community they may not last more than three months. So that's a really risky idea by infecting people to get her immunity. Ideally, we want to get hurt me immunity bite vaccination. All right, let me let me ask you this. We worry about a twin dem ICC coming up here in the fall, where the regular flu is going to come around, and then you lay on top of that the covert 19 flu or it's worse than the flu. It's it's a pneumonia type. Situations of vascular attack. Ah, so we worry about a twin Demi Should people be thinking of getting our seasonal flu shots now, just in case we actually really strongly recommend, And in fact, I'd like to share with you in the earlier the experience from Taiwan. Thailand has to be the world in terms of effectiveness control. And it learned from past experience in 2009 remember there for each one in one pandemic. And I wanted planning ahead in spring. They kneel by four the bushes that will be coming. So they plan in a bus and deployment of us all off the testing the quick testing ofthe flute as well as last immunized fruit, so that the reason to do that is to prevent when the 4 ft seas and came The symptoms between regular flu and each one and one are very similar. That same situation were he and now the symptom between fruit and could be 19 a very A minute. You don't want to overrun the hospital off confusing cases between flute and and coffee 19 back then it was blue and it ran and won. So they deployed in all hospital, quick testing and quick. Viral treatment for flu so they can throughout those people with fruit. Be fast vaccination, So the hospital cleaning will be will not be overloaded with miss cases and that's something very important. We need to prevent because when the full season Are coming. We went a voi hospital clinic Doctors. They're confusing about people because of Lou and communicating. Well, I don't have a lot of confidence in things like that. The way things have been going here. Yeah, Yeah. Alright. I promise schools and vaccines with.

Oregon flu College of public Health and h Dr Chun Wei CI professor voi hospital clinic Doctors Oregon State University soccer Corvallis California Center for Global Health University of Kyoto Khun Dio United States Idaho program director pneumonia Japan Lou
Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

John Batchelor

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

"Two of college football's power. Five conferences have cancelled their fall sports seasons due to concerns about the virus. Click. Nevel tells both the Big 10 and Pac 12 leaving the option open to play football in the spring. But all fall sports are postponed. Dr. Doug Ackerman with Oregon State University, says help risks associated with Kobe, 19 played into the recommendation not to play specifically the cardiac, you know, side effects of Of potential covert infections that we don't know enough about. And so we became more concerned about that. Medical experts were advised by both conferences and university presidents. I'm

Football Dr. Doug Ackerman Oregon State University PAC Kobe Nevel
Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

Mark Mason

06:55 min | 2 years ago

Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

"With us. Dr. John Wade CI, the professor of the Global Health Programme, professor of health system and policy program. And the director of the Center for Global Health College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. And Dr CI Welcome back to the Mark Mason Show. It's my pleasure to be back with you. Well, I'm glad to hear your voice again. I always use you is kind of our update into the really world of Corona virus. What's really going on and a lot has happened since we last talked. On that the virus seems to be more prevalent than ever. But we seem to be learning to live with it. I suppose one of the virus limits we can live with. I mean, we won't like it. But can we get by at this rate? No. We add a to high rate a TTE this great, many, many stay or counties there. Health care for city would not be able to 15 we We have to bring down because most European and Asian country at much lower levels, so they are able to lead you much higher level of activity, which we still cannot. And so if we maintain this high level or pandemic, it will hurt both our economy and people's life and health, and so we had to do something to bring it down to a much lower level. Wow. I don't know how we do that. The governor's talked about maybe travel restrictions. Is that one possible thing we should seriously look at where maybe people from high incident states are are not allowed to come where they if they do. Come there, quarantined. Well, it is. It's It's a good idea, in theory, but in practice will be very difficult to implement. Because he had to send lots of people to monitor to supervise and that costs money. So are you thinking another lock down or slow down? No, no, I think for the last Upfield. Early June, We duty our 2.5 months left town. And we see the serious impact on Mike, honey, and I don't think al economy can sustain more locked down. What we need to do is to learn how to live. Save it. How to operate our business. I work safety and one particular major. Uh, I know the difficulty but that's very critical measure, not just Oregon. But slowly, 90 states we were not able to implement and that is one of the biggest reason we are in this high level off epidemic. So remember in my early and Evi I mentioned that there are three step process. That's important. The first step is contact tracing. The second step is testing and so We're not doing a superb job, but we have the great improvement compare with March or April in term of the first step. But we still fail on the last step that is after the testing. What do we do with the confirmed cases So far, we only isolate people with moderate to see via symptoms. And completely neglected people with mild or no symptoms, and the latest studies, said just people with mild to know Simpson. They accounted for about 80% of total infection. But this 80% of total infection also, if we don't contain them, they also contribute to about 70 to 80% of new infection. Just think about this way. We pay attention to the Penta pus it with more moderate to severe symptoms contained them. But we let the other 80% continue to spread the virus free tea, and it will be a miracle if we don't have. Ah, hi. Hi. Cases continue to be in this house. How did we get more testing? I mean, we can barely my doctor tells me that he has no more tests because they've shipped him off to Florida and Texas and other states that need him. That's a problem I was comparing with Beck in March or April, Wright had done better dimension. We're not doing a super job during the testing as well, Well, I'm with you on the testing, and they and the containment. It's just a question of Why aren't we doing it? There are multiple reason one if people are still resisting the idea ofthe isolation and quality scene and the other financial Many Asian country. I don't know much about European country mediation country like Taiwan, they when they have a mandatory quarantine, isolation, government pay for the costs and company people. The example of Taiwan in their quarantine and isolation. Everyone who and the quarantine everyday received about equipment to certify us started per day for 14 days. So people who need to be quarantined need to be compensated because they lost income and we're not able to do that. I know we're on our financial crunch. So it's both financial reason but also political social reason, because people are not waiting. Yeah, I would have to be afraid, though. Doctors at the AA liberal Mike what would fake Corona virus just so he could sit at home for two weeks and get paid by the government? But there's you know, there's the question of you gotta have the test and it's got to come back positive. So I'm with you. I think a lot of listeners were with you test and contained testing contain, And maybe that's what they should be trying to come up with. In the way of money in Washington, D C right now, the World Health Organization says We should not expect a miracle where a vaccine is concerned. Are we being spoon fed in folded a cure A vaccine, If you will make may not be what we think it's going to be. So that I have some reservations because we still know ability to about the vaccine because there's no effective action available yet. I think I just saw the news. Russia has a plan to have a effective action by October, and we don't know how safe it is, but I think they're waiting between safe and effectiveness. For the U. S. I think the earliest might be the beginning of next year. And I cannot say anything about how effective it is because we haven't seen that yet. We don't know yet, but most likely given the nature of the disease, even an effective vaccine. The immunity may not last very long. If the image can last up to a year. That would be wonderful, but most likely will be somewhere between six months and 12 months. That means we may need to do more than one dose of

Center For Global Health Colle Oregon Professor Taiwan Corona Dr. John Wade Ci Global Health Programme Oregon State University Director World Health Organization Corvallis Penta Beck AA Mike Russia Simpson Washington Florida
Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

The Pilot Network Podcast

04:30 min | 2 years ago

Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

"Flights thirty fifth anniversary and and we fly exclusively commercial now. So all of our patients in all of the families that we serve fly commercially and but that always that that wasn't always the case So when we were founded back in nineteen eighty, five we started as a as a nonprofit and with with a group of this network of private pilots and and it was only with these private pilots on donating their time, their money, their their planes that that these patients would be able to travel say from. Las. Vegas to Los Angeles writer. Las. VEGAS TO STANFORD University for treatment. So. So with our thirty five anniversary of this year, we we've really wanted to sort of celebrate that Celebrate our pilots that that that started this. Entire. Journey. At. Miracle flights and and actually played such a pivotal role as we're starting to brainstorm with Rachel and Matt. From forgoing about how we might activate some of these The. Celebration and really create some ideas and we were thinking about, Hey, what if we actually gifted some of these amazing time pieces to to these private pilots that actually helped us all those years ago. So so our team. Contacted one, a gentleman His name is Dave and and he's actually a Las Vegas resident. is now eighty years old but dave helped. So many of our patients fly back in the I guess it was like the early nineties nineties. And And what we thought would be a good good ideas. If we connected Dave, the pilot, you one of the patients that he flew all those years ago and there's a patient. Her name is Jessica and Chm actually. Has A has a disease called arthri posts and it's an orthopedic, a condition where the the limbs don't necessarily form on the way their intended to and and she her first flight would dave. Back in nineteen, ninety, five and nineteen, ninety, six was Was To Seattle, at Jessica was like two years old Ohka and again day flew her a number of times and when we reached out to Dave and said, hey, we want to do this little reunion. He could. He was just so excited began this is he's eighty now. So you know he's getting up there and he was just so excited to connect so. In the pandemic times we connected via zoom and they had this wonderful reunion where Dave was able to see Jessica who is now walking and anyone who knows a typical diagnosis a of of Arthur guideposts you're you don't walk. You're you're pretty much confined to a wheelchair, but Jessica is walking she she's a college student at the at Oregon State University. And it was so incredible to see them re reunite of the resume, and then we were able to present Dave with with the awesome a Tornado watch as some kind of symbol. Of thanks and and obviously celebrating partnership so it was lovely to do that values are first Reunion that we were planning on doing other ones. In Togo has just been so generous that they really wanted to get into celebrating other pilots as well. So a few things that we actually have in line of for for activation coming the next few months actually going to. meet up with an air. Force. Pilot Air. Force. Vet Who who used to be a pilot and SORTA surprised him with the tour going watch. He's actually been supportive miracle flights for a long time as well and as our kids fly you know our kids are still flying an Algebra Algebra accident short with they're going to surprise their pilots that are actually flying the the commercial planes flying on. Now they're gonNA surprise those pilots with some with some Togo and watches as well. So we have a law planned, but it's it's such a amazing partnership really to celebrate. These families, these pilots are so instrumental in helping these families.

Dave Jessica Togo Vegas Los Angeles Stanford University Writer Seattle Oregon State University Rachel Ohka Matt Arthur
The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:19 min | 2 years ago

The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

"Today is a really special podcast is an amazing guests that we have that takes us back to the time when the tenor towards genetic engineering was very different back around the turn of the Millennium I. Guess is the turn of the century two two. It was a little bit different field before the Internet really took over the defamation of scientists and career assassination, and those opposed to technology took on other means to solve their problems. At least to. Agitate and we'll talk about that today in an event from two thousand and one and we'll talk more about that in a second speaking with doctor, Toby Bradshaw A. He's a professor emeritus in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and thank you for joining me today. I really appreciate you being toby. It's a pleasure to be here. Yeah this is really an interesting point in history and I remember when this happened. And in a kind of kind of fell into the background a little bit, but let's set the stage if we go back to two thousand and one. What kind of work were you doing in Merrill Hall at the University of Washington. Since the mid nineteen nineties, I have been working on the genetic adaptation and growth in hybrid poplars. They're fast growing tree. News all around the world, but heavily in the Pacific northwest up to produce. Hebrew products primarily so I was involved with. The early molecular genetics research, including M Gino Mapping. And ultimately identifying traits that were responsible for faster growth, which I had a basic interest in, but which of course the temp companies had a commercial innocent. And where you're working with genetic engineering, or were you really just dealing with hybrids myself? I was only producing hybrid poplars through traditional cross pollination methods that have been used for centuries in in poplars around the world I was also collaborating with Steve Strauss. At Oregon State University on some preliminary work to genetically engineered trees, four different growth form to produce more would in a smaller land area, but I myself had never still have never a genetically engineered a tree. And really the facility that you were working at. It isn't on the campus, right? It's it's the center for Urban Culture and what are the kinds of things that were being done there well. It is technically on the UW. Campuses at the very periphery separated from the main campus by the Union Bay Natural Area A place for I enjoyed bird every day on my walk to work, so that was a nice interlude. Of every day, but the other kinds of work that we're going on at the Center for Urban Horticulture included a restoration ecology primarily for wetland restoration, understanding a plant succession after the eruption of Mount Saint Helen's in nineteen eighty was conservation work for rare plants, going on so rare plants in Washington be propagated for reintroduction into the wild, and that was a particular focus of my colleague I'm single ride card who you will hear more about later and the graduate students in Undergrad who doing their own research, their work on a wide range of topics, including for example how to? Have, urban gardens produce more food for people who otherwise might not be able to afford a fresh vegetables, so it was. A typical horticulture center I, think it most universities where there was a mix of basic research applied research in outreach up to the public in the form of extension. And, so it doesn't sound like this was the you know the the center of the universe of Monsanto or something I mean this sounds like a really practical extension oriented center that had significant roles in community, and and and even just in the regional agriculture's that's. Is that more what it was about yes? Oh, the University of Washington is not a land grant university. It's not an agricultural school. School, in the focus at the UW has always been a basic research and the center. For urban horticulture included in its mission, some applied research and quite a bit of extension and outreach up to the public, so in that way it was different from much of the rest of campus in its mission, but by no means is the University of Washington on any kind of center for plant biotechnology now. It isn't now. Yeah. Good basic biology know basic science and a lot of really good plant people there, but it's Can you give me a little bit of sense? Outside the University of like two, thousand, zero, two, thousand and one, what was the environment like a genetic engineering in your perspective and in your area of the country? What was really happening? Then in that environment, it was an interesting time. The first genetically engineered crops that were planted on a wide scale, had only been in production for less than a decade, so as a relatively new technology on the commercial sector, perceiving though scientists and people who keep up with science for familiar with the progress of genetic engineering. How it was eventually applied in agriculture, get caught a lot of the general public by surprise, and as everyone who's familiar with plant biotechnology knows that can sometimes lead to misunderstandings. And worse at the the first inkling that I had that anyone might be opposed to the kinds of research that I was doing was just a couple of years before in nineteen, ninety nine, when Seattle hosted the World Trade Organization meetings and I had some of my. Poplars. That were growing in pots out in the back forty behind the. Urban Horticulture. Cut Down by vandals during those WTO protests mean. As often happened to these kinds of things at my mind. The damage done to my plants was fairly minimal. Because these are poplars. Cut Him off. They just re grow the we. That's how we actually propagate them through cutting, so it had zero effect on me, but at the same time they went through and cut down all of the older seedlings that a colleague of mine was growing for re, vegetating streamsides in Alder. Don't re sprout after being cut-backs. Again it was one of these ready fire. Aim moments for an activist who really didn't understand. Even the species of trees that they were looking at i. mean did a lot more damage to someone else's research than to mind we might. Research was essentially funded by the wall critics,

UW Urban Horticulture Center For Urban Horticulture Toby Bradshaw Oregon State University World Trade Organization University Of Alder Professor Washington Pacific Merrill Hall Department Of Biology Steve Strauss Union Bay Natural Area M Gino Mapping Mount Saint Helen Seattle
The technology behind the discovery of a new blue hue

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:13 min | 2 years ago

The technology behind the discovery of a new blue hue

"The It is feeling an open sky and ocean and chemistry today geeking out about the color blue. From American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm Ali would. So it turns out. It's very rare to discover new color pigments, an oregon chemist, a major breakthrough in the science of color. A decade ago, he discovered the I knew blue pigments in more than two hundred years, and just about a month ago, that pigment was cleared for use in commercial products that as it happens, are actually more energy efficient as paint and surface colorings, and now that same chemist is pushing color science forward again. Oregon public broadcasting just burns reports. Matsu Superman is a scientist versed in serendipity. The happy chance occurrence the lottery of the amazing, many of the importance, scientific discoveries come by accident. Clearly a pot of boiling science serendipity was in play a decade ago when his Oregon State University lab discovered the new pigment which would be named union men blue. He was looking for new materials to use an electronics, but what came out of the furnace was something else entirely I couldn't believe it. I was shocked because the samples Gimmel, so blue paints made with Yin and blue or highly heat reflective in the formula has been licensed for use. Since that Discovery Mayan has focused on the chemistry of color. He and Brett dual who just got his PhD started experimenting with a mineral called Hip night, which is mostly found in meteorites, and they tried adding a little bit of cobalt to make another blue pigment. We didn't expect it to be as intense as it was. The formula for cobalt blue made without hip night was discovered about two hundred years ago, but paint made with the pigment comes with health warnings because it can be toxic, this new color could be less toxic because it uses a fraction of the cobalt. Cobalt was so low. Giving off the same color essentially. It was a little surprised moment followed by an a Ha moment like an hour or so later dual says materials are also cheaper by a six, but it's still too early to know. If night blue will catch on with manufacturers, the labs discovery is only a few months. Old David Waller is with the Color Pigments Manufacturers Association, representing. That produce colors for paints, coatings and plastics. He says the adoption of new pigments can take years certainly room. To add something new because some older technologies have been phased out regardless of hip night, Blues Future Ma Superman Ian is continuing his search for color every day. Walk into this chemistry building. I don't know what I'm going to discover. I have some ideas I have some goals, but once you enter the lab. Put things together. You don't know what's going to be. This is the exciting part what we do and the next big color challenge ahead. We'll be red.

Cobalt Color Pigments Manufacturers A Oregon ALI David Waller YIN Oregon State University Scientist Superman Ian Gimmel Mayan Brett
"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Show professor from wintry Oregon State University his credentials go on and on and on professor of the global health program school of biological population health sciences professor health policy program school of social and behavior health sciences director of the center for global health college of public and health and Human Services you understand how these viruses spread and just another reminder as to why we are being asked to work from home and stay indoors as much as possible okay earlier I mentioned in the previous NDC official one of the most challenging or scary part of this virus is roughly twelve to twenty percent of the people who are infected I have absolutely no symptoms yet they can spread the virus so defect in regional carriers we don't know a list we we we we need dramatic expand testing out that we don't know otherwise we don't know who is spreading the disease it could be a close one your friend your colleague are you a classmate etcetera and on top of that there's another between thirty to fifty percent of people who are infected I have very much L. Simpson that looks just like through an open time is mistaken for flu yep they left get deadly combat and this people also also contagious so the issue of staying home is because we don't know who potentially can spread that on top of that this is my research is extremely tough we videos it can stay in the in the in the federation you can stay here any center east between a few hours up to ninety so for example when when I'm I'm I'm staying home in order a grocery delivery for the after I had during those foods I immediately have to wash my head because you don't know I don't fool you you order or packaging there might be my at the summit so even stay home I I encourage our audience to practice extreme caution on anything you touch that deliver to you while I'm you know I'm I'm sitting here thinking of if you drive out you get some gasoline in your car the guy the hands you the receipt are you are you saying we should be thinking every thing every interested we have went wild let me give me an example the other day I had I I feel my my gas because I need to need to be prepared that I don't want to feel the gas fell open and so I I I he said I don't need the receipt and then when when the the federal food delivered me my credit card I used the tissue paper to recieve it and I don't touch my credit card at all and and when I get home I use soap to wash my credit card well what I I do this is from an expert in this field so okay let me let me ask you this if I had just washed my hands just wash them okay did my twenty second sang the Happy Birthday song and then I you know I touch something a receipt that somebody else handled within let's say ten minutes in my still protected or is it do I have to wash again if you are in your home you are safe why is it is important to avoid going outside and I I do know that people who have to go out to work all day and then image it typically off that job you still have to go out yes when you have it because of your work you have to even contact you if you go to grocery shopping assuming everything you patch potentially could have wow is the standard hand sanitizer that says is kills ninety nine point nine percent of germs on the on the front of it is that protection most of them you have to you have to look at the label yeah hi B. if it's safe it contains sixty percent or higher alcohol yes but there's also the issue of the proper way of using hand sanitizer you have to grab your hand for a few seconds let just just to to to to to put on your hand I saw somebody at the store the other day and they were shopping and they had gloves on a little latex gloves are you the proper proper safety major no kidding wow is because you touch things you put them in your car you're going to take him into your car you put your hands on the steering wheel you could be affecting your car not know it yes and when I when I pick up my mail from my mailbox I need them on the floor that way they can get from the sun unless it's something urgent I don't open them right away you just leave them in the sun for a while yes be polite I I touch them again and of course when I every time I die because my mail I need to understand and then I wash my hands that is that's remarkable and that's and that's great advice and it's something that I'm sure most people wouldn't think of professor but what a great tip you know provided we have sunshine you know throughout the year even if we don't have vision even deviate for if it's not urgent even for a date hopefully the the the the most matters will be a key democratic another important tip for people who still have to go out and about especially people who commute and left you have to go to work this advice if you came from temas commenced into his talent has said the golden standard of controlling everything when you when you.

professor Oregon State University
"oregon state university" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"We have a special link their special for coach listeners and we've got a little gift there super thank you so much we've been talking over the years about GMOs and you've always kind of hinted that there are new GMOs are right around the corner how close is that corner well fortunately we've passed that we've crossed the corner there's a pretty odd was already in play and we have no enough information so that it he recently actors that I gave the audience is rated the new GMOs has a greater existential threat to the planet and climate change yes and when I was with you tonight is not science fiction in the future it's a threat this looming in building right now that if we don't do something it could be not only a catastrophe it could be a cataclysm all right first of all what our new GMOs what are they well there's a number of them I mean we're gonna talk about insects that can produce viruses in crops that are genetically engineer in the field we'll talk about gene drives we can wipe out entire species sprays that can alter genetic expression we could talk about little micro factories that pump out little you know fake vanilla and fig stevia but I think the one that I want to focus on the star George is the one that we keep hearing most about and that's gene editing CRISPR as an example now Christian gene editing is so cheap it is so easy you could go on Amazon today and buy a do it yourself kit for a hundred sixty Bucks you can eat and in what we spicy what we plan with splicing bacteria belt back to this case it's bacteria but you see because of the process is so cheap and easy Hey it's getting cheaper and it's getting easier then just imagine that everything with the DNA is being targeted the butterflies allergy to animals what about viruses viruses absolutely we have a situation where the entire nature can be played within the laboratory now here's the problem well there's two problems the first problem is when you release a GMO into the environment you cannot recall it obviously for a virus or bacteria you can't even see it but anything can cross with the natural variety and end up contaminating and corrupting the gene pool in reversibly and the second problem George is that the most common results from genetic engineering is surprised side effects to take take a hundred thousand new GMOs regeneration take a million what we're talking about is the possibility of replacing nature so that future generations do not like we did inherit the products of the billions of years of evolution but instead inherit the products of laboratory creations prone to side effects and causing massive collateral damage in the DNA this is what I'm talking about it it's not actually far from in the future we're already seeing gene edited products being introduced and no safety testing required and we have major companies gearing up with facilities full of robots driven by artificial intelligence for massive production now some might argue Hey this is progress we're moving ahead well let's take a look at a couple of examples and then you tell me if it's progress we're talking about bacteria for example I interviewed Dr Elaine Ingram who is at the end in Oregon State University and she had a graduate student they did some research on some genetically engineered bacteria and two weeks before they were about to release it he discovered that it might have caused a cataclysm here's what was going on she explained to me that the back tear which is founded old roots of all the plants on the planet was genetically engineered to convert plant matter to alcohol has the world leading scientists had the brilliant idea of distributing this alcohol creating bacteria to farmers who could mix it with stubble from field instead of burning their their stubble he would turn the stubble into alcohol to run their tractors headed the sludge at the bottom could be spread on the fields as fertilizer great however with the graduate student took that sludge and put it into soil and started to grow some weed seedlings he came into the laboratory one Saturday morning and all of the weed seedlings were dead they were turned to mush it turns out the bacteria in this fertilizer we still active converting plant matter into alcohol now delayed in group tells me that she was secretly told by someone at the EPA actually several people that they had secretly released bacteria different bacteria just to see how far do you go back Terry was spread we did the first growing season it's spread eleven miles but it continued to grow and continue to spread and eventually after several years it was frowned everywhere on the planet so when you put together and I said to her what could have happened if they released of this genetically engineered bacteria which is called Klebsiella plan take a look what it was designed to engineer to create alcohol what is the release date which still plenty to do two weeks after this discovery the lab she said it had the capacity to theoretically eliminate terrestrial plant life all the food crops basically the trees everything because they're all surrounded by this bacteria and if they switched it to alcohol he would have killed terrestrial plant life who would destroy the planet absolutely sympathetic Elizabeth was nearly nearly enacted and the thing is that bacteria he had passed all of the EPA's requirements in this isn't some Hollywood movie isn't all it could be a Hollywood movie but it's true and the thing is it wasn't the first time because that was in the nineties like nineteen ninety one in the eighties there was another genetically engineered bacterium it was designed to protect strawberries and potatoes from frost damage you see there's bacteria.

"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Out of your career of course you do at Oregon State University we can get you there Oregon state delivers more than seventy programs online in fields like business engineering and natural resources at O. S. U. is one of America's best in online education ranked number five in the nation by U. S. news and World Report your dreams our degrees let's see how far we can go you can start any terms apply today at ecampus dot work in state dot EDU your listening to Sunday night podcasts featuring one of the biggest podcasts of the week on the free I heart radio app now number one for podcasting the family secrets podcast from I heart radio I'm your host Danny Shapiro family secrets is sponsored by audible one of my favorite things to do is listen to an audible it is such a great way to relax and pass the time as you being transported from one place to another audible so leading provider of audio books and spoken word entertainment in every genre imaginable you can listen with the audible app anytime anywhere get your first three listens free with a thirty day trial that's one audiobook plus to audible originals for free visit audible dot com slash Danny to get started in.

"oregon state university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on KOMO

"New research here in the northwest suggests college students are leaving one vice behind and now gravitating toward another come was Brian Calvert has more this first finding of researchers at Oregon State University may not shock you at all in states where cannabis use is the goal there is definitely an up tick in pot use among college students forty seven percent more student use in cannabis in states where it's legal compared to their peers in non legal states but it's the second part of the study that's turning heads your college days are likely filled with memories of alcohol use get this new research concludes that in states for cannabis is legal in cannabis uses up binge drinking is actually down to be fair there's been a general decline in campus alcohol use over the last several years but the number drop significantly in states where marijuana use is illegal the research doesn't offer any conclusions as to why the shift is happening and more studies required to determine whether this is just a fad because cannabis is the new thing or whether they shift maybe the new norm Brian Chalford colonias the new firefighter one of new Jersey's largest cities as a familiar name ABC's Brian Clark has more Bruce Springsteen is one of the biggest names in New Jersey but his son Sam did not want the attention when he was sworn in Tuesday as a Jersey city firefighter was to say the twenty five year old was part of a fifteen member clash joining that apartment in New Jersey second largest city Bruce Springsteen and his wife Patty skillful watch the ceremony from the front row after sharing a big family hug the boss said he was very dedicated or a few years and just excited more than two hundred firefighters been hired in Jersey city since twenty thirteen Brian Clark ABC news here now are your political insights.

Brian Calvert Oregon State University cannabis Brian Chalford new Jersey ABC Brian Clark Bruce Springsteen Sam Jersey city marijuana Patty
Lane Selman on the Culinary Breeding Network

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:18 min | 2 years ago

Lane Selman on the Culinary Breeding Network

"Breeding network. Tell us about it sort of genesis and I think I in its creation story. There were peppers involved right. Yeah tell us about sore. Yeah so I worked for Oregon. State University Here in Oregon and I work on a project recalled novick which is the northern organic vegetable improvement collaborative and that is a project that's led by Oregon State University but also includes the organic Steve Alliance. That's up in Washington but works nationally University of Wisconsin at Madison and Cornell University so at each of those institutions there are breeders that breed at least part-time specifically for organic farmers. which have very different needs? A lot of the same needs a lot of gardeners I believe and and also and so so what we've done in this project project as Taking a lot of the breeding lines that all these different plant breeders are working on their specific organic systems and trial them on a lot. A lot of different firms all over the country to see how they perform On organic farms. And we compare them to varieties that we no are gonNA perform really well on farms. We also test out new varieties that come out. You know you open up your seats. How like right now? At this time of year we opened the seed catalogs catalogs and as farmers it's like. Oh Wow. There's always new varieties. Are They GonNa do well for me are not everyone's thinking that right So we trial all those And this one year we were trailing these sweet peppers so kind of like a roasting pepper. The ones that Corner Detoro they call them That are pointed me too. That are really nice for for have stick wall for roasting and we're trying to find a variety that would perform really well here in Oregon where we have You know we have short season. We have Also we have evenings at get really cool. Where a lot of times on the east coast like they say well but warmer so so we never really know a variety to perform really well? So we're looking for that And so we knew exactly what the farmers wanted out of a variety but And we're finding that out. We're doing all this work on the farms. But then I had the question like well. What about what they taste like grow great? They don't taste great then. That really isn't that helpful to the supermarket and gotten a really nasty. Exactly what do they really taste. Like and You know uh-huh as researchers we get stuck in this thing where we're like okay. Well let's just bite into it and give it a one two nine rating but I didn't really want to do that because mostly I didn't trust myself I know like I'm one person. And what do I know about what you know. How great a peppers when the taste or not and also to be honest? It's hard for me to be unbiased because I'm out there in the field. I'm looking at all of these and I really want to choose varieties That perform really well for farmers so I wanted to remove myself for the from the question. Right and so I asked a lot of chefs that I knew. I work at a farmers market in Portland Oregon at that time also and I asked a bunch of chefs to get together and taste them with me and they tasted them and they basically started identifying the different things that they liked about does peppers that went beyond just the flavor but actually the shape and the size right because practicalities of structure that make something in the same way that a piece of meat or fish or whatever is or isn't appropriate for a particular recipe or or you know a method of cooking that's right it's like exactly yeah. Yeah and he's thinking about waste to like hijacked and seeing the kitchen all these things that are very important and we I and I thought. Oh my gosh are the parameters that are actually creating these new varieties of tomatoes peppers of everything. Do they know. So what this was wealth of information that the shafts and other value added You know if someone's making hot sauce or something or just the end user. Do they a spend enough time interacting with them to understand what the knees are right right so you wanted to plug these these participants who were working around these same vegetables but not together yet. You plugged them together and made culinary breeding network exactly. Yeah started You know organizing these events wants to bring individual these individuals all these different stakeholders and Arthur system together which has extended into the public? Because we all are you know stakeholders orders and the food system. Yeah so so you have this interesting perspective because you're working with all these leaders. Many of whom we gardner types hypes don't necessarily hear about one of their writers who may not even know who breaded or developed it but you're you're interacting with all of these people as all the stakeholders and you have the chefs and produce managers managers and all these other approach fires and and farmers and seed growers and breeders and so forth So you get to see and hear about a lot of things that are kind of coming down the pike or or that are getting their starting to trend even before we gardner see them in a catalog may be so like from your instagram. which is at culinary breeding network? I know some of the crops that you especially love and I mentioned the Ridichio the intro so tell us about that one for instance and is that something that you all ever talked about among this group this these steak steak. Oh Yeah Yeah Yes well I could go on forever. So you're going to have to cut me off. I'll just say shush me. I I think at all well so I am Sicilian and I grew up With a lot of food and a lot of Italian food so this is something that has just been something thing that we consumed but it is not a crop or a vegetable that has consumed much in the United States but working with chefs There is an appreciation for different flavors. Other than sweet. I mean this is something that we see all the time. Plant breeding is the trend keeps going toward breeding sweeter and sweeter things but there there you know there are earthy masses in earthy nece and their bitterness and all these things that actually should be appreciated. I feel like in vegetables. So there's that kind of culture food culture kind of side that I really like about radio but additionally it is something that is very important and the Pacific northwest as well as where where you are in the North East to be Consuming for individuals. You know the public to be consuming. Because that's what we grow in these areas in the winter. We cannot grow lettuce. This is what I see a lot of times like in the farmers market setting is all these people come out and support farmers and the height of the season. When of course everything is so wonderful fola tasty why would you go to the grocery store And farmers markets and a lot of areas very plentiful. So it's convenient. You can go there but as soon as it starts here. Are you know it starts raining. And it's cold. It's not so nice to go to the farmer's market people go back to the grocery store and they're buying lettuce and cucumbers from places that are very far away. Yeah so I really want people to eat things that are grown here all year round so we have a campaign called winter vegetables. There's a website you wanNA restful dot dot com ridiculous part of that so With the Ridichio then one of the flavors that you get from it is the bitter. Not Sweet you were just talking about Sweden vegetables being something that a lot of people breed for and so forth and it's more cold tolerant so it can grow at a time when say lettuce can't even in northern areas And I would say from the pictures picture on your instagram. The even though it's the leaves of their the they look like flowers so beautiful and they're all these sort of lavender and Mauve move shades and modeled and just beautiful beautiful. Do grow it in your Home Garden. Yes I do actually Yes it's very rewarding. It's exciting exciting. It's it's kind of like I think I've always loved growing garlic because you plant. Yeah and it's like you don't see it and then all of a sudden you have this wonderful thing that you pull out the ground well ridichio you grow and you can harvest the leaves and eat the leaves but it heads up and it can get a lot of frost damage on the outside and get really slimy and you think Oh God you know. I've lost it. It's it's done and then you get out there and you start pulling off. These slimy lease and you get down to just a hidden jewel rally little head. That is beautiful and perfect. Yeah do you have any favorite variety seat one. Tell us about real quick. Oh sure Well I so one thing I wanNA wanted to mention this one of the reasons. Also that hasn't been grown a lot is that it hasn't been a lot of resources for a seed So uprising seeds does have have They have several They they love radio yeah they do have several and this year. I think it's the first time that they have released. The is so Tina we now and that is one. That is a pink until people are really drawn to the beauty salon called. Yeah roasted over Netto. And there's several varieties of those but that's a really beautiful

Oregon Oregon State University Washington Cornell University Madison Corner Detoro State University Portland Novick Netto University Of Wisconsin Steve Alliance United States Pacific Northwest Gardner Tina Arthur
Scientists Find Caffeine, Xanax, And Cough Medicines In Donor Blood

Tom Sullivan

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Scientists Find Caffeine, Xanax, And Cough Medicines In Donor Blood

"Scientists have found traces of caffeine in the anti anxiety drug Xanax and samples of supposedly pure blood to have been used in transfusions two scientists at Oregon State University bought eighteen samples of what should have been pure human blood from a number of different biomedical suppliers all eighteen tested positive for caffeine thirteen tested positive for Xamax and H. showed traces of over the counter cough medicine the scientists say their findings indicate that much of the blood used for transfusions and research is

Caffeine Oregon State University Xamax
Famously Fickle Felines Are, In Fact, Clingy

60-Second Science

02:36 min | 3 years ago

Famously Fickle Felines Are, In Fact, Clingy

"Considered dogs to be overly attentive and cats. Well a bit more aloof. But a new study shows the cats can become attached to their humans. And we'll turn to that person for comfort in times times of stress the findings per in e journal current biology although kitties are a popular pet more people own cats than dogs here in the. US There are few few studies that examine how the furtive felines feel about their owners. There has actually been relatively little research into the cat human bond especially when we compare it to the number of research studies with dogs in humans. Kristen Batali a post doctoral scholar at Oregon State University to explore the Cat Caregiver Connection Battalion or colleagues colleagues turned to a test. That's been used to assess bonding behavior in puppies apes and even infants the researchers would show a cat and its owner to an unfamiliar room and leave them there for two minutes. At which point the owner would depart leaving the cat on its own. We know that in human infants attachment behaviors toward their parents. It's our heightened in response to a frightening or novel situation so in this case the experience of the cat being in the novel room alone. Axes are strange. The situation in allows us to observe the cat directs any attachment behavior to the owner. When they then come back to the room when the owners returned battalion company would observe their reunion and they saw the feelings displayed a variety of categories says some cats greeted their owner and then they returned to exploring the room while periodically Riyadh going back to their own? Ah for attention. These kids are apparently secure enough in their relationship. Let's some quick reassurance. Was All they needed before continuing to pursue do their perusal of the room on the other Pau some were real scaredy. Cats other cats behaved in an insecure way in excessively clung to their owner side. And then there were the cats that lived up to their reputation for supercilious stand-offishness other cats avoided their own are when they return to the room. These securing an insecure patterns of behavior are actually the same as what we observe between dogs and their owners and even human infants in their caregivers. In all three of these populations nations the majority of individuals are actually securely attached to their caregivers indicating similarities across these species. Although snubbing is generally considered classic classic conduct the majority of cats in the study around sixty five percent actually use their owners a source of security one could even describe right. Those cat human relationships as Don. Thanks

Cat Caregiver Connection Batta Kristen Batali Riyadh PAU Oregon State University DON Sixty Five Percent Two Minutes
OSU study using mutant flies finds blue light from phones, computers may speed aging

The KFBK Morning News

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

OSU study using mutant flies finds blue light from phones, computers may speed aging

"A new study is suggesting blue light is speeding up the aging process K. of BK's Brian shook has the details researchers at Oregon State University announced its findings Thursday in a study linked to prolonged exposure to blue light coming from smart phones computers and other household fixtures it says the blue light wavelengths produced by light emitting diodes damage cells in the brain as well as the redness during the study on fruit flies the insects exposed to blue light had much shorter lives than those kept in the dark it also found if given a choice the flies avoided blue light all

Oregon State University
Oregon State study says wind turbines threaten migrating bats

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Oregon State study says wind turbines threaten migrating bats

"A study by Oregon State University concludes the hoary bat faces an uncertain future because its numbers have declined by two percent each year in the study and author writes bats can be killed by collisions with propellers and buy a barrel trauma which occurs when bats fly through low pressure zones created by spinning blades of a wind turbine the sudden change in pressure causes bath lungs to expand faster than the bats can exhale resulting in burst vessels that filled her lungs with blood according to the study hoary bats often fly into danger zones because they're sophisticated sonar capabilities can't detect pressure

Oregon State University Two Percent
University study says wind turbines threaten PNW migrating bats

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:27 sec | 3 years ago

University study says wind turbines threaten PNW migrating bats

"A new study says a Pacific Northwest bat that migrate south for the winter faces threats from wind turbines Oregon State University concludes the hoary bat faces an uncertain future because its numbers have declined by two percent per year a study author Tom rod houses bats can be killed by collisions with propellers and by beryl trauma which happens wood bats fly through low pressure sales created by those spinning blades their sonar capabilities can't detect drops in

Oregon State University Pacific Northwest Tom Rod Two Percent
Farmland Also Optimal For Solar Power

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 3 years ago

Farmland Also Optimal For Solar Power

"Arrays raise with desert's but the extreme heat can curb solar panels potential. It's like your laptop or your home computer. If it over heats it slows down so there's this tradeoff between having a lot a lot of fun like in a desert but if it gets too hot the efficiency of those panels drops oregon state university ecological logical engineer chad higgins his team is interested in where photovoltaic panels should be located in order to maximize energy production in addition addition to moderate temperatures in sunlight they found the conditions for the most efficiency include low relative humidity and gentle wins that enhanced transfer of heat from the panels by analyzing satellite data for these four factors they created a map of potential solar panel productivity for different land types around the globe coming out on top agricultural crop lands and you think about it for a minute and it kind of makes sense what is agriculture but taking the funds raves and and converting it into a form of energy that we consume so there's this sweet spot where you get a lotta sun but it's a temperate temperature and that is where you get the maximum productivity and that's also where plants thrive other factors also favor croplands solar agricultural tre lands tend to be closer to population centers where there's a market for electric rather than way off in the desert their cultural lands tend. That'd be flat. They tend to be already disturbed so you don't have as many ecological conservation worries higgins team thinks that agriculture in solar can complement each other paving the way to a more sustainable energy future the researchers estimate that installing photovoltaic panels on just one percent of croplands worldwide would be enough to meet all of humanity's global electricity needs the study is in the journal scientific reports higgins hopes hopes the research will inspire collaborations between solar companies and farmers to feed the world and power it to a prospect that should brighten anyone's day. Thanks for

Chad Higgins Oregon State University Engineer One Percent
To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:48 min | 3 years ago

To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by guideline over seventy. Five hundred growing businesses have chosen guideline for its modern retirement plan that automates the heavy lifting involved in offering a 4. Sign up and get your first three months free visit guideline dot com for details and by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation Evan Lyle Rush enterprises surprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet dot com to find out why that's P.. L. A. N. E. A._T.. Dot Com if you WANNA get broadband access to every state you gotta know the local laws from American public media yeah. This is marketplace tech demystify digital economy. I'm molly would the digital economy as we like to call it over here depends pretty heavily on access access to the Internet and that is still not a solved problem here in the United States over thirty percent of Americans don't have access to broadband Internet which is defined as twenty five megabits per second or higher. That's according to research released Tuesday by the N._p._d.. Group the Pew Charitable Trusts has an initiative should've broad-band definitions like in Alabama for example broadband speed is defined as only ten megabits per second. If your network is busy that's barely fast fast enough to stream net flicks and hi. Def Katherine dewitt manages the Broadband Research Initiative for Pew Charitable Trusts. She told me state policy is a huge deal. When it comes comes to expanding broadband access state policy matters because lack of access to broadband is a national issue but it is felt at the local level and states states have taken a pretty aggressive approach to closing gaps in access particularly over the last five years we've seen a significant uptick in legislation since two thousand fifteen eighteen <hes> and what we can take away from this is not only do state policymakers see and feel that immediate urgency <hes> lack lack of broadband access? They're saying it's important to things like education healthcare and economic developments but they're also saying this. This is what we want our state to look like they're setting goals and then they're laying out a path and a framework for how to achieve those goals. Let's just dive into some of what is in the tool. Some of the different approaches does that states are taking like. Could you give me an example two totally different approaches that states might have taken so going into this research we knew that states <hes> face similar challenges oranges and increasing access to broadband <hes> but we learned that there are also taking similar approaches but adapting them to their needs. That's really where those categories came from. Those groupings things <hes> if you look at goals for example <hes> you have states like Minnesota and West Virginia where they're statewide broadband goals are focused. I'm border to border universal coverage thing you look at a state like California <hes> that has a goal to connect ninety eight percent of the population in each one of its roughly fleet twenty regions. How do you hope that a tool like this can help close the digital divide in terms of broadband access while this tool is actually the first step in <unk> are ongoing research on how states are addressing gaps and broadband access so for us this was about understanding that fifty state landscape of broadband deployment laws ause and it provides the basis for our next level of research which is a deeper examination of how states are addressing those gaps in access. What we hope so is that <hes> users will be able to use this tool to learn what other states are doing and how they're actually doing it. Katherine dewitt manages the Broadband Research Search Initiative for the Pew Charitable Trusts. We've got a link to that new tool and some analysis about spending per state at our website marketplace tech dot Org <music> for some related links so this tool is super new obviously and Pew hopes that policymakers and local governments will jump in and start creating some more analysis and comparison and of course. They'll be publishing their own pieces. The first one that I mentioned there is about how states let's fund their broadband projects whether it's grants or loans or general fund kind of things or some creative funding apparently Illinois makes Internet service providers providers pay into a special offer called the digital divide elimination fund and it uses that to pay for broadband buildouts and in Virginia a legal settlement. Element with tobacco producers is paying to build more Internet. Look I'm not saying this isn't a little walkie over here but it is interesting. Also I gotta be honest. I'm still hung up on that ten megabits per second in Alabama and probably some other states too. I haven't made it through the entire tool yet but Alabama's regulation also says I._S._P.'s can call their upload at speeds broadband at one megabit per second so basically if you're at home trying to upload some photos to facebook or anything to the cloud ever you'd be doing that at speeds ten times slower than the slowest four G. Cell Phone connection set it and forget it because it's GonNa take all night now. The speed question is so controversial that even though Pugh is using the twenty five megabits per second speed guideline which is set by the Federal Communications Commission Network congestion usually means actual actual speeds are nowhere near that fast and again a four g phone connection is faster than that on the best providers. It is such a big discrepancy that while Pew says says twenty one million Americans don't have broadband Microsoft put out its own map of high speed Internet access back in April. It said the real number of people people without appropriately fast Internet access for today's economy is more like one hundred sixty three million in the United States alone. I'm Hollywood breath and that's marketplace tech. This is a P._M.. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Oregon State University e campus pushing the boundaries of what's possible in online education a classroom that incorporates virtual reality check faculty members using augmented reality Yup a top ranked university known for Innovation and excellence. That's them see what a twenty first century education looks like at e Campus Dot Oregon State Dot e._D._U..

Pew Charitable Trusts United States Broadband Research Initiative PEW Alabama Katherine Dewitt Michigan Oregon State University Evan Lyle Rush California Hollywood L. A. N. Illinois Facebook
A tailored ride-hail service with special needs in mind

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:33 min | 3 years ago

A tailored ride-hail service with special needs in mind

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by guideline think your business is too small to offer a 4. It's not join the thousands of small businesses and startups that offer a guideline 4. Guideline is affordable easy to manage and the best part it's it's free to start a guideline dot com for details. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by smart water on a mission to add fresh thinking to the world that's why they created to new ways to hydrate smart water alkaline with nine plus P. H.. Helps keeps you hydrated while you're on the move and smart water the antioxidant with added Selenium helps you find balance for your body in mind and now you can order smart water with Alexa yourself will thank yourself smart water. That's pretty smart a startup banking on ridesharing. That's more caring thing from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Jed Kim in Hollywood. It seems like Uber and lift are everywhere these days and for many millions of people it's great because those services make it easier and often cheaper to get where you need to go but they don't work for everyone. Seniors and people with disabilities often need more help than a ride hailing services designed to provide and while sometimes city or a county has special public transportation options. They're not always available or reliable. Able K. Cheetah lives a gable pines a senior living community in Saint Paul Minnesota until very recently she mostly got around with a shared public transportation program called Metro Mobility but it wasn't the greatest the night they left until seventy seven. We won't charge you for this right. I said we'RE NOT GONNA get paid if you did charge me and I said I'm never caught using you again. We'll got so where I had to now. She has another option hyphen her residence partnered with a startup called mobility for all its in the business of on-demand rides for people who need extra help getting into a car or other special services. You don't need an APP or even a smartphone. It's designed with seniors and people with disabilities in mind. John is the C._E._O.. Of Mobility for all for our latest installment of evenly distributed exploring digital divide and tech don't shares what's at stake for his users. Seniors and people with disabilities have have gotten used to have accepted that they're just going to be socially isolated and that's not good for their health. It's not good for their wellbeing. That is a huge cost to our society. If you think think of like an Uber or lift or a taxi company those are typically curbed curb service you have to go meet them at the curb whereas our drivers are trained and the expectation is that they will meet our riders within. The senior communities that they live in or after front door and provide that assistance from the threatful all the way into the vehicle and then to their final destination whether it's at Church or at the reception desk for an appointment at doctor's office we have very little capital. We don't have a fleet of cars or minivans or wheelchair accessible vehicles. We contract out for those so that's more of that Gig kind of tech economy that we're using and then we use technology also to make sure all that works in concert in the twin cities we have partnerships with five senior living communities so the market that we're building has actually there. It's one that's invisible to a lot of companies out there whether it's Uber lift because they're underserved seniors and people with disabilities want to be out they have this huge pent up demand for getting a ride for having mobility options but the supply of that service is an out there and that's what we're feeling. We're filling that gap. That's John Donne C._E._O.. Of Mobility for all that's four as in the number four by the way don't says he hopes to expand the company beyond the Minneapolis Saint Paul area in twenty twenty and now for some related links more. Services are popping up to provide ridesharing focused on accessibility tech crunch reports on May mobility which is developing electric vehicles that travel at low speeds and our wheelchair accessible. The design allows wheelchair users to stay in their chairs rolling up rams to enter the vehicles and there's no testing shows they need to make some adjustments like longer rams to make it easier to board still company hopes to make its shuttles operational in Columbus grand rapids and providence soon food. How did the whole Gig economy thing takeoff Yahoo? Finance has an interview with the founder of cash grab it service connects freelance laborers with customers who need health and developed back when we weren't used to the idea of using an APP to a higher some ordinary Schmo task grab. It didn't go the I._P._O.. Route was instead acquired by here in two thousand seventeen another thing that sets it apart from Uber lift than the like it was profitable when it made the decision to sell as a driver for Uber or lift. You've got to worry about keeping a ratings up. Hope no one Ralph's in the backseat nowadays though you also need to worry about becoming an unwitting accomplice to a crime Newsweek lists a few instances of rideshare rideshare as getaway driver including one where a new uber driver had no idea his writer was holding up a gas station. You only figured it out when the cops came to his house and arrested him he was released but man gotta hope he got a good tip from the writer Ryder Right Jed Kim and that's marketplace tech. This is a P._M.. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Oregon State University campus it's been said.

Jed Kim John Donne Writer Alexa Metro Mobility Oregon State University Saint Paul Minnesota Minneapolis K. Cheetah Gable Pines Columbus Grand Rapids Hollywood Ralph Newsweek Yahoo Founder Ryder Schmo
Probing the secrets of the feline mind

Science Magazine Podcast

09:06 min | 3 years ago

Probing the secrets of the feline mind

"Is all about scientists during these social mind cats in other words, how do they bond with us? How do the Hemu the Cate with us? How do they have the kind of learned involved to live with us and people been saying this dogs for decades? But nobody staying cats are not had been till recently, which was very upsetting for me. Because I really wanna story the story about how how smart cats are. But haven't had the opportunity to do. So until now Ray I mean, that's my question. Every time we do a look how smart is an well it understands the world and social interactions, and I'm like what about cats? I have a cat. He definitely tells me things he wants for sure. And I have two cats cat owners purely a lot of the stuff to be true. But it's one thing to sort of seed in your home. So they're being tested scientific. Right. Your cat made tell you. It's. Hungary. They tell you wants to go out with different cries. Hey, but how do you capture that and say how it works in cats, more, generally? It's right. So we'll kind of stuff what kind of questions were they asking about cats when you visit. The this lab in Oregon. This is a lab out in Oregon, Oregon state university. One of these are trying to vote how emotionally attached cats are to do the pick up on our motion cues in one of the experiments. They do is they actually have researcher go into a room with a cat. You know, the cats kinda freaked out because the weird environment cats leaving their home, the owner of been leaves the room in the cats alone by itself and other cats even more freaked out right, then the owner comes back in Africa. Couple minutes and often the cat will come greet the owner want get loved headed by the owner and will often happens. The cat will start Goff and explore the room on her own. So the cap may be starting to look into crevices to sniff around maybe play with toys, and a lucky would see that say, well, the cat crew doesn't care about the owner of the owner showed that back up. The cat was at high the owner than the cat went off again. But actually, this is a sign of the cat is emotionally tach. The owner will be socially attached the owner because the Kansas simply saying you're here. I know you are trust you now it can go off and do my cat thing. I can go explore this room. I feel safe that you're here. So dash he does short type of motion bonding the cats have with us, and they many able to do this with different pairs of animals and owners exactly they stay show this consistently and different cats have different personalities, not all cancer going to do this. But the fact that some cats will do this suggests that this is something that inherently cats are able to do they actually have this ability to be very emotionally and socially connected with us. Is that unexpected considering that they are domesticated animals, you know, it's weird. Because in some ways, we would expect domestic animals to be somewhat comfortable around us. But clearly, there's a range. I mean, a horse or cower chicken, there's a different relationship there that we have cats and dogs. Pigs aren't sleeping in our beds for most part, and we don't have horses in our house, so cats and dogs, you would think they would have to take this to the next level. They don't just need to be kind of. -cially aware and kind of emotional aware of us. But you have to have really be tuned into. They have to know. For example, what we mean, we make certain gestures are one of the beams experiments with dogs is your researchers will point at one of two bowls or go gaze at one of two balls and dogs actually will follow this very well. And it's the whole idea was allow dogs must be like so tune into us that they know what our gestures me 'cause even ship pansies, we pointed something they don't know what that means a lot of Amil struggle with especially with the gays. Look if you just look really quickly at something. This is something that's been very rarely observed any other type of animal so dogs really taking that to the next level that turns out cats can do that too. So the fact that cats and dogs can do it may suggest that they have this social bond with us the social intelligence that a lot of other animals, even other domestic animals might not have other kinds of domestication are often for service or jobs like you're gonna be food. You're going to my field. But with cats it's been much more like your. You're gonna live with me. Right. And that's one of the really surprising things. Here's to because cats and dogs have a very different background dogs. They were very heavily domesticated by people think they were heavily bred to be workers and kept pan-ion's helping us hunt, and do all these very complicated tasks, and so the idea was will dogs must be much more tuned into us because we've done this very aggressive domestication with them whereas cats as you alluded to share we kind of just once cats showed up and start hunting, mice and rats. We just kinda let them be cats. We didn't do a lot of stuff with them in terms of domestication. And yet we're seeing the cats of all a lot of the same skill set that dogs have which may indicate that this is the skill set. Both animals really need in order to live, and he's very close kind of intimate situations with human beings. This is something researchers were really doing while dogs got their day in the sun. But what other labs are involved in what kind of questions are they looking at right. And so in whether reasons I wrote the story is because before five or six. Ago. There was very little being done at least in terms of social intelligence on cats. And now we're seeing these labs pop up all over the world. So this is lavon Oregon is lobby. Mexico's couple out in Japan is a couple out in Turkey and they're starting variety things like the gays steady. I loot it to also other ideas with social attachments, if you go into a room with a scary object with your cat like a fan with streamers of this fans. Streamers are coming out of it. We got a picture of it in with the story. This is gonna freak out cat you expect an an often does. But what's really interesting is the owner behaves very calmly around objects even tries to quote unquote, make friends with says what a nice fan and to the cat like between meet this fan. It's such a nice fan. What was remarkable is some research has shown that the cats actually can take on these emotional cues in is freaking out the actually approach the fan. I saw can actually go up to just lie down right in front of it. The scary fan with streamers coming out as the owner was being very calm and really projecting. This very friendly. Calm state of mind of the cat seemed to be picking up. On. And what does that mean? That means again that you know, cats and similar work has been shown with dogs that they're very tuned into us as to what we're saying. But also how were feeling these really pick up on this these emotional cues that we let out a lot of the seems like something a cat owner or some a cat aficionado is tuned into their animals kind of expect. But other bigger questions that they're trying to answer. Besides, you know, do our cats understand us and kind of get things. Sometimes we'll, you know, one of these beer questions is what actually happened the horse domestication out, which is cats and dogs, but with it some of these other animals, we've been talking about and if we can figure out that even cats and dogs have similarities may see something about inherently some of the stuff that happens over domestication would air. Interesting things is that there's this idea that human beings actually, self domesticated in than we used to be very aggressive on cooperative species. And that we found a way to be much more friendly cooperative with each other and something very similar. We know or we suspect up with cats. They also self domes-. Iq as humans had seen with very little role in their domestication. And yet they were able to figure out a way to become more friendly and more cooperative and more used to living around other creatures than their ancestor was and so it's possible that we can tease apart with happened in the cab mind, we can maybe shed a little light about what happened in the human mind as well now. All right. So as a as a cat expert was there anything that you was prising to you as you were business labs and reading this new literature. Yeah. You know, I think one of the things that surprised me is that scientists actually get brave enough to study cats because nobody really wants to study cats you bring a dog into laboratory and a dog for the most part is really willing to do whatever you wanted to do dog'll sitting at mar I sit an MRI, it'll do trial trial trial of experiment, whereas cats are gonna freak out even if you come into their home stranger or these will participate. There's the cats they're gonna walk away into the other room. Even some the early experiments were replicated because the people that did them were just so frustrated with working outs. And was really surprising actually, kind of nice to see. He now is that a few brave souls like this group in organic in some of these other groups are taken other shot at and they're finding new ways to try to get them to participate in the experiments, and because of that we now have papers that are starting to come out that are really showing revealing all these things about cats that we may have suspected, but we didn't really know for sure scientifically until now is any of this research going to help us better care for our animals will. So if you look at the article, we have a table called how socially smart is your cat. Oh, and you can actually do some of these tests mobile simplified than with the you do you can try some of the stuff at home and figure out, you know, does your cat notes. Name how emotionally bonded to you is your cat. Independent is your cat is your cap refer you to food or vice versa. So those a few relatively simple experiments. You can do to figure out not only does this mean for all cat kind. But what does it mean for your particular cat as well as you do these tests? I haven't done yet. I think we did a name. Name test, which I think I don't think we should are cast do Norte Duda their names. But we haven't done the other. You think your cats would be good test of a little? I'm a little afraid to test them personally. Mike has a freight of nothing, but he doesn't do anything. Yes. That's the other problem. So the two problems of cats are there either freaked out or they just really wanna have nothing to do with whatever you wanna try to figure

Researcher Oregon United States Oregon State University Africa RAY Hungary Kansas Norte Duda Lavon Oregon Goff Pan-Ion Mike Turkey Mexico Japan
The age-old quest for the color blue

Science Magazine Podcast

06:44 min | 3 years ago

The age-old quest for the color blue

"Up we have contributing correspondent Kaikaku for Schmidt. He's here to talk to us about the pursuit of blue. Hi kai. So how long have humans been on the hunt for a blue color? That's already whether the difficulty begins. I guess. Yeah. Pretty good evidence from a cave in South Africa, the Blombos cave that one hundred thousand years ago, humans already will making pigments so more like red ochre yellow ker in using charcoal for black. They will make pigments. But there's no evidence at all of any blue pigments than for a very very long time. That stays the same is some recent evidence of from from gravesite in Turkey that about nine thousand years ago. There was some burials of women children whether it had ground down as right, which is a blue mineral. And even when it's down. It's it's kind of a nice, blue pigment. They were very with this possibly was used for medics. We don't really know. But that's kind of the earliest evidence. We have of any Lukman. Why is blue so rare? Is there some physical property required to make something reflect the color blue, it's hard to achieve if you look in the plot world as a lot of different classes, pigments that we have. But there's only one class of pigments Dan to signs which can actually make blue. And even then it tends to be the complicated molecules that blue in that simply because in order for something to be blue it needs to absorb the rent. So the other part of the visible spectrum, basically and red light is of the visible spectrum. It's the lowest energy light. So in order for something to absorb the red. The kind of jumps that an electron makes which is how molecule usually absorbs collapse these jumps need to be very small jumps in order to absorb the right rather than the blue. So it's much easier for nature appears to make molecules that absolve blue instead of once that absorb Bredon appeal blue these molecules often have to have. A lot of consigned chains and little ecoregions until they really make a good blue. I mean, there is blue in nature. We got water we got sky, we got blueberries. But for some reason making a synthetic version making a dye or pigment is really difficult. What about blue butterflies? Those those have nice blue color several of the blues. You've mentioned now are ones that aren't really pigment. So if you take sky, it's you know, kind of scattered more than than red light. Which is why the sky his loop in Walter. It's interesting because Walter actually absorbs kind of in the red kind of to vibrate the water molecules vibrate with the energy of red light. But it's not a very strong effect. Which is why you only see the bluest as up of water, and then the butterflies like most animals, they also not producing any blue pigments, they have like tiny structures that reflect light in a way that most of the other colors cancelled. So. If you take something very famous example like Mosul butterfly if you do into the scales on its wings. It has these little structures, and they basically end up reflecting all of the light the Chines onto the onto the wing in a way that the other colors, just disappear. What you see is the blue. So basically, everything is not a payment or at tied that we see in everyday life. But if we want to reproduce, those colors, if we want to make painting or make something out of plastic. That's the right color blue. It's really difficult, exactly. And humans in the past. Usually they found these pigments by accident. Some of the earliest examples are indigo which is a dye made from plants, but actually the plot itself isn't extra blue. So it's a blue from nature, but it's only blue ones humans do some chemistry on people for a very long time wanted to try and make synthetic indigo. And it took the s chemical company many, many years in precedent. The amount of money to finally come up with synthetic indigo. So they spent more than eight million gold marks at the time, which was more than the company was even worth to finally come up with with the recipe for synthetic indigo which was then produced around the world in is still used today to color jeans. It does make me wonder what is wrong with the blues that we have. I mean, we have plenty of toys that are blue plastic. We have paints that are blue. What what are those things that are available now not doing right or not cheating? Right. Chart is just the festive nation with colors, right? I mean, there are so many different hues of blue. And if somebody comes up with a new one, it's just especially of the artists. So usually the first ones to use them at it's just fascinating to have, you know, one more shoop. But then the other thing is that a little the blues that use Sopher instance, ultra marine, which is basic ground down. That's right. The part of Lapsley. It was one of the one of the most expensive pigments ever made was just very rare, right? Because you need the semi precious stone Lasley to even able to do it later people came up with a way of making it synthetically. But then even this static version it takes her chemicals to make that end up polluting the environment. A lot of self dioxide is produced as site product while you do so that I mean, that's one reason this the environmental implications on the other one office. Toxicity. I mean, this quite a few loose kkob. Lou that on that on exactly healthy, and this is an ongoing. Search people are still looking for blue pigments, and dyes and new or you took a look at three different approaches that are in the works right now, let's start with the first blue seeking scientists that actually found a new blue. But on accident like most blues in history, so must super money on this is a solid state chemists than he worked for a while. And he made a lot of discoveries, but not really related to pigments at all. And then he started work at Oregon state university in values. Two thousand six and what he actually wanted to do was to find what's called a multi for roic, basic material at room temperature has certain magnetic properties also electrical properties in that would make really interesting for building a computer. And so he used manganese oxide. Trim oxide in indium oxide, and he combined these Anna turn up that the compound came up with didn't have any interesting properties. But it was incredibly blue and he remembered from his days to punt the people said Lewis actually kind of hard to make. So he just published it and the color that he created has just had this incredible life of being used in many many places than now. It's also being sold far too to us.

Walter Blombos Cave Turkey South Africa Bredon Oregon State University Kaikaku Lukman DAN Schmidt Mosul Anna Lewis Lapsley LOU One Hundred Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years